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Ulrich X von Kyburg, 22nd Great-grandfather

August 20, 2014

coat of arms

coat of arms

Grafen von Kyburg

Grafen von Kyburg

Just yesterday I was talking to a friend in Zurich about one line in my family tree.  I told her I was just dying to prove my Swissness by finding the missing pieces of my ancestry puzzle.  Today, in another one of my father’s branches I discover that my 22nd great grandfather was the Grafen of Kyburg.  A grafen was a kind of count or noble in Switzerland.   His family was powerful and he went to the Crusades.  I am pretty excited about Ulrich!!

Ulrich X von Kyburg* (1162 – 1227)
is my 22nd great grandfather
Hedwige VonKyburg (1192 – 1260)
daughter of Ulrich X von Kyburg*
Rudolf IV King of Germans, Holy Roman Emperor Habsburg (1218 – 1291)
son of Hedwige VonKyburg
Albert I King of Germany Habsburg (1248 – 1308)
son of Rudolf IV King of Germans, Holy Roman Emperor Habsburg
Albrecht Albert II ‘The Wise’ Duke of Austria Habsburg (1298 – 1358)
son of Albert I King of Germany Habsburg
Leopold III “Duke of Austria” Habsburg (1351 – 1386)
son of Albrecht Albert II ‘The Wise’ Duke of Austria Habsburg
Ernst I “Ironside” Archduke of Austria Habsburg (1377 – 1424)
son of Leopold III “Duke of Austria” Habsburg
Katharina Archduchess Austria Von Habsburg (1420 – 1493)
daughter of Ernst I “Ironside” Archduke of Austria Habsburg
Christof I VanBaden (1453 – 1527)
son of Katharina Archduchess Austria Von Habsburg
Beatrix Zahringen (1492 – 1535)
daughter of Christof I VanBaden
Sabine Grafin VonSimmern (1528 – 1578)
daughter of Beatrix Zahringen
Marie L Egmond (1564 – 1584)
daughter of Sabine Grafin VonSimmern
Richard Sears (1590 – 1676)
son of Marie L Egmond
Silas Sears (1638 – 1697)
son of Richard Sears
Silas Sears (1661 – 1732)
son of Silas Sears
Sarah Sears (1697 – 1785)
daughter of Silas Sears
Sarah Hamblin (1721 – 1814)
daughter of Sarah Sears
Mercy Hazen (1747 – 1819)
daughter of Sarah Hamblin
Martha Mead (1784 – 1860)
daughter of Mercy Hazen
Abner Morse (1808 – 1838)
son of Martha Mead
Daniel Rowland Morse (1838 – 1910)
son of Abner Morse
Jason A Morse (1862 – 1932)
son of Daniel Rowland Morse
Ernest Abner Morse (1890 – 1965)
son of Jason A Morse
Richard Arden Morse (1920 – 2004)
son of Ernest Abner Morse
Pamela Morse
I am the daughter of Richard Arden Morse

ULRICH von Dillingen und Kiburg, son of HARTMANN [III] Graf von Dillingen und Kiburg & his wife Richenza von Lenzburg (-1227, bur Schänis). Graf von Kiburg. Crusader 1190. Vogt von Schänis, Beromünster und Glarus 1212. “…Ulricus comes de Kiburc et filii eius Wernerus et Hardemannu…” witnessed a charter of Friedrich II King of Germany dated 31 Mar 1213 [393].
m ANNA von Zähringen, daughter of BERTHOLD IV Herzog von Zähringen & his first wife Heilwig [von Froburg] (-after 1226). The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names “ducem Bertoldum…et duas sorores” as children of “ducem Bertoldum” & his wife, specifying that the younger daughter was “comitissa Kiburgensis” and had many children [394]. This is confirmed by the charter dated 1226 under which “Haimonem dominum de Fucignie” reached an agreement with the bishop of Lausanne concerning the advocacy of the church of Lausanne, which Aimon claimed had been granted by “comitibus de Ciburc”, which names “comitibus de Kibor Vuernerio et Armanno…quia filii erant sororis Bertoldi ducis Faringie” [395].
Graf Ulrich & his wife had six children:
1. WERNER [I] (-Acre 1228). “…Ulricus comes de Kiburc et filii eius Wernerus et Hardemannu…” witnessed a charter of Friedrich II King of Germany dated 31 Mar 1213 [396]. The contract of marriage between “Thomas comes Savoyæ…filiam suam Margaritham…infra nubiles annos” and “comiti Hartmanno filio comitis Ulrici de Kyburg” is dated 1 Jun 1218, stating that “Dni Bertholdi comitis de Novocastro et Dni Wilhelmi de Stavayé” acted as guarantors, and with the consent of “Ulricus comes de Kyburg et comes Garnerius frater eius et comitissa uxor comitis de Kyburg” [397]. His parentage is confirmed by the charter dated 1226 under which “Haimonem dominum de Fucignie” reached an agreement with the bishop of Lausanne concerning the advocacy of the church of Lausanne, which Aimon claimed had been granted by “comitibus de Ciburc”, which names “comitibus de Kibor Vuernerio et Armanno…quia filii erant sororis Bertoldi ducis Faringie” [398]. Graf von Kiburg. m as her first husband, ALIX [Bertha] de Lorraine, daughter of FERRY II Duke of Lorraine & his wife Agnes de Bar (-[Apr/29 Sep 1242], bur Clairlieu). The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names “Aaliz relictam comitis Kyburgensis sororem ducis Lotharingie Mathei” when recording her second marriage to “Galtherus de Vangionis Rivo…filius Galtherius” [399]. She married secondly (before Nov 1229) Gautier [II] Sire de Vignory. Graf Werner [I] & his wife had three children:
a) HARTMANN [V] (-3 Sep 1263, bur Wettingen). Graf von Kiburg. Seigneur de Fribourg. The Community of “Uriburt” promised to observe the donation by “Conte Hartmano di Kibourg” with the consent of “Conte Hartmano Giuniore” to “Dama Margarita Moglie del detto Conte H. Seniore” by charter dated 1241 [400]. The necrology of Wettingen records the death “III Non Sep 1263″ of “Hermannus com iunior de Kiburg et Anna uxor eius” [401]. The index of benefactors of Wettingen records the death in 1263 of “Hartmannus com de Kiburg iunior…benefactor” and his burial “apud sacellum beatæ Mariæ Virginis” [402]. The necrology of Fraubrunnen records the death “IV Non Sep” of “Graf Hartman der jünger” [403]. m firstly (before 9 Feb 1248) ANNA von Rapperswil, daughter of RUDOLF II [VIII] Graf von Rapperswil (-30 May 1253). The necrology of Wettingen records the death “III Kal Jun” of “domina Anna de Kiburg”, recalled in the later entry “III Non Sep 1263″ of “Hermannus com iunior de Kiburg et Anna uxor eius” [404]. m secondly (contract 27 Jan 1254) ELISABETH de Chalon, daughter of HUGUES de Chalons Sire de Salins Comte Palatin de Bourgogne & his wife Alix von Andechs-Merano Ctss Palatine de Bourgogne (-9 Jul 1275). The primary source which confirms her parentage and marriage has not yet been identified. She became a Clarissan nun at Freiburg. Graf Hartmann [V] & his first wife had one child:
i) WERNER (-after 4 Jun 1253).
Graf Hartmann [V] & his second wife had two children:
ii) ANNA . The charter dated 1263, under which the town of Fribourg placed itself under the protection of “Dominum Comitem Rudolfum de Habisburg Landgravium Alsatie” also names “Anna ipsius domini neptis, domina nostra, quondam filia…domini nostri comitis Hartmanni junioris de Kyburgo” [405]. Dame de Fribourg. “Anna quondam filia comitis…Hartmanni de Kiburgo junioris et…Eberhardus comes de Habisburg maritus eiusdem domine” confirmed the privileges of the town of Fribourg by charter dated Mar 1275 [406]. “Domini…Eberhardi comitis de Habsburch et…dominæ…Annæ uxoris suæ” confirmed the donation to the abbey of Frienisberg by “Petrus de Viviers” by charter dated Oct 1275 [407]. The necrology of Fraubrunnen records the death “XII Kal Dec” of “Frow Anna gräfin von Kiburg” [408]. m ([30 Oct/12 Dec] 1271) EBERHARD Graf von Habsburg-Laufenburg, son of RUDOLF I “der Schweigsame” Graf von Habsburg-Laufenburg & his wife Gertrud von Regensberg (-1284, before 2 Jun). Graf von Kiburg.
iii) son (posthumously 1264-before 7 Feb 1265).
b) CLEMENTIA . 1248/49. m firstly RUDOLF [I] Graf von Montfort (-[Oct 1244/1247]). m secondly — Graf von Hohenberg .
c) ADELHEID . 1258. m (before 29 Sep 1242) FRIEDRICH [III] Graf von Leiningen in Dagsburg und Hardenburg, son of FRIEDRICH [II] Graf von Leiningen & his wife Agnes von Eberstein (-1287).
2. HARTMANN [III] (-27 Nov 1264, bur Wettingen). “…Ulricus comes de Kiburc et filii eius Wernerus et Hardemannu…” witnessed a charter of Friedrich II King of Germany dated 31 Mar 1213 [409]. His parentage is confirmed by the charter dated 1226 under which “Haimonem dominum de Fucignie” reached an agreement with the bishop of Lausanne concerning the advocacy of the church of Lausanne, which Aimon claimed had been granted by “comitibus de Ciburc”, which names “comitibus de Kibor Vuernerio et Armanno…quia filii erant sororis Bertoldi ducis Faringie” [410]. Graf von Kiburg. The necrology of Wettingen records the death “V Kal Dec 1262″ of “com Hartmannus senior de Kiburg” [411]. m (contract Mouden 1 Jun 1218) MARGUERITE de Savoie, daughter of THOMAS I Comte de Savoie & his wife Marguerite [Beatrix] de Genève (1212-1/2 Sep 1270 or 1273 [412]). The contract of marriage between “Thomas comes Savoyæ…filiam suam Margaritham…infra nubiles annos” and “comiti Hartmanno filio comitis Ulrici de Kyburg” is dated 1 Jun 1218, stating that “Dni Bertholdi comitis de Novocastro et Dni Wilhelmi de Stavayé” acted as guarantors, and with the consent of “Ulricus comes de Kyburg et comes Garnerius frater eius et comitissa uxor comitis de Kyburg” [413]. Her marriage date is confirmed by the charter dated 1230 under which her husband “H. comes de Kiburch” confirmed donations “propter nuptias uxori sue filie comitis Sabaudie”, with the consent of “fratris sui Ul. Constantiensis canonici et H. filii fratris sui beate memorie Wer. quondam comitis de Kiburch” [414]. The Chronicon Colmarense records that “comes…[Kiburc]” married “filiam comitis de Sabaudia” [415]. “Amedeus comes Sabaudie et marchio Italie” granted “castrum…Monteys” {Montheys} to “sorori mee Margarete comitisse de Kiborch” by charter dated 16 Oct 1239 [416]. “Amedeus comes Sabaudie et in Italie marchio…cum…genetrice sua et fratribus suis B. Bellicensi Electo et Philippo Metensi Primicerio” granted “villam S. Mauritii de Chablaisio” {Saint-Maurice de Chablais} to “soror illorum Margareta comitissa de Kiborch” by charter dated 24 Feb 1240 [417]. “H. comes de Kyburch” granted “castra Windegge, Oltingen…advocatiam et predium in Shennis, Wizennanc et Kemanatvn” to “uxori mee” by way of dower, with the consent of “fratruelis mei H”, by charter dated 28 May 1241 [418]. The same collection includes several other charters relating to this grant, dated between 9 Jul 1241 and 1243 [419]. Her parentage is confirmed by the 1264 testament of her brother Boniface [420]. According to Europäische Stammtafeln [421], Marguerite de Savoie married secondly Eberhard von Habsburg-Laufenburg, son of Rudolf III Graf von Habsburg-Laufenburg & his wife Gertrud von Regensberg. Apart from the unlikelihood of Graf Eberhard (who at the time must have been at least 40 years old) marrying as his first wife a lady over 50 years old, his marriage to Anna heiress of Kiburg is recorded [422] as having taken place in [30 Oct/12 Dec] 1271 when Marguerite was still alive. In addition, the Chronicle of Hautecombe refers to Marguerite as ‘Margarita comitissa de Quiborch in Alemania’ when she died, with no mention of Habsburg-Laufenburg. The necrology of Waldens records the death “Kal Sep” of “Margareta com de Kuberg” [423]. The necrology of Fraubrunnen records the death “1 Kal Sep” of “Her Hartman graf von Kyburg und frow Margreta sin gemachel” [424], the date apparently referring to the death of Marguerite. The necrology of Wettingen records the death “IV Non Sep” of “Margareta com de Kiburch” [425].
3. ULRICH (-17 Jun 1237). His parentage is confirmed by the charter dated 1230 under which her husband “H. comes de Kiburch” confirmed donations “propter nuptias uxori sue filie comitis Sabaudie”, with the consent of “fratris sui Ul. Constantiensis canonici et H. filii fratris sui beate memorie Wer. quondam comitis de Kiburch” . Canon at Basel Cathedral 1223. Canon at Konstanz Cathedral 1229. Provost of Beromünster and Imperial chaplain 1231/34. Bishop of Chur 1233.
4. HEILWIG ([1192]-30 Apr 1260, bur Muri). The Ellenhardi Chronicon refers to the wife of “Alberti comitis in Habichburg…lantgravius Alsatie superioris” as “filia comitis in Kiburch” [427]. A Habsburg genealogy names “Heilwigam filiam Uolrici comitis de Chiburg” as the wife of “Alberctus” [428]. m ([1217]) ALBRECHT [IV] “der Weise” von Habsburg, son of RUDOLF II “der Alte” Graf von Habsburg, Herr zu Laufenburg & his wife Agnes von Staufen (-Ascalon, Palestine 22 Nov 1240). He succeeded his father in 1232 as Graf von Habsburg.
5. MECHTILD . 1232. m RUDOLF [I] Graf von Rapperswil (-1250). The index of benefactors of Wettingen records the death in 1250 of “Rudolphus com de Raperschwyl, patruus fundatoris” and his burial at Wettingen .
6. ADELHEID (-1231 or after). The primary source which confirms her parentage and marriage has not yet been identified. m GERHARD [IV] Graf von Dollnstein und Hirschberg, son of GERHARD [II] Graf von Dollnstein & his wife — (-1225).

he House of Kyburg was family of Grafen or counts from Zürich in Switzerland. The family was one of the three most powerful noble families in the Swiss plateau beside the Habsburg and the House of Savoy during the 11th and 12th Centuries. With the extinction of the male line in 1263, Rudolph of Habsburg laid claim to the Kyburg lands and annexed them to the Habsburg holdings, which marked the beginning of the Habsburg rise to power.

The first line of counts of Kyburg were influential in local politics during the 1020s but the male line died out in 1078. Kyburg castle, southeast of Winterthur (in the modern canton of Zürich), passed on to the Swabian counts of Dillingen.[1] Through the marriage of Hartmann von Dillingen († 1121) with a certain Adelheid the House of Dillingen acquired the old Kyburg possessions as well as territorial claims in the Thurgau. The exact origin of Adelheid is unclear. She is either the granddaughter of the Count of Grüningen-Winterthur or from a cadet branch of the Winterthur family, the Counts of Nellenburg. She might also be the daughter of Adalbert II von Winterthur, the last knight from Winterthur, who died in 1053 at the Battle of Civitate against the Normans.

Expansion of the Kyburg lands
The Kyburg land continued to be part of the possessions of the House of Dillingen until the grandson of Hartmann von Dillingen, Hartmann III († 1180), split the Dillingen lands.[2] Adalbert received the Swabian territories, while Hartmann III von Dillingen got the Swiss lands and became Hartmann I of Kyburg. The House of Kyburg were vassals of the Duke of Swabia, who was of the House of Hohenstaufen and would become the Kings of Germany from 1138-1254. When the House of Lenzburgdied out in 1172/73, the Kyburgs together with the Hohenstaufen and Zähringen split the Lenzburg possessions between them. The Kyburg family acquired the allodial title to the Vogtei of Windegg or Gaster (today 7 municipalities in the See-Gaster Wahlkreis of St. Gallen) and land around Baden. Later additional Lenzburg territories, the Schänis Abbey and Beromünster, were also acquired by the House of Kyburg.

In 1180 the family began to consolidate their power. They founded the cities of Diessenhofen and Winterthur to help spread their power. They also appointed many of the Lenzburg, and later Zähringen, vassals to be unfree knights or Ministerialis for the Kyburg family.

When the Zähringen family died out in 1218, the Kyburgs grabbed another chance to expand. Anna von Zähringen, the sister of the last Duke of Zähringen, Berthold V, was the wife of Ulrich III von Kyburg (†1227). From the Zähringen line the Kyburgs acquired land west of the Rhine and in Burgundy including the cities of Fribourg,Thun and Burgdorf as well as estates in the canton of Zurich. However, the House of Hohenstaufen, the family of the Holy Roman Emperors, refused to support the Kyburg claims on the city of Zurich and in 1226 on the Abbey of St. Gall. As a result, they turned increasingly away from the Hohenstaufens and in 1243 and were one of the mainstays of the pro-Pope and anti-Holy Roman Emperor Party.

Around 1220 they started to make claims on property and rights that had unclear ownership and was near property that they already owned. In 1225 they founded a burial site for the Chorherrenstift Heiligberg in the center of the property of the former Freiherr von Weisslingen at Winterthur, and in 1233 founded Töss Abbey west of Winterthur. Both sites were endowed with property that they had taken from the Weisslingen and Rossberg families. These two properties served to define the borders between the Kyburg and Rapperswil families.[3]

At the same time the Kyburg family attempted to strengthen themselves through marriage. Hartmann V, a grandson of Ulrich III was engaged to Anna of Rapperswil in 1227. His uncle, Hartmann IV, called the Elder, married Margaret of Savoy while his sister Heilwig, the future mother of King Rudolf I von Habsburg, married Albert IV of Habsburg

Even though the family continued to found cities and expand, they were declining in power. In 1230 they founded Zug and Baden, then Frauenfeld, Aarau, Lenzburg, and Mellingen. In 1250 they founded Sursee, Weesen and the fortified towns of Kyburg and Laupen. The last two were Richensee and Huttwil which they lost shortly thereafter.

Suffix Graf von Kyburg Birth of, Kyburg, Zürich, Switzerland Gender Male AFN WRQG-ST Ecclesiastic 1212 [ 4] Vogt von Schänis Beromünster u Glarus Name AKA Ulrich Count of Kyburg [ 5] Name AKA Ulrich III [ 6] Died 1227 [ 6, 7] Buried Schäntis Beromünster, Luzern, Switzerland [ 4] Person ID I50509 Europe: Royal and Noble Houses with Colonial American Connections Last Modified 24 Jul 2011
Father Hartmann III, Graf von Kyburg-Dillingen, d. Aft 22 Aug 1180 Mother Richenza von Lenzburg, d. Abt 24 Apr 1172 Family ID F185946 Group Sheet
Family Anna von Zähringen, d. Yes, date unknown Married Y [ 6] Children
1. Werner, Graf von Kyburg, d. 1228, Acre, Palestine
2. Heilwig von Kyburg, b. Abt 1192, of, Kyburg, Zürich, Switzerland , d. 30 Apr 1260, of, Kyburg, Zurich, Switzerland
3. Hartmann III “der Ältere”, Graf von Kyburg, d. 27 Nov 1264
4. Ulrich von Kyburg, Bischof von Chur, d. 17 Jun 1237
5. Mechtilde von Kyburg, d. Aft 1232
6. Adelheid von Kyburg-Dillingen, d. Aft 1231
Last Modified 15 Jul 2011 Family ID F148606 Group Sheet
Notes
MILITARY: In the Crusades in 1190. NOTE: Was the count of Kyburg, Leutzburgh and Baden. A descendant from the Dukes of Zahringen.

Frances de Vere, Countess of Surrey

August 18, 2014

 

My 15th great-grandmother was  lady in waiting to Anne Boleyn when she was married at the age of 15. She managed to stay alive during the shaky royal shake downs that caused her husband to be beheaded. To be in court with Henry VIII was a treacherous position. She wrote poetry like her more well educated husband.

Frances de Vere was the daughter of John de Vere, 15th earl of Oxford (1490-March 21,1540) and Elizabeth Trussell (1496-c.1527). She had no fortune, but in April 1532, she married Henry Howard, earl of Surrey (1517-x.January 19,1547). They lived apart until 1535 because of their youth. Alison Weir in Henry VIII: The King and his Court, states that Anne Boleyn arranged the match over the objections of the duchess of Norfolk and that Frances was at court as one of Anne’s ladies from 1533. She was also at court when Catherine Howard was queen, but not, apparently, afterward. Catherine gave her a brooch set with tiny diamonds and rubies. According to one of her grandson’s biographers, Frances, in common with her more famous husband, wrote poetry. Her children were clever and well educated, although Frances did not have charge of their education. They were Jane (1537?-1593), Thomas (March 10, 1538-June 2,1572), Catherine (1539?-April 7,1596), Henry (February 1540-1614), and Margaret (January 1543-March 17,1592). Frances miscarried in 1547, the year her husband was executed for treason. She was ill for some time afterward. Alternatively, Robert Hutchinson in House of Treason states that Frances gave birth to daughter Jane three weeks after Surrey was executed and names Catherine as the eldest daughter. W. A. Sessions in Henry Howard The Poet Earl of Surrey gives the birth order as Thomas (March 12, 1536), Henry (February 25, 1538), Jane, Catherine, and Margaret (1547). By 1553, Frances had married Thomas Steyning of Woodbridge, Suffolk (d. October 20, 1575+), where she owned the manor of East Soham near Framlingham Castle. She was granted nine manors in all by the duke of Norfolk, her father-in-law, after his restoration in 1553. In July 1554, Frances represented Queen Mary at the christening of the French ambassador’s son and in December 1557 she was chief mourner at the funeral of her sister-in-law, Mary Howard. She was also chief mourner for her daughter-in-law, Margaret Audley, on January 17, 1563. Frances had two children by her second husband, Henry and Mary. She died at East Soham. Portrait: sketch by Hans Holbein, 1535.

source: http://www.kateemersonhistoricals.com

Frances DeVere (1517 – 1577)
is my 15th great grandmother
Thomas Howard (1536 – 1572)
son of Frances DeVere
Margaret Howard (1561 – 1591)
daughter of Thomas Howard
Lady Ann Dorset (1552 – 1680)
daughter of Margaret Howard
Robert Lewis (1574 – 1645)
son of Lady Ann Dorset
Robert Lewis (1607 – 1644)
son of Robert Lewis
Ann Lewis (1633 – 1686)
daughter of Robert Lewis
Joshua Morse (1669 – 1753)
son of Ann Lewis
Joseph Morse (1692 – 1759)
son of Joshua Morse
Joseph Morse (1721 – 1776)
son of Joseph Morse
Joseph Morse III (1752 – 1835)
son of Joseph Morse
John Henry Morse (1775 – 1864)
son of Joseph Morse III
Abner Morse (1808 – 1838)
son of John Henry Morse
Daniel Rowland Morse (1838 – 1910)
son of Abner Morse
Jason A Morse (1862 – 1932)
son of Daniel Rowland Morse
Ernest Abner Morse (1890 – 1965)
son of Jason A Morse
Richard Arden Morse (1920 – 2004)
son of Ernest Abner Morse
Pamela Morse
I am the daughter of Richard Arden Morse

Frances deVere was from a prestigious family, but one without great wealth. She was one of Anne Boleyn’s ladies-in-waiting and Anne probably arranged the match between Frances and Henry Howard, Earl of Surrey, whose mother would not have approved the choice of a bride with no dowry otherwise. Because of her young age (they married in 1532, when she was only 15), Frances continued her role as lady-in-waiting before joining her husband at his home – which is why she was at court to be sketched by Holbein in 1535. Frances shared her husband’s love of the arts, and also wrote poetry. She was traumatized by the 1547 execution of her husband, suffering a miscarriage and spending the next few years in delicate health.

Fides, Goddess of Trust

August 17, 2014

TPD SWAT

TPD SWAT

The Roman goddess of trust was known in the later years of the Roman Empire as Fides Publica, or public trust.  Her temple was used for ceremonies of public treaties and agreements.  Her role was to oversee the honor and honesty of the Roman people.  Trust is essential for all other elements of society to function well.  When the public does not trust the authority figures society begins to crumble.  Romans were interested in democracy, even though they owned slaves and had some tragic foreign policies. The importance of public trust merited a temple in the center of the city close to Jupiter’s temple.  The meaning of the word, as well as the goddess was the elemental and mutual trust or faith that must exist for fair trade and governance.  It can not exist on only one side because it implies a level of commitment to integrity that holds up under social pressure.  It is like magnetism, both parties are always participating in the action. Gifts and offerings brought to Fides at her temple were given with hands that were covered in cloth, to keep the gift a secret.  This symbol was the privacy statement of the time, meaning that the invisible trust between humans and gods was secret as well as sacred.

In our modern world we have nothing that resembles Fides Publica.   We can’t reverse history or erase technology, but we must somehow regain the respect for integrity that it once had.  Trust is earned and also constantly in flux.  Facts or impressions can radically alter  faith in institutions when they fail to live up to ethical standards.  Rather than working to increase levels of trust our factions and media dramatists like to build separate camps that take pot shots at the trustworthiness of the other camps.  The cops in the United States are one of the contentious camps that are forced to deal with dwindling levels of faith from the communities they serve.  Many citizens now believe the cops serve and protect themselves but not the public.  The advanced incarceration rates and military stye heavily armored local police forces are working against a positive future outcome.  I am in favor of having every minute of every cop’s duty recorded on video cameras.  This would substitute some evidence for some of the untrustworthy statements we have heard from police.  I would think cops would welcome such monitoring because in cities where it is being used complaints against the law enforcement officers have dramatically decreased.  That is a good example of Fides Publica…..the camera may change the cops’ attitude since it can and will be used as evidence, and the citizen might feel more secure interacting with a cop if that interaction was being recorded.  Our goddess of trust will be called GoPro.

Ancestral Karma

August 16, 2014 4 Comments

Padmasambhava

Padmasambhava

The following quote from the famous Dr Carl Jung explains the unconscious inheritance of unsolved and unanswered mysteries from our ancestors.  My intense study of all the branches of my family tree that still bear data leads me to conclude that Dr. Jung was onto something. There are certainly themes that run in families, if not a shared fate.  We have more than our immediate family to thank for the belief system we have been handed.  The religious, cultural, and sociological forces that inspired our ancestors to take action and undertake dangerous missions and travels have not evaporated into thin air. They are passed on as attitudes if not as law.

“I feel very strongly that I am under the influence of things or
questions which were left incomplete and unanswered by my
parents and grandparents and more distant ancestors. It often seems
as if there were an impersonal karma within a family which is
passed on from parents to children. It has always seemed to me
that I had to answer questions which fate had posed to my
forefathers, and which had not yet been answered, or as if I had to
complete, or perhaps continue, things which previous ages had left
unfinished.”~ Dr. Carl Jung , Memories, Dreams, Reflections

I wonder why my addition to my family fortune and mindset will be.  History changes the perception of everything, but when we learn about our ancestors we are instantly on their side, no matter what they were doing.  With few very crazy exceptions I find I am sympathetic with all of my relations in history because I would not be alive if it had not for their ability to survive.  I admire their adventurous natures, and am embarrassed by slaveholding, war mongering, and some elite royal behaviors of my people as they managed to survive.  I identify with them and their struggles, trying to imagine myself alive in much more primitive conditions.  I wonder how I would have managed in heavily religious times, or times of extreme violence and conflict.  Trauma as well as enlightenment is inherited.  Distrust as well as confidence is passed down to the next generation.  Self image as well as ethics are part of the ethical will we are given.  Our national identity contains within it preferences and prejudices that last for many generations.  Can you think of belief systems you have that you never questioned?  Have you ever wondered if the thoughts  in the minds of your family members before your birth have influenced your thinking?  How do you explain the collective consciousness?

Carnivorous Plants

August 15, 2014 6 Comments

While the butterfly exhibit is on hold for the summer the Tucson Botanical Gardens has a small but impressive display of flesh eating plants in the tropical greenhouse. It is easier to handle since the USDA does not require full time guards as they do on the butterfly species.  The small and well appointed display teaches us that there are many forms that plants use to lure in insect prey for their food.  We know about some of the obvious styles, like fly trap and pitcher, but the cute little flowers on bladderwort and butterworts are there to attract the insects that will be killed and consumed when stuck to the flypaper type leaves.  The diminutive sundews produce extra sticky dew drops that never release the bug that gets too close.  They are all botanically interesting and some very pretty to see.  Imagine the poor bug’s life ending as it is called to investigate one of these exotic traps.  Survival depends on more than fitness of body.  In the wild we must have the good sense to leave attractive menaces alone.

Want to have some Social Media fun this weekend?

August 15, 2014 3 Comments

mermaidcamp:

Party time on Empire Avenue!! Great weekend to join the fun of EA Leaders!!

Originally posted on Earn More Money from Home!:

Come visit us and join in on the fun!  Just use this link to set up a new account, it just takes a few minutes and you are ready to play!  

http://www.ibourl.com/29ad

Xpendapalooza events are the best way for a new player to get really successful on Empire Avenue right away.  Basically, all the experience players are ready to buy your shares and give you a huge boost this weekend.  You feel very welcome and popular!

The event is only held 4 times a year, and gets better and better each time.  The admins and other players offer special missions to give you “eaves” to play with, and everyone has a fun, friendly, party attitude.

EA_rocket_fuel

There is also a lot of benefit to joining our “Leaders” group before the event ends Sunday afternoon!  Empire Avenue is free to play, and there are ways to add to your resources by…

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Spiritual Crisis

August 14, 2014 3 Comments

What is a spiritual crisis? They are all over the biblical stories and the parables we are taught about heroes.  Some power that is not explained in the regular time bound reality has an influence on the character. Through hardship, or magic, or stressful change the hero, or the hero people,  become stronger than the force that had power over them.  There must be a zillion versions of this in video gaming.  Comic superhero figures and stories are based on supernatural battles in altered states with magical super powers thrown into the mix.  We see our religion and entertainment in terms of spiritual crisis pending or resolving, or causing trauma.  Why do we think of our everyday world as void of spiritual energy?  What makes us draw a line between reality and spirit?  Why do we think only shamans or monks have obligations to the spirit world?  Just as prayer and meditation will not repair the roof, tar and roofing tiles alone will not restore peace and security inside a home that has been bombed.  Everyone has both an earthly reality to tend and a higher meaning to life.

Looking at world events as evolving from a spiritual rather than  scientific or political causes might change the way we act and react.  Our own souls have certain obligations or tasks that coincide with the talents we have been given.  It is time to find right livelihood and spend our time and energy uplifting those who need help and who are seeking spiritual guidance.  At the end of life, no matter how and when that comes, we will not be concerned about how many insignificant tasks we have completed or how many hours we put on the clock doing busy work.  We will wonder if we have done what we have the talent to do, and if we have contributed the gift that was ours to create.  Much ado is being made about the suicide of Robin Williams this week.  Without diagnosing him or making light of all the circumstances (which I don’t know) I see this incident as a crisis of spirit, like the wars around the world.  It makes me sad, but I view it as a call for profound change.  We need to shift our outlook, about 2 octaves higher.

Elizabeth Trussel, 16th Great-grandmother

August 13, 2014 3 Comments

effigy at Church of St Nicholas, Castle Hedingham, Essex

effigy at Church of St Nicholas, Castle Hedingham, Essex

Trussel coat of arms

Trussel coat of arms

I have yet another buried in the church ancestor to seek and find when I go to Britain on the dead people tour.  My 16th great-grandmother was sold into marriage at age 13, but she became a countess and has an effigy in a church.

Elizabeth de Vere (née Trussel), Countess of Oxford (1496 – before July 1527) was an English noblewoman. Through her daughter Frances, she was the mother-in-law of celebrated poet Henry Howard, Earl of Surrey.

Elizabeth was born in Kibblestone, Staffordshire, England on an unknown date in 1496 to Sir Edward Trussel and Margaret Dun. On 10 April 1509 at the age of about thirteen, she became the second wife of John de Vere, 15th Earl of Oxford. His first wife, Christian Foderingey had died about ten years earlier without having produced children. Together John and Elizabeth had seven children.
Elizabeth Trussell, born in 1496,was the daughter of Edward Trussell (c.1478 – 16 June 1499) of Elmesthorpe, Leicestershire, only son of Sir William Trussell (d. before 24 June 1480) of Elmesthorpe, Knight of the Body for King Edward IV, by Margaret Kene. The Trussells were a “very ancient Warwickshire family”;Elizabeth’s ancestor, Sir Warin Trussell, was of Billesley, Warwickshire.
Elizabeth Trussell’s mother was Margaret Donne, the daughter of Sir John Donne (1450–1503) of Kidwelly, Carmarthenshire, and Elizabeth Hastings (c.1450 – 1508), daughter of Sir Leonard Hastings and Alice Camoys, and sister of William Hastings, 1st Baron Hastings.[6] Sir John Donne’s mother, Joan Scudamore, was the granddaughter of the Welsh rebel, Owain Glyndŵr.

Elizabeth had a brother, John Trussell (d.1499), to whom she was heir.

Through her father’s family, Elizabeth was a descendant of King Henry II by his mistress, Ida de Tony.

Elizabeth Trussell’s grandfather, Sir John Donne, from the Don triptych by Hans Memling.

Elizabeth’s father, Edward Trussell, had been a ward of William Hastings, 1st Baron Hastings, and at Hastings’ death in 1483 was still a minor. In his will, Hastings expressed the wish that Trussell’s wardship be purchased by Hastings’ brother-in-law, Sir John Donne:

Also I will that mine executors give to my sister Dame Elizabeth Don 100 marks . . . Also where I have the ward and marriage of Edward Trussell, I will that it be sold and the money employed to the performing of this my will and for the weal of my soul; and if my brother Sir John Don will buy the said ward, I will that he be preferred therein before any other by £10.

After her father’s death on 16 June 1499 and the death of her brother, John, in the same year, Elizabeth Trussell became a royal ward. Her wardship and marriage were initially purchased from King Henry VII by George Grey, 2nd Earl of Kent (d. 21 December 1503), who intended her as a bride for Sir Henry Grey (d. 24 September 1562), the 2nd Earl’s son by his second marriage to Katherine Herbert, daughter of William Herbert, 1st Earl of Pembroke, by Anne Devereux, the daughter of Sir Walter Devereux. However after the 2nd Earl’s death, Richard Grey, 3rd Earl of Kent, the 2nd Earl’s eldest son and heir by his first marriage to Anne Woodville, abducted Elizabeth Trussell, a crime for which the King levied a heavy fine against him:

Aged at least twenty-five when he succeeded his father in 1503, [the 3rd Earl] wasted his family’s fortunes — possibly, as Dugdale says, he was a gambler. In a striking series of alienations he gave away or sold most of the lands, principally in Bedfordshire, that he had inherited . . . The earl also fell quickly into debt to the king: he failed to pay livery for his father’s lands, and he was fined 2500 marks for abducting Elizabeth Trussell, whose wardship the second earl had left to Richard’s half-brother Henry; he then failed to keep up the instalments laid down for the payment of the fine.

As a result of these events Elizabeth Trussell’s wardship and marriage again came into the hands of the King, who sold it on 29 April 1507 to John de Vere, 13th Earl of Oxford, and his cousin John de Vere, later 15th Earl of Oxford, for an initial payment of 1000 marks and an additional £387 18s to be paid yearly, less £20 a year for Elizabeth’s maintenance. The annual value of Elizabeth’s lands had been estimated in the inquisition post mortem taken after her brother John’s death at £271 12s 8d a year.

Marriage and issue
Between 29 April 1507 and 4 July 1509 Elizabeth became the second wife of John de Vere, 15th Earl of Oxford, whose first wife was Christian Foderingey (born c. 1481, died before 4 November 1498), the daughter and co-heiress of Thomas Foderingey (c. 1446 – 1491) of Brockley, Suffolk, by Elizabeth Doreward (c. 1473 – 1491), daughter of William Doreward of Bocking, Essex, by whom the 15th Earl had no issue.

By her marriage to the 15th Earl of Oxford, Elizabeth had four sons and three daughters:

John de Vere, 16th Earl of Oxford (1516 – 3 August 1562), who married firstly, Dorothy Neville (died c. 6 January 1548),[16] second daughter of Ralph Neville, 4th Earl of Westmorland, by whom he had a daughter, Katherine de Vere, who married Edward Windsor, 3rd Baron Windsor. The Earl married secondly, Margery Golding (d. 2 December 1568),[17] by whom he had a son, Edward de Vere, 17th Earl of Oxford, and a daughter, Mary de Vere.

Aubrey de Vere (d. 1580), who married firstly Margaret Spring, the daughter of John Spring of Lavenham, by whom he had a daughter, Jane, who married Henry Hunt of Gosfield,Essex, and a son, Hugh Vere,[18] who married Eleanor Walsh, the daughter of William Walsh. Hugh Vere and Eleanor Walsh had a son, Robert, who inherited the title as 19th Earl of Oxford. Aubrey de Vere married secondly, Bridget Gibbon, the daughter of Sir Anthony Gibbon of Lynn, Norfolk.[19]

Robert de Vere (died c. 1598), who married firstly, Barbara Berners, by whom he had a son, John Vere,[20] and a daughter, Mary Vere, and secondly, Joan Hubberd, sister of Edward Hubberd (d. 1602), by whom he had no issue.

Geoffrey Vere (d. 1572), who in 1556 married Elizabeth Hardekyn (d. December 1615), daughter of Richard Hardekyn (d. 1558) of Wotton House near Castle Hedingham, by whom he had four sons, John Vere (c. 1558 – 1624) of Kirby Hall near Castle Hedingham, Sir Francis Vere (born c. 1560), Robert Vere (b. 1562), and Sir Horatio Vere (b. 1565), and a daughter, Frances Vere (born 1567), who married, as his second wife, the colonial adventurer and author, Sir Robert Harcourt (1574/5–1631), of Nuneham on 20 March 1598.

Elizabeth de Vere (born c. 1512), who married, as his second wife, Thomas Darcy, 1st Baron Darcy of Chiche (d. 28 June 1558), by whom she had three sons, John Darcy, 2nd Baron Darcy of Chiche (d. 3 March 1581), Aubrey (d. 1558–68) and Robert (died c. 1568), and two daughters, Thomasine and Constance, of whom the latter married Edmund Pyrton (died c. 1609).

Anne de Vere, (born c. 1522, died c. 14 February 1572), who married firstly, Edmund Sheffield, 1st Baron Sheffield of Butterwick, Lincolnshire, second but eldest surviving son of Sir Robert Sheffield by Margaret Zouche, by whom she had a son and three daughters. Edmund Sheffield was slain 31 July 1549 during the suppression of Kett’s rebellion. Anne de Vere married secondly, John Brock, esquire, of Colchester, Essex, son and heir of John Brock of Little Leighs, Essex, by Agnes Wiseman, by whom she had no issue.

Frances de Vere (c. 1517 – 30 June 1577), who married firstly, Henry Howard, Earl of Surrey, by whom she was the mother of Jane Howard, Thomas Howard, 4th Duke of Norfolk, Margaret Howard, Henry Howard, 1st Earl of Northampton, and Katherine Howard. Frances de Vere married secondly, Thomas Steynings, by whom she had no issue.

Elizabeth died before July 1527, and was buried in the Church of St Nicholas, Castle Hedingham, Essex, where her effigy can be seen on the black marble tomb erected for Elizabeth and her husband, the 15th Earl.

Footnotes
Jump up^ She is usually said to have been born at the Trussell manor of Cubleston or Kibblestone near Barlaston and Stone, Staffordshire.

Elizabeth Trussel (1494 – 1527)
is my 16th great grandmother
Frances DeVere (1517 – 1577)
daughter of Elizabeth Trussel
Thomas Howard (1536 – 1572)
son of Frances DeVere
Margaret Howard (1561 – 1591)
daughter of Thomas Howard
Lady Ann Dorset (1552 – 1680)
daughter of Margaret Howard
Robert Lewis (1574 – 1645)
son of Lady Ann Dorset
Robert Lewis (1607 – 1644)
son of Robert Lewis
Ann Lewis (1633 – 1686)
daughter of Robert Lewis
Joshua Morse (1669 – 1753)
son of Ann Lewis
Joseph Morse (1692 – 1759)
son of Joshua Morse
Joseph Morse (1721 – 1776)
son of Joseph Morse
Joseph Morse III (1752 – 1835)
son of Joseph Morse
John Henry Morse (1775 – 1864)
son of Joseph Morse III
Abner Morse (1808 – 1838)
son of John Henry Morse
Daniel Rowland Morse (1838 – 1910)
son of Abner Morse
Jason A Morse (1862 – 1932)
son of Daniel Rowland Morse
Ernest Abner Morse (1890 – 1965)
son of Jason A Morse
Richard Arden Morse (1920 – 2004)
son of Ernest Abner Morse
Pamela Morse
I am the daughter of Richard Arden Morse

Vitex Agnus Castus

August 12, 2014 1 Comment

 

Vitex is a tree with powerful medicinal uses. It stimulates and normalizes the pituitary gland, regulating progesterone.  It can produce opposite effects at different times and in different subjects, which is known as an amphoteric remedy.  As a hormone balancer it is used for menopausal changes as well as to regulate the body after using birth control pills.  The common names of the plant, chaste tree, or monk’s pepper indicate that it is an anaphrodesiac, but in some circumstances it will act as an aphrodisiac.  The berries and the purple flowers are the parts of the plant most commonly used medicinally.  The berries are brewed as an infusion and drunk 3 times a day, or a tincture is made with alcohol as the carrier agent.  It both looks and smells a little like cannabis, but is not to be smoked.

The vitex agnus castus plant is ornamental and spreads easily by seed.  It likes well drained soil and plenty of sun to do well.   I have two growing in my garden, and a baby that has come up from seed.  I have not thought about selling the fruits and seeds, although when I price the product it makes me wonder if I should.  The herbal remedy has been used for centuries, and today there are many preparations and capsules created using vitex.  Weather you like it for the colorful floral display or for the medicine, vitex is a valuable addition to the garden.

Right to Bear Video Camera

August 12, 2014 4 Comments

I have recently watched footage from 1968 in a museum exhibit which included the Democratic convention in Chicago and other riots. As I see St Louis now drenched in violence over the shooting of another unarmed teenager of color I have a deja vu feeling. The riots of Watts and Detroit in the 60s were about the same issues we face today.  When the narrator speaks in the black and white footage shot 46 years ago he reveals the culture of the broadcast universe at the time.  Today news footage flashes across twitter at the speed of digital finger snapping, allowing a more complete story to emerge instantly.  The new cameraperson is the bystander who is ready to capture what happens with a phone.  The new commentary is done live on the scene by everyone.  The facts come out quicker and opinions are shouted  out on Youtube before you can say network newscast.  People have the facts caught on camera and distributed throughout the world before you can say Jessie Jackson.  Justice must now take into account the fact that everyone is now a reporter and every phone is an official source of news.  The editorial department has swelled to include anyone who has an opinion and chooses to voice it.  Do you think this democratic version of news reporting will be a remedy for social injustice?  Have you ever whipped out your phone to record evidence as something happened in front of you? Do you think we will know the truth and the truth will us us free, or do so many versions of the truth make the world more contentious?  What does the camera toting public change?  Do you feel safer now?

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