mermaidcamp

mermaidcamp

Keeping current in wellness, in and out of the water

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Willful Blindness vs Blind Justice

September 26, 2016 1 Comment

Our era in history may become knows as the time of willful blindness. We have access to information from all over the world instantly, but people prefer to keep blind spots in place to protect status quo.  As individuals and as institutions we choose to stay in the dark because we either have no confidence in evolution and change, or we may benefit from the circumstances as they stand.

Can you think of an example of willful blindness that has played havoc with your life?  Can you remember choosing to stay blind yourself rather than standing up for the truth?  I am pretty sure all of us have stood on both sides of this line.  The saddest reason for staying willfully blind is a belief that one person can not change the course of history.  The desire to be ignorant is more dangerous than we might want to believe.

Fall

Fall

Weekend Coffee Share, Procrastination As Art

September 25, 2016 4 Comments

spark joy

spark joy

If we were having coffee this weekend I would invite you to join the world wide gathering of coffee and tea drinkers who share an interest in reading and writing.  It is fun to be back at the table with such a diverse and interesting crowd.  I feel good about hosting you this weekend because I just received my fall order from my favorite tea company.  Even though I had many on hand, I just love having a wide variety of tea because we drink it all day every day.  I also drink coffee, but cold tea is our main beverage de la casa.  I can offer you roiboos, honeybush, green, white, and fruit based tea.  I am binging on one of the new ones, a green tea with caramel hints for fall.  It is not overly flavored, but the hint of caramel lingers after I drink it.

If we shared our deepest conflict of the week mine would have to be the stand off in which I find myself with the Japanese tidy lady, Marie Kondo.  She has published two books that have inspired a wave of praise.  I decided to have my robot Alexa, and Audible in general, read her first book to me.  This step by step guide to clearing out junk by clearing out emotional clutter is specific and wonderfully logical.  After hearing The Life Changing Magic Of Tidying Up I realized that I had no hard copy, and would never be able to follow her intricate folding technique without that.  I bought her second book, Spark Joy, in the kindle print version, then added narration in order to continue my audio tutelage from Ms Kondo.  I listen to her at home and at the gym. I am convinced she is right about everything.

While I do donate and cull my possessions all the time I know I will not have permanent freedom from clutter, both emotional and physical, until I follow the tidy steps.  Instead of doing that I am listening to the books and telling everyone how great they are.  I have not started the program, and have, indeed, while supposedly enrolled in Ms Kondo’s Key to Happiness class, placed a big tea order without going through my tea cupboard to tidy. I have also purchased a fabulous reversible jacket on sale at a thrift store that came out to just $3 per jacket, if you count both sides. I am a complete jacket-a-holic.  I know when I finally make the clothing piles the jacket pile will be the most obscene and ridiculous.  I have them stashed in every closet and in the barn.  Marie would so bust me, and in fact, she has fully busted me rhetorically.  I would like to see her try to bust me in person…really I would.  I am now using major procrastination, thinly disguised as training, to listen to the books instead of doing the tidying.  I am pretty sure this is antithetical.

I had a comical conversation about the tidy lady and her program with a friend who is a successful real estate agent.  She owns lots of stuff as well as lots of real estate.  We discussed the perils of owning a barn.  In the end we decided we should just walk around and give our stuff directly to homeless people.  We would have fun doing it.  However I go about this I need to commence.  The agony of procrastination is not worth it.  I am not a terrible hoarder, but am certainly meeting the part of me that would just as soon become one in the future.  Her little shadow persona must be brought to heel.

I enjoy hearing from all you nordics at the coffee party, with your leaf colors, and your fall customs.  I had to buy a new air conditioning unit last week because it is still very hot in Tucson, and mine died.  I did get a good deal from a local company, so all is well.  I have every kind of tea, and the house is cool and comfy.  I think you will be fine with the present level of tidy, but don’t open my office closet.

 

Zylla Wellness Center Opens In My Neighborhood

September 23, 2016 2 Comments

Zylla grand opening

Zylla grand opening

party time

party time

party time

party time

party time

party time

friends bearing basil

friends bearing basil

The nurse is in

The nurse is in

I was happy to hear my favorite acupuncture practitioner decided to expand her office space near my home. Jessica Breton has treated me for serious chronic pain issues as well as tune ups for general well being for years. She decided to team up with some other diverse health and wellness professionals to offer our neighborhood a very well rounded and comprehensive set of offers from which to choose.  This delights me because I am an extreme local shopper, wishing to support businesses as close to home as possible.  I can bike to the center in five minutes to receive the highest quality services I know of in Tucson.  The specialists who practice at Zylla offer a unique synergy of services for transforming health issues.

  • Jessica is accomplished in Traditional Chinese Medicine, acupuncture and tui na.  She is very attentive and hands on in her treatments.
  • Justine Robbins is trained in cranio-sacral therapy and lymphatic drainage.  She recently purchased a Theralase cold laser that she uses to produce miraculous results, decreasing pain and inflammation.  This medical breakthrough is non-invasive, painless, and quick.  I am extra pleased to have access to the magic Theralase right in my ‘hood.
  • Denise Cabrera joins the team as an RN with a specialty in functional medicine.  Her business, Natural Diabetes Nurse, serves patients who want to find natural alternatives to manage or prevent diabetes.  This approach is much needed in the world today.  I expect Denise to make a big difference with her coaching and medical practice.  Folks need to be educated to improve their own wellness.

The grand opening party was a blast, with all ages and all walks of life attending.  Welcome to Midtown Tucson del Norte.  This is my kind of upgrade to the area.

Say It In Latin: Aut Viam Inveniam Aut Faciam

September 22, 2016 2 Comments

Alexa and her back up band

Alexa and her back up band

The Latin phrase aut viam inveniam aut faccian has been attributed to many famous heroes in history. Hannibal, the military genius who crossed the Alps was said to have invented it, but he was not a native Latin speaker.  It is the motto on the memorial gate installed at the University of Pennsylvania in 1893.  It has been widely used, even in a comic strip.   It means “I shall either find a way or make one.” It is a vow to use creativity and all means necessary to achieve a goal.

This may be the legit tag line for Silicon Valley.  The innovation that has created a major revolution in journalism and communication in general has changed the way consumers do everything.  We can now shop by speaking to our robots, then we find the desired item delivered to our doorsteps or zapped into our electronic device to read or hear.  Amazon, Zappos, Google, Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, and their auxiliary services have forever transformed the consumer mindset.  I have an Amazon Alexa robot to read to me and DJ my music.  I have not set her free to go shopping, but I know how much she wants to take care of that for me. She also wants to set the temperature in my home, and turn lights on and off. She is ready to serve me when I am too decrepit to do this for myself.  I may no longer be able to find a way, but I can count on Alexa to either find a way or invent one.

 

Aubrey de Vere, 10th Earl of Oxford, 20th Great-Grandfather

September 20, 2016 1 Comment

St James the Less Churchyard

St James the Less Churchyard

Photo submitted by geoffrey gillon on findagrave.com

This is the final resting place of Sir Aubrey.  I would love to visit Haleigh someday to take in the sights and visit my dead ancestors, in romantic ruin.

Located on High Street in Hadleigh, Essex, England – Cemetery notes and/or description from findagrave.com: Hadleigh is a town in southeast Essex, England, on the A13 between Benfleet and Leigh-on-Sea. Although a historic settlement with its castle, it has become intertwined with Benfleet to the West and Leigh-on-Sea to the East. This has led to the Hadleigh in Suffolk becoming more well known. Hadleigh is probably best known for its castle, and the country park that surrounds it. The castle has been a romantic ruin for a few hundred years, but parts of two towers are still standing. John Constable painted Hadleigh Castle in 1829, and the painting now resides at the Yale Center for British Art in USA.. Set at the top of a hill overlooking the Thames Estuary, it is possible to see as far as the Canary Wharf development to the west. Since the Local Government Act 1972, Hadleigh, along with Canvey Island, South Benfleet, and Thundersley has formed the parliamentary constituency and local government district and borough of Castle Point. General Booth, founder of the Salvation Army, established the Farm Colony in 1891 in Hadleigh. Today the colony operates an employment training centre for people who have special training needs, and accepts referrals from Social Services and the Employment Service. A reminder of the Salvation Army’s work in the area is a special section at the east end of the churchyard for the graves of Colony officers and workers. St. James the Less Church, like the castle, is a Norman building, with a typical Norman round east end, but the church is still in use today. It is built of Kentish ragstone with 3 feet thick walls. It remains picturesque despite the fact that it effectively stands in the central reservation or island, of the A13.(text by Geoffrey Gillon)

Hedingham Castle in Essex, John de Vere's main residence

Hedingham Castle in Essex, John de Vere’s main residence

 

My 20th great-grandfather was tight with the Black Prince, who took good care of his people.  Sir Aubrey was knighted and accompanied the Black Prince to Aquitaine in battle.  His father, John de Vere, is both my 21st and my 20th great-grandfather.  This is because I descend from two of his children, Aubrey and Margaret.  I am pretty sure I also descend from the Edward Black Prince himself, but more about that later.  When sorting out various branches of a tree it is really important to look carefully for errors.

Sir Aubrey 10th Earl of Oxford DeVere (1338 – 1400)
20th great-grandfather
Sir Richard, 11th Earl of Oxford DeVere KG (1385 – 1417)
son of Sir Aubrey 10th Earl of Oxford DeVere
Sir John 12th Earl of Oxford DeVere (1408 – 1462)
son of Sir Richard, 11th Earl of Oxford DeVere KG
John DeVere (1447 – 1509)
son of Sir John 12th Earl of Oxford DeVere
John DeVere (1490 – 1540)
son of John DeVere
Frances DeVere (1517 – 1577)
daughter of John DeVere
Thomas Howard (1536 – 1572)
son of Frances DeVere
Margaret Howard (1561 – 1591)
daughter of Thomas Howard
Lady Ann Dorset (1552 – 1680)
daughter of Margaret Howard
Robert Lewis (1574 – 1656)
son of Lady Ann Dorset
Robert Lewis (1607 – 1644)
son of Robert Lewis
Ann Lewis (1631 – 1686)
daughter of Robert Lewis
Joshua Morse (1669 – 1753)
son of Ann Lewis
Joseph Morse (1692 – 1756)
son of Joshua Morse
Joseph Morse (1721 – 1776)
son of Joseph Morse
Joseph Morse III (1756 – 1835)
son of Joseph Morse
John Henry Morse (1775 – 1864)
son of Joseph Morse III
Abner Morse (1808 – 1838)
son of John Henry Morse
Daniel Rowland Morse (1838 – 1910)
son of Abner Morse
Jason A Morse (1862 – 1932)
son of Daniel Rowland Morse
Ernest Abner Morse (1890 – 1965)
son of Jason A Morse
Richard Arden Morse (1920 – 2004)
son of Ernest Abner Morse
Pamela Morse
I am the daughter of Richard Arden Morse

Aubrey de Vere, 10th Earl of Oxford (c. 1338 – 15 February 1400) was the second son of John de Vere, 7th Earl of Oxford and Maud de Badlesmere, daughter of Bartholomew de Badlesmere, 1st Lord Badlesmere.
In 1360 he was made steward of the royal forest of Havering in Essex. In 1367 was retained to ‘abide for life’ with the Black Prince, with a substantial allowance. He was knighted, made constable of Wallingford Castle in 1375 and also given the honours of Wallingford and St. Valery, though he gave up Wallingford in 1378 for Hadleigh Castle. Edward III used him as an ambassador in seeking peace with France. In 1381, de Vere became a Chamberlain of the Royal Household and member of the privy council. In 1388 his nephew, Robert de Vere, Duke of Ireland and 9th Earl of Oxford was deemed a traitor, causing Aubrey to lose his post of chamberlain. However, after Robert’s death in 1392, the king gave Aubrey the title of Earl of Oxford allowing him to take a seat in parliament. Aubrey’s son, Richard became the 11th Earl of Oxford on his death.

John De Vere, Earl of Oxford, 20th Great-Grandfather

September 19, 2016 4 Comments

Siege of Rheims

Siege of Rheims

My 20th great-grandfather was the 7th Earl of Oxford, hereditary Chamberlain of England.  He was son and heir to Sir Alphonese de Vere and Joan Foliot, grandson of Sir Robert de Vere and Alice de Sanford, Sir Jordan Foliot and Margery Newmarch.  He was husband of Maud de Badlesmere, daughter of Bartholomew Badlesmere and Margaret de Clare, widow of Robert FitzPayne. They were married before 27 March 1336 and had four sons and three daughters.  John was a captain in King Edward III’s army, and as such participated in the Battle of Crécy and the Battle of Poitiers.

John de Vere, 7th Earl of Oxford (c. 12 March 1312 – 24 January 1360) was the nephew and heir of Robert de Vere, 6th Earl of Oxford. He succeeded as Earl of Oxford in 1331, after his uncle died without issue. John de Vere was a trusted captain of Edward III in the king’s wars in Scotland and France, and took part in both the Battle of Crécy and the Battle of Poitiers. He died campaigning in France in 1360. Throughout his career he was closely associated with William de Bohun, 1st Earl of Northampton, who was his brother-in-law.

Hedingham Castle in Essex, John de Vere's main residence

Hedingham Castle in Essex, John de Vere’s main residence

 

John de Vere was the only son of Alfonso de Vere, and Jane, daughter of Sir Richard Foliot. Alfonso was a younger son of Robert de Vere, 5th Earl of Oxford, and brother of Robert de Vere, 6th Earl of Oxford. When the younger Earl Robert’s son died without issue in 1329, the earl obtained licence from the king to entail his estates on his nephew, John.  It was in this way that John de Vere, when his uncle died 17 April 1331, became Earl of Oxford. He had made homage and received livery by 17 May.

In 1336 he married Maud, who was the second of the four daughters of Bartholomew de Badlesmere, 1st Baron Badlesmere, of Badlesmere in Kent and Margaret de Clare. Maud was a co-heiress of her brother Giles de Badlesmere, 2nd Baron Badlesmere. When Giles died in 1338, this brought a significant part of the Badlesmere inheritance into de Vere’s hands. The marriage also forged a strong bond with William Bohun, Earl of Northampton, who had married Badlesmere’s third daughter, Elizabeth de Badlesmere and thus became Oxford’s brother-in-law.The two campaigned together, sat on the same commissions and died the same year.

De Vere’s military career began with service on Edward III’s Scottish campaigns, in the 1330s Second War of Scottish Independence. He took part in the Roxburgh campaign of 1334–5, and in the summer campaign of 1335.   Later in the decade, England’s military efforts turned towards France, with the beginning of the Hundred Years’ War. In March 1340, de Vere served in Flanders, and was therefore out of the country during Edward’s disputes with Archbishop John de Stratford. Oxford was not forced to take sides in the conflict, and has been described as a “political neutral”.

After a period in England, de Vere returned to the Continent in 1342, where he served with Northampton, who had been made lieutenant of Brittany. They both took part in the Battle of Morlaix that year. The next year the two earls were sent to Scotland to relieve Lochmaben Castle, and in 1345 they were again campaigning in Brittany. Tradition has it that, returning to England, their ships were forced ashore by bad weather, and the party was robbed of their possessions by the locals.  In the summer of 1346 de Vere was campaigning with the king in Normandy, and took part in the Battle of Crécy. According to the chronicler Froissart, de Vere was fighting with the Black Prince, and was among the captains who sent a request to Edward III for reinforcements when the king famously answered ‘Let the boy win his spurs’.  Oxford was also at the Siege of Calais, but reportedly fell ill in 1348, and did not take part in any major campaigning until 1355.

In 1355 he was again in the company of the Black Prince, and took part in the prince’s great raid in Languedoc. 19 September 1356, at the Battle of Poitiers, Oxford was in command of the vanguard together with the earl of Warwick. de Vere’s attack on the flank of the French cavalry, with a group of archers, did much to secure the English victory.  His last campaign was Edward III’s Rheims campaign in 1359–60. Here he died, probably during the raid into Burgundy, on 23 or 24 January 1360.  He was buried in the de Vere family’s burial place Colne Priory in Essex.

Maud de Vere died in 1366. The couple had four sons and two daughters. The eldest son, John, married the daughter of Hugh Courtenay, Earl of Devon, but died before his father, in 1350. Also another son, Robert, died in his father’s lifetime. The oldest remaining son was then Thomas, born around 1336–7, who succeeded his father in 1360. Thomas’s son Robert succeeded at his father’s death, but with Robert’s forfeiture in 1392, the earldom was given to Robert’s uncle Aubrey – the seventh earl’s fourth son. The eldest daughter, Margaret, married three times, while of the second, Matilda, little is known.

John de Vere, in the family tradition of the “fighting de Veres”, was active in almost all major military engagements in the years from 1340 to 1360.  On the Roxburgh campaign he brought a retinue of twenty-eight men-at-arms and twelve mounted archers. In Brittany in 1342, the retinue had grown to forty men-at-arms, one banneret, nine knights, twenty-nine esquires, and thirty mounted archers.  His retinue was of a diverse composition, and also included foreign mercenaries.[10] At one point, in the Battle of Poitiers, John Hawkwood, who was later to make his fortune as a condottiero in Italy, also served with de Vere.   Yet in spite of this, de Vere never distinguished himself particularly as a military commander. Neither did he receive a great amount of royal patronage, and was never made a member of the Order of the Garter. This was largely a consequence of the de Vere family’s relatively modest resources among the English peerage. As an example can be mentioned that in the late 1340, £349 were owed to Oxford in arrears for his services, yet at the same time the king owed Northampton two debts of £782 and £1237.  This obstacle of resources and status John de Vere was unable to overcome either by marriage or warfare.

from John de Vere, 7th Earl of Oxford
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

 

John de Vere (1311 – 1359)
20th great-grandfather
Margaret De Vere (1340 – 1398)
daughter of John de Vere
Margaret De Lovaine (1372 – 1408)
daughter of Margaret De Vere
Thomas St Clair (1394 – 1434)
son of Margaret De Lovaine
Edith StClair (1425 – 1472)
daughter of Thomas St Clair
Alice Harcourt (1450 – 1526)
daughter of Edith StClair
Elizabeth Bessiles (1465 – 1511)
daughter of Alice Harcourt
Anne Fettiplace (1496 – 1567)
daughter of Elizabeth Bessiles
Mary Purefoy (1533 – 1579)
daughter of Anne Fettiplace
Susanna Thorne (1559 – 1586)
daughter of Mary Purefoy
Gov Thomas Dudley (1576 – 1653)
son of Susanna Thorne
Anne Dudley (1612 – 1672)
daughter of Gov Thomas Dudley
John Bradstreet (1652 – 1718)
son of Anne Dudley
Mercy Bradstreet (1689 – 1725)
daughter of John Bradstreet
Caleb Hazen (1720 – 1777)
son of Mercy Bradstreet
Mercy Hazen (1747 – 1819)
daughter of Caleb Hazen
Martha Mead (1784 – 1860)
daughter of Mercy Hazen
Abner Morse (1808 – 1838)
son of Martha Mead
Daniel Rowland Morse (1838 – 1910)
son of Abner Morse
Jason A Morse (1862 – 1932)
son of Daniel Rowland Morse
Ernest Abner Morse (1890 – 1965)
son of Jason A Morse
Richard Arden Morse (1920 – 2004)
son of Ernest Abner Morse
Pamela Morse
You are the daughter of Richard Arden Morse

  • EO7 – John de Vere, 7th Earl of Oxford (1313 – 1360)

John de Vere, 7th Earl of Oxford and 8th Great Chamberlain, born in 1313, became one of the most famous “Fighting Earls of Oxford,” renowned for bravery, gallantry, and chivalry as one of Edward III’s greatest generals, serving in Scotland, France, Flanders, Brittany and Gascony.

John was the son and heir of Sir Alfonso de Vere (d. 1328) [younger brother of Robert de Vere, EO6] by his wife Jane, daughter of Sir Richard Foliot. John succeeded his uncle, who left no issue, in April 1331. John EO7 actively participated in the wars of King Edward III’s, fighting in the Scottish campaigns of 1333 and 1335, in support of Edward Baliol. When war broke out with France in 1339, EO7 accompanied King Edward III to Flanders, and, in 1342 joined the first Breton campaign of William de Bohun, earl of Northampton. EO7 had, in his war party, 40 men-at-arms, one banneret, nine knights, 29 esquires, and 30 mounted archers, with an allowance of 56 sacks of wool as wages. On one occasion, when EO7 was returning from fighting on the continent, his ship was driven off course and wrecked on the shores of Connaught where some ‘barbarous people’ robbed the party of all of their possessions. [A similar encounter with pirates happened 200+ years later to the 17th Earl of Oxford upon his return from Italy and France in 1576). John de Vere, EO7, was a commander at the battles of Crecy, where he fought with a contingent of 160 men, including three bannerets and 27 knights. In October 1355, EO7 returned to France, joining the Black Prince in his famous raid into the Languedoc. EO7 shared the command of the first division at Poitiers with the Earl of Warwick, where he organized a crucial maneuver that saved the English archers from being downtrodden by the enemy’s cavalry.
“Yet all courage had been thrown away to no purpose, had it not been seconded by the extraordinary Gallantry of the English Archers, under the earl of Oxford, who behaved themselves that day with wonderful Constancy, Alacrity and Resolution ”
John de Vere, EO7, was killed during the siege of Rheims on January 24, 1360, during the British invasion of Burgundy. His corpse was brought back to England and interred in the family crypts at Colne Priory.

John’s will, dated November 1, 1359, contained bequests to Colne church and to the chapel (called the New Abbey) at Hedingham. EO7 also left instructions to his executors to pay out 400 marks sterling that had been accumulated by his ancestors in aid of the Holy Land.
John EO7 had married, in 1336, Maud Badlesmere [b. 1310, widow of Robert Fitzpayne], second sister and coheir of Giles, lord Badlesmere (d. 1338) of Badlesmere in Kent. The couple had had four sons and one daughter, Margaret or Maud. The sons were Thomas (1337-1371), the 8th Earl of Oxford, Aubrey, who became 10th EO in 1393, and John and Robert, who predeceased their father.
By EO7’s marriage, the title of Lord Badlesmere was added to the honorific employed by all later Earls of Oxford. His son Thomas succeeded him.

By Robert Brazil © copyright 2003

Weekend Coffee Share #CommunityMatters

September 18, 2016 2 Comments

painting

painting

fall flora in Tucson

fall flora in Tucson

fall flora in Tucson

fall flora in Tucson

Although I see some of you around the inter webs I have not taken the time to sit down and share coffee and life events with the group for a long time. I  follow with interest your writing projects and day to day issues because although we are scattered around the globe, we have much in common.  If you read and write as a primary source of pleasure and value, this coffee share is for you.  The diversity of nationality and interests makes this the perfect place to just chat about this and that.

Fall is finally arriving at a snail’s pace in Baja Arizona.  I have been writing about a serious crime problem we have had with the city government in Tucson for years.  I think after almost a decade we will finally get a little rule of law in the neighborhood where I live. It has been a ridiculous struggle to communicate with all departments of this highly convoluted system.  You never know how crazy it all is until you try to make it perform for the benefit of the community.  I started writing blog posts about our predicament in 2013, never thinking I was creating an e book about government dysfunction. I thought that as soon as I presented the facts the problem would be solved by our paid public servants.  This turned out to be a serious joke.  Not only did all the departments refuse to perform in their respective jurisdictions, they refused to respond when citizens petitioned and pleaded for law enforcement services.  I was dragged into the vortex of government dysfunction, to my horror.  There was no bottom to this high speed waste of public funds and energy.

I wrote a post every few months and sent them all to the officials I hoped to make aware of our dire straights.  This practice continues until today because every department  has refused to address the crime problems we have reported to them.  Without an hero I could never end the book or get any help to end obvious crime in my neighborhood.  I searched high and wide for a hero for ages, finally finding one at the police department. This is very fitting since we have been plagued with crime and willful blindness to it courtesy of the inaction and or refusal to respond by the police department.  We actually had a fake neighborhood watch to promote crime and willful blindness, funded by taxpayers.  The damage done was, and continues to be, significant to property value as well as quality of life.  It tuns out that once you set a precedent of non compliance and willful blindness it is very hard to change the direction.  It continues to drag the community down until it is reformed.

There were two working titles before I settled on the current, and very apt one. The first few years the book was named after the neighborhood watch cop who supported charity scamming in the fire lane of our condo village.  I called the work in progress “Dirty Becky”.  Then Tucson elected a mayor who is a lawyer.  Neighbors got all excited and petitioned this lawyer mayor to stop the 24 hour donation drop off inviting the general public to drive through our condo village to “donate” or volunteer to handle food for a charity scam.  He never responded to us, even after we petitioned two years in a row. He told some cops to just stonewall us, and all the crime continued full speed ahead.  Naturally with all this official help the scam stayed in business and completely trashed our hood as well as our respect for law enforcement.  The working title changed to “The Emperor’s New Neighborhood Watch” to indicate that the lawyer mayor still had no idea the neighborhood watch was working hard to promote crime in the hood.

I have, after all these years, and all this inability to find a government agency that functions for our benefit, created a third and final title for my e book.  It is “Clulusion, The Sinister Fusion of Cluelessness and Colusion in Government.”  I do think the title perfectly evokes the spirit of the book I never wanted to write.  Now all I need is a denouement.  The hero will need to move mountains because changing the government is a gigantic task.  When I am able to put this one in the can I think I can write an e book on purpose.  Have you ever written an e book, gentle reader?

If you care to join the weekend coffee share party, share your link here.

AlchemyAstrology: September 17-18, 2016, Saturday-Sunday, Passive

September 17, 2016 1 Comment

For this weekend, reflect and carefully select the new habits and practices you wish to make permanent in your life.

Alchemy Astrology

Moon in Pisces, laboratory process of Projectionemotionally instinctive

If you find an affinity for any of these statements it’s good to know what’s ‘in the air’.

A good time to: scrutinize and reinforce your gut feelings about things you want to stick with.

Challenges: Feeling that your amount of determination is a bit troublesome.

Balance: Just be attentive to what you know is right and remember to breath.

Sidereal astrology, from an individual viewpoint.
Keywords:
Sun in Virgo – persistent, analyzing = conscientious
Moon in Pisces – changes, relaxative = emotionally instinctive
Mercury in Leo – mental, organizing = positive
Venus in Virgo – pleasant, analyzing = fastidious
Mars in Scorpio – impulsive, solidifying = explosive
Jupiter in Virgo – fortunate, analyzing = dutiful
Saturn in Scorpio – disruptive, solidifying = purposeful

#alchemyastrology
—–
The author’s ads:

Laboratory Alchemists – plan ahead, purchase…

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Pygmalion Revisited

September 16, 2016 1 Comment


I subscribe to Hulu for a month at a time, then put the subscription on hold for the maximum time, 90 days.  This means it is only in the home 4 months out of the year, which is perfect for us. I binge down on different new shows, and by the end of the month I have seen everything I care to watch.  This month I have watched a lot of very well produced series.  I have focused on comedy, seeing at least 10 stand up comedy specials.  I also found many comedy tv series that make me very happy. My favorite, now that the month is coming to a close, is Selfie.  This modern day version of Pygmalion is hysterically updated to show characters typical to our times.  This social satire hits all the notes.

Eliza Dooley, the same archetype represented in My Fair Lady by Julie Andrews as Eliza Doolittle, has a modern twist as a self obsessed social media star.  The romantic comedy takes a satirical look at workaholics, socialnetworkaholics , and corporate hierarchy.  It is set in a children’s pharmaceutical company where Henry Higgins, the British snob, is thinly disguised as Henry Higgins, branding expert.  The plot and characters are instantly recognizable, but the story unfolds in ways I could never have imagined.  All the parts are extremely well played, but the writers and producers get major credit.  This script makes me laugh for every reason, from physical comedy schtick to sophisticated satirical commentary woven into the whole story.  Some of the smaller parts are the very best because they have such extreme personalities and dialogue. I will not give away more than that. Just watch it if you can.

The story of Pygmalion comes for the mythology of Greece.  It is based on a god who fell in love with one of his own sculptures.  In 1748 the story was presented at the prestigious Paris Opera House.  This production, written by Jean-Philippe Rameau, was staged as a one act piece.  Since that time this story has been told and retold, including the popular musical version with Rex Harrison playing the stuffy and rude Henry.  The story has the same punch line every time.

Greek god Pygmalion

Greek god Pygmalion

 

Edward Yelverton, Eleventh Great-Grandfather

September 15, 2016 3 Comments

 

Yelverton Family Tree

Yelverton Family Tree

My 11th great-grandfather lived in England when religion was a dangerous thing.  He and his wife were on a list of “popish Recusants” kept by Queen Elizabeth.  He was imprisoned for getting caught with Jesuits in his home.  He was a graduate of Peterhouse College.  His grave lies beneath the pavement of Sandringham Church. Location: Grimstonmanor, Norfolk,England

Edward Yelverton (1559 – 1623)
11th great-grandfather
Elishua Miller Yelverton (1592 – 1688)
daughter of Edward Yelverton
Yelverton Crowell (1621 – 1683)
son of Elishua Miller Yelverton
Elishua Crowell (1643 – 1708)
daughter of Yelverton Crowell
Yelverton Gifford (1676 – 1772)
son of Elishua Crowell
Ann Gifford (1715 – 1795)
daughter of Yelverton Gifford
Frances Congdon (1738 – 1755)
daughter of Ann Gifford
Samuel Thomas Sweet (1765 – 1844)
son of Frances Congdon
Valentine Sweet (1791 – 1858)
son of Samuel Thomas Sweet
Sarah LaVina Sweet (1840 – 1923)
daughter of Valentine Sweet
Jason A Morse (1862 – 1932)
son of Sarah LaVina Sweet
Ernest Abner Morse (1890 – 1965)
son of Jason A Morse
Richard Arden Morse (1920 – 2004)
son of Ernest Abner Morse
Pamela Morse
I am the daughter of Richard Arden Morse

Nazareth was known as the “virtuous and loving wife’ of Edward Yelverton. But she was also known as “an obstinate Recusant” and was listed as a “popish Recusant” which is a yearly list since the beginning of Elizabeth’s reign, and is a list of Catholics who refused to attend the worship of the Established Church, and denied the spiritual supremacy of the cross and were subjected to cruel penalties and fees.

Edward Yelverton, her spouse, was also named on the list of “Popish Recusants in Norforld and Suffolk. He was the son of William Yelverton of Rougham. Edward was born in Rougham and moved to Grim stone Manor, then to Appleton. He also had a small house in Wolferton. His grave lies beneath the pavement of Sandringham Church.
Edward inherited Estates at Grimstone. He received Jesuits there and was imprisoned in 1598.
Edward went to Peterhouse College and received a B.A. 1579-80

His grave lies beneath the pavement of Sandringham Church.

His grave lies beneath the pavement of Sandringham Church.

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