mermaidcamp

mermaidcamp

Keeping current in wellness, in and out of the water

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Jumping Jupiter Retrograde, Batman

December 17, 2014

Jupiter is by far the most massive planet in our solar system. The Roman god Jupiter was worshiped as the purveyor of the universe.  He was the ruler of the daytime sky, the god of lightning and thunder, and the political deity of the Roman state. As king of the gods he administered the cosmos. He is the son of Saturn, known for his  jovial nature.  Jove, as in by Jove the English expression, refers to the god Jupiter.  Thursday is his day and protection of the state is his mission.  He was the main man in the pantheon when Jesus was born in a Roman colony.  He was revered for his reputation for abundance and good fortune, as well as very fine organizational and judicial skills.  He was known for bringing chaos to order.

The fifth planet from the sun is now retrograde from the point of view of the earth.  This means that due to our orbits around the sun, Jupiter appears from the earth to travel in reverse.  This phenomena has significance in astrology, representing a chance to go over events in the past and make improvements.  The Jupiter retrograde period will last until April, ending just as US taxes will be due.  It represents a chance to review our organization and abundance issues.  This time is a portal to edit and remake your own movie that has been running since last September.  You do not have to believe in the power of Jupiter to know that good fortune regularly follows good organization. There is no need to worship the god of the daytime sky to use this time to significantly improve your own judgement and organization.  Americans need to review the year for the IRS, if not for Jupiter.  Take your habits through an honest evaluation aimed at creating more joviality and order.  We all have room for improvement, Gentle Readers.  What did you start last September that is not properly organized?  Imagine jolly Jupiter guiding you through tax preparation and New Year’s resolutions.  Redirect your attention to all that brings you joy.  Rigorously remove disorder and chaos that clutter your life.  Finish what you started, either by discarding it or completing it.

Angelic Forces

December 15, 2014 2 Comments

Angels were common before Jesus was born. There were happy spirits protecting humans all over the pre-Christian world.  Some people today debate the powers and presence attributed to angels because we know them through story and legend.  Their existence is a rhetorical belief, but there has been no empirical evidence that proves they are here with us.  December is a very popular time to display angels and even dress up and portray them in live nativity scenes.  In the darkest month of the Northern Hemisphere’s year, angels usher in the light.  They often wear white, have white wings and a bright body halo.  They are messengers, beings of light, that assist humans on both sides of the grave.  They intercede for the benefit of humans.

December is the right time to settle into a hot herbal bath, light a candle, and put out the do not disturb sign for the human element.  Around the winter solstice have a conversation with angels.  If this is easy and natural for you, pray and get in touch with the angelic realm.  If you need some help getting used to the idea of being surrounded by beings of light, do some meditating.  Soak in the aromas of your scented tub, breathing deeply and leave thought behind.  Have a conversation, out loud or in your mind, with the spirit guardians of your life.  Imagining the presence of another dimension, allow yourself to say what is in your heart and ask for help that you know you need.  You can do it with eyes open our closed.  Using this method is a formula to make wishes come true. Belief in our angels is belief in supernatural powers at work on our behalf.  Speaking to angels has been done by all kinds of people without shame or embarrassment for a very long time.  The time is right to tell your deepest wishes to the angels, Gentle Readers.

Nostalgia and Winter

December 14, 2014

festive headgear

festive headgear

Christmas is such an anticipated holiday in America that it leaves lasting impressions on children. If I dig deeply into my memories of Christmas past there are certain phases that marked my history of celebrating.

  • My earliest years, 1-4, all holidays were at my grandparents’ farm

The house was small and the farm very big.  My grandmother made bread and cookies all the time.  At Christmas she cranked up the volume and included cinnamon rolls.  We played Chinese checkers, regular checkers, and Parcheesi.  Between baking with my grandma and playing games with my grandpa all my wishes came true.  I don’t know what my parents did, but I was always thrilled to be in Lincoln, Arkansas at the farm.

  • School in Pennsylvania had many holiday traditions, as well as snow.

Pittsburgh had excellent quality building snow, so my friends and I constructed forts and had snowball wars. We had sleds, toboggans, and ice skates.  At holiday break we were free to slip and slide all over town in our preferred method.  We did have caroling in the 50’s with people showing up at your house singing and very cold.  You were to invite them inside and give them hot chocolate.  My mother made fruitcake (of which I was never a fan) and pralines (which were the best).

  • Venezuela is a very festive place, and Christmas is a time to party with aguinaldos

Special songs of the season, often with no religious connotations, are sung by bands of traveling musicians.  The parranda grows as the host at each home visited joins the group and travels to the next home.  Sometimes extemporaneous lyrics are created to flatter the host or the neighborhood.  My parents were huge appreciators of the art form, and my dad was the boss of all the people in the petroleum camp.  For this reason our house was the last stop of the night.  The bar would open and the musicians would stay for hours, playing harps, rhythm instruments, cuatros, and guitars.

  • In my own home as an adult I invited friends for potluck parties for many years.

I had neither funds nor interest in entertaining like my parents had done.  I did still like the large crowd festivities, but preferred to make the occasion pot luck.  I still love this form of celebrating because each cook showcases something special that they want to prepare.  I also like the progressive dinner, which goes from house to house for each course.  Those seem to have fallen out of favor today, but they were fun while they lasted.

  • Holidays at resorts all over the world

There is something excellent about paying others to do all the preparations and clean up for holidays.  I spent wonderful holidays all over the world, in Chamonix, Swiss ski resorts, and one superb Christmas in Maui.  If you have the extra cash and don’t mind traveling at peak times (when I did it the peak was not so hard to take)  being in another land with room service can be a really good way to make the holiday season.  Instead of making effort at home, the energy and money is spent on the travel itself.

  • December at home

We like to stay close to home and make very little fuss about our December now.  I am working hard to clear space and give away old items rather than acquire any new ones.  I use seasonal plants for decorations these days because I just don’t bother with electric lights and other time consuming ways to change the decor.  We have no tree, and each year I give away more ornaments and outdoor decorative items.  Not only are we happier during the season, we have nothing much to strike in January.  This year we may zip up to Scottsdale for a meal at Posh and the farmers’ market.  This is our family trip with our dog, who adores the FireSky Resort.  The low key way to celebrate suits our lifestyle and our budget.

tropical

tropical

Hello Kitty hot spring lets you fill two spots at once on your Japan bingo card

December 13, 2014

Pamela Morse:

hot springs and Hello Kitty???What could be more therapeutic???

Originally posted on RocketNews24:

KB 3

For most travelers in Japan, the highlight of a trip to the hot springs is the rotenburo, or open-air bath. The idea of an alfresco dip is so appealing that drawing visitors to your hot spring inn or hotel becomes several degrees harder if you don’t have outdoor tubs.

But you shouldn’t write off indoor hot springs entirely, as they boast a couple of advantages. Having a roof over your head makes them a good choice for a rainy day, and being climate controlled means less shivering once you step out of the water. Plus, if you’re heading to Gunma Prefecture, soon one indoor hot spring will give you the chance to soak in the company of Hello Kitty.

View original 332 more words

What Is My Modus Operandi?

December 11, 2014 5 Comments

unique bloom

unique bloom

The way you do one thing is the way you do everything.  This is the theory that detectives use when they construct a modus operandi for criminals they want to catch and crimes that may be linked. In business it is helpful to know the M.O. of your customers or clients in order to better serve them.   This way of observing things applies to politics and daily life just as much as it does to business and law enforcement.  In our world today it is often necessary to construct a modus vivendi between individuals or groups just to survive. The U.S Congress is engaged in just such a desperate way of doing business.  We look at big institutions and see these conflicts but rarely do we bring it down to a personal scale.  How do I know what my own M.O. is?  How do others perceive my communication?  Do I poison the conversation with preconceived notions?

Normally we start be assuming we are right and entitled to our opinion.  In conflict, however, both sides usually reveal some irrational thinking that arises from prejudice.  If we bring some reflection to the subject beliefs often cloud all evidence to the contrary.  We may not be able to start from the position that we might be wrong, but by asking some simple questions we may discover our own ulterior motives and intellectual weakness.

  • Do I listen in an open spirit, without a need to form a reply?
  • Do I do any research before adopting something as a fact?
  • Am I more concerned with appearance than with reality?
  • Do I hold any hard feelings for entire countries, races, or religious groups?
  • Could I possibly be too prejudiced by my past to make good decisions on this subject?
  • Can I see the opposition’s point of view?
  • Is my argument based on fact or emotions?

Each of us has a unique way of doing business, and patterns are engrained in all of us.  We could all do with less mendacity and obstruction in our lives.  To do that we have to identify the ways we create that obstruction through our thoughts words and deeds.  Look within, Gentle Readers.  You are your own answer.

unique bloom

unique bloom

Spirit of Giving, Animism

December 10, 2014 7 Comments

first box to go

first box to go

I have a rather animistic relationship with my possessions and potential possessions.  I find them in a somewhat psychic shopping style, and buy them in a love at first sight condition.  This happens on a regular basis with jackets..and other items of clothing.  I adore costuming and potential costuming.  I like it way too much.  When I first find the unusual jacket/prom dress/beaded top I believe we are meant to be a pair.  I see us as fabulous fashion partners stunning and shocking our fans.  This is where the delusion begins..but not at all where it ends. It ends in my closet, my garage, and alas, gentle readers, in my barn.  The truth is that after a brief romance, all these dazzling duds live a life of drudgery, never seeing any action or fun.  I need to set them free for their own self realization.  They need to party as their original construction intended.  No clothing is happy in the bottom of the drawer or the back of the closet.

Yesterday on PBS radio a lady was reviewing a book about Japanese style tidying up and animistic treatment of the objects in the home.  The author had been a Shinto shrine maiden in Japan in her youth, so she really knew a lot about space and ritual.  Her method of cleansing starts with a realization that we are not treating our objects with love and respect if we allow them to pile up and collect dust.  She emphasizes the feeling of happiness an object must evoke in order to stay in our presence.  She aptly notes that old papers never give us feelings of happiness.  By keeping so many objects that do not make us happy (any more) we restrict our own spacious feeling and daily comfort.  I listened in the car to this radio interview and felt very personally touched by this message.  I recently chipped the glass on vase containing fake amaryllis that my mother gave me about 15 years ago.  It has been on display in my living room in a prominent place all those years and we have enjoyed it.  It is not by any means the only gift I have that she gave me, but I do feel an attachment.  My partner and I talked it over and joked about it, and I am ready to part with the object, for the good of all involved.  Someone may recycle it if I set it free.  It has served its purpose and now it can do something new.

Today my friend is going to visit while I go through my clothing to determine which items truly contain joy for me now.  I do not dare to estimate how much needs to go, but I now see my wardrobe as a family.  I have cramped the pieces into prison quarters with no light or air.  How could they possibly be happy as my wardrobe, overcrowded and starved for attention?  The majority of these items need to live in another person’s wardrobe, where they can be loved and treated well.  Then I will have a well ordered place for the happy items that will remain with me.  The Japanese method suggests that while our socks are in a drawer, they are on holiday.  We want them to rest and feel good for the next time they go on our feet.  We must pay attention to the state of the holiday resort by assuring proper order and visibility for the resting clothing.  I totally love this whole concept, and am sure my clothing will applaud the good news.  I just told a friend that by the end of the year I plan to make my closet look like  a Shinto shrine.  He said, “Send me a picture.”   Now I have made a true commitment, and at this point nothing looks less like a shrine than my closet.  I have a goal and a deadline.  I look forward to making the clothing that makes the cut very happy in the future.

Lady Joanna Danzielstour, Baroness More of Rowallan

December 9, 2014 2 Comments

My 20th great grandmother was born in Scotland and married Sir Adam Mure.  She gave birth to her daughter, Elizabeth, who became queen of Scotland, at Rowallan Castle.

Rowallan Castle

Rowallan Castle

The surname of MURE was derived from the Old French word ‘more’ – a nickname given to one with a swarthy complexion. The name was brought into England in the wake of the Norman Conquest of 1066. There are also places of the name in Cheshire, from which the name may have been derived. Early records of the name mention Johannes filius More, 1185 County Kent. More Kalendrer was documented in County Surrey in 1332, and Thomas Mor was recorded in the year 1340

Elizabeth Mure, daughter of Sir Adam Mure of Rowallan, became Queen of King Robert 11 in 1347. Alicia del More of Yorkshire was listed in the Yorkshire Poll Tax of 1379. Henry More married Alice Simpson in London in the year of 1578. Francis Moore (1656-1715) was an Astrolger and quack physician. He advertised his pills by publishing an almanac, forecasting the weather. George Moore (1852-1933) was the Irish novelist, the author of Esther Water, The Brook of Kerith, Heloise and Abelard. The name was taken to Ireland at an early date, and is one of the twenty most popular names in Ireland. Of the several thousand Moore families, some are of settler descent, their forebears being immigrants from England, who have come to Ireland in considerable numbers over the centuries since the Anglo-Norman invasion.

Lady Joanna Danzielstour, Baroness More of Rowallan (1275 – 1330)
is my 20th great grandmother
Elizabeth Mure (1320 – 1355)
daughter of Lady Joanna Danzielstour, Baroness More of Rowallan
Robert Scotland Stewart (1337 – 1406)
son of Elizabeth Mure
James I Scotland Stewart (1394 – 1434)
son of Robert Scotland Stewart
Joan Stewart (1428 – 1486)
daughter of James I Scotland Stewart
John Gordon (1450 – 1517)
son of Joan Stewart
Robert Lord Gordon (1475 – 1525)
son of John Gordon
Catherine Gordon (1497 – 1537)
daughter of Robert Lord Gordon
Lady Elizabeth Ashton (1524 – 1588)
daughter of Catherine Gordon
Capt Roger Dudley (1535 – 1585)
son of Lady Elizabeth Ashton
Gov Thomas Dudley (1576 – 1653)
son of Capt Roger Dudley
Anne Dudley (1612 – 1672)
daughter of Gov Thomas Dudley
John Bradstreet (1652 – 1718)
son of Anne Dudley
Mercy Bradstreet (1689 – 1725)
daughter of John Bradstreet
Caleb Hazen (1720 – 1777)
son of Mercy Bradstreet
Mercy Hazen (1747 – 1819)
daughter of Caleb Hazen
Martha Mead (1784 – 1860)
daughter of Mercy Hazen
Abner Morse (1808 – 1838)
son of Martha Mead
Daniel Rowland Morse (1838 – 1910)
son of Abner Morse
Jason A Morse (1862 – 1932)
son of Daniel Rowland Morse
Ernest Abner Morse (1890 – 1965)
son of Jason A Morse
Richard Arden Morse (1920 – 2004)
son of Ernest Abner Morse
Pamela Morse
I am the daughter of Richard Arden Morse

Joan Stewart, Princess of Scotland

December 8, 2014 1 Comment

My 16th great-grandmother was deaf, and used sign language. Joan died after 16 October 1486, she was buried at Dalkeith Church, Midlothian. Joan’s effigy on the Morton Monument is said to be the world’s oldest image of a known deaf person

Joan Stewart (1428 – 1486)
is my 16th great grandmother
John Gordon (1450 – 1517)
son of Joan Stewart
Robert Lord Gordon (1475 – 1525)
son of John Gordon
Catherine Gordon (1497 – 1537)
daughter of Robert Lord Gordon
Lady Elizabeth Ashton (1524 – 1588)
daughter of Catherine Gordon
Capt Roger Dudley (1535 – 1585)
son of Lady Elizabeth Ashton
Gov Thomas Dudley (1576 – 1653)
son of Capt Roger Dudley
Anne Dudley (1612 – 1672)
daughter of Gov Thomas Dudley
John Bradstreet (1652 – 1718)
son of Anne Dudley
Mercy Bradstreet (1689 – 1725)
daughter of John Bradstreet
Caleb Hazen (1720 – 1777)
son of Mercy Bradstreet
Mercy Hazen (1747 – 1819)
daughter of Caleb Hazen
Martha Mead (1784 – 1860)
daughter of Mercy Hazen
Abner Morse (1808 – 1838)
son of Martha Mead
Daniel Rowland Morse (1838 – 1910)
son of Abner Morse
Jason A Morse (1862 – 1932)
son of Daniel Rowland Morse
Ernest Abner Morse (1890 – 1965)
son of Jason A Morse
Richard Arden Morse (1920 – 2004)
son of Ernest Abner Morse
Pamela Morse
I am the daughter of Richard Arden Morse
Born in Scotland c.1428, she was the third daughter of James I of Scotland and Joan Beaufort. Joan had two older brothers, including the future King of Scotland, James II, and five sisters. She had “the misfortune to be deaf and dumb”, and was known as muta domina or “the mute lady”. Joan was reported to have used sign language to communicate, even in public (although it was considered at that time to be impolite).

Joan was originally contracted to marry James Douglas, 3rd Earl of Angus on 18 October 1440, but he died (without issue) in 1446 before the marriage could take place.   In 1445 she was sent to France and did not return home to Scotland until 1457. She had been promised in marriage to the Dauphin of France but the marriage did not take place, probably due to her inability to articulate. Joan married James Douglas, 4th Baron Dalkeith before 15 May 1459, who at the time of their marriage was raised to the peerage as the first Earl of Morton.  They were granted a dispensation on 7 January 1463-4 for being consanguineous in the second and third degrees.  Joan and her husband James were both aware of their close relationships but were persuaded to marry by her brother King James II of Scotland and applied for the dispensation to legitimize their marriage. The Countess Joanna died in 1493, predeceasing her husband, James, by several months.

Constance VonHohenstaufen, 21st Great-grandmother

December 5, 2014 9 Comments

Constance VonHohenstaufen

Constance VonHohenstaufen

My 21st great-grandmother was born in Sicily and died in Barcelona.  Her grandfather was Holy Roman Emperor.  Her husband died so she became a nun, as many of the queen consorts did.  I think it was the only safe place to be.  She is buried in Barcelona Cathedral, with some of my other ancestors, in a royal urn.

urns Barcelona Cathedral

urns Barcelona Cathedral

 

After her original interment Constance was moved to Urns containing the bodies of multiple nobles. Urns Barcelona Cathedral with the remains of: In the other box: – Alphonse Franc, Count of Barcelona and King of Aragon – Jaume d’Urgell, Count of Urgell and Frederick of Aragon, both sons of en: Alphonse Benign In the other: – Constance of Sicily, wife of en: Peter the Great – Cyprus Maria, wife of en: James the Just – Sybil Fort, fourth wife of en: Peter of Aragon – Eleanor of Aragon (+1416), second wife of en: Peter I of Cyprus, King of Cyprus and Jerusalem.  The sculptures are by Frederic Seas

Constance of Sicily Queen consort of Aragon, Sicily, and Valencia; Countess consort of Barcelona Tenure 1276–1285  Spouse Peter III of Aragon

Issue Alfonso III of Aragon
James II of Aragon
Elisabeth, Queen of Portugal
Frederick III of Sicily
Yolanda, Duchess of Calabria
Pedro of Aragon House Hohenstaufen Dynasty (by birth)
House of Aragon (by marriage) Father Manfred of Sicily Mother Beatrice of Savoy Born 1249
Sicily Died 9 April 1302 (aged 52 or 53)
Barcelona, Spain Burial Cathedral of Santa Eulalia, Barcelona
Constance (or Constantia) (1249 – 9 April 1302) was the Queen consort of Peter III of Aragon.
Family
She was the only daughter of Manfred of Sicily and his first wife Beatrice of Savoy. Her paternal grandparents were Frederick II, Holy Roman Emperor and his mistress Bianca Lancia. Her maternal grandparents were Amadeus IV of Savoy and his first wife Anne of Burgundy.
Marriage
On 13 June 1262, Constantia married Prince Peter of Aragon, eldest son of James I of Aragon and his second wife Violant of Hungary.
Manfred was killed in the Battle of Benevento (26 February 1266) while fighting against his rival Charles of Anjou, son of Louis VIII of France and Blanche of Castile. As his eldest daughter she could be considered his heiress but did not pursue her claim at this time.
James I died on 27 July 1276 and Peter succeeded to the throne. Constance became his Queen consort. With the War of the Sicilian Vespers (1282–1302), at first Peter and then their sons claimed the throne of Sicily in her right. The War resulted in the partition of the Kingdom of Sicily to the “Kingdom of Trinacria” (the island of Sicily) under her descendants and the Kingdom of Naples under the descendants of Charles of Anjou.
Peter III died on 2 November 1285 and Constantia remained a widow. She ended her days as a nun in Barcelona.
Children
Constantia and Peter III of Aragon had six children:
Alfonso III of Aragon (1265 – 18 June 1291).
James II of Aragon (10 August 1267 – 2 November 1327).
Elizabeth of Aragon (1271 – 4 July 1336). Married Denis of Portugal.
Frederick III of Sicily (13 December 1272 – 25 June 1337).
Yolanda of Aragon (1273 – August, 1302). Married Robert of Naples.
Infante Pedro of Aragon (1275 – 25 August 1296). Married Guillemette of Béarn, daughter of Gaston VII of Montcada, Viscount of Béarn.

Constantia’s ancestors in three generations Constantia of Sicily Father:
Manfred of Sicily Paternal Grandfather:
Frederick II, Holy Roman Emperor Paternal Great-grandfather:
Henry VI, Holy Roman Emperor Paternal Great-grandmother:
Constance of Sicily Paternal Grandmother:
Bianca Lancia Paternal Great-grandfather:
Unknown Paternal Great-grandmother:
Unknown Mother:
Beatrice of Savoy Maternal Grandfather:
Amadeus IV of Savoy Maternal Great-grandfather:
Thomas I of Savoy Maternal Great-grandmother:
Marguerite of Geneva Maternal Grandmother:
Anne of Burgundy Maternal Great-grandfather:
Hugh III, Duke of Burgundy Maternal Great-grandmother:
Béatrice of Albon
Constance of Sicily, Queen of Aragon
House of Hohenstaufen
Born: circa 1249 Died: 9 April 1302 Royal titles Preceded by
Teresa Gil de Vidaure Queen consort of Aragon
1276–1285 Succeeded by
Isabella of Castile Countess consort of Barcelona, Girona, Osona and Besalú
1276–1285 Queen consort of Valencia
1276–1285 Preceded by
Margaret of Burgundy Queen consort of Sicily
1282–1285 Succeeded by
Isabella of Castile [edit] External links
A listing of descendants of the Hohenstaufen Dynasty

Constance VonHohenstaufen (1249 – 1302)
is my 21st great grandmother
Isabella Pedra Aragon (1271 – 1336)
daughter of Constance VonHohenstaufen
Alphonso Dinisez Portugal (1290 – 1357)
son of Isabella Pedra Aragon
Peter I Portugal Cruel Algarve (1320 – 1367)
son of Alphonso Dinisez Portugal
John I DePinto (1358 – 1433)
son of Peter I Portugal Cruel Algarve
Beatrix DePinto (1403 – 1447)
daughter of John I DePinto
John Fettiplace (1427 – 1464)
son of Beatrix DePinto
Richard Fettiplace (1460 – 1511)
son of John Fettiplace
Anne Fettiplace (1496 – 1567)
daughter of Richard Fettiplace
Mary Purefoy (1533 – 1579)
daughter of Anne Fettiplace
Susanna Thorne (1559 – 1586)
daughter of Mary Purefoy
Gov Thomas Dudley (1576 – 1653)
son of Susanna Thorne
Anne Dudley (1612 – 1672)
daughter of Gov Thomas Dudley
John Bradstreet (1652 – 1718)
son of Anne Dudley
Mercy Bradstreet (1689 – 1725)
daughter of John Bradstreet
Caleb Hazen (1720 – 1777)
son of Mercy Bradstreet
Mercy Hazen (1747 – 1819)
daughter of Caleb Hazen
Martha Mead (1784 – 1860)
daughter of Mercy Hazen
Abner Morse (1808 – 1838)
son of Martha Mead
Daniel Rowland Morse (1838 – 1910)
son of Abner Morse
Jason A Morse (1862 – 1932)
son of Daniel Rowland Morse
Ernest Abner Morse (1890 – 1965)
son of Jason A Morse
Richard Arden Morse (1920 – 2004)
son of Ernest Abner Morse
Pamela Morse
I am the daughter of Richard Arden Morse

Constance of Sicily Queen consort of Aragon

Constance of Sicily Queen consort of Aragon

 

#CrimingWhileWhite

December 4, 2014 5 Comments

While protests on American streets continue a new protest movement is taking place on twitter.  White people are discussing white privilege as experienced by them.  It captures the other side of the policing story from the point of view of the beneficiaries of a highly prejudiced system.  I think most of us know being white is an advantage, but we are not aware of how much of a boon it is to white criminals.  Equal protection under the law, if it were to be equal, would extend all the way from safe, secure protected living environments for all to criminal justice that deals out fair and equal sentencing.  If you take a look at this trending hashtag you will see some shocking examples of system failure.

I am white to the WASPiest extreme.  See my super Brit ancestors to validate my whiteness.  I live my life in such a way as to avoid all contact with doctors, lawyers, and police.  I have been highly successful with this plan, in part because I am white. I have no crimes to report, pre se, except that I was an undocumented worker in Tecate, Baja California, Mexico, off and on for many years.  As a wetback gringa all privilege and courtesy was bestowed on me by the migra on both sides of the border.  There was never any problem. I have not crossed the border since 2003 because things just became too complicated after 2001.  The era of the #WetbackGringa, wild and free, became a thing of the past.

I think the #CrimingWhileWhite phenomena comes from unconscious prejudice embedded in our culture.  I don’t think there is willful or criminal intent by police to treat citizens by different standards.  That is why the grand jury is able to rule that there is no probable cause to try the cops who ended lives while on duty.  These preferences, or assumptions that white people are not threatening society, are not consciously accepted by the individuals dealing out the uneven justice and protection.   Systemic privilege as well as systemic prejudice exist in the collective beliefs of a culture.  Just as people have shadow qualities of which they are unaware, so do institutions.  Institutional shadow qualities are even harder to nail because there is no institutional Jungian shrink to assist the patient in seeing its whole being. The very nature of shadow prejudice is to hide and stay hidden because nobody wants to believe we are acting from such base instincts.  I have been a petroleum princess in Venezuela and a wetback gringa in Mexico.  I can tell you from experience the only thing better than being a white woman is being a bilingual blonde white woman.  We are automatically above suspicion and nobody ever suspects we understand Spanish, so they say anything in front of us, assuming we will not know what they are saying. Have you ever had an experience of white supremacy or privilege, gentle reader?

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