mermaidcamp

mermaidcamp

Keeping current in wellness, in and out of the water

You can scroll the shelf using and keys

Trading Places at The Sonoran Glass School

November 21, 2014

Last week I attended a very special event at The Sonoran Glass School in Tucson.  The auction and live art in the making was designed as a fundraiser for the non-profit school.  By inviting artists and others to design a piece of glass art to be executed by the students and faculty of the school they added an extra layer of creativity to the pieces.  Lupin Murillo, a local broadcaster, designed a high heeled shoe with fancy trimmings.  The fun really heats up when they auction the piece off before it is finished.  The shoe was well received and fetched a nice price in the auction.  The next live creation was done by a well-known photographer in Tucson, Bill Lesch.  I had an excellent seat to see the forming of Bill’s globe.  It was blown and shaped by the glass artists, with manipulations and creative decisions made by Bill.  The collaboration had 4 people involved full-time in the making of the piece.  Non-stop action and careful choreography was a real thrill to watch.  I was sitting so close that I had to remove a layer of my outfit because I was right in the hot seat near the fire.  It was exciting and unlike any event I have attended in the past.  I will go again if they hold it next year.  The food was catered by Blu, and was out of this world good. The items for auction were diverse examples of the breadth of glass art.  I enjoyed seeing all of the work and meeting some of the artists.  I am now interested in joining and taking some classes.  The school is a great asset to our community.  Our next flaming glass art event will be the Flame Off at the Fox Theater, the high point of Gem Show.  If you have not seen a live glass event, I urge you to try one.

Thankful to Survive

November 20, 2014 2 Comments

descendants of Massasoit

descendants of Massasoit

 

The Thanksgiving story is told in November to commemorate the precarious situation in which the Pilgrims of Plymouth Colony found themselves. By the good graces of the local tribe these English people managed to survive very far from home. They were not ready for the harsh winter and new surroundings.  They were able to negotiate a treaty for mutual protection with Massasoit, the leader in the area.  The meal shared to celebrate the treaty has been told for centuries, but there are a few written words from the time documenting this meeting.  Most of us have an image from our school days of happy well dressed Pilgrims entertaining Native Americans at an extensive potluck supper.  There is some mention that the Wampanoags supplied all the vittles, but we tend to gloss that over while we celebrate our highly revised impression of history and the Pilgrims.

These Pilgrim heroes soon broke down into all kinds of crazy religious infighting and banished each other for infractions.  My own ancestors were banished to Sandwich and other little settlements on Cape Cod.  Some had to leave because they had been secret Quakers, and one was banished to Barnstable for marrying a Native woman.  We imagine Plymouth as some pure attempt at religious freedom because we have not looked very closely at what happened.  Many of my ancestors went to Rhode Island to look for religious freedom and fair dealings with the Native Americans.  I had several ancestors who fought on both sides of King Philip’s War, which I am sure we did not study in school.  We just move on quickly to Boston and tea party and America without stopping to think what became of those people who gave the Pilgrims dinner and protection.

The big news that has been edited is all about that treaty.  The pact worked for a while, but as time passed the English population grew and the agreements became strained.  The English proved to be less than honorable when it came to keeping their word.  The Wampanoags who survived King Philip’s War were shown no mercy.  I have extra interest in the Native version of this event because I went to Cape Cod expecting to find traces of my Wampanoag family tree.  I found that records do not exist to trace it although my Mayflower ancestors are very well documented.  Intermarriage was very common so I am not the only one with a mystery branch in my tree.  There is a very small group of people who are members of the Wampanoag tribe today, and their last names came from England.  Survival for them meant adapting.  This year, for a change, imagine the entire Thanksgiving story from the perspective of the original people.

Menu Planning and Creativity

November 19, 2014 1 Comment

 

Black Sphinx dates

Black Sphinx dates

I recently reached the conclusion that I have never in my life done menu planning. I love to cook and be creative, and I also aspire to healthy eating. I own so many cookbooks they are running out my ears, and I am tuned in to all kinds of digital food situations including television’s Food Network. I have never examined why I don’t follow recipes and don’t do meal planning even though my food life is very big.  I tweet about dishes and preparations with my friends at #Mmgd all year. We sometimes gather under that hashtag for twitter parties that include recipes and pictures. Some of us have met in real life, but all of us are food friends forever. Digital food is non threatening and completely calorie free.

I like to watch people make food at least as much as I like to eat it. Iron Chef was always popular at our house, as are many of the holiday specials traditional to this time of year. On weekends we take in all manner of victuals visually before we venture out to taste anything in real life.  We follow our instincts and our mood to decide where to dine or which farmers market to attend.  We have favorites but are always on the lookout for new places to try.  We don’t like to overeat, but enjoy being very gourmet in our selections.

ripe calamondins

ripe calamondins

I now see that my aversion to menu planning has been an excuse to avoid realistic assessment of my diet. I eat well, and shop pretty well, but the specific desire to freestyle every meal I prepare is a real flaw. I have been pretending that I need to be plan free in order to reach my creative potential as a chef.  Nothing could be less realistic.  Chefs know how they will use ingredients and tightly budget to make the most of all the provisions they purchase.  I shop with wild abandon and then later I must put it all together and avoid waste.  I am going to shift the emphasis from improvisation on random seasonal ingredients to balanced menu planning.  I will still have a wild card from the fresh produce in season and in abundance.  I will not be entirely without my creative hobby, but will elevate my planning to a more strategic level.  I will still be spontaneous, but for the first time I will be working with a plan.  What a concept!! How do you like to arrange your food preparation, gentle reader? Do you follow a plan, or like to freestyle in the kitchen?  Do you make up your own meal plans or take advise from other sources?   Bon Appetite!  May your days be tasty and bright!

What do exercise, veggies, and writing have in common?

November 19, 2014 1 Comment

Pamela Morse:

Write for your health!!!

Originally posted on The Daily Post:

Part of the mission that drives The Daily Post is to provide encouragement and inspiration to people who want to be more active writers, bloggers, and creators. We often provide tips on how to write or prompts on what to write, but today, let’s talk about why to write.

Science stands firmly in support of what many of us intuitively know: writing is good for you.

Studies have shown that just the act of putting words together to express yourself leads to several physical and mental health benefits, including:

  • Improved mood and sense of well-being
  • Decreased stress and anxiety levels
  • Lower blood pressure
  • Better memory and sleep

Writing has been shown to boost immune responses, speed post-surgical healing, and help cancer patients cope with their diagnosis and treatment. Writing has also been linked to improvements in managing chronic conditions such as asthma and arthritis.

A note about privacy: If you prefer to…

View original 350 more words

Giving Thanks for Less

November 18, 2014 5 Comments

chiles from the garden

chiles from the garden

Tucson winter

Tucson winter

 

I am pleased that our household is free to interpret holidays in our own way, which might include not at all. When I was younger I had many family gatherings at my house with heavy responsibility and expense. I am thankful that I am free of that kind obligation now. Good or bad, the traditions that my parents embraced are not my own. Bob and I live in a city with wonderful dining and entertainment options. We like the idea of supporting those local business owners who provide happy hours, dinners, and delicious lunches. We normally buy some gift cards this time of year when the restaurants offer discounts. It is a fun way for us to make plans to do something special together and save a few bucks at the same time. This year the restaurant we chose is excluding the use of the gift card on holidays and special occasions. At first I was miffed because we had planned to go on Thanksgiving. Upon consideration we realized we don’t even like to celebrate on the real day because it is always crowded with all the servers stressed. We will just go the night before or the day after the real holiday for our party and have the restaurant to ourselves.

This philosophy is catching on quickly here.  Rather than bring out lots of decorations for the house I am doing a full deep cleaning and clearing of our home.  We have very little space now because we have crammed things into every corner and cabinet.  We love art, but can’t find a place to display what we already own.  It makes no sense for us  to acquire more. The most impressive and useful gift I can think of for our home is a serious removal of clutter and junk from top to bottom.  We need a big haul to the Goodwill much more than any shopping trip for new items.  We are not cutting corners on anything we like, want, or need.  We just don’t want or need a busy expensive winter season.  I am ready for the holidays because I don’t build any false obligations or social pressure.

Christmas cactus

Christmas cactus

Here at our house we celebrate by:

  • sharing happy hour at home with friends
  • making our own holiday hootch to toast the season
  • avoiding driving
  • filling our home with music and scent
  • gifting small homemade items to a few people

I am thankful for my stress free life.  Less is the best for me.  Is there anything you could easily eliminate to make this time of year less stressful?

Tucson sunset

Tucson sunset

Deliverance Brown, 8th Great-grandfather

November 17, 2014 1 Comment

Brown Coat of Arms

Brown Coat of Arms

Deliverance Brown was born in 1656 in Stamford, Fairfield, Connecticut.  His father, Peter Brown, came to America in 1638 and settled in New Haven. In 1647 Peter moved the family to Stamford, Ct, where his wife died in 1657. Young Deliverance was a baby when his mother died. We don’t know much about him, but his brother is also my ancestor.

He owned land in Rye, NY (1678) and in Greenwich.
- In 1691 Deliverance was elected a vestryman in Rye.
- In 1697 Deliverance Brown and Thomas Merrit where sent to Hartford to convince the General Court of CT to take Rye back into it’s juristiction and in 1707 the two men were selected to settle a boundary question between Rye and Greenwich.

Deliverance Brown (1656 – 1727)
is my 8th great grandfather
Rachel Brown (1700 – 1716)
daughter of Deliverance Brown
Mary Mead (1724 – 1787)
daughter of Rachel Brown
Abner Mead (1749 – 1810)
son of Mary Mead
Martha Mead (1784 – 1860)
daughter of Abner Mead
Abner Morse (1808 – 1838)
son of Martha Mead
Daniel Rowland Morse (1838 – 1910)
son of Abner Morse
Jason A Morse (1862 – 1932)
son of Daniel Rowland Morse
Ernest Abner Morse (1890 – 1965)
son of Jason A Morse
Richard Arden Morse (1920 – 2004)
son of Ernest Abner Morse
Pamela Morse
I am the daughter of Richard Arden Morse

Vengeance Belongs to God

November 13, 2014 4 Comments

My parents

My parents

The idea that both glory and vengeance belong only to God is an often repeated concept. In the bible this is a giant theme that runs throughout both testaments.  This is the keystone of the golden rule, “Do unto others” that we have heard so often in all religious teachings.  Repressing anger and believing God is taking care of your personal earthly pay back is not the essence of this idea.  Truly trusting that justice eventually prevails in ways we can’t imagine or fathom is a relief.  Carrying our own grudges rather than letting go and trusting that the universe will provide both punishment and reward exactly in the perfect portions is senseless.  If you step back and look at a bigger version of any drama on this earth you must notice that every action does have an equal and opposite reaction.  Some understanding is within our reach, and plenty of mystery still abounds.  We actually do not know enough to be effective in this realm.

I have been meditating on the idea that Everything that is the Father’s is mine because the Father and I are one.  This, of course is the big father, not my personal dad, Richard Arden Morse.  The meditation makes me consider that I do have traits, talents, and even possessions from my earthly father that are mine.  I have worked hard not to inherit his anger and greed.  The end of my parents’ lives would have been more peaceful and happy if my father had not considered himself to be righteously wrathful.  He was angry at entire nations and at anyone he suspected of disrespecting him (the list only grew, never diminished).  He used to sing the song “I Have a Little List” from the Mikado which makes fun of this phenomena.  By the time he was old and demented his list was so long it tortured him and everyone around him.

Now that Richard has been dead and in the ground for 10 years I am sure he is over his violent feelings.  He wants me to know that both glory and vengeance are not mine at all.  He warns me with his memory about personally taking on too much anger.  He assures me that the truth does set us free and there is no point in crying over spilled milk (this was a favorite expression of his).  If you have started a list of those you find responsible for all evil, work to eliminate those beliefs before they make you very crazy.  Also, remember, gentle readers, you are on somebody else’s list.

First Hello Kitty cafe to open in California!

November 12, 2014 3 Comments

Pamela Morse:

Hello Kitty Cafe in LA!!!! At last, a dining establishment dedicated totally to her image!!!

Originally posted on RocketNews24:

1

North American fans of the mouth-less Sanrio feline can now rejoice as the first ever Hello Kitty Cafe will finally land on their continent!

Announced in the form of a bright pink food truck at the Hello Kitty Convention held in Los Angeles, fans were elated to learn that Hello Kitty will finally get her own cafe in California! Judging by theextreme cuteness of the pictures released so far, it seems like this cafe will take kawaii to a whole new level!

View original 153 more words

Hannah Mead, 10th Great-Grandmother

November 11, 2014 1 Comment

King's Colors

King’s Colors

My 10th great-grandmother was a midwife who outlived two husbands before she arrived in America.  I am a descendant of her first husband, John Potter who died in England.  Her immigration to America was tragic, and she survived to the  age of 75.  The reason the colonists gave her the land belonging to her dead husband was her profession as a midwife.  Since they needed her services they wanted her to stay.

John BEECHER was born on 28 Mar 1594 in Kent, England. He died in 1637/38 in New Haven, Connecticut. He immigrated on 26 Jun 1637 to Boston Harbor. Arrived April 26, 1637 from Steldhurst County, Kent, England. In Governor Eaton’s Company. The first Beecher to reach New England was John Beecher, who came from Kent, England in 1637. He was in the company led by Rev. John Davenport and Theophilus Eaton who had been the Ambassador to Denmark and Deputy-Governor of India. The company crossed the ocean on the “Hector” and another sister-ship. These two ships, after a two month voyage, dropped anchor in Boston harbor. The company consisted of 50 men and 200 women and children and was the most prosperous that ever arrived in New England. Unfortunately, they landed in the midst of a quarrel about Anne Hutchinson who had set herself up as a preacher, irregardless of her sex. Not wishing to become involved, they sent out a scouting party to find another location to settle. They decided upon Quinnipiack on the Long Island Sound, the site of present day New Haven, Conn. The party built a hut and left seven of their men to hold the post for the winter and to prepare for the arrival of the rest of the company in the spring. John Beecher was one of the seven and he failed to survive the winter. Hannah arrived in the spring with her son Isaac and found her husband in an unmarked grave. Since she was the only midwife among them, and thus relied upon by the others in the company, she was given her husband’s allotment of land for herself and her son Isaac. One hundred and twelve years later, in 1750, when David Beecher was a boy of twelve, workmen who were digging a cellar for a house at the corner of George and Meadow Streets in New Haven came upon human bones, believed to be those of John Beecher.  Hannah Mead  was born in 1600 in Spaldhurt, Kent, England. She died on 5 Apr 1658/59 in New Haven, Connecticut.

Hannah Beecher sailed from England with her son Isaac and was a widow at the time she left England. Husband John Beecher, one of the seven whom Eaton sent to New Haven in advance of the colony ,died before the colony arrived. He did not survive the first winter. It is established that this ship load of people was rather wealthy landowners from Steldhurst County, Kent, England. Since the company was rather young, it was felt that Hannah’s services of midwife would be greatly needed. She therefore was offered her husband’s land right in the new world if she would agree to go and fulfill this need, which she did.

The will of Hannah Beecher was proved April 5, 1659 and is recorded in first part, vol i., p 80 of New Haven Probate Records as follows: “I Hannah Beecher of New Haven, expectying my great change do make this my last will and testament, I bequeath my soul unto the hands of my Lord Jesus Christ by whose meritt I hope to be saved and my body to be burried at the discretion of my Son William Potter my Executor. And for my worldly goods I give unto John Potter my Grand child twenty shillings and to Hannah Blackly, my Grand child twenty shillings to be paid to them within three months after my decease. And for the rest of my estate I give one third part to my son Isaac Beecher and two thirds to my eldest son William Potter, making him my Executor, desiring him to be as a father to his younger brother and his children. And in dividing my goods my will is that my son William should have my feather bed with that belongeth to it, unto his part and that the rest be divided at the discretion of my Overseers with the assistance of Sister Wakeman and sister Rutherford and I desire my loving friends Mr Mathew Gilbert and Job Wakeman to be overseers of this my last will whereunto I have set my hand this 13th day of June, Anno 1657. Witnesses, the mark of Mathew Gilbert, Hannah Becher John Wakeman, Sarah Rutherford. This source also indicates that the inventory of Hannah’s estate following her death in 1659 amounted to 55 pounds, 5 shillings, and 6d.

Hannah (Potter) Beecher appears in early New Haven as a widow with sons: John Potter, William Potter, and Isaac Beecher. She has been considered to be the mother of Isaac Beecher, for she calls him her son in her will and gave him one third of her property, but recent investigations (source unproven ) suggest that Isaac was a step son, the son of her second husband by a former wife.

Note: There was in New Haven, says G.F. Tuttle, as early as 1641, a widow Hannah Potter, known as widow Potter the midwife. In 1643 she had two persons in the family, thirty pounds estate and twenty and one quarter acres of land. She is called “sister Potter the midwife,” in seating the meeting house in 1646. She is supposed to have been akin to the other Potters, but there is no record to show it. She has often been confounded with the widow Hannah Beecher, but the records clearly show that they were two different persons. -Per “Families of Ancient New Haven”

Hannah Mead (1584 – 1659)
is my 10th great grandmother
William Potter (1608 – 1684)
son of Hannah Mead
Hannah Potter (1636 – 1700)
daughter of William Potter
Benjamin Daniel Mead (1667 – 1746)
son of Hannah Potter
Mary Mead (1724 – 1787)
daughter of Benjamin Daniel Mead
Abner Mead (1749 – 1810)
son of Mary Mead
Martha Mead (1784 – 1860)
daughter of Abner Mead
Abner Morse (1808 – 1838)
son of Martha Mead
Daniel Rowland Morse (1838 – 1910)
son of Abner Morse
Jason A Morse (1862 – 1932)
son of Daniel Rowland Morse
Ernest Abner Morse (1890 – 1965)
son of Jason A Morse
Richard Arden Morse (1920 – 2004)
son of Ernest Abner Morse
Pamela Morse
I am the daughter of Richard Arden Morse

I am descended from Hannah two different ways.  She is also my 11th great-grandmother.  Two of her second great grandsons, Ebenezer and Benjamin Daniel, have contributed to my DNA.

Hannah Mead (1582 – 1659)
is my 11th great grandmother
William POTTER (1608 – 1684)
son of Hannah Mead
Hannah Potter (1636 – 1700)
daughter of William POTTER
Ebenezer Mead (1663 – 1728)
son of Hannah Potter
Ebenezer Mead (1692 – 1775)
son of Ebenezer Mead
Amos Mead (1730 – 1807)
son of Ebenezer Mead
Abner Mead (1749 – 1810)
son of Amos Mead
Martha Mead (1784 – 1860)
daughter of Abner Mead
Abner Morse (1808 – 1838)
son of Martha Mead
Daniel Rowland Morse (1838 – 1910)
son of Abner Morse
Jason A Morse (1862 – 1932)
son of Daniel Rowland Morse
Ernest Abner Morse (1890 – 1965)
son of Jason A Morse
Richard Arden Morse (1920 – 2004)
son of Ernest Abner Morse
Pamela Morse
I am the daughter of Richard Arden Morse

This is always tricky and requires a lot of switching and updating to make the tree accurate.  The Meads and the Potters married each other, and so did the Meads and the Meads.  It is too late now to worry about inbreeding.  This happens more than once in my ancestry.

Ebenezer Mead II, 8th Great-Grandfather

November 8, 2014 2 Comments

Ebenezer Mead II

Ebenezer Mead II

Ebenezer Mead II was the son of Ebenezer I, who ran a tavern and served as justice of the peace in Fairfield County during his lifetime.  He did military service and stepped into his father’s shoes as justice of the peace.  His political career also included holding the office of deputy to the assembly.  He is  buried in the Union Cemetery in Greenwich, Connecticut next to many of his family members, and some of my ancestors.  He lived a very long life.  He  married a young wife to spend his last 16 years with him.  I bet she was surprised he made it to the age of  83.  He died the year before the Declaration of Independence.  I really wonder what his politics were, since all his service had been to the crown of England in a technical sense.  His son Amos was a soldier in the Revolutionary War.

Ebenezer Mead (1692 – 1775)
is my 8th great grandfather
Amos Mead (1730 – 1807)
son of Ebenezer Mead
Abner Mead (1749 – 1810)
son of Amos Mead
Martha Mead (1784 – 1860)
daughter of Abner Mead
Abner Morse (1808 – 1838)
son of Martha Mead
Daniel Rowland Morse (1838 – 1910)
son of Abner Morse
Jason A Morse (1862 – 1932)
son of Daniel Rowland Morse
Ernest Abner Morse (1890 – 1965)
son of Jason A Morse
Richard Arden Morse (1920 – 2004)
son of Ernest Abner Morse
Pamela Morse
I am  the daughter of Richard Arden Morse

Ebenezer Mead II was born in Greenwich on October 25, 1692, the eldest son of Ebenezer Mead and Sarah Knapp. He was married on December 12, 1717, to Hannah Brown, the daughter of Peter Brown of Rye NY, and they had Ebenezer, Silas, Abraham, Jonas, Solomon, Deliverance, Amos, Edmund, Hannah, Jabez, Jared and Abraham.
On May 9, 1728, Ebenezer was commissioned a Lieutenant of the East Company, or Train-band, at Horseneck. On May 11, 1738, he was commissioned a Captain of the same company.
He was a Justice of the Peace for Fairfield County from 1733 to 1758, and was a deputy to the assembly in 1733, 1734, 1737 and 1738.
Late in life, in 1759, when he was approaching 70, he was married for a second time, this time to Naomi Weed, the daughter of Abraham Weed. She was about twenty years old at the time. Ebenezer Mead’s will was dated June 3, 1772, and probated June 15, 1775. In it he mentions his wife Naomi and children Deliverance, Jared, Silas, Jonas, Solomon, Amos, Abraham, Jr.; his grandson Enoch Mead, granddaughter Hannah, and grandson Ebenezer, the children of his son Ebenezer, who had predeceased him. His executor was his son Jared. The witnesses were Daniel Smith, Joshua Smith, and Jesse Parsons.

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 10,124 other followers

%d bloggers like this: