mermaidcamp

mermaidcamp

Keeping current in wellness, in and out of the water

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Beaching Ourselves

March 23, 2017 2 Comments

empty sandy beach

empty sandy beach

The sandy beach was sunlit and appealing as we stepped ashore. We had all been on a picnic party out to the island that had become a bit too rowdy for some of us. We left our jolly drinking friends to make their own way back, since they had become argumentative and feisty in a rude way. We could see that they had more than enough rum left to bring the evening to some kind of roaring conclusion, but we had roared quite enough with the crowd. They were always the same. We rowed the short distance back to mainland and felt the peace descend gently just as the sun sunk lower on the horizon, reflecting in the water.

I like to watch the sun go down from those dunes when the summer is starting to warm up. The sailing and kayaking pick up as weather permits. The bay becomes crowded with vessels, visitors, pretenders, and kings. The cottages are rented or opened for the just summer by those who can afford multiple dwellings. The visitors employ plenty of staff in the kitchens, gardens and drawing rooms. There are chauffeurs and butlers hanging out at the tavern in town late at night telling all the stories of their households to the other servants.

No secret lasted long, and no juicy gossip traveled on unembellished. Stories of wild lavish parties, intrigue and financial ruin were the daily bread of this summer society.  They did not separate themselves from city life to be out of touch with all the news.  They savored the tales of family strife or business struggles with relish.  We enjoy a week at the cottage my aunt lends to us every year at this time.  We do go to a few parties, like the picnic today, but we don’t really come for the social life. We like the beach when it is empty.  Our pleasures are simple and all our needs are easily met.  We pull our green rowboat out of the water and lift it over our heads to carry it back to the boathouse. The day is complete.

This story is based on the inspiration drawn from Sue Vincent’s photo prompt.  Please join us to submit a poem or story, read, or comment on last week’s photo  here.

#writephoto

#writephoto

Inclined To Glory

March 22, 2017 2 Comments

sky

sky

Tomorrow I might decide to fight but now I am inclined
To let the ship of fools sail out of the harbor without a word
They have enough rope and madness has made them blind
There is no stopping the clueless, no redemption for the herd
There is a stampede rumbling and roaring over the cliff so steep
The fog hides their destiny, Davey Jones awaits them in the deep
Neptune will have his way with them, drowning, gasping death
Takes them from the perils of living, choking out their last breath

Edmund Lockwood, Eleventh Great-Grandfather

March 21, 2017 1 Comment

The Arabella

The Arabella

My eleventh great-grandfather was an early settler in Cambridge, Massachusetts.  The records of the Massachusetts Bay Colony are extensive, so we know quite a bit about his life in America.

MIGRATION: 1630
FIRST RESIDENCE: Cambridge
FREEMAN: Requested 19 October 1630 (as “Mr. Edmond Lockwood”) and admitted 18 May 1631 (as “Mr. Edmond Lockewood”) [MBCR 1:79, 366].
OFFICES: Trial jury in case of Walter Palmer (as “Mr. Edmond Lockwood”), 9 November 1630 [MBCR 1:81]; “Mr. Lockwood” deputy to General Court for Cambridge, 9 May 1632 [MBCR 1:95]; “Mr. Edmond Lockwood” constable for Cambridge, 9 May 1632
ESTATE: 3 March 1634/5: “It is ordered, that Ruth Lockwood, widow, shall bring all the writings that her husband left in her hands to John Haynes, Esq., & Simon Bradstreete, on the third day of the next week, who shall detain the same in their hands till the next Court, when they shall be disposed of to those to whom they belong”
7 April 1635: “It is referred to the church of Waterton, with the consent of Rob[er]te Lockwood, executor of Edmond Lockwood, deceased, to dispose of the children & estate of the said Edmond Lockwood, given to them, to such persons as they think meet, which if they perform not within fourteen days, it shall be lawful for the Governor, John Hayne, Esq., & Simon Bradstreete, to dispose of the said children & estates as in their discretion, they shall think meet, as also to take an account of the said Rob[er]te Lockwood, & give him a full discharge”
2 June 1635: “In the cause of the children & widow of Edward Lockwood, (the elders & other of the church of Waterton being present,) and upon consideration of the order of Court in April last made in the case, which was found not to have been observed, because the estate was not computed & apportioned, it is now ordered, with consent of all parties, viz:, the church of Waterton, the widow of the said Edmond living, & the executor having consented to the former order, that the present Governor & the Secretary shall have power to call parties & witnesses for finding out the true estate, having consideration of the uncertainty of the will, & the debts, & other circumstances, to apportion the remainder of the estate to the wife & children, according to their best discretion; & then the church of Waterton is to dispose of the elder children & their portions as shall be best for their Christian education & the preservation of their estate” [MBCR 1:151].
BIRTH: By about 1600 based on estimated date of marriage (but see COMMENTS below).
DEATH: Cambridge between 9 May 1632 [MBCR 1:95, 96] and 3 March 1634/5 [MBCR1:134] (and probably closer to the earlier date, since Edmund Lockwood does not appear in any of the recorded Cambridge land grants beginning in August 1633).
MARRIAGE: (1) By about 1625 _____ _____; she may have died in England before 1630.
(2) By 1632 Elizabeth Masters, daughter of JOHN MASTERS; she married (2) Cary Latham of Cambridge.
CHILDREN:
With first wife

i EDMUND, b. England say 1625; m. Stamford 7 January 1655[/6] Hannah Scott, daughter of Thomas Scott [FOOF 1:381].

ii Child (one or more additional children by first wife implied by court order to the Watertown church “to dispose of the elder children” [MBCR 1:151]); no further record.

With second wife
iii JOHN, b. Cambridge November 1632 (“son of Edward Lockwood & Elisabeth his wife”) [NEHGR 4:181]; d. at New London in 1683, unmarried [Lockwood Gen 10].

ASSOCIATIONS: Although no record states the relationship explicitly, Edmund and Robert Lockwood were almost certainly brothers.
COMMENTS: The oft-stated origin of the Lockwood brothers in Combs, Suffolk, seems to be based on nothing more than finding the right names at about the right time. Further research is needed before this origin can be accepted.
In a discussion of financial transactions, John Winthrop wrote to his son John in Groton 23 July 1630 saying “If money be brought to you or your Uncle Downinge for Goodman Lockwood, let Mr. Peirce be paid his bill of provisions for him, and bring the rest with you” [WP 2:306].
“Mr. Edmond Lockwood” was the third in the list of eight “Newtowne Inhabitants” which is found at the beginning of the Cambridge town records, and probably dates from 1632 [CaTR2].
After NICHOLAS KNAPP was fined for quackery on 1 March 1630/1, “Mr. Will[ia]m Pelham and Mr. Edmond Lockewood hath promised to pay to the Court the sum of £5” [MBCR 1:83].
BIBLIOGRAPHIC NOTE: The 1889 Lockwood genealogy (Frederic A. Holden and E. Dunbar Lockwood, Descendants of Robert Lockwood, History of the Lockwood Family in America[Philadelphia 1889]) was deservedly described by Jacobus as “a genealogical atrocity” [TAG31:222]. By lumping all the descendants of the first Edmund under his brother Robert, the posterity of this family through eldest son Edmund was misplaced.
Donald Lines Jacobus began to sort the family out properly in 1930, with further contributions made in 1955 [FOOF 1:380-81; TAG 31:222-24]. In 1978 Harriet Woodbury Hodge published detailed arguments for a rearrangement of the Lockwood families that would restore to Edmund Lockwood his children [Some Descendants of Edmund Lockwood (1594-1635) of Cambridge, Massachusetts, and his son Edmund Lockwood (c. 1625-1693) of Stamford, Connecticut (New York 1978), cited above as Lockwood Gen].
Edmund Lockwood (1574 – 1634)
11th great-grandfather
Eliner Lockwood (1592 – 1658)
daughter of Edmund Lockwood
Caleb Knapp (1637 – 1684)
son of Eliner Lockwood
Sarah Knapp (1669 – 1750)
daughter of Caleb Knapp
Ebenezer Mead (1692 – 1775)
son of Sarah Knapp
Deacon Silas Meade (1730 – 1807)
son of Ebenezer Mead
Abner Mead (1749 – 1810)
son of Deacon Silas Meade
Martha Mead (1784 – 1860)
daughter of Abner Mead
Abner Morse (1808 – 1838)
son of Martha Mead
Daniel Rowland Morse (1838 – 1910)
son of Abner Morse
Jason A Morse (1862 – 1932)
son of Daniel Rowland Morse
Ernest Abner Morse (1890 – 1965)
son of Jason A Morse
Richard Arden Morse (1920 – 2004)
son of Ernest Abner Morse
Pamela Morse
I am the daughter of Richard Arden Morse

Mechanism Of The Cosmos

March 20, 2017 1 Comment

opening

opening

The mechanism drives forward through the cosmic dust of seasons
Waking the flora and the fauna of each time of year is a serious task
Few moments of equilibrium contrast with plunges into disorder
Filling the months and years with primary planting and development
Fruition of every harvest begins a new cycle of reaping and sowing
The rushing of planets though nighttime sky continues unabated
What kind of seasons will follow these? Will there be more drought?

opening

opening

Path To The River

March 19, 2017 3 Comments

 

Santa Cruz River

Santa Cruz River

Santa Cruz River

Santa Cruz River

On the way down to the river the thick grass rustled as we walked
Animals scampered away as we approached, finding shelter
Our thirsty tired bodies were weary from days of hiding and running
The heat of the day was dry and brutally bright with white sunlight
Tears fell into the river when we finally touched the water at last
Our latest disaster might be averted by this running stream we found
We can fill ourselves and our canteens with liquid we hope is not foul

Our lives have become precarious, supported merely by twists of fate

There is no question that we must drink it, polluted or not, or we will perish

 

 

 

 

#WeekendCoffeeShare Spring Training Edition

March 18, 2017 17 Comments

If we were having coffee this weekend I would show you my new favorite item, which is parked just inside my front door. It is my new Power Plate Personal vibration platform. I had purchased a cheap knock of version of this equipment and become very addicted to using it. The knock off completely died electronically after two month’s use. I am always bragging that I am thrifty but not cheap. In this case I proved myself wrong by purchasing an inferior product while trying to “save” money. Imagine my ire when I looked it up on Amazon and found out they are no longer even selling the thing. I left a horrible review, then went on to read many other horrific reviews of the many cheap knock off brands. I reached the conclusion that I needed to invest in a Power Plate to make the most of my dollar expenditure. Amazon delivered, as usual, and sold me a 5 year warrantee on parts and labor that makes me feel secure that I have made a good decision this time about my purchase. My new equipment is far superior to the trashy thing I bought, and comes with a free month of video training.  This is the spring training I had in mind.  I learned my lesson about Chinese knock off merch.

If you were hanging out here today, perhaps trying the Power Plate, just for fun, you would be seriously treated to major aromatherapy. The pink jasmine in front is in full bloom, along with the white Lady Banksia rose. The jasmine scent is intoxicating, and will soon be followed by two other varieties of jasmine. In the back yard my lemon tree is blooming and setting fruit profusely this year. Last year I had a crop of zero lemons, which saddened me greatly. It looks like a bumper crop this year. The bees are very busy pollinating the flowers.  Please sit back and enjoy some iced tea, pink grapefruit juice, or freshly squeezed tomato juice.  I processed fresh tomatoes all week, and still have almost a full case, so this morning we are making a big brunch with fresh tomato juice.  Please stay for brunch, which will feature very fresh eggs from my neighbor’s pampered chickens.

If we were having coffee (juice or iced tea) this weekend I would extend my sympathy to those of you who suffered severe snow storm, Stella.  I loved snow as a child growing up in Pittsburgh, and as a serious downhill skier in middle age, but have no use for it today.  I don’t know how to drive in it, and probably could no longer construct a decent snow fort if challenged to a snowball fight.  Winter weather does seem rather perfect for writers, in a way.  Stuck indoors, perhaps with winds howling past the door, and perilous conditions on the nearest waterway, a creative person could come up with some imaginative stories.  I read some really good ones this week on Sue Vincent’s Daily Echo #writephoto blog. My own little fiction story took a hellish, dark, underworld turn, once again surprising me with the disturbing sinister tales my fiction muse creates.  I think maybe I need to listen to Homer’s Odyssey to get into this whole journey into darkness and then home again theme.  I found it free on Amazon and will add it when Alexa finishes reading my next book.  I never hurts to review the classics.

Pray tell, gentle reader, what have you been reading and writing? This movable coffee, tea, juice, and story smorgasbord meets each weekend at Nerd on the Brain’s blog.  Please join us here to contribute, to comment, or enjoy the literary and imaginary international gourmet feast.

#WeekendCoffeeShare

#WeekendCoffeeShare

St. Patrick’s Day Special – Irish Weather – The Musical – Narrated by renowned author – I.V.E. Mildew

March 17, 2017 1 Comment

St Patrick’s Day Special

Smorgasbord - Variety is the spice of life

Welcome to the St. Patrick’s Day Special and my name is I.V.E. Mildew, a raconteur, author, graffiti artist and bon vivant. I have lived all my life amongst the warm hearted and generous people’s of this Isle and delight in sharing its bounteous beauty.

Ireland is renowned for its lush emerald green scenery, ancient history, singing, dancing and an abundance of the wet stuff. No, not the dark stuff served up around the world, but the reason why Guinness tastes so much better when drunk here in Ireland, and what makes our clover so bright and green.

That would be the rain my friends.

In the space of a couple of hours you can experience all of the moods and variations that the Irish weather has to offer. For over 200 days of the year that usually involves a drop of the grand soft drizzle to tumultuous downpours that…

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#Writephoto The Hinges Of Hades

March 16, 2017 8 Comments

 

Hades

Hades

His death was sudden and unexpected, leaving matters in disarray at home, at his business, and with his students.  The mystery school had been meeting in underground caves teaching secrets and rites of magical passage.  Delphina became Fidel’s assistant, a priestess who inherited prophesy and ritual magic from her people, who came from an island with a volcano.  When the volcano erupted few survivors managed to make it to safety.  Delphina and her grandmother were saved by a passing ship.  She was only 3 years old when she arrived in her new land, so she found it easy to adapt to the culture and language.  Her grandmother suffered from nostalgia and yearned for a home Delphina did not remember.

Fidel lived next door and was her friend all through childhood.  Her grandmother was cautiously approving of him, observing his exceptional nature.  After her grandmother died Delphina moved in with Fidel’s family, and eventually married him.  Their work together at the school replaced children and family in their lives.  They dedicated themselves to higher truth and strict observance of their beliefs.  She had grown up within the culture, and never questioned the motives or the fundamental beliefs of the elders.  They always told her she was lucky to be alive, and she agreed.  She did not question the essential mystery she had been taught.  She believed that wealth was the most important and significant reward granted to the faithful.  Her teachings reflected her willingness to do anything to acquire money.  Fidel, whose very name meant faithful, was a son of Lucifer, trained in the art of stealing souls.  He was raised in splendor and glorious excess to impress the rest of the populace.  It never occurred to him that the rest of the inhabitants were there because they had been cursed.  He never suspected their deep resentment of his position.  He never even suspected who he was himself. His whole life was the ultimate betrayal.

While he was carrying out a ritual hypnotism in the inner sanctum of the cave, a group of hooded assassins stabbed him a thousand times with pitchforks.  The shocking news reached Delphina as she descended into the chamber to deliver ritual wine.  The large heavy gate at the top of the stairway slammed behind her, leaving her trapped with her husband’s murderers.  This was the first inkling she had about her true location and her fate.  She read the sign now facing her on the gate.  “Hotter than the hinges of Hades”, was all it said.

#writephoto

#writephoto

This is a response to Sue Vincent’s photo prompt.  Please visit to contribute your own story, read, or comment.  There is a lively and interesting mix of writers who regularly contribute here.  Enjoy!

Musical Instrument Museum

March 15, 2017 4 Comments

The Musical Instrument Museum in Phoenix is a destination worth a lengthy visit. I spent the day there recently in complete awe.  The special exhibit on display now is an incredible collection of artfully inlaid instruments.  They exhibit includes videos to show the methods and makers of this specialized art. The intricacy they achieve is impressive, and almost impossible to discern with the naked eye.  The museum furnishes the visitors with little flashlights to illuminate the inlay for better appreciation of the detail.  This show is all in one large room, but is packed with amazing art.  The exhibit is both enlightening and inspirational.  I have a new appreciation for this fine craftsmanship.

The well designed space tells the story of the history and evolution of music all around the globe.  There are instruments and videos to explain the origins and uses of them arranged by geographic region.  Plan to spend a long time, or go back more than once to see the entire space.  I took out some time in the afternoon to attend a concert by the Phoenix Symphony Orchestra in the small acoustically perfect theater on site.  The selections played were very special for the small space, and I had a front row seat with a direct view of the conductor.  It was intimate and wonderfully transformative.  I enjoyed the concert immensely, and would return for another matinée the next time I plan a trip. The concert/museum combination is hard to beat. The concert series offers all kinds of music, and the prices are very reasonable for the quality.  The concert hall is a real treat in itself.  I highly recommend this museum for an hour or a week.  It is fascinating, and feeds the soul.

William Mead, Ninth Great-Grandfather

March 14, 2017 1 Comment

Entrance to Old Sound Cemetery, also known as the Tomac Burying Grounds

Entrance to Old Sound Cemetery, also known as the Tomac Burying Grounds

“William Mead, born in England, about 1600, probably sailed from Lydd, County Kent, England, in the ship, Elizabeth, Captain Stagg, April 1635, for the Massachusetts Bay Colony; first settled in Wethersfield, Connecticut; removed to Stamford, Connecticut, in 1641, where he died about 1663. His wife died at Stamford, Sept. 19, 1657. Their children were: Joseph, Martha, and John. Joseph and John settled in the town of Greenwich. See “History & Genealogy of the Mead Family”, Spencer Mead.”
THE MEAD FAMILY
The Mead Family of Greenwich, Fairfield Co., Conn. was originally from England, and came to this country shortly after the Mayflower had landed its load of Pilgrims on the shores of Massachusetts. It has generally been the tradition in the family that two brothers came over; that one stopped at the Eastward, while the other came to Horse-Neck. That two brothers or possibly three, came over is very probable, as it would not be natural for one to come alone, could he find a relative to join him in his adventures. In the “History of Lexington, Mass.” we find that Gabriel Mead was one of the earliest settlers of that place, as also David. The dates of their arrival, and of William of Horse-Neck (or rather Stamford) agree with one another, leading to the conclusion that all three were near relatives; furthermore the Coat-of -arms of both branches is identical, which is almost proof positive. It is not fully detemined from what part of England the Connecticut family came; but searches that have been made there seem to show a starting place somewhere near London, possibly Greenwich, Co. Kent.
The first record of any Mead in Fairfield Co. is the following in Stamford Town Records: “Dec. 7, 1641, William Mayd received from the town of Stamford, a homelot and 5 acres of land.” This William was undoubtedly the ancestor of the Fairfield Co. Meads. His wife died Sept. 19, 1657. We have record of three children. Joseph, born in 1630, the ancestor of the Ridgefield and North Fairfield Co. Meads; Martha, who married John Richardson, of Stamford, and John, the ancestor of the Horse-Neck Meads. The two sons, Joseph 2 and John 2, seem to have migrated (though if proved only a temporary sojourn) to Hempstead, L. I.
John 2 removed from Hempstead, L. I. to Greenwich (Horse-neck) in 1660. It was in this village that he purchased land; the date of the deed is Oct. 26, 1660, and is as follows, verbatim et literation.
These presents witnesseth an agreement made between Richard Crab of Grenwich, on ye one side & John Mead of Hemstead on Long Island on ye other side, viz: ye sd Richard Crab hath sould unto ye sd John Mead all his houses & Lands yt sd Richard Crab hath in Grenwich with all ye Apurtenances. Rights & Privileges & Conveniences yt doth belong unto ye sd houses & lands or shall here after belong unto them namely ye house yt Rechard Crab liveth in. Ye house yt Thomas Studwell liveth in with ye Barne yt is on ye other side of ye hyewaye; also ye home lott ye house stands on being bounded with a fence about them Lying on ye North west side against ye home lott also Eightene Acres of Land in Elizabeth neck more or less being bounded on ye sea on ye East ans south east and a fence on ye west norwest & ye north. Also ye Rig (ridge?) with five acres of Meadow Lying in it more or les. Ye rig being bounded by ye Sea on ye south east. Williamses Land on the east & a fence on ye northwest. Ye hye waye & hubert (Hubbard?) & angell Husted land on ye west; also three acres of meadow in ye Long meadow & one acre of Meadow by ferris bounded by Jeffere Ferris land on ye southwest and ye Cove on ye west and northwest: ye hyewaye on ye East & northeast & five acres of meadow in myanos neck. All these above spesiffied I do acknoledge to have sould unto ye above sd John Mead. His heaires & asignes fully & freely to be posses forever & for ye just & full performance hereof I have hereunto subscribed my hand Ann 1660 October 26 Daye.
Richerd Crabb

Tomac Burying Grounds

Tomac Burying Grounds

William Mead (1600 – 1659)
9th great-grandfather
John Mead (1634 – 1699)
son of William Mead
Benjamin Daniel Mead (1667 – 1746)
son of John Mead
Mary Mead (1724 – 1787)
daughter of Benjamin Daniel Mead
Abner Mead (1749 – 1810)
son of Mary Mead
Martha Mead (1784 – 1860)
daughter of Abner Mead
Abner Morse (1808 – 1838)
son of Martha Mead
Daniel Rowland Morse (1838 – 1910)
son of Abner Morse
Jason A Morse (1862 – 1932)
son of Daniel Rowland Morse
Ernest Abner Morse (1890 – 1965)
son of Jason A Morse
Richard Arden Morse (1920 – 2004)
son of Ernest Abner Morse
Pamela Morse
I am the daughter of Richard Arden Morse

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