mermaidcamp

mermaidcamp

Keeping current in wellness, in and out of the water

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Floatli for All Seasons

September 1, 2014

I like to work out in both the warm and cool water in the morning.  If I go early the pool is in the shade, which my skin requires for happy water dancing.  The warm jacuzzi is perfect with the steps and handle for my long stretches and yoga postures.  The ladder in the deep end of the big pool provides similar advantages.  Not featured in the video here is the full set of steps with a handrail in the sallow end.  There are endless stretches and sun salutation variations that can be done when you have steps.  Each pool has its advantages.   Some pools and bodies of water have dangerous safety issues to consider.  A water movement routine can take advantage of all depths of water and all architectural features that are safely installed.  In nature you can use the tide or the current to your advantage if you are careful and have a clear understanding.

I am very lucky to have such a warm climate and pools that suit my purposes right at home.  In the winter our community pool is not heated, but the large jacuzzi is, so I can still enjoy a stretchy warm water work out at all times of the year.  My body is used to this kind of large movement in water and starts to miss it if I am away for very long.  The only places I like better than my own pools at home are hot springs pools.  My idea of pure bliss is to Floatli for hours in a mineral hot spring with a nice view.  Glenwood Springs, Colorado comes to mind.  I also love Desert Hot Springs, California. Euro hot springs resorts are the bomb.  Where do you like to go in the water, Gentle Reader? Do you have a pool, beach or lake near your home? How do you like to enjoy the water?

The Spa Spy

August 31, 2014 2 Comments

Spa Lady logo

Spa Lady logo

My business cards are running low so I have thought how I would like to edit the next batch I order.  I do love my logo that I had designed many years ago, but the way I work now and want to work in the future has changed.  I still love spas and travel, but am much more moderate about the amount of time I want to spend away from my home now.  I have not taught at a destination spa for ten years and I have no desire to resume any teaching like that.  I have been enjoying learning to blog and communicate in new ways in order to spread my talents and my message.  I still am a big believer in water immersion and bodywork as a restorative feature of holiday merriment.  I no longer have any need of classes all day and a competitive program to follow in an all-inclusive package.  I don’t need instruction to make good use of a gym, pool or a steam room. I am an expert at all of that.  I appreciate good teaching but now prefer to study in short spurts, doing workshops with teachers I truly admire over a one size fits all health curriculum.  I now like an a la carte approach to my own health.

This has made me think about my very first job in the spa industry which was not a paid position.  I was a swimming teacher and also taught aquatics and studio fitness classes at a local health club.  I was invited to Canyon Ranch in Tucson to meet one of my travel clients and deliver a ticket to her (airline tickets were on paper and very valuable, if you remember). She took me to a class in which I was invited to participate.  During the class the teacher, who was the fitness director, danced over and asked me if I wanted a job.  I said no.  After class I spoke to her and she made me an offer I did not refuse, which was to be a spy in the pool classes.  There had been complaints and she wanted to have a person take the classes and evaluate them.   This dandy offer came with no strings attached.  I went to 3 or 4 pool classes a day and wrote a short evaluation of them for the office.  If the teacher was very bad I had a talk with that instructor about improving the class, but never wrote them up to be as bad as they were.    If they did not improve, then I did make the report more negative.  The rest of my busy spa day was spent in the team room or taking classes or getting discount body work.  I was really good at that job and added value to the operation while taking from it exactly what I desired at the time.  Later I went on the payroll, which I think was a big mistake.  I liked spying much better than working and going to meetings.

I think I have particular specialized knowledge that is useful to anyone operating a spa, and that I am going to launch a service called The Spa Spy.   I will offer to do an evaluation based on the needs of the client spa.  I can bring the spa director new perspectives, most importantly that of the customer.  Secret shoppers help retailers narrow down and eliminate problems in stores.  Since spas depend a lot on energetic and emotional elements it is even more important to find out how a customer who is not known to the staff is treated.  I can provide valuable feedback about in house rumors and attitudes…always easy to extract during a one hour service.  It is the easiest thing in the world to get the dish on how the staff feels about management during a spa treatment. My vast experience as a travel agent as well as a spa instructor makes me uniquely qualified to provide this service.  My next card will have a revision.  She will undergo a makeover..and become The Spa Spy….same classy lady, new services offered.  What do you think, Gentle Reader?  Do you won a spa and wonder what is really going on there?

Cameras, Corruption, and Cops

August 28, 2014 3 Comments

Well, as through the world I’ve rambled, I’ve seen lots of funny
men
Some rob you with a sixgun, some with a fountain pen- Woody Guthrie

I have been advocating for cameras on cops because it makes sense. Even if you don’t think the police are corrupt you must agree that getting evidence straight is a boon to justice. There is a petition being circulated by citizens who are demanding that all cops be wired with cameras when on duty.  I think it is essential to somehow regain respect for local law enforcement, but many of us have direct experience of cops wildly abusing their power.  My neighborhood has a fake neighborhood watch for the sole purpose of willfully denying crime.  This has lowered our quality of life for years and certainly lowered our opinion of the Tucson Police Department.  It seems that they apply for grant money by gathering signatures and submitting them to some agency claiming that they are doing some kind of relationship building or neighborhood policing.  It does not matter if the signatures are all gathered from folks who are committing heavy duty crimes against their neighbors, or that the cops refuse to respond to citizens reporting those crimes (for years).  They support these corrupt activities with Federal grant funding because it is so easy to defraud the funding agency.  Cops never expect to be investigated and act accordingly.

While I am also saddened by the loss of life and violent deaths of innocent citizens at the hands of cops, I believe that corrupt cops do more financial damage than we can imagine.  I think every word that comes out of  an on duty cop’s mouth must be recorded for everyone’s benefit.  The police departments using the camera system report a huge drop in complaints about the force, so I don’t know why they would resist this idea of recording what they do while they are on salary.  The people with the most potential to damage public trust in the police are the cops who interact with the public “informing” us.   Delivering highly edited and mendacious information is not the same as communicating with the public.  Communication is not a one way street.  Both parties have valid positions in communication.  Both parties are honest in ethical conversations.  In order for the public to have ethical conversations with police we need back up and evidence that protects us…the citizens.  We know cops protect and serve themselves, but I want them to start to protect and serve the public with the same zeal.  I do not think this will naturally occur.  Please sign the petition and communicate with the White House on this important issue.  It would be great to be able to trust the cops.

 

 

Fall Food Fiesta, Grapes

August 27, 2014 2 Comments

Thomcord grapes

Thomcord grapes

I look forward to all the changes of seasons, but fall makes me think about food and the farm.  My grandfather grew concord grapes on his farm in Arkansas.  He sold his crop to Welch’s but we had plenty to eat, juice and make jelly.  My grandmother had a farm kitchen with everything in super large industrial sizes.  She milked the cow and sometimes when I was young she even made butter in a churn.  That was some kind of demonstration for me, because she could.  Jelly production involved a mountain of grapes and a giant sieve to strain the solids.   I have strong memories of their farm, but my favorite part by far was the grape vineyard.  My love of concord grapes has never left me.  Of all the fruits I think it will always be the one I wait for and want the most.  This may also be because living in Arizona I can’t get my hands on very many and the season goes fast.  I am happy that I have found a variety known as Thomcord at  Safeway early in the season.  This small seedless table grape is reminiscent of the concord deep flavor, but without the seeds and the slip skin.  It is like concord light.   I rather like the slip skin, but I am fond of the way I can eat these non stop.  I like to snack on all kinds of grapes, but there are some extra cool ways to use them in cuisine and at the bar too.

The seedless varieties are less intense in flavor but lend themselves well to:

I would use the real concord with seeds and full flavor for the perfect versions of:

I am looking forward to some deep purple cocktails this season:

What are your favorite varieties of grapes and how do you like to use them?  I always love learning new customs and recipes.

 

Season of the Witch

August 26, 2014

When September sends kids back to school everyone starts to prepare for winter holidays.  I was at the grocery store yesterday and saw the entire seasonal section ready for Halloween.  It is still August but the candy, the costumes, and all the yard decorations are on display to get us in the mood.  Americans spend about 7 billion dollars annually on Halloween, according to the National Retail Federation.  More money is spent on adult consumes than on children’s costumes.  The season that begins Nov 1 and runs through Dec 16, known as the holiday shopping season results in 52 billion dollars in spending.  You might say that the slow warm up in both celebration time and money spent on Halloween is a drop in the bucket compared to the rest of the spending year.  People get very wound up with lists and crafts and party planners as New Years finally approaches.  The typical diet/fitness regime begins on January 1, along with new credit card redemption plans.  The remorse about over spending and over eating lasts about a month until Super Bowl time.

Fall is a natural time to store things and preserve them for winter.  Our ancestors endured heavy hardship if they did not prepare and store enough food for the winter months.  Harvest was a time of joy and celebration (perhaps not exactly like modern Day of the Dead) when neighbors came together and gave thanks for the crops they had grown.  They had to be mindful to keep enough and share enough to make it as community through the cold months.  Today we let the food banks worry about feeding society.  We follow an unnatural cycle of spending just when we should be doing some saving for future needs.  I suggest a few changes we can make to give the earth a better holiday season:

  • Buy locally made and locally grown products
  • Think twice before buying anything made out of plastic
  • Find crafty DIY ways to decorate with up cycled or recycled items
  • Teach your kids to give of themselves to those who need help
  • Limit the junk food treats as a central holiday theme
  • Don’t ask a single person if they’re ready for the holidays
pumpkin spice

pumpkin spice

glitter pumpkins

glitter pumpkins

Wild Garlic Grill in Tucson

August 25, 2014 5 Comments

We dined at the Wild Garlic Grill for the second time yesterday and vowed to go more frequently because it suits us perfectly.  The first time we ate there was on Easter when we were looking for something new and different.  Both times we have ordered from the daily special menu and have been mighty impressed with the cuisine.  The chef is skilled in creating contrasts with flavor, temperature, and surprise ingredients.  We remembered the cocktails because they are inventive and made with fresh ingredients.  Bob likes beer so he enjoyed a nut brown ale from a local brewery while I tried the fuzzy tini, a peach martini cocktail.

There is a vegetarian special all the time which revolves around sessional ingredients, so mine were very different from each other since the seasons had changed.  I think mine was the best bargain because it was so plentiful it came home and became a beautiful pasta salad to eat today.  Bob enjoyed his fish dish very much, reporting that  it was fresh and perfectly prepared.  We both had really cute yucca strips as garnish on top of our entrees.  Our portobello mushroom appetizer course filled us significantly because it was accompanied by warm french bread and a sauce that made us want to lick the plate.  It was made with mostly red peppers, I think.  When we asked for more bread the very accommodating server brought extra sauce as well.  Service was very well executed, which we remembered from our fist time.  You feel that your server is paying close attention to timing and making sure your needs are met without being intrusive.  In fact the whole operation suits us because attention is placed on high quality and good service instead of high overhead for the facility.  The bar is cozy and the kitchen open for viewing.  We like the local art work that includes portraits of stars of the horror genre.  The Wild Garlic Grill is a comfortable and delicious place to spend a happy hour, a brunch, or a dinner.  We will return often since it is close to home, and recommend it to anyone looking for a special individual dining experience.

Richza vonBerg Schelklingen, 25th Great-grandmother

August 24, 2014 2 Comments

 

Richenza of Berg (c. 1095 – 27 September 1125) was the wife of Vladislav I of Bohemia and the Duchess of Bohemia. She was the daughter of count Henry I of Berg and his wife Adelheid of Mochental.

Richenza married Vladislav before 1111; her sister Sophie of Berg married another Přemyslid, Otto II the Black, in 1114. The third sister, Salomea of Berg, married the Duke of Poland Bolesław III Wrymouth in 1115.

In 1125 the dying Vladislav I chose his relative Otto II the Black as his successor, which was also the wish of Vladislav’s wife Richenza. Only the intervention of his mother Świętosława changed his mind, and Vladislav reconciled with his brother Soběslav.

After Vladislav’s death the disappointed Richenza wanted to move to Zwiefalten monastery, but died on the way on 27 September 1125. She is buried in Reichenbach.

Issue
Svatava
Vladislav II of Bohemia (c.1110 – January 18, 1174), King of Bohemia
Děpolt (- August 1167)
Jindřich
[edit] Literature
KAREŠOVÁ, Z.; PRAŽÁK, J. Královny a kněžny české. Prague : X-Egem, 1996.
[edit] References
^ KAREŠOVÁ, Z.; PRAŽÁK, J. Královny a kněžny české. Prague : X-Egem, 1996.

Richza vonBerg Schelklingen (1080 – 1125)
is my 25th great grandmother
Vladislav Bohemia (1117 – 1175)
son of Richza vonBerg Schelklingen
Fredrich Bohemia (1141 – 1189)
son of Vladislav Bohemia
Lidmila Bohemia (1170 – 1240)
daughter of Fredrich Bohemia
OTTO II Wittelsbach of Bavaria (1206 – 1253)
son of Lidmila Bohemia
Elisabeth Wittelsbach Duchess Bavaria (1227 – 1273)
daughter of OTTO II Wittelsbach of Bavaria
Consort Elisabeth the Romans Carinthia (1263 – 1313)
daughter of Elisabeth Wittelsbach Duchess Bavaria
Albrecht Albert II ‘The Wise’ Duke of Austria Habsburg (1298 – 1358)
son of Consort Elisabeth the Romans Carinthia
Leopold III “Duke of Austria” Habsburg (1351 – 1386)
son of Albrecht Albert II ‘The Wise’ Duke of Austria Habsburg
Ernst I “Ironside” Archduke of Austria Habsburg (1377 – 1424)
son of Leopold III “Duke of Austria” Habsburg
Katharina Archduchess Austria Von Habsburg (1420 – 1493)
daughter of Ernst I “Ironside” Archduke of Austria Habsburg
Christof I VanBaden (1453 – 1527)
son of Katharina Archduchess Austria Von Habsburg
Beatrix Zahringen (1492 – 1535)
daughter of Christof I VanBaden
Sabine Grafin VonSimmern (1528 – 1578)
daughter of Beatrix Zahringen
Marie L Egmond (1564 – 1584)
daughter of Sabine Grafin VonSimmern
Richard Sears (1590 – 1676)
son of Marie L Egmond
Silas Sears (1638 – 1697)
son of Richard Sears
Silas Sears (1661 – 1732)
son of Silas Sears
Sarah Sears (1697 – 1785)
daughter of Silas Sears
Sarah Hamblin (1721 – 1814)
daughter of Sarah Sears
Mercy Hazen (1747 – 1819)
daughter of Sarah Hamblin
Martha Mead (1784 – 1860)
daughter of Mercy Hazen
Abner Morse (1808 – 1838)
son of Martha Mead
Daniel Rowland Morse (1838 – 1910)
son of Abner Morse
Jason A Morse (1862 – 1932)
son of Daniel Rowland Morse
Ernest Abner Morse (1890 – 1965)
son of Jason A Morse
Richard Arden Morse (1920 – 2004)
son of Ernest Abner Morse
Pamela Morse
I am the daughter of Richard Arden Morse

RICHINZA (-27 Sep 1125). Berthold’s Chronicon of Zwiefalten names (in order) “Richinza ductrix Boemiæ, Sophia ductrix Moraviæ, Salome ductrix Poloniæ” as sisters of “Heinricus comes [et] Rapot”, specifying in the subsequent paragraph that Richinza was “uxor Vlatizlaus qui et Lauzlan dux Boemiæ” [942]. The necrology of Zwiefalten records the death “V Kal Oct” of “Richinza ductrix Boemie filie Heinrici comitis senioris” [943]. m ([1110]) VLADISLAV I Duke of the Bohemians, son of VRATISLAV II Duke of the Bohemians & his third wifeSwiętoslawa [Svatana] of Poland (-12 Apr 1125, bur Prague St Maria).

Reflexology Rules

August 23, 2014 1 Comment

Reflexology is a powerful healing modality for the entire body. I recently made my feet very sore and wanted to recover as quickly as possible. I booked some sessions with Carol Crockett, who is an excellent therapist I had visited in the past.  My overall health as well as my aching feet benefit greatly from the treatments.  She provides an eye pillow and follows your lead about talking or observing silence.  I can be in the mood for either one because Carol also knows a lot about health and makes a very congenial conversationalist.  She worked as a hospital nurse before she took her training to work in reflexology.  This is really important in her work with cancer patients at the U of A Supportive Care for Healing department at the Cancer Center.  Since this treatment can be done without the luxury of the massage table she often goes upstairs to the chemo unit to give sessions for the patients who need her help.  She works at the hospital one day a week, but she also offers cancer patients a discount on services at her private practice, Footbliss Reflexology.

Carol has a great intuitive sense of healing and makes her client feel very comfortable by explaining what she is up to during the session.  Most people don’t want a play by play of their relaxing treatment, but if you have any questions she is very knowledgeable and expressive.  I sometimes discuss general health topics with her and am impressed with the depth and breadth of skill of her knowledge.  She is a champion of non invasive modalities for healing and enhancing health, but is, by no means, interested in doing any preaching or converting.  If you have never received any kind of body work or touch healing therapy I think starting with reflexology is a perfect way to get to know how to enjoy and benefit from professional massage therapy.   You remain clothed and it is very pleasant during the entire process.  Carol uses essential oils to enhance the whole experience.  For those of us with advanced tastes in body work she can offer facial reflexology as well as Tenzo, a combination of shiatsu style movements combined with reflexology which is also performed with the client fully clothed.   She sometimes substitute teaches the yoga classes at the hospital, and offers private instruction in yoga in her private practice.  If you are interested in improving your health and adding some pure bliss to your life I encourage you to try reflexology.  If you live in Tucson I highly recommend Carol’s variety of healing services.  She is talented and professional.

Knowing Neighbors is Good for Your Health

August 21, 2014 3 Comments

Our community in midtown Tucson started using the Nextdoor app six months ago.   We now have 7% of our households in the area enrolled and communicating. This is a real change for us since few of the residents knew many other people in the vicinity. We still have more recruitment to do, but it is pretty easy and natural to grow the membership once the site gets started.  This startup from San Francisco was started in 2010 by techies to meet a need that seemed obvious to them.  Social media has made it possible to be in touch with folks around the world, but statistics showed that local communication was grinding to a halt.  A third of Canadians and half of Americans did not know the name of a single neighbor.  If you live here this should not shock you. Close knit communities are a distant memory for America.  Gangs, vandalism, and drug related crime have a chance to thrive when nobody knows each other.  Tagging and theft become a regular part of life when the entire population is isolated from each other.  Nobody wins.

Nextdoor is a private way for neighbors to connect and start to improve social fabric of a place.  Crime and safety is one of the topics frequently discussed.  Like our counterparts across the nation I think it has been shocking to start to learn about how much crime is going on constantly all around us.  Eventually, when we have more membership, I am sure it will become more difficult to commit crime without being busted by neighbors with cameras.  We all look forward to that day since our cops are neither responsive nor communicative.  People do complain about lack of law enforcement, but that will have no effect on the situation.  Some angry citizens feel that owning many guns will protect them and their property, but I think this is a fallacy.  One of the most common items stolen in break-ins is a gun.  Heavily armed communities are not safer than those with a healthy respect for private property and a strong social fabric.  They may be more dangerous and are probably depressed about what they perceive as a need to be heavily armed at home.

Here are a few good reasons to start using Nextdoor in your neighborhood:

  • You meet interesting people
  • You find out there is crime going on around you all the time to which you were oblivious
  • You have a chance to form special interest groups such as garden, pet lovers, or book clubs
  • You have a place to ask for recommendations when you need work done
  • You have a place to ask for help finding a lost pet
  • You can advertise your yard sales and services to a very local audience
  • You can organize events and parties for social fun in your vicinity

I hope you will join us in creating safer more appealing neighborhoods through communication. Use this link to go directly to the Nextdoor site for more information and to join.

Ulrich X von Kyburg, 22nd Great-grandfather

August 20, 2014

coat of arms

coat of arms

Grafen von Kyburg

Grafen von Kyburg

Just yesterday I was talking to a friend in Zurich about one line in my family tree.  I told her I was just dying to prove my Swissness by finding the missing pieces of my ancestry puzzle.  Today, in another one of my father’s branches I discover that my 22nd great grandfather was the Grafen of Kyburg.  A grafen was a kind of count or noble in Switzerland.   His family was powerful and he went to the Crusades.  I am pretty excited about Ulrich!!

Ulrich X von Kyburg* (1162 – 1227)
is my 22nd great grandfather
Hedwige VonKyburg (1192 – 1260)
daughter of Ulrich X von Kyburg*
Rudolf IV King of Germans, Holy Roman Emperor Habsburg (1218 – 1291)
son of Hedwige VonKyburg
Albert I King of Germany Habsburg (1248 – 1308)
son of Rudolf IV King of Germans, Holy Roman Emperor Habsburg
Albrecht Albert II ‘The Wise’ Duke of Austria Habsburg (1298 – 1358)
son of Albert I King of Germany Habsburg
Leopold III “Duke of Austria” Habsburg (1351 – 1386)
son of Albrecht Albert II ‘The Wise’ Duke of Austria Habsburg
Ernst I “Ironside” Archduke of Austria Habsburg (1377 – 1424)
son of Leopold III “Duke of Austria” Habsburg
Katharina Archduchess Austria Von Habsburg (1420 – 1493)
daughter of Ernst I “Ironside” Archduke of Austria Habsburg
Christof I VanBaden (1453 – 1527)
son of Katharina Archduchess Austria Von Habsburg
Beatrix Zahringen (1492 – 1535)
daughter of Christof I VanBaden
Sabine Grafin VonSimmern (1528 – 1578)
daughter of Beatrix Zahringen
Marie L Egmond (1564 – 1584)
daughter of Sabine Grafin VonSimmern
Richard Sears (1590 – 1676)
son of Marie L Egmond
Silas Sears (1638 – 1697)
son of Richard Sears
Silas Sears (1661 – 1732)
son of Silas Sears
Sarah Sears (1697 – 1785)
daughter of Silas Sears
Sarah Hamblin (1721 – 1814)
daughter of Sarah Sears
Mercy Hazen (1747 – 1819)
daughter of Sarah Hamblin
Martha Mead (1784 – 1860)
daughter of Mercy Hazen
Abner Morse (1808 – 1838)
son of Martha Mead
Daniel Rowland Morse (1838 – 1910)
son of Abner Morse
Jason A Morse (1862 – 1932)
son of Daniel Rowland Morse
Ernest Abner Morse (1890 – 1965)
son of Jason A Morse
Richard Arden Morse (1920 – 2004)
son of Ernest Abner Morse
Pamela Morse
I am the daughter of Richard Arden Morse

ULRICH von Dillingen und Kiburg, son of HARTMANN [III] Graf von Dillingen und Kiburg & his wife Richenza von Lenzburg (-1227, bur Schänis). Graf von Kiburg. Crusader 1190. Vogt von Schänis, Beromünster und Glarus 1212. “…Ulricus comes de Kiburc et filii eius Wernerus et Hardemannu…” witnessed a charter of Friedrich II King of Germany dated 31 Mar 1213 [393].
m ANNA von Zähringen, daughter of BERTHOLD IV Herzog von Zähringen & his first wife Heilwig [von Froburg] (-after 1226). The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names “ducem Bertoldum…et duas sorores” as children of “ducem Bertoldum” & his wife, specifying that the younger daughter was “comitissa Kiburgensis” and had many children [394]. This is confirmed by the charter dated 1226 under which “Haimonem dominum de Fucignie” reached an agreement with the bishop of Lausanne concerning the advocacy of the church of Lausanne, which Aimon claimed had been granted by “comitibus de Ciburc”, which names “comitibus de Kibor Vuernerio et Armanno…quia filii erant sororis Bertoldi ducis Faringie” [395].
Graf Ulrich & his wife had six children:
1. WERNER [I] (-Acre 1228). “…Ulricus comes de Kiburc et filii eius Wernerus et Hardemannu…” witnessed a charter of Friedrich II King of Germany dated 31 Mar 1213 [396]. The contract of marriage between “Thomas comes Savoyæ…filiam suam Margaritham…infra nubiles annos” and “comiti Hartmanno filio comitis Ulrici de Kyburg” is dated 1 Jun 1218, stating that “Dni Bertholdi comitis de Novocastro et Dni Wilhelmi de Stavayé” acted as guarantors, and with the consent of “Ulricus comes de Kyburg et comes Garnerius frater eius et comitissa uxor comitis de Kyburg” [397]. His parentage is confirmed by the charter dated 1226 under which “Haimonem dominum de Fucignie” reached an agreement with the bishop of Lausanne concerning the advocacy of the church of Lausanne, which Aimon claimed had been granted by “comitibus de Ciburc”, which names “comitibus de Kibor Vuernerio et Armanno…quia filii erant sororis Bertoldi ducis Faringie” [398]. Graf von Kiburg. m as her first husband, ALIX [Bertha] de Lorraine, daughter of FERRY II Duke of Lorraine & his wife Agnes de Bar (-[Apr/29 Sep 1242], bur Clairlieu). The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names “Aaliz relictam comitis Kyburgensis sororem ducis Lotharingie Mathei” when recording her second marriage to “Galtherus de Vangionis Rivo…filius Galtherius” [399]. She married secondly (before Nov 1229) Gautier [II] Sire de Vignory. Graf Werner [I] & his wife had three children:
a) HARTMANN [V] (-3 Sep 1263, bur Wettingen). Graf von Kiburg. Seigneur de Fribourg. The Community of “Uriburt” promised to observe the donation by “Conte Hartmano di Kibourg” with the consent of “Conte Hartmano Giuniore” to “Dama Margarita Moglie del detto Conte H. Seniore” by charter dated 1241 [400]. The necrology of Wettingen records the death “III Non Sep 1263″ of “Hermannus com iunior de Kiburg et Anna uxor eius” [401]. The index of benefactors of Wettingen records the death in 1263 of “Hartmannus com de Kiburg iunior…benefactor” and his burial “apud sacellum beatæ Mariæ Virginis” [402]. The necrology of Fraubrunnen records the death “IV Non Sep” of “Graf Hartman der jünger” [403]. m firstly (before 9 Feb 1248) ANNA von Rapperswil, daughter of RUDOLF II [VIII] Graf von Rapperswil (-30 May 1253). The necrology of Wettingen records the death “III Kal Jun” of “domina Anna de Kiburg”, recalled in the later entry “III Non Sep 1263″ of “Hermannus com iunior de Kiburg et Anna uxor eius” [404]. m secondly (contract 27 Jan 1254) ELISABETH de Chalon, daughter of HUGUES de Chalons Sire de Salins Comte Palatin de Bourgogne & his wife Alix von Andechs-Merano Ctss Palatine de Bourgogne (-9 Jul 1275). The primary source which confirms her parentage and marriage has not yet been identified. She became a Clarissan nun at Freiburg. Graf Hartmann [V] & his first wife had one child:
i) WERNER (-after 4 Jun 1253).
Graf Hartmann [V] & his second wife had two children:
ii) ANNA . The charter dated 1263, under which the town of Fribourg placed itself under the protection of “Dominum Comitem Rudolfum de Habisburg Landgravium Alsatie” also names “Anna ipsius domini neptis, domina nostra, quondam filia…domini nostri comitis Hartmanni junioris de Kyburgo” [405]. Dame de Fribourg. “Anna quondam filia comitis…Hartmanni de Kiburgo junioris et…Eberhardus comes de Habisburg maritus eiusdem domine” confirmed the privileges of the town of Fribourg by charter dated Mar 1275 [406]. “Domini…Eberhardi comitis de Habsburch et…dominæ…Annæ uxoris suæ” confirmed the donation to the abbey of Frienisberg by “Petrus de Viviers” by charter dated Oct 1275 [407]. The necrology of Fraubrunnen records the death “XII Kal Dec” of “Frow Anna gräfin von Kiburg” [408]. m ([30 Oct/12 Dec] 1271) EBERHARD Graf von Habsburg-Laufenburg, son of RUDOLF I “der Schweigsame” Graf von Habsburg-Laufenburg & his wife Gertrud von Regensberg (-1284, before 2 Jun). Graf von Kiburg.
iii) son (posthumously 1264-before 7 Feb 1265).
b) CLEMENTIA . 1248/49. m firstly RUDOLF [I] Graf von Montfort (-[Oct 1244/1247]). m secondly — Graf von Hohenberg .
c) ADELHEID . 1258. m (before 29 Sep 1242) FRIEDRICH [III] Graf von Leiningen in Dagsburg und Hardenburg, son of FRIEDRICH [II] Graf von Leiningen & his wife Agnes von Eberstein (-1287).
2. HARTMANN [III] (-27 Nov 1264, bur Wettingen). “…Ulricus comes de Kiburc et filii eius Wernerus et Hardemannu…” witnessed a charter of Friedrich II King of Germany dated 31 Mar 1213 [409]. His parentage is confirmed by the charter dated 1226 under which “Haimonem dominum de Fucignie” reached an agreement with the bishop of Lausanne concerning the advocacy of the church of Lausanne, which Aimon claimed had been granted by “comitibus de Ciburc”, which names “comitibus de Kibor Vuernerio et Armanno…quia filii erant sororis Bertoldi ducis Faringie” [410]. Graf von Kiburg. The necrology of Wettingen records the death “V Kal Dec 1262″ of “com Hartmannus senior de Kiburg” [411]. m (contract Mouden 1 Jun 1218) MARGUERITE de Savoie, daughter of THOMAS I Comte de Savoie & his wife Marguerite [Beatrix] de Genève (1212-1/2 Sep 1270 or 1273 [412]). The contract of marriage between “Thomas comes Savoyæ…filiam suam Margaritham…infra nubiles annos” and “comiti Hartmanno filio comitis Ulrici de Kyburg” is dated 1 Jun 1218, stating that “Dni Bertholdi comitis de Novocastro et Dni Wilhelmi de Stavayé” acted as guarantors, and with the consent of “Ulricus comes de Kyburg et comes Garnerius frater eius et comitissa uxor comitis de Kyburg” [413]. Her marriage date is confirmed by the charter dated 1230 under which her husband “H. comes de Kiburch” confirmed donations “propter nuptias uxori sue filie comitis Sabaudie”, with the consent of “fratris sui Ul. Constantiensis canonici et H. filii fratris sui beate memorie Wer. quondam comitis de Kiburch” [414]. The Chronicon Colmarense records that “comes…[Kiburc]” married “filiam comitis de Sabaudia” [415]. “Amedeus comes Sabaudie et marchio Italie” granted “castrum…Monteys” {Montheys} to “sorori mee Margarete comitisse de Kiborch” by charter dated 16 Oct 1239 [416]. “Amedeus comes Sabaudie et in Italie marchio…cum…genetrice sua et fratribus suis B. Bellicensi Electo et Philippo Metensi Primicerio” granted “villam S. Mauritii de Chablaisio” {Saint-Maurice de Chablais} to “soror illorum Margareta comitissa de Kiborch” by charter dated 24 Feb 1240 [417]. “H. comes de Kyburch” granted “castra Windegge, Oltingen…advocatiam et predium in Shennis, Wizennanc et Kemanatvn” to “uxori mee” by way of dower, with the consent of “fratruelis mei H”, by charter dated 28 May 1241 [418]. The same collection includes several other charters relating to this grant, dated between 9 Jul 1241 and 1243 [419]. Her parentage is confirmed by the 1264 testament of her brother Boniface [420]. According to Europäische Stammtafeln [421], Marguerite de Savoie married secondly Eberhard von Habsburg-Laufenburg, son of Rudolf III Graf von Habsburg-Laufenburg & his wife Gertrud von Regensberg. Apart from the unlikelihood of Graf Eberhard (who at the time must have been at least 40 years old) marrying as his first wife a lady over 50 years old, his marriage to Anna heiress of Kiburg is recorded [422] as having taken place in [30 Oct/12 Dec] 1271 when Marguerite was still alive. In addition, the Chronicle of Hautecombe refers to Marguerite as ‘Margarita comitissa de Quiborch in Alemania’ when she died, with no mention of Habsburg-Laufenburg. The necrology of Waldens records the death “Kal Sep” of “Margareta com de Kuberg” [423]. The necrology of Fraubrunnen records the death “1 Kal Sep” of “Her Hartman graf von Kyburg und frow Margreta sin gemachel” [424], the date apparently referring to the death of Marguerite. The necrology of Wettingen records the death “IV Non Sep” of “Margareta com de Kiburch” [425].
3. ULRICH (-17 Jun 1237). His parentage is confirmed by the charter dated 1230 under which her husband “H. comes de Kiburch” confirmed donations “propter nuptias uxori sue filie comitis Sabaudie”, with the consent of “fratris sui Ul. Constantiensis canonici et H. filii fratris sui beate memorie Wer. quondam comitis de Kiburch” . Canon at Basel Cathedral 1223. Canon at Konstanz Cathedral 1229. Provost of Beromünster and Imperial chaplain 1231/34. Bishop of Chur 1233.
4. HEILWIG ([1192]-30 Apr 1260, bur Muri). The Ellenhardi Chronicon refers to the wife of “Alberti comitis in Habichburg…lantgravius Alsatie superioris” as “filia comitis in Kiburch” [427]. A Habsburg genealogy names “Heilwigam filiam Uolrici comitis de Chiburg” as the wife of “Alberctus” [428]. m ([1217]) ALBRECHT [IV] “der Weise” von Habsburg, son of RUDOLF II “der Alte” Graf von Habsburg, Herr zu Laufenburg & his wife Agnes von Staufen (-Ascalon, Palestine 22 Nov 1240). He succeeded his father in 1232 as Graf von Habsburg.
5. MECHTILD . 1232. m RUDOLF [I] Graf von Rapperswil (-1250). The index of benefactors of Wettingen records the death in 1250 of “Rudolphus com de Raperschwyl, patruus fundatoris” and his burial at Wettingen .
6. ADELHEID (-1231 or after). The primary source which confirms her parentage and marriage has not yet been identified. m GERHARD [IV] Graf von Dollnstein und Hirschberg, son of GERHARD [II] Graf von Dollnstein & his wife — (-1225).

he House of Kyburg was family of Grafen or counts from Zürich in Switzerland. The family was one of the three most powerful noble families in the Swiss plateau beside the Habsburg and the House of Savoy during the 11th and 12th Centuries. With the extinction of the male line in 1263, Rudolph of Habsburg laid claim to the Kyburg lands and annexed them to the Habsburg holdings, which marked the beginning of the Habsburg rise to power.

The first line of counts of Kyburg were influential in local politics during the 1020s but the male line died out in 1078. Kyburg castle, southeast of Winterthur (in the modern canton of Zürich), passed on to the Swabian counts of Dillingen.[1] Through the marriage of Hartmann von Dillingen († 1121) with a certain Adelheid the House of Dillingen acquired the old Kyburg possessions as well as territorial claims in the Thurgau. The exact origin of Adelheid is unclear. She is either the granddaughter of the Count of Grüningen-Winterthur or from a cadet branch of the Winterthur family, the Counts of Nellenburg. She might also be the daughter of Adalbert II von Winterthur, the last knight from Winterthur, who died in 1053 at the Battle of Civitate against the Normans.

Expansion of the Kyburg lands
The Kyburg land continued to be part of the possessions of the House of Dillingen until the grandson of Hartmann von Dillingen, Hartmann III († 1180), split the Dillingen lands.[2] Adalbert received the Swabian territories, while Hartmann III von Dillingen got the Swiss lands and became Hartmann I of Kyburg. The House of Kyburg were vassals of the Duke of Swabia, who was of the House of Hohenstaufen and would become the Kings of Germany from 1138-1254. When the House of Lenzburgdied out in 1172/73, the Kyburgs together with the Hohenstaufen and Zähringen split the Lenzburg possessions between them. The Kyburg family acquired the allodial title to the Vogtei of Windegg or Gaster (today 7 municipalities in the See-Gaster Wahlkreis of St. Gallen) and land around Baden. Later additional Lenzburg territories, the Schänis Abbey and Beromünster, were also acquired by the House of Kyburg.

In 1180 the family began to consolidate their power. They founded the cities of Diessenhofen and Winterthur to help spread their power. They also appointed many of the Lenzburg, and later Zähringen, vassals to be unfree knights or Ministerialis for the Kyburg family.

When the Zähringen family died out in 1218, the Kyburgs grabbed another chance to expand. Anna von Zähringen, the sister of the last Duke of Zähringen, Berthold V, was the wife of Ulrich III von Kyburg (†1227). From the Zähringen line the Kyburgs acquired land west of the Rhine and in Burgundy including the cities of Fribourg,Thun and Burgdorf as well as estates in the canton of Zurich. However, the House of Hohenstaufen, the family of the Holy Roman Emperors, refused to support the Kyburg claims on the city of Zurich and in 1226 on the Abbey of St. Gall. As a result, they turned increasingly away from the Hohenstaufens and in 1243 and were one of the mainstays of the pro-Pope and anti-Holy Roman Emperor Party.

Around 1220 they started to make claims on property and rights that had unclear ownership and was near property that they already owned. In 1225 they founded a burial site for the Chorherrenstift Heiligberg in the center of the property of the former Freiherr von Weisslingen at Winterthur, and in 1233 founded Töss Abbey west of Winterthur. Both sites were endowed with property that they had taken from the Weisslingen and Rossberg families. These two properties served to define the borders between the Kyburg and Rapperswil families.[3]

At the same time the Kyburg family attempted to strengthen themselves through marriage. Hartmann V, a grandson of Ulrich III was engaged to Anna of Rapperswil in 1227. His uncle, Hartmann IV, called the Elder, married Margaret of Savoy while his sister Heilwig, the future mother of King Rudolf I von Habsburg, married Albert IV of Habsburg

Even though the family continued to found cities and expand, they were declining in power. In 1230 they founded Zug and Baden, then Frauenfeld, Aarau, Lenzburg, and Mellingen. In 1250 they founded Sursee, Weesen and the fortified towns of Kyburg and Laupen. The last two were Richensee and Huttwil which they lost shortly thereafter.

Suffix Graf von Kyburg Birth of, Kyburg, Zürich, Switzerland Gender Male AFN WRQG-ST Ecclesiastic 1212 [ 4] Vogt von Schänis Beromünster u Glarus Name AKA Ulrich Count of Kyburg [ 5] Name AKA Ulrich III [ 6] Died 1227 [ 6, 7] Buried Schäntis Beromünster, Luzern, Switzerland [ 4] Person ID I50509 Europe: Royal and Noble Houses with Colonial American Connections Last Modified 24 Jul 2011
Father Hartmann III, Graf von Kyburg-Dillingen, d. Aft 22 Aug 1180 Mother Richenza von Lenzburg, d. Abt 24 Apr 1172 Family ID F185946 Group Sheet
Family Anna von Zähringen, d. Yes, date unknown Married Y [ 6] Children
1. Werner, Graf von Kyburg, d. 1228, Acre, Palestine
2. Heilwig von Kyburg, b. Abt 1192, of, Kyburg, Zürich, Switzerland , d. 30 Apr 1260, of, Kyburg, Zurich, Switzerland
3. Hartmann III “der Ältere”, Graf von Kyburg, d. 27 Nov 1264
4. Ulrich von Kyburg, Bischof von Chur, d. 17 Jun 1237
5. Mechtilde von Kyburg, d. Aft 1232
6. Adelheid von Kyburg-Dillingen, d. Aft 1231
Last Modified 15 Jul 2011 Family ID F148606 Group Sheet
Notes
MILITARY: In the Crusades in 1190. NOTE: Was the count of Kyburg, Leutzburgh and Baden. A descendant from the Dukes of Zahringen.

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