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Being Vegetarian

May 27, 2015 3 Comments

Fiddler's Convention

Fiddler’s Convention

I became a vegetarian at Union Grove, North Carolina in March of 1970.  I had travelled with a group of friends to camp over Easter weekend at my first fiddler’s convention.  I cooked and baked for the occasion, very excited to be camping out right next to the music. I did not know what to expect, nor did I have any idea what others might bring.  I made hot crossed buns and brought a really giant (about 15 pounds) country ham, and made plenty of biscuits.  I can’t remember the rest of the spread but do know everyone brought way too much food.    We ate, drank, and gave the food to our fellow merry makers so we would not need to take it back home with us.  The ham was super savory, chosen very carefully for Easter on the go.  Country hams are salt cured and require no cooking.  I was 19 years old with a big appetite and plenty of energy to dance late into the night. The party was memorable, wonderful, and very delicious.  A fun time was had by all.

When I arrived home in Durham Sunday night something just clicked in my mind.  I had a friend who had recently become a vegetarian because she witnessed a bird hang itself.  This did not strike me as a good reason not to eat meat, but the idea of being a vegetarian sprouted in my mind because of her.  She worked with me, and on Monday at the office I started talking to her about her two week old vegetarian practice.  I decided to try it.  There was no particular issue or reason at the time.  I ate way too much ham, and was having some kind of rebound from it.  In North Carolina in 1970 people did not take kindly to being questioned about meat in the restaurant dishes.  Vegetarianism was an extreme fringe belief system with few believers.  The Seventh Day Adventists were the core.  They sometimes had little health food stores with Worthington fake meat in cans, but there was not much catering to vegetarians in the 70’s.

Now being vegan is all the rage.  The vegetarian lifestyle services and product lines are mind boggling.  My diet went through a metamorphic change over time.  First I stopped eating meat, but had few cooking skills.  I learned to make tasty food, but had never heard of vegetarian diet for health, so I was heavy on the butter and whipped cream, etc.  Any food can be made to taste great with enough cream and butter.  In about 1972 I met a woman from California who was not only a vegetarian, but did not eat white flour or sugar.  We thought her odd in our Austin household of hippies and did not know what to feed her. We cooked from scratch but put sugar and white flour in almost everything.  We also drank Dr. Pepper like it was going out of style. She did leave an impression, however.  By learning to cook and expand the healthy ingredients in my cuisine I eventually gave up all sugar and white flour myself.

Today I am still a lacto-ovo vegetarian.  I like to make vegan food, and tend to eat much of my food raw.  I am not interested in full on veganism although I think it can be a very healthy choice.  I still enjoy dairy and eggs, so I buy organic products and use them as a minor part of the menu.  A little cheese goes a long way, and my butter habit is well under control now too.  I eat a bit of sugar these days too, but keep that at a minimum.  Common sense and savoring each bite are the keys to happy relating with sugar.  Why I am telling you this story, gentle reader?  I want you to know that being a vegetarian since 1970 has shown me a lot of different attitudes toward the idea.  I am often asked how to become a vegetarian by those who want to make a change.  I think the way to go is find one new vegetarian dish you like each week and start to switch out that for some of your beefier meals.  Experiment and try recipes your mother never served you.  Check out some ethnic restaurants with exotic vegetable preparations, and make them at home. Don’t restrict yourself or feel deprived.  Just branch out and do it.  If and when you succeed, don’t give us a bad name by telling other people what they should eat.  Badgering will never become popular.

 

Feng Po, Goddess of the Wind

May 26, 2015 2 Comments

Mistress of the Wind

Mistress of the Wind

In China the goddess Feng Po is in charge of wild animals, weather and movement. She must certainly be involved in global warming. She is seen riding a tiger.  She holds the wind in a bag over her shoulder on the days when it is calm on earth.  She has the power to move and or shake things into place.  Her message is integrity. Representing the winds of change, she must discern the most appropriate velocity of wind for each purpose. Her energy can be very refreshing, cleansing and clearing the air for new ventures.  Think of how many metaphors there are in English for this breath of fresh air.

Like other gods and humans she has a dark nature that is dangerous.  She warns against all false agreements and conditions.  Move carefully through your obligations and promises to others.  Giving requires a cheerful heart.  Quid pro quo, expecting something in return for favors, leads to resentment.  Feng Po teaches a healthy balanced approach to the needs of others.  If we allow space, time, and understanding into our decision making process we will be authentic.  We will say yes only when we genuinely want to engage, and we will discover the beauty of saying no when we are really not into it.  Feng Po will support and stay at the back of the sincere sailor on the winds of change.  She is known to reek havoc, unleashing stormy gusts of destruction to tear down bonds built from guilt.  She is sometimes called Feng Po Po, and even sometimes referred to as a male.  She represents the value in conserving and preserving energy, and spending it wisely.  On a personal basis she shows us how to say no to time wasting.  On a global level she asks us to make some sense of the power balance at work around the world.  We need to resist certain larger issues on the world stage in order to survive.  It is time to both show power and control it wisely.

Self Surveillance

May 25, 2015 9 Comments

I recently shopped my brains out to select a surveillance camera to mount outside to catch the casual thieves who steal things in our neighborhood. I selected the D Link system, which offers many different styles and models for both inside and outside. It is mounted on the wall over my front entry walkway. It is motion activated, which means on windy days it records frequently because when the trees move it captures 7 seconds of that too. I have needed to reset it a couple of times, but it works really well. No incidents have occurred since I placed it out there, but I am pretty surprised at the amount of traffic we have after midnight here in my residential condo village. There is nothing illegal about that, I am just surprised.

My friend Ms Cheevious held a contest on Mothers Day  to win a Piper system, which I entered.  Lisa was so impressed with the quality of hers, so  I decided maybe I would like it.  I won!!!! This is really a thrill, since I rarely even enter contests.  Now that it is here and I have installed it I am a huge fan of my new Piper.  It is for indoor use.  My dog has end of life issues.  At the moment she is doing pretty well, but she needs more attention than she used to.  Her issue is kidney problems, so she needs to urinate frequently.  She does let us know and has had very few accidents inside the house.  When I go out I start to wonder if she needs me, so I keep my trips away from home short.  More often than not when I come back to check on her she is in deep slumber exactly where I left her and does not wake for hours.

The Piper can show me a shot of her on her bed, and record a clip of 35 seconds if it detects motion.  It also records if it detects a loud sound.  I have set each of these up on a menu.  The set up could not have been easier, and there is no chip to record.  It all goes to the cloud, and then is easily deleted after you see the clips.  It has a huge wide angle lens that captures the whole room, and the audio quality is excellent.  Since I have the one camera I can tell if my dog is still passed out or howling at the door.  If I chose to combine several cameras I could follow her in all rooms of the house.  The app on my phone tells me if an event has been recorded, and gives me a live view.  I also have the capability to talk to the dog remotely. That should be funny.  Piper did have pet parents in mind when they created the system, so one of the settings is Pet at Home.  I am a very happy customer who may extend my coverage one day with more cameras.

The Piper has elements that measure temperature, light, and activity in the area.  If you install the interactive switches in your home you can remotely turn your lights on and off or change the thermostat.  You get a read out on the high and low temp, the humidity, the light, and activity during the last 24 hours.  If one of these were drastically wrong you can also set up alerts to call trusted friends if you are in vacation mode.  They have put this together with all the options of a home security company, for which you pay monthly, in a permanent and versatile solution for which you pay only once.  I like to be able to see the entry to my house as well as my snoozing hound from wherever I may be with my phone.  I had no idea how satisfying it would be.

Fully-customized, modular solar house is 3D printed prefab

May 24, 2015 1 Comment

Pamela Morse:

3 D printed dwellings!!!

Originally posted on Joseph A. Gier:

Another trend that could be huge ..
Consider that these house are built with the geographical location in mind… a house made in say Charlotte NC would be vastly different than one built for Vancouver BC and very different than one built for Madrid despite having the same plan. . Because they are built to suit the environment the homeowner can realize enormous efficiencies in energy use in terms of use of light, environmental control and even water usage.

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Lyssa, Stark Raving Mad

May 23, 2015 1 Comment

May is mental health month, so I want to pay a tribute to Lyssa, the Greek goddess of rage, rabies, and madness. In Rome she became known as Furor.  She is the daughter of Nyx and Erebus, who was ruler of the underworld.  She hangs out with other terrifying qualities like death and darkness, but she represents sudden uncontrollable rage and frenzy.  Her sisters are vengeance and retribution.  This is one very angry family.  Lyssa is seen in the company of dogs because of her rabies association.  Fits like rabies are attributed to her influence.  She is the messenger the gods send to drive a victim into madness.

What does this character have to do with mental health?  The acknowledgement that rage, fury, and madness really exist is very good because they do.  The pantheon portrayal of mad dogs suggests that this misfortune can befall anyone.  In Athenian tragedy she is a figure who has the power to drive humans and dogs suddenly out of their wits.  Madness itself is a character that plays central roles in the plays of Aeschylus, Euripides and others. Anger, and repressed anger create illness and depression when left unattended.  The sudden and supernatural anger experienced by victims of Lyssa show dark rage as a curse.    Tragedy follows angry outbursts in these stories teaching the dangers of explosive fury.

It would be impossible to go through life without anger entirely.  Some of us have more than others.  Our mental health and well being depend on our relationship with anger.  Finding constructive ways to engage in happiness producing activities is a life long search. Learning to control stress and personal need to be right can make the difference between a close relationship with Lyssa and her sisters and a walk in the park.  Learn to recognize and avoid this goddess. Here she is dressed in a short hunting skirt, driving dogs mad and causing them to eat their master Actaeon:

Lyssa and Actaeon

Lyssa and Actaeon

If you see her coming run the other way.

Captain John Peabody, 11th Great Grandfather

May 19, 2015 1 Comment

Captain John Peabody

Captain John Peabody

 

My 11th great-grandfather was born in England in 1590, and died in Bridgewater, Massachusetts in 1667.  He was active in service to the colony.

Descendants of John Peabody[From Ancestors and Anecdotes Genealogy Blog, posted 17 Jan 2007 by JEM]

JOHN1 PEABODY was born 1590 in St. Albans, Hertfordshire, England, and died 1667 in Bridgewater, Mass. He married ISABEL HARPER Bet. 1608 – 1638. She was born 1592 in St. Albans, England, and died Bet. 1624 – 1686. The name Peabody is said to have originated during the reign of Nero, when Queen Broadicia was located at Icena, Briton. This Brave Queen opposed the Romans in their invasion of the country and with her son Boadie, took refuge in the craggy heights of Wales. Among his Britain’s “Boadie” signified a man of great strength and Pea meant “hill or mountain”. Consequently the name Peabody was applied to a mountain man. This name became the name of a tribe and in some branches of the family, “Boadie” became anglicized to the name Mann and Pea into the well-known name of Hill.In later times the name was spelled in different ways; Pbodie,Paybody, and Peabody. One of the earliest settlers in America of this name was William Pabodie who was a member of Captain Miles Standish’s military company of Mass. in 1643. John Peabody was another early settler who was active colonist of the Bay State, serving as its ensign, captain and deputy to the general court. More About JOHN PEABODY:Came to America: 1635, Bridgewater, Mass Isabell married John Peabody in 1608 in Stafford Stafford England. (John Peabody was born in 1589-1590 in St Albans Hertfordshire England, christened about 1635 in St AlbansHertfordshire England, died in Apr 1667 in Bridgewater Plymouth MA and was buried on 27 Apr 1667 in Boston Suffolk MA.More

Note to Reader: This genealogical narrative is drawn from my many years of research on the Peabody family and related families. It is presented here, for what help it might be to other researchers, in the same format as it was first published on my website in about 1998. No effort has been made to update this material or to incorporate more recent genealogical discoveries published on Ancestry.com or elsewhere. The list of sources at the end may prove especially helpful. This narrative is archived at http://web.archive.org/web/20001018124830/www.pbdy.com/begin.html -Velton Peabody

JOHN PAYBODY1 was born about 1590 in England. He probably arrived in the Plymouth Colony in 1635 or 1636, for his name appears on the list of freemen of the colony dated March 7, 1636/37, and he was admitted and sworn with others whose names were on that list on Jan. 2, 1637/8. He married Isabel Harper, sister of Thomas Harper of London, England.John Peabody received a grant of 10 acres of land Jan. 1, 1637/8, “on Duxburrow side, lying betwixt the lands of William Tubs on the north side and those of Experience Mitchell on the south side, and from the sea in the west; and from Blew Fish River in the easte.” Another tract, granted him Nov. 2, 1640, was 30 acres “with meadow to it” at North River. He was a member of the jury that convicted three young Englishmen of the murder of an Indian on Sept. 4, 1638, and of the “Grand Inquest” at the court June 4, 1639. He was one of the sureties on a neighbor’s bond June 4, 1645.In 1645, John Paybody and his son, William, were among the original proprietors of Bridgewater, Mass. He was a witness with Thomas Winterton against Edward Richards when he was tried in court at Salem 4:9:1645, on a charge of making a false statement to them concerning shipboard killings. Richards was convicted and fined 10 shillings and ordered to acknowledge his sin before the congregation at Lynn.John’s will, dated July 16, 1649, at Duxbury, was proved Apr. 27, 1666/7 at Boston:“In and about the sixteenth of July in the yeare of our Lord 1649 I John Paybody of Duxbrook in the Collonie of New Plymoute planter being in prfect health and sound in memory God be blessed for it doe ordaine and make this my last Will and Testament In maner and forme as foloweth;“Imprimis I bequeath my soule to God that gave it hopeing to be saved by the Meritt of Christ my blessed Saviour and Redeemer; as for my worldly goods as followeth“Item I give and bequeath unto Thomas my eldest sonne one shilling“Item I give and bequeath unto ffrancis Paybody my second son one shilling.“Item I give and bequeath unto William Paybody my youngest son one shilling.“Item I give and bequeath unto Annis Rouse my daughter one shilling.“Item I give and bequeath unto John Rouse the son of John Rouse my lands att Carswell in Marshfield after my wifes decease;“Item I give unto John Pabodie the son of William my lott of Land att the new plantation,“Item I give and bequeath all the Rest of my goods that are my mine liveing and dead unto my wife Isabell Paybody whome I make my sole executrix of this my last Will and Testament; memorandum all these legasyes before sett downe are to yayed by William Paybody my youngest son when they shallbe demanded John PaybodyJohn ffernesyde Boston in New England the 27th of April, 1667“Mr John ffernesyde came before mee under written and deposed that by order of Paybody above written and mentioned: hee wrote what is above written and Read it to the said John Paybody on the day of the date thereof and declared the same to be his Last Will and that when hee soe did hee was of a sound disposing mind to his best knowlidg and alsoe subscribed his name thereunto John ffernesyde as a witness; As Attesteth Edward Rawson Recorder”Children, probably all born in England: i. Thomas,2 b. about 1612 #2 ii. Francis, b. about 1614#3 iii. William, b. 1619 iv. Annis or Annie, b. about 1620; m. Jan. 7, 1638/9, in Marshfield, John Rouse of Marshfield; John was a Quaker, he was a town officer in Marshfield in 1645; he d. Dec. 16, 1684, in Marshfield, and she d. before Sept. 12, 1688, when he will was proved; children: Mary Rouse, John Rouse, Simon Rouse, George Rouse, Elizabeth Rouse, Anna Rouse.Sources: Records and Files of the Quarterly Courts of Essex County, [Mass.], I, 1911; “Plymouth Colony Wills and Inventories,” Mayflower Descendant XVII:1 (January 1915); Justin Winsor, History of the Town of Duxbury, Massachusetts, 1849; Eugene Willard Montgomery, Willard Peabody Genealogy, 1915; Charles Henry Pope, Pioneers of Massachusetts, 1900; William Richard Cutter and William Frederick Adams, Genealogical and Personal Memoirs Relating to the Families of the State of Massachusetts, II, 1910; C.M. Endicott, Genealogy of the Peabody Family, 1867, revised and corrected by William S. Peabody with a partial record of the Rhode Island Branch by B. Frank Peabody, cited hereafter as Peabody Genealogy, 1867; Selim Hobart Peabody, Peabody (Paybody, Pabody, Pabodie) Genealogy, 1909, cited hereafter as Peabody Genealogy, 1909; Leon Clark Hills, History and Genealogy of the Mayflower Planters (Cape Cod Series), I, 1975 reprint of 1936 1941 ed.; Dorothy A. Sherman Lainson, John Paybodie (Peabody) English Immigrant to Plymouth Duxbury, 1635, 1972; Goldie Peabody Brownyard and Theodore Lucius Brownyard, Ancestors and Descendants of Charles Elmer Peabody, 1980; Richard Gentry, Gentry Family in America, 1909; Detroit Society for Genealogical Research Magazine XXX:3 (Spring 1967); Family History Library; William R. Marsh, Ancestors and Descendants of F.A. Marsh and Ivy Crites, 1990; Nahum Mitchell, History of the Early Settlement of Bridgewater, in Plymouth County, Massachusetts, 1840.
CaptainJohnPabodie
John Peabody and descendants
The PEABODY Family of St. Albans, Hertfordshire, Hampton, Rockingham, NH and Topsfield, Essex, MASend comments and corrections to anneb0704@yahoo.co.ukJOHN PAYBODY (d. by 1649) of St. Albans and Duxbury m. Isabel Harper|FRANCIS PEABODY (abt 1614 – 1698) of Hampton and Topsfield m. Lydia Unknown|WILLIAM PABODIE (c. 1620 – 1707) m. Elizabeth Alden|LYDIA PEABODY (bp. 1640 – 1715), wife of Thomas Howlett 2LYDIA PABODIE (1667 – 1748) m. Daniel Grinnell
History of the Town of Duxbury, Massachusetts with Genealogical Registers
Seventeenth Century Colonial Ancestors, Vol. I
Elizabeth (Alden) Pabodie and descendants
A genealogy of the Peabody family

John Capt Peabody Pabodie (1590 – 1667)
is my 11th great grandfather
Lieut Francis Peabody (1614 – 1697)
son of John Capt Peabody Pabodie
Lydia Peabody (1640 – 1715)
daughter of Lieut Francis Peabody
Mary Howlett (1664 – 1727)
daughter of Lydia Peabody
John Hazen (1687 – 1772)
son of Mary Howlett
Caleb Hazen (1720 – 1777)
son of John Hazen
Mercy Hazen (1747 – 1819)
daughter of Caleb Hazen
Martha Mead (1784 – 1860)
daughter of Mercy Hazen
Abner Morse (1808 – 1838)
son of Martha Mead
Daniel Rowland Morse (1838 – 1910)
son of Abner Morse
Jason A Morse (1862 – 1932)
son of Daniel Rowland Morse
Ernest Abner Morse (1890 – 1965)
son of Jason A Morse
Richard Arden Morse (1920 – 2004)
son of Ernest Abner Morse
Pamela Morse
I am the daughter of Richard Arden Morse

Acrostic Poem. Shipbuilding

May 18, 2015 5 Comments

Pamela Morse:

Acrostic poetry is all about spelling with the first letter of each line. This one is brilliant, recalling British history

Originally posted on willowdot21:

Silent  now  the  sound  of  hammer on steel

Held  still  the  giant  cranes and  wheel

Indolent  men  lost,  without  work robbed of  future

Pushed  aside  by business’s  uncaring  of  nature .

Busy no  longer, the  ships  and  trade  all gone

Urchins  run and play  no  more

Itinerant  men  all banished from the  shore.

Long ago  echoes  can  be heard  still

Dint of  history  and it’s  maddening  will.

Indolent seagulls  in search of  food

Nudge  the   empty newspapers  and brood.

Gone , gone  the  glory days.

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Irene, Goddess of Peace and Spring

May 18, 2015 7 Comments

There are several goddesses involved in different aspects of peace.  Spring was a season in ancient Greece associated with military campaigns, therefore a time when peace was hard to achieve. Irene is a daughter of Zeus and Themis, one of the Horai. Along with her sisters she rules natural timing and seasons. Her season is Spring. She is a peace goddess who guards the gates of Mount Olympus. Conscious clear peace is a result of coming into alignment with Divine Time.  Peace and harmony are results of staying in tune with natural rhythm and seasonal harvests.

As mistress of timing and peace Irene is a natural diplomat.  She has the skills and power to negotiate differences between sides to reach solutions. Her symbols, Herme’s staff, corn and the infant Ploutus, represent wealth and abundance.  In times of peace prosperity can flourish and progress can be made.  Now, as in ancient times, war is devastating to both civil and economic success. In personal ways we can employ the wisdom of Irene to bring more peace into our existence.  Take note of the phases of the moon, the seasonal changes around you, and the longer cycles of global warming and dramatic weather.  You don’t have to be a farmer to feel the power of nature’s timekeeping.  How do you fit into the seasons, Gentle Reader?

 

Codepending with the Cops

May 17, 2015 1 Comment

TPD

TPD

In a co-dependent relationship each side wants the other to be different.  One striking example today is the relationship between the public and the cops. Police departments across the country are found to be engaging in all kinds of costly and illegal practices that are not in the best interest of the taxpayers.  One such practice is the use of public safety disability systems to pay off and retire problem (and criminal) cops. We foot the bill for all the retirement and disability payments retired cops are given, whether they are valid or not.  Obviously we want to protect, heal and compensate those who are legitimate victims of on the job injuries. To do otherwise would be irresponsible and thoughtless.

Since this system is so easily deceived by bogus medical claims it only makes sense to examine the system for fraud.  Tucson has unreasonably high disability figures compared to the national average for cops, which drains our coffers in an unsustainable way.  Either we are really doing something that inures our employees more than other cities, or we are being taken for a ride much more than other cities.  I sense that it may be a little of each.  If they do nothing to take care of themselves they will not be healthy as they go through their careers.  Obesity, drug addiction, depression, mental health issues, and low back problems would naturally arise from a work life sitting in a patrol car all day or wearing a bullet proof vest to compress the spine.  There are significant risks to health besides getting shot or killed.  I think this problem needs to be addressed.  They have direct exposure to the worst of general public all day, every day.  None of us could do that without experiencing a loss of optimism and bliss.  PTSD is as real for the cops as it is for the people who go to war.

In Tucson our police department is drastically understaffed by the city council.  They loose more to retirement and atrophy then they can replace by training because they are so far behind in the process.  The lack of personnel leads to highly impaired service.  I hear people say they can’t get through to 911 after holding for 5 minutes to report gun shots next to their home.  I don’t try to call 911 because I have never had a response, and am not expecting that situation to improve by itself.  I do report and send in pictures of suspicious activity and crime I see on a phone app.  This is a way for me to contribute to better law enforcement without wasting my own time.  I think most of the crime in my neighborhood goes unreported.  People have no faith that there will be a response or a solution.

To provide protection under the law for our city Tucson needs:

  • Engagement- Citizens and cops need to work on the same side to improve our neighborhoods
  • Evidence- Citizens need to know that they are being heard and that evidence we provide is being considered and used to stop crime
  • Ethics- Taxpayers need to know that our law enforcement budget is spent with return on OUR investment in mind.
TPD

TPD

Edward Hazen, 9th Great Grandfather

May 15, 2015 1 Comment

Rowley burial ground

Rowley burial ground

My 9th great-grandfather was a Puritan who came to Rowley, Massachusetts with a religious community. Rowley was one of New England’s earliest settlements, founded in 1639.  Like Haverill, it was originally inhabited by a small group of Puritans who emigrated from England. A Puritan minister named Ezekiel Rogers founded Rowley. He gathered together 20 families, including the Grants, from his Yorkshire parish of Rowley in England to establish the American Rowley.  Edward arrived with his first wife Elizabeth, who died in 1649.  He then married my 9th great-grandmother, Hannah Grant.

Edward Hazen (1614 – 1683)
is my 9th great grandfather
Lt Thomas HAZEN (1658 – 1735)
son of Edward Hazen
John Hazen (1687 – 1772)
son of Lt Thomas HAZEN
Caleb Hazen (1720 – 1777)
son of John Hazen
Mercy Hazen (1747 – 1819)
daughter of Caleb Hazen
Martha Mead (1784 – 1860)
daughter of Mercy Hazen
Abner Morse (1808 – 1838)
son of Martha Mead
Daniel Rowland Morse (1838 – 1910)
son of Abner Morse
Jason A Morse (1862 – 1932)
son of Daniel Rowland Morse
Ernest Abner Morse (1890 – 1965)
son of Jason A Morse
Richard Arden Morse (1920 – 2004)
son of Ernest Abner Morse
Pamela Morse
I am the daughter of Richard Arden Morse

Edward Hazen b:1614
THE IDENTIFICATION OF EDWARD HAZEN

What are the reasons for concluding that Edward Hazen of Rowley, Massachusetts, the founding ancestor of the American family, was the same ‘Edwardus Hasson filius Thomae’ who ‘fuit baptizatur 24 die Decembris 1614′ as entered in the registers of Cadney, Lincolnshire?1. The surname was not a very common one in England, and a great deal of research in Northumberland and Lincolnshire has not disclosed any otherEdward Hazen of suitable age.2. No other history has been found for Edward Hazen (baptized 24 Dec. 1614), who was living in 1628 when his father made his will. No record ofburial has been found in the search of many Parish registers of Lincolnshire. In July 1641, Parliament passed an act that Every clergyman shouldtake a census of males over eighteen in his Parish, presenting tothem for signature a paper upholding the Protestant faith. ; This ‘ProtestationRoll’ is very compete for Lincolnshire. It shows at Cadney, William Hassen, first cousin of Edward; at Great Limber, Richard Hason, Edward’sbrother; and at South Ferraby, a Thomas Hason, servant to William Bromby. Edward does not appear in this Roll, indicating that unlesshe had diedwith record, he had left Lincolnshire before 1641.3. The date of birth is about what we should expect for Edward of Rowley, and makes him in his sixty-nineth year at death.4. The names which Edward of Rowley gave his children are very significant. The first child was Elizabeth named after his mother, and also hisgrandmother who lived until he was fifteen years old. The next child, Hannah, was named for Edward’s wife. Then came John, the eldest son, whichwas the name of Edward’s grandfather and elder brother. The next child, Thomas, was named after both grandfather, Edward’s father andHannah’sfather both bearing the name of Thomas. The next son, Edward, was named for himself, and the youngest, Richard, for Edward’s brother of that name.The names of the other children, who were daughters, are not significant, since Edward had no sisters for whom they could have been named.5. Other settlers in Rowley were from Lincolnshire, and after Edward Hazen married Hannah Grant, her sister Anna married Robert Emerson, who was,like Hazen, a native of Cadney.This from the records of Tracy Elliott Hazen.In the political life of the town also, the Rowley records show that Edward Hazen was a man of influence and importance.On 3 Jan. 1650, at a town meeting, Edward Hazen was chosen as on of the four overseers, and was again chosen to this office, 19 Dec. 1651 and 12 Dec.1654. He was also overseer for the years 1660, 1661, and 1662, and was a selectman for the year 1669. These overseers were not the same asselectmen, as sometimes has been stated, but were always named after and in addition to the select men, or ‘prudentiall men,’ and in 1649aredescribed as ‘ouerseers for the execution of towne orders and Hy wayes.’ On 10 Jan. 1660/70, ‘Thomas Tene’ and ‘Edward Hasne’ werre chosen’ouerseers for vuiin fences and hywayes and vuiin Chimneys.’ Among the ‘Towne Charges for the year past 1651: for John Smith for going to Court0-4-6: alsoe for Edward Hasen the lyke worke 0-3-6.’ ‘Town charges 1665: Edward hasen a Day Jury Man.’ The Ipswich Court Records and Files showthat Ed. Hassen served on Trial Jury 30: 7: 1651 and also 26:7:1654. On 9 Jan. 1665/66, Edward Hazon was chosen one of the four judges ofdelinquents ‘for not comeing to towne meetings'; 9 Jan. 1666/67, ‘Edward hasen Judge for yeare ensuing.’ In a list [of town charges?] 1662: ‘Edhason 0-10-2.’ Towne charges 1667: ‘Edward Hason for ueiwinge fence 0-3-0.’ In an undated record probably referring to King Phillip’s War and toEdward Hazen’s sone: ‘Work done for Samuel person in ye war–James Tenny 1 day: Thomas Hasen and Edward each a day.’ [Early Records of the Town ofRowley (1894), pp 70, 71, 73, 91, 106, 118, 132, 146, 159, 162, 165, 185, 200, 205, 224; Quarterly Courts of Essex County, 1:232, 362.]The follow account of the settlement of Edward Hazen’s estate is taken from the original papers, in two sheets, on file at Salem, and differssomewhat from the clerk’s book copy.Edward Hazen and his wife Hannah appear in the following deeds:Peter Eyers and wife Hannah of Haverhill convey to Edward Hasen of Rowley 6 1/2 acres of puland, Peter Eyers’ 3d division, with land abutting on theMerrimack River, (date not give in copy). Witnesses, Jno. Carlton, Jno. Gryffyn [Old Norfolk Co. Deeds, 3:336, p. 367 in copy.]Edward Hassen and wife Hannah of Rowley convey to John Tennie of Rowley100 acres in the division called ‘Merimake land,’ the northwest end abuttingon the Merrimack River, and 4 acres of meadow called Crane meadow; also a parcel of land granted to John Harris, John Tod, Richard Longhorne,Richard Holmes, and Edward Hassen by the town of Rowley, dated 20 May 1664. Witnesses, Ezekiell Jewit, Thomas Tenny.The name was signed ‘Hasin.’ Edward acknowledged 16 June 1673. [Ipswich Deeds, 4:41.]John Pearly and wife Mary of Newbury convey to Edward Hazen of Rowley 7acres of upland in Rowley Village-land of Thomas Pearly, Daniel Wood, andEzekiel Northen mentioned, (date not given in copy). Witnesses, Benjamin Rolfe, Thomas Hale. John and Mary acknowledged on 19 Feb. 1684 and sheresigned her right of dower to Edward Hazen’s administrators. [Ibid., 5:371.]’Hanah ye Relict and late wife of said Edward Hason deceased & Edward Hason son of ye said Edward Hason Joynt administrators’ confirm to ThomasHason land in Rowley Village where he now lives and which his father Edward before his death settled upon him as his portion-land bought of JohnPearly of Rowley Village and on 19 Feb. 1684 acknowledged by him, dated 14 May 1685. No witnesses. Signed ‘Hannah Hazzen alias Browne.’ Hannah acknowledged 19 May 1685; Edward, 4 Nov. 1685. [Ibid., 5:371.]Hannah Browne of Haverhill, widow and relict of Capt. George Browne, ‘for & in consideration of natural & christian love & afection which I beare unto my loving & beloved sonns Thomas & Edward wch I had by my former Husband Edward Hazen long time deceased at Rowley,’ conveys to them all theinterest in the estate of her brother John Grant of Rowley, dec’d; 1 Mar. 1699 or 1700. Witnesses, Thomas Eaton, Senr., Richard Saltonstall. [EssexCo. Deeds, 14:37.]Capt. George Brown and wife Hannah of Haverhill convey to Thomas Carlton of Bradford 76 acres laid out to her former husband Edward Hazzen ofRowley, dec’d, and her part of the estate of Edward Hazzen in Bradford-widow Smith, widow Hobson mentionsed, 3 Apr. 1697. Witnesses, AbrahamPerkins, Solomon Reves, Senr., Jacob Perkins, 3d. Acknowledged 3 Dec. 1698. [Ibid.,30:44,45.]Richard Hazzen, Thomas Hazzen, Edward Hazzen, Daniel Wicom, Junr., Nathaniel Storey, children of Edward Hazzen and Hannah, now wife of Capt. GeorgeBrowne, quitclaim to Thomas Carlton, 3 Apr. 1697. Witnesses, Edward Carleton, Nath. Walker, Solomon Keyes, Senr., Jacob Perkins, tertius. [Ibid.,30:45.]An agreement concerning some land that was their father Edward Hazen’s and that after his death was laid out to his wife for her thirds, was made by Thomas Hazen of Norwich, John Wood of Bradford, Timothy Perkins of Topsfield, Edward Hazzen of Boxford, Richard Hazzen of Haverhill; first, thatEdward Hazzen is satisfied with 16 pounds already received, one ox gate in east end of ox pasture, and 5 pounds which his brothers promise to pay;secondly, that the others are satisfied with a lpiece of march, call cowbridge marsh, and a piece of land called cowbridge lot, and another piece ofland in Symond’s new field from their mother’s thirds, taking in brother Jeremy Person, brother Harris’ children, brother Gibson’s children, andbrother Wicom’s children, they having their sharewith the others; dated 20 June 1716. Witnesses, Thomas Perley, Junr., Nathaniel Perley.d [Ibid.,34:189]On 4 July a ‘Hanah Hazen’ was a witness to the will of Ann Swan, relictof Richard Swan of Rowley. [Essex Co. probate files, Docket 268976.] It is highly probable that she was the wife of Edward Hazen, as his daughter Hannah was presumably married before that date.From Hazen family in America by Tracy Elliott Hazen[Hazen21404.FTW] SiteMap | Visitors: 772 | TribalPages Forum

Family History
http://www.angelfire.com/journal/pondlilymill/heisende.htmlThe Hazen Family in AmericabyTracy Elloit HazenTHE ORIGIN OF THE ENGLISH HAZENS

There is a township in Northumberland, England, near Alnwick, and Warworth Castle, now called Hazon (or Hazen). In early records it was written Heisende, and philiolgists beleive it was derived from Hegges ende (softened into Heies ende), meaning end of the hedge. To this day there are miles of hedge by the roadside in the township.From this town, the surname was derived. Hugh of Heisende [in the Latin form, Hugo de Heisende] made an agreement 8 Sept. 1202 regarding 100 acres of wood in Heisende [Feet of Fines, John Northumberland, case 180, file 2, no. 8]; a Hugo de Heisende is also found in 1256, in an Assize Roll of Northumberland, and in another Roll in 1277 he appears as “Hugo Heisand [Surtees Society Pub. 88: 64,387].Men removing from the town and settling elsewhere, during the period when surnames were coming into use, would be called “de Heisende” – from Heisende- to identify them by their place of origin, and their offspring would become plain Heisende. The name seems to have worked down through Yorkshire, south into Linconshire, all on the eastern coast of England. Many records have been found, in both printed and documentary sources, of the occurrence of the name. It has been decided not to include full mention of these records, partly because of space limitations, and even more because no descent or generation sequence can be established, so that the sporadic occurrance of the surname, variously spelled, is of importance solely as indicating the continutity of appearance of the surname in the northeast counties. It cannot be proved that all who bore the surname in this region were of the same blood, since more than one family deriving from the town of Heisende may have adopted the name.In Northumberland, more than a century after Hugh de Heisende, we fine Will Haysand mentioned in 1376 [De Banco Roll, Michaelmas Term, 49 Edward III]. In 1455 one Willaim Haysand of Newcastle, Northumberland, claimed part of the manor of Dopmanford, co. Huntingdon, being son of Hugh, son of Thomas (born in Haysand, Northumberland), son of William Haysand, brother and heir of Gilbert Haysnad who married the heiress of Dopmanford and died without issue [De Branco Roll, Easter Term, 33 Henry VI, memb. no. 128]. Before 1399 John of Gaunt granted the leper hospital at Warenford to a hermit named Richard Hayzaund [John Crawford Hodgson, History of Northumberland, 1:251].In Yorkshire is found the will (in Latin) of Willaim Hassand of Watton, dated 11 August 1484, which mentions his father and eldest son, both named Thomas [Reg. Test. Edor., 5:243]. John Hasande late of Watton died 22 October 1515; and John Hassand of Kirkburne died interstate before 13 April 1559 [Act Book for the Deanery of Harhill and Hull with Beverley].In 1535 Richard Hasande was bailiff, paid for collecting the rents, in the Deanery of Ludburghe, Lincolnshire [Valor Ecclesiasticus, 4:59]. He may be the Richard Hassand with whom the proved ancestry of Edward Hazen beginning in the section. The known ancestors of Edward Hazen were husbandmen of the better class, of sufficient substance to make wills. The family was not armigerous, and no Hazen coat of arms is known.NOTE: There are similar sounding names in Dutch (Haas) and German (Haassen) with a Jack-Rabbitt on a family Coat of Arms, there is no family connection. So don’t be fooled by misleading family Coat of Arms. Hazzan is the Hebrew spelling which means a cantor, one who crys out the truth. Hazen is a common first name in Isreal. Jews were not allowed to be armigerous. All the Hazen’s in America and Canada are decended from Edward Hazen who came from Cadney, Lincolnshire, England to Rowley, Massachusetts in 1638,. There is two recent arivals from England who are related to the family back in England. Where the family name is still spelled Hason.

In 2008 on the programme ‘Who do you think you are?’ the story of the model Jodie Kidd’s family history was featured As he sory unfolded it was revealed that Jodie was descendent from Edward. This part of the programme explained how the Hazen family had orginally been one of the founding family of America. Edwrd had moved the family from the nearby settlement Rowley to Haverill. The story of the family’s struggles was told and Jodie was able to work backward thrugh her family history from Rowley and back to England to Rowley in Yorkshire. The programme brought Edward’s family’s story back to life and explained why they had left England.Edward’s wife Hannah (Hannah was Edward’s second wife whom he married after his first wife died in 1649) parents Thomas and Jane Grant were among the original settlers who founded Rowley in 1639. This group of settlers were Puritans and were led by their minister Ezekiel Rogers. He had gathered together 20 families from his parish of Rowley in Yorkshire, England and they had set out to the new world to find religous freedom as Puritans were being persecuted in England when the King, Charles 1, had banned the puritan clergy from preaching.Thomas and Jane Grant were amongst 20,000 British Puritans who travelled to the new world. This new life was extremely hard to begin with and many died making the journey or from stravation, disease or the severe cold winter. The surviours through great sacrifce gradully established themselves in the new world and craved out there settlements.
Sources:
U.S., Sons of the American Revolution Membership Applications, 1889-1970
New England Marriages Prior to 1700
The Hazen family in America : a genealogy
History of Essex County, Massachusetts. : with biographical sketches of many of its pioneers and prominent men
Vital records of Rowley, Massachusetts to the end of the year 1849
Vital records of Rowley, Massachusetts to the end of the year 1849
Massachusetts, Town and Vital Records, 1620-1988
The Granberry family and allied families : including the ancestry of Helen (Woodward) Granberry

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