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William Sinclair, 24th Great-Grandfather

January 28, 2014 , ,

Roslin Castle

Roslin Castle ruins

My 24th great grandfather probably died in the Tower of London  after Edward I took over Scotland:

1296 Edward I Invades Scotland & the Battle of Dunbar
When the Scots signed a treaty with England’s old enemy, France, King Edward I decided it was time to crush the Scots once and for all…thus started the wars of independence.
In 1296 an English army, said to number 35,000 men, marched up the East Coast of England on their way to invade Scotland. They crossed the Scottish border at the small town of Coldstream and then marched north onto the town of Berwick. The English sacked Berwick, then a rich Scottish burgh, slaughtering 16,000 of its inhabitants: men, women and children.
After sacking Berwick the English continued along the coast heading for the town of Dunbar. Before reaching Dunbar, Edward was met by a large but inexperienced Scottish army, which was heavily defeated by Edward at the Battle of Dunbar (1296). From then on there was very little to stop Edward and the English who soon occupied much of Scotland, advancing all the way to Elgin. The disputed King of Scotland, Balliol, surrendered at Brechin, earning his nickname Toom Tabard – empty coat – and was stripped of his office.
Edward took over control of Scotland, installing English garrisons in many castles. He eventually returned south, taking with him the Stone of Destiny and Coronation Chair, on which the kings of Scotland had been inaugurated, Edward stripped Scotland of many of it’s treasures.
Edward forced over 2,000 nobles, churchmen and landholders to swear allegiance to him. The list of their names became known as The Ragman Roll, after the ragged look of all the different seals and ribbons.
The Scots where now under English rule, Scotland had no king, no army and no weapons.

The good news is that the castle that stands on my ancestral home is now a holiday accommodation, so when I go to Scotland I can stay there:

Roslin Castle (sometimes spelt Rosslyn) is a partially ruined castle near the village of Roslin in Midlothian, Scotland. It is located around 9 miles south of Edinburgh, on the north bank of the North Esk, only a few hundred metres from the famous Rosslyn Chapel.

There has been a castle on the site since the early 14th century, when the Sinclair family, Earls of Caithness and Barons of Roslin, fortified the site, although the present ruins are of slightly later date. Following destruction during the War of the Rough Wooing of 1544, the castle was rebuilt. This structure, built into the cliffs of Roslin Glen, has remained at least partially habitable ever since. The castle is accessed via a high bridge, which replaced an earlier drawbridge. Roslin was renovated in the 1980s and now serves as holiday accommodation

William Sinclair (1230 – 1297)
is my 24th great grandfather
Annabel Sinclair (1269 – 1304)
daughter of William Sinclair
Michael Wemyss (1295 – 1342)
son of Annabel Sinclair
Margaret Wemyss (1322 – 1342)
daughter of Michael Wemyss
Isabel Inchmartin (1340 – 1399)
daughter of Margaret Wemyss
Margaret Erskine (1357 – 1419)
daughter of Isabel Inchmartin
Isabel Glen (1380 – 1421)
daughter of Margaret Erskine
Isabel Ogilvie (1406 – 1484)
daughter of Isabel Glen
Elizabeth Kennedy (1434 – 1475)
daughter of Isabel Ogilvie
Isabella Vaus (1451 – 1510)
daughter of Elizabeth Kennedy
Marion Accarson (1478 – 1538)
daughter of Isabella Vaus
Catherine Gordon (1497 – 1537)
daughter of Marion Accarson
Lady Elizabeth Ashton (1524 – 1588)
daughter of Catherine Gordon
Capt Roger Dudley (1535 – 1585)
son of Lady Elizabeth Ashton
Gov Thomas Dudley (1576 – 1653)
son of Capt Roger Dudley
Anne Dudley (1612 – 1672)
daughter of Gov Thomas Dudley
John Bradstreet (1652 – 1718)
son of Anne Dudley
Mercy Bradstreet (1689 – 1725)
daughter of John Bradstreet
Caleb Hazen (1720 – 1777)
son of Mercy Bradstreet
Mercy Hazen (1747 – 1819)
daughter of Caleb Hazen
Martha Mead (1784 – 1860)
daughter of Mercy Hazen
Abner Morse (1808 – 1838)
son of Martha Mead
Daniel Rowland Morse (1838 – 1910)
son of Abner Morse
Jason A Morse (1862 – 1932)
son of Daniel Rowland Morse
Ernest Abner Morse (1890 – 1965)
son of Jason A Morse
Richard Arden Morse (1920 – 2004)
son of Ernest Abner Morse
Pamela Morse
I am the daughter of Richard Arden Morse

Sir William Sinclair of Roslin, of the territorial Barony, of which he was granted a charter by Alexander II 14 Sep 1280 on the resignation of Henry de Roskelyn (probably Sir William’s father in law); opposed Edward I’s invasion of Scotland 1296-99; married Amicia, (probably) daughter of Henry de Roskelyn, and died (probably as a prisoner in the Tower of London). [Burke’s Peerage]
Note that Burke’s Peerage does not mention a second marriage to Matilda of Orkney, but I am retaining it.

Burke’s Peerage indicates that the parent of William Sinclair is Robert Sinclair, a Norman, and not Henry Sinclair of Rosslyn as much of the Rootsweb information on the internet states. However, according to Burke’s Peerage, William did marry Amicia daughter of Henry de Roskelyn, lord of Roslin/Rosslyn and was given charter to Rosslyn by Alexander II of Scotland. This puts the name of the entire ancestry of Henry in doubt, but I assume that the persons are the same. Thus I am keeping the same ancestry for Henry de Roskelyn, father-in-law of William, that many people have for Henry Sinclair, father of William.

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comments

My brother is moving to Edinburgh so I shall be up there visiting this year! And, it’s the vote for independence too

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London-Unattached.com

January 29, 2014

Yay!!!! I wonder if we get back that rock they used to make the kings…

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mermaidcamp

January 29, 2014

ma chère cousine,
After all we are Norman French. Nicely done as usual. We may be cousins again. What follows is rough and needs review:
William Sinclair (1230 – )
is my 23rd great grandfather
Henry Sinclair (1255 – )
son of William Sinclair
William Sinclair (1283 – 1330)
son of Henry Sinclair
William Sinclair, Lord of Roslin Castle (1303 – 1358)
son of William Sinclair
William Sinclair, Earl of Orkney (1327 – 1358)
son of William Sinclair, Lord of Roslin Castle
Henry Sinclair, Earl of Orkney (1345 – 1400)
son of William Sinclair, Earl of Orkney
William Sinclair, Earl of Orkney (1392 – 1420)
son of Henry Sinclair, Earl of Orkney
William Sinclair (1408 – 1481)
son of William Sinclair, Earl of Orkney
Eleanor Sinclair (1457 – 1519)
daughter of William Sinclair
John Stewart, 2nd Earl of Atholl (1478 – 1521)
son of Eleanor Sinclair
Helen Stewart (1504 – 1577)
daughter of John Stewart, 2nd Earl of Atholl
Patrick Lindsay, 6th Lord Lindsay (1521 – 1589)
son of Helen Stewart
James Lindsay, 7th Lord of the Byres (1554 – 1601)
son of Patrick Lindsay, 6th Lord Lindsay
Robert Lindsay, 9th Lord Lindsay (1580 – 1616)
son of James Lindsay, 7th Lord of the Byres
John Lindsay, 17th Earl of Crawford (1611 – 1678)
son of Robert Lindsay, 9th Lord Lindsay
James William Lindsay (1644 – 1698)
son of John Lindsay, 17th Earl of Crawford
Elspeth Lindsay (1667 – 1720)
daughter of James William Lindsay
James Gibson (1687 – 1765)
son of Elspeth Lindsay
James Gibson (1717 – 1831)
son of James Gibson
Margaret (Peggy) Gibson (1769 – 1846)
daughter of James Gibson
John Gill Hendricks (1797 – 1857)
son of Margaret (Peggy) Gibson
Harrison Gill Hendricks (1819 – 1873)
son of John Gill Hendricks
Octavia Abigail Hendricks (1865 – 1961)
daughter of Harrison Gill Hendricks
Walter Root Bennett (1886 – 1935)
son of Octavia Abigail Hendricks
Ethel Bennett (1917 – 2013)
daughter of Walter Root Bennett
Frederick Edward Rehfeldt
You are the son of Ethel Bennett –
More later on this….

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Frederick Rehfeldt

February 1, 2014

wow.. MORE history. this is really impressive Pam

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Stevie Wilson (@LAStory)

February 3, 2014

Cousin- Have you written about our common ancestor William Sinclair, Earl of Orkney b. 1327? His apparent connections to the New World and the Knight Templar surprised and fascinated me. I wrote a piece on it but I know you can do better. Rick

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Frederick Rehfeldt

February 3, 2014

I doubt that I can do better..I see you on both my paternal and maternal lines ..and the Knights Templar do that too…all pretty spooky.

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mermaidcamp

February 3, 2014

OK I will stick my neck out and make the first move:

I think the last time I wrote I told about learning that we descend from the Scottish Kings, including Robert the Bruce. They of course intermarried with English royalty, and other royal families of the time. It has been an interesting discovery.
Also, according to information supplied by Ancestry, the Scottish Kings were actually descendants of friends of William the Conqueror that moved north after the Conquest.
One name that stood out among the Scottish Nobility, was “Sinclair”, and we descend from them it seems. Henry Sinclair, Earl of Orkney (abt 1345- abt 1400) is particularly interesting.
Prince Henry was a Knight Templar. In 1118 AD the Templars were established to protect the Christian Pilgrims as they traveled to the Holy Land in Jerusalem. They served under the sole direction of the Pope! They remained in this capacity for two centuries, until Pope Clement V moved his seat from the Vatican to Avignon in France. Some say he was an impostor. There, he came under the strong influence of his nephew, King Philip “le Bel” of France. This was also the time when France had borrowed vast sums of money from the wealthy Templars. So huge was this indebtedness that King Philip chose to exterminate the Templars, rather than to pay back his obligations. This triggered the fateful Suppression Order, supported by the Pope. All nations were asked to capture the Templars. Scotland refused to obey the Suppression Order; because its King Robert the Bruce had been excommunicated from the Church for murdering John “the Red” Comyn in a church. Consequently, many Templars fled to safety with their treasures to Scotland. They went to Balantrodoch, their ancient outpost, located on the Sinclair estates near Edinburgh. Or, so I have read.
Here is an abbreviated statement about Henry Sinclair from one of the writings provided by Ancestry:
“One of the most interesting and mysterious of Scottish characters was Prince Henry Sinclair, the last king of the Orkney Islands. Henry Sinclair, like many other nobles of the Middle Ages, held many titles and he was many things. He was king of the Orkney Islands, although they were officially an earldom granted to Prince Henry by the King of Norway. At the same time Prince Henry held other territories as a vassal of the Scottish king. Prince Henry Sinclair was also a Grand Master of the Knights Templar, a veteran of the crusades and, according to some sources, the possessor of the Holy Grail.
In the year 1391 A.D. Prince Henry Sinclair met with the famous explorers and mapmakers Nicolos and Antonio Zeno at Fer Island, which is located between the Orkneys and the Shetlands. The Zeno brothers were well known for their maps of Iceland and the Arctic. Prince Henry would contract them to send an exploratory fleet to the New World.
With the aid of funding from the Knights Templar, who had by then been banished by the Pope, Prince Henry gathered a fleet of twelve ships for a voyage to establish a safe haven for the order of Knights and their treasure. The party was led by Prince Henry under the guidance of Antonio Zeno, the mapmaker from Venice.
The fleet left the Orkneys in 1398 and landed in Nova Scotia, wintered there and later explored the eastern seaboard of the United States. It is said that the effigy of one of Henry’s close companions, Sir James Gunn, who died on the expedition is to be found carved upon a rock-face at Westford, Massachusetts.
The party is said to have built a castle and left a portion of their navy in Nova Scotia. The famous Oak Island just off the mainland of Nova Scotia was to become part of the mystery surrounding Prince Henry Sinclair. Prince Henry and his fleet returned to the Orkneys but shortly afterward Prince Henry was assassinated in Scotland. The year was 1400 and it was another 92 years before Cristobal Colon, known to us as Columbus, was to use his knowledge of Iceland and the Zeno brothers’ maps to make his famous voyage across the Atlantic.”
There is a connection between Henry Sinclair and Christopher Columbus.
It’s a bit convoluted, but essentially, a relative of Doña Felipa Perestrello e Moniz, the wife of Christopher Columbus, was the first husband of a woman who later married Henry Sinclair’s son. At the wedding of Christopher Columbus and Dona his mother-in-law gave Christopher Columbus a very special wedding present: The maps and charts of the Templar explorations in the Atlantic bringing Christopher Columbus knowledge of the Atlantic route to America. They had a connection, but they weren’t related by blood. Or, so I have read.
My best.
RR 2-4-2014
Ps. I seem to recall reading somewhere that Christopher Columbus was a descendant of Edward III? That would explain many things if true. RR

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frederick (rick) rehfeldt

February 4, 2014

This is a fabulous story..discovery of Nova Scotia..wow, what a great set of charts those must have been. My Sinclair line peels of before this fabulous Henry, but at least I am distantly related…thats very much for the tale. I love it.

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mermaidcamp

February 4, 2014

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