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Say It In Latin, Fiat Justitia

February 22, 2017

The term fiat justitia (et ruat caelum) means let justice be done (though the heavens fall).  In other words, justice is the most important of all things to be done.  In our society justice has been left to wither and die.  Social injustice has overcome the masses and the inequity of income inequality is taken for granted.  The vast majority of the American population has little knowledge of finances or government.  They have no political will, so to speak, because the lack the education to discern right from wrong and lawful from criminal. They have been trampled by unjust and corrupt institutions that no longer have legitimate authority.  We are in a crisis of ignorance. This volatile time in history will certainly change the world. The question is, will we wake up in time to make a change for the better?

We have been hypnotized to believe that justice is no longer possible.  I like what this trippy Irish guy has to say about this.  We are our own judges, gentle readers.

Robert the Bruce, 21st Great-Grandfather

February 21, 2017 9 Comments

birthplace, Turnberry Castle

birthplace, Turnberry Castle

This is one of the ways I descend from the famous badass, Robert the Bruce:

Robert Bruce (1274 – 1329)
21st great-grandfather
Marjorie Bruce (1297 – 1316)
daughter of Robert Bruce
Robert II, King of Scotland, Stewart (1316 – 1390)
son of Marjorie Bruce
Robert Scotland Stewart (1337 – 1406)
son of Robert II, King of Scotland, Stewart
James I Scotland Stewart (1394 – 1434)
son of Robert Scotland Stewart
Joan Stewart (1428 – 1486)
daughter of James I Scotland Stewart
John Gordon (1450 – 1517)
son of Joan Stewart
Robert Lord Gordon (1475 – 1525)
son of John Gordon
Catherine Gordon (1497 – 1537)
daughter of Robert Lord Gordon
Lady Elizabeth Ashton (1524 – 1588)
daughter of Catherine Gordon
Capt Roger Dudley (1535 – 1585)
son of Lady Elizabeth Ashton
Gov Thomas Dudley (1576 – 1653)
son of Capt Roger Dudley
Anne Dudley (1612 – 1672)
daughter of Gov Thomas Dudley
John Bradstreet (1652 – 1718)
son of Anne Dudley
Mercy Bradstreet (1689 – 1725)
daughter of John Bradstreet
Caleb Hazen (1720 – 1777)
son of Mercy Bradstreet
Mercy Hazen (1747 – 1819)
daughter of Caleb Hazen
Martha Mead (1784 – 1860)
daughter of Mercy Hazen
Abner Morse (1808 – 1838)
son of Martha Mead
Daniel Rowland Morse (1838 – 1910)
son of Abner Morse
Jason A Morse (1862 – 1932)
son of Daniel Rowland Morse
Ernest Abner Morse (1890 – 1965)
son of Jason A Morse
Richard Arden Morse (1920 – 2004)
son of Ernest Abner Morse
Pamela Morse
I am the daughter of Richard Arden Morse

Robert The Bruce was born on 11 July 1274, probably in Turnberry Castle. He was descended from Scots, Gaelic and English nobility. His mother, Countess Marjorie of Carrick, was heir to a Gaelic earldom.

Robert’s grandfather, Robert Bruce ‘The Competitor’, was one of the claimants to the Scots throne. Bruce’s father, Robert de Brus of Annandale, fought in Wales for Edward I, was made governor of Carlisle Castle and fought on Edward’s side at the Battle of Dunbar in 1296. The Bruces refused to support John Balliol’s kingship and stayed close to Edward I. Balliol gave Bruce lands to the Comyns.

In 1298 Robert the Bruce became a guardian of Scotland alongside his great rival John ‘Red’ Comyn of Badenoch, and William Lamberton, Bishop of St Andrews. When Bruce and Comyn quarrelled Bruce resigned as guardian. In 1302 Bruce submitted to Edward I and returned ‘to the King’s peace’. Bruce married Elizabeth de Burgh.

Robert the Bruce’s father died in 1304. Bruce now had a viable claim to the throne. On 10 February 1306 Bruce met John Comyn of Badenoch at Greyfriars Kirk in Dumfries. A fight broke out, daggers were drawn and Bruce killed Red Comyn by the altar. The Pope excommunicated Bruce but Robert Wishart, Bishop of Glasgow, absolved him and made plans for Bruce to quickly take the throne. On 27 March 1306, Isobel of Fife, Countess of Buchan, crowned Bruce at Scone. His inauguration was small and hastily arranged but Robert Bruce was now King of Scots.

To Edward I the usurper King Robert was a rebel to be crushed. Edward’s reprisals were swift and brutal. Bruce was defeated at Methven. His wife, daughter and sisters were captured and imprisoned in England. Countess Isobel was locked in an iron cage at Berwick while Bruce’s brothers were hanged, drawn and beheaded. Bruce fled Edward’s wrath and spent a long winter hiding on the islands off the west coast and Ireland.

Bruce began a guerrilla war and struck at his enemies. His forces defeated Edward’s men at Glen Trool and Loudon Hill, then Edward I finally died in July 1307 – Bruce now faced Longshanks’ son, Edward II.

Bruce attacked his Scots enemies – destroying Comyn strongholds along the Great Glen and harrowing Buchan and the north east. His men cut a bloody swathe through Galloway and the south west.

One by one Scotland’s castles fell to Bruce and his supporters. Bruce had the castles ‘slighted’ – walls were torn down and defences were raised to the ground – the fortresses were made useless to an invading English army. As more castles fell more nobles pledged support to Bruce.

In 1314 Bruce watched Edward II’s army march toward Stirling Castle. Edward II had been given a year to relieve the besieged English force at Stirling or surrender the castle. Their forces met at the Battle of Bannockburn on 23 and 24 June 1314. Thousands died as the Scots defeated Edward’s army. The river was choked with the dead as Edward II fled the field and returned to England.

Bannockburn was not the end of Bruce’s struggle but it was a turning point. Captured English nobles were traded for his family and King Robert I gained international recognition. The Scots took the final English stronghold at Berwick in 1318 but Edward II still claimed overlordship of Scotland. Two years later the Scots sent a letter to the Pope – the Declaration of Arbroath – as part of an ongoing battle of words.

In 1327 Edward II was deposed by his Queen, Isabella. He was murdered in captivity. The English made peace with the Scots and renounced their claim of overlordship. The Black Rood, taken by Edward I, was returned to the Scots. It seemed that Bruce had finally won.

Robert the Bruce retired to Cardross near Dumbarton on the Firth of Clyde. He lived peacefully in a comfortable mansion house until his death on 7 June 1329. He asked that James Douglas take his heart on crusade. Bruce’s body was buried at Dunfermline Abbey, by his wife Elizabeth’s side, beneath an alabaster tomb. Bruce’s heart was finally buried at Melrose Abbey.

In the 1370s the Scots poet John Barbour wrote of Bruce, the hero-king, in ‘The Brus’.

Robert I, known as Robert the Bruce, was the king of the Scots who secured Scotland’s independence from England.

Here is another lineage:

Robert I “The Bruce” Bruce, King of Scotland (1274 – 1329)
21st great-grandfather
Margaret Bruce (1307 – 1346)
daughter of Robert I “The Bruce” Bruce, King of Scotland
John Glen (1349 – 1419)
son of Margaret Bruce
Isabel Glen (1380 – 1421)
daughter of John Glen
Isabel Ogilvie (1406 – 1484)
daughter of Isabel Glen
Elizabeth Kennedy (1434 – 1475)
daughter of Isabel Ogilvie
Isabella Vaus (1451 – 1510)
daughter of Elizabeth Kennedy
Marion Accarson (1478 – 1538)
daughter of Isabella Vaus
Catherine Gordon (1497 – 1537)
daughter of Marion Accarson
Lady Elizabeth Ashton (1524 – 1588)
daughter of Catherine Gordon
Capt Roger Dudley (1535 – 1585)
son of Lady Elizabeth Ashton
Gov Thomas Dudley (1576 – 1653)
son of Capt Roger Dudley
Anne Dudley (1612 – 1672)
daughter of Gov Thomas Dudley
John Bradstreet (1652 – 1718)
son of Anne Dudley
Mercy Bradstreet (1689 – 1725)
daughter of John Bradstreet
Caleb Hazen (1720 – 1777)
son of Mercy Bradstreet
Mercy Hazen (1747 – 1819)
daughter of Caleb Hazen
Martha Mead (1784 – 1860)
daughter of Mercy Hazen
Abner Morse (1808 – 1838)
son of Martha Mead
Daniel Rowland Morse (1838 – 1910)
son of Abner Morse
Jason A Morse (1862 – 1932)
son of Daniel Rowland Morse
Ernest Abner Morse (1890 – 1965)
son of Jason A Morse
Richard Arden Morse (1920 – 2004)
son of Ernest Abner Morse
Pamela Morse
I am the daughter of Richard Arden Morse

Both connect with Anne Dudley, my famous poet ancestor. One went through the Gordons for many generations, and the other went though the Kennedy family.

Robert's grave

Robert’s grave

Robert was born on 11 July 1274 into an aristocratic Scottish family. Through his father he was distantly related to the Scottish royal family. His mother had Gaelic antecedents. Bruce’s grandfather was one of the claimants to the Scottish throne during a succession dispute in 1290 – 1292. The English king, Edward I, was asked to arbitrate and chose John Balliol to be king. Both Bruce and his father refused to back Balliol and supported Edward I’s invasion of Scotland in 1296 to force Balliol to abdicate. Edward then ruled Scotland as a province of England.

Bruce then supported William Wallace’s uprising against the English. After Wallace was defeated, Bruce’s lands were not confiscated and in 1298, Bruce became a guardian of Scotland, with John Comyn, Balliol’s nephew and Bruce’s greatest rival for the Scottish throne In 1306, Bruce quarrelled with Comyn and stabbed him in a church in Dumfries. He was outlawed by Edward and excommunicated by the pope. Bruce now proclaimed his right to the throne and on 27 March was crowned king at Scone. The following year, Bruce was deposed by Edward’s army and forced to flee. His wife and daughters were imprisoned and three of his brothers executed. Robert spent the winter on the island off the coast of Antrim (Northern Ireland).

Returning to Scotland, Robert waged a highly successful guerrilla war against the English. At the Battle of Bannockburn in June 1314, he defeated a much larger English army under Edward II, confirming the re-establishment of an independent Scottish monarchy. Two years later, his brother Edward Bruce was inaugurated as high king of Ireland but was killed in battle in 1318. Even after Bannockburn and the Scottish capture of Berwick in 1318, Edward II refused to give up his claim to the overlordship of Scotland. In 1320, the Scottish earls, barons and the ‘community of the realm’ sent a letter to Pope John XXII declaring that Robert was their rightful monarch. This was the ‘Declaration of Arbroath’ and it asserted the antiquity of the Scottish people and their monarchy.

Four years later, Robert received papal recognition as king of an independent Scotland. The Franco-Scottish alliance was renewed in the Treaty of Corbeil, by which the Scots were obliged to make war on England should hostilities break out between England and France. In 1327, the English deposed Edward II in favour of his son and peace was made with Scotland. This included a total renunciation of all English claims to superiority over Scotland. Robert died on 7 June 1329. He was buried at Dunfermline. He requested that his heart be taken to the Holy Land, but it only got as far as Spain. It was returned to Scotland and buried in Melrose Abbey.

#WeekendCoffeeShare Wildflower Wanderlust

February 19, 2017 4 Comments

desert in bloom

desert in bloom

If we were having coffee today I would invite you to sit by the wood stove, which has been burning all night because it is cold, and raining again. This winter has been the best rainy time we have had in Arizona for years. The rain has fallen gently and steadily here this year. Erosion is minimal because the water sinks into the soil when it is not a big sudden chubasco. We are doing better than Southern California, where the terrain is steep, and the ground is saturated with water. The coast is land-sliding into the sea, which is a big freak out. For Arizona, we are recovering from major draught, but are still in it.   The African daisies are in bloom in people’s yards here in the city, and the desert will soon be completely in bloom because of the wet weather.

Please sit back and let me serve you some coffee or tea to keep you warm.  Tell me what is happening in your world and your writing.  Are you making progress on your writing goals?  I am keeping up with my once a week fiction writing, still threatening to break out into more than once a week.  I wrote a dream sequence this week which was fun.  I am also keeping up with my pen pal exchange in #InCoWriMo.  I was happy that some of you here gave me your addresses so I can send you real snail mail.  The month of February is not over, so if you want mail in your box please give me your address here.  I have no reason to share it or use if for any other reason, so your secret is safe with me.

Many of my pen pals have a common interest in gardening and botanical gardens.  I have received cute miniature water color of flowers, and other wonderful gardening themed correspondence.  One of my fabulous pen pals is the educational director of the Buffalo, NY Botanical Garden.  I am really enjoying this exchange.  It has made me think about botany around the country, and the arrival of spring.  Our wild flower and flowering tree season is a super quick flash of vibrant color that increases in intensity in direct proportion to the amount of rain in the winter.  I have both driven through and flown in a small plane over wildflower displays that have truly taken away my breath.  The California desert has some very exotic and super psychedelic plants that bloom when there has been rain, so this year will be a spectacular show of nature’s fashion.  Arizona will be very colorful also.  This has moved me to start checking into Air BnB availability, and think about itineraries.  My favorite spa is in Desert Hot Springs, right down the hill from Joshua Tree National Park, one of the most exotic landscapes in the world.  I love to be there in the spring when everything is blooming.  I have not decided if I will go, but I am starting to dream about it, so chances are good that I will do at least a short wildflower trip.  I could just go down the hill to Tempe, and I could catch a lot of seasonal color, as well as see what is up at the Desert Botanical Garden, which has plenty of blooms itself.

Do you go on botany excursions, for fall color, dogwoods, or wildflowers, gentle reader? You don’t have to be a botanist to enjoy them.

Our weekend coffee share has moved to Nerd In the Brain.  Please join this jovial and talented group of digital beverage guzzling writers who get together on the weekend to share our thoughts.  You are welcome to read, comment, or contribute to the movable feast here. Thanks for stopping by today.

#WeekendCoffeeShare

#WeekendCoffeeShare

Special Christianity

February 19, 2017

President Donald Trump embraces several political stances important to his conservative evangelical base. This includes support for “religious liberty” legislation and exempting evangelicals from laws upholding lesbian, gay, transgender and bisexual rights. However, Trump does not demonstrate any of the beliefs that have historically characterized evangelicalism. Unlike the majority of American evangelicals, he does not…

via This 19th Century Movement Could Explain Donald Trump’s Faith — TIME

#WritePhoto Destined To Meet

February 17, 2017 11 Comments

summerhouse

summerhouse

The long trek to the remote village has exhausted the group.  The backpacks grew heavy as they walked for miles in the woods.  They had all come to be part of a writers’ retreat designed to spark creativity.  The accommodations in the country were intended to take the group away from day to day concerns in order to concentrate on writing. Most of them came from big cities and were not accustomed to primitive conditions.  They were told they would need to pump water and carry wood, but this sounded more romantic at the time than it was when they started scouting for fire wood in the wet forrest.  The rain had drenched the woods, so all the wood was too wet to start a fire.  They had no wilderness skills, and were weary and wasted before they even started the weekend. The emotions were tightly wound before they even saw the bunk beds in the attic where they would sleep, dormitory style.

On Saturday morning they awoke to find no staff at the summerhouse.  There was a sign left on the screen door that said, “We have gone to town. Now you go to town.”  This naturally infuriated the writers who had come to be taught some kind of creative trick to unlock their talent. “Go to town?  What the hell does THAT mean?”  Left to their own devices, they scattered into space to figure out what to do.  Sitting under the shade of a large oak tree Emily spotted Eric.  He was wearing a velvet coat, leaning against the trunk of the tree, casually smoking a pipe.  She approached him with caution, but when she clearly saw his handsome face she was instantly smitten by this stranger in the woods.  She wondered why he was so calm, cool, and dressed like a person from a different century. He explained that these woods are haunted with the ghosts of writers who never pushed themselves beyond their limits.  They are the real ghost writers.  They can never be free because they dissed their muse while they were alive.

When Emily awoke back in New England in the 21st century she knew she had just met destiny in a dream.  Her muse, Eric, would be her greatest asset, and it did not matter that nobody else could see him.  He was hers alone.  He faithfully pushed her to work with words every day.  Their tryst was a gift from the creative creator of creation, and would last forever and ever.

To enjoy more interpretations of this photo by other writers, please visit Sue Vincent, who provides these in fleek prompts each week.  Read, comment, or try your hand at fiction here.

#writephoto

#writephoto

 

 

Digital vs Manual Skills

February 16, 2017 1 Comment

post cards from the world

post cards from the world

The journey into my stationary drawer and the the mailbox this month is a very healthy investigation into my skills.  #InCoWriMo is a challenge in correspondence by hand, by snail mail during the month of February.  I have received the most beautifully written letters from around the country.  I am so impressed with some of the cursive that I tried it myself.  Good grief, was I ever bad at it.  It is not like riding a bicycle, it does not come back naturally.  I was never great at penmanship, but I could do it 50 years ago.  I am not sure when I switched to printing, but it probably was in architecture school.  When I attempted to write longhand it was incredibly challenging, and I only lasted a short paragraph before I abandoned hope.  I also notice how very addicted I am to spellcheck.  I halt in the middle of writing a word by hand, and no magic feature steps in to spell for me..I am almost disabled by this.  I have personally lost my own skills by not practicing them.  It is not too late for me to recover lost skills of youth.

My new pen pals have shown me that I lean to hard on digital skills.  If the internet goes down what will become of me? I must balance my creative life by spending some of it by hand on paper..I can still take a picture of it and post it on instagram.  I used to sew, draw, write songs and poetry, all without computer assistance of any kind.  I even had a treadle sewing machine at one point.  I made my living as a production potter, throwing pots on a kick wheel.  I was such a home grown/ hand made/ alternative economy hippie that I did now own a television.  Now I hear people talking about going back to the old Nokia un-smart phone to regain balance in life.  I don’t really have a phone addiction so much as a general digital device issue.  Balance for me will involve spending more time writing by hand.  I need the tactile therapeutic value of putting the pen on the paper.  The muse responds differently than when it is coming through a keyboard.  My manual muse needs encouragement. What about you, gentle reader?  Do you still write by hand?

 

History of Valentine’s Day

February 14, 2017 3 Comments

Saint Valentine

The Curious Rambler

public-domain-images-vintage-postcards-valentine-victorian-1900s0060

In February everyone’s heart turns to love… and chocolate… but mostly to love. February 14 is the day we show those special people in our lives how much we truly care. But did you ever wonder why? Who was Saint Valentine? And why is February 14 so special? Well, let’s have a look at the history of Valentine’s day and see if we can find out…

Who was Saint Valentine?

According to legend, Valentine was a priest who lived in Rome during the third century. At that time, Emperor Claudius II, who liked going to war, discovered that married men didn’t make very good soldiers. For some reason, they were more concerned about staying alive and providing for their wives and children than about enlarging the empire for him.  So, he simply outlawed marriage for men of soldiering age.

red-heartBut Vicar Valentine was a romantic at heart. He couldn’t bear seeing young lovers…

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Fermented Full Moon Fun

February 13, 2017 1 Comment

The Metal Arts Village has a party every month with open artists’ galleries, live music and food trucks. This month was special because there as a DJ’d yoga class in the parking lot, and some acrobats on silk fabric hanging from a big tripod. The crowd was happy and the entertainment was fantastic.  The fuel that kept the fun going was as ancient as human partying itself–fermentation. Beer is a fermented beverage, and pizza dough is a fermented grain product as well.  Brewers and bread makers often combine to use the leavening from a beer in a bread. This kind of artisanal food production is rampant in Tucson, which is a happy thing for us.  I am not the biggest beer drinker, and try to keep my pizza eating to a minimum, but do indulge when the time and the quality is right.  Full Moon Party at metal Arts Village is just such an occasion.

I drank a glass of excellent stout aged in a bourbon barrel as a starter.  Bob had a more bitter stout, which he stuck with for the day. I switched to a cappuccino stout from Lagunitas Brewery that made me happy.  We sat with a couple drinking a red pilsner that was yummy also. This is the kind of place where people taste each other’s beer, no fear of cooties.  Our table companions were interesting and cool with two dogs under the table.  We enjoyed chatting with them.  We all noticed Luke of the pizza truck trowing a towel in the air, pizza style.  From a distance is certainly looks like dough.  I went to investigate the situation and enjoyed learning about Luke’s dough and fermentation process.

He uses a sourdough proofing to create an amazing crisp thin crust.  His wood fired oven takes 4 hours to heat up, but once it is hot the pizza cooks quickly. We ordered the pesto pizza from the menu and added jalapeño and garlic. This rates as one of the pest pizzas we have ever eaten.  We will now become groupies of Luke and follow him around town when he parks at breweries and events.  I can highly recommend this pizza with Lagunitas cappuccino stout..it is dreamy on the tastebuds.  It would be good with any beer….or without beer.

The flying acrobats were fabulous, but the night was still young.  One of my favorite artists in Tucson had set up a table top sell little stuff from her garage, and I was able to buy a piece of her art for almost no money. I now own an original signed Lynne Rae Lowe metal sculpture, that was derived with an amazing story.  It is a Shabbis angel. She is highly symbolic, and now has a place of honor in front of a lamp I made myself.  This is huge, and unexpected.  I bought her on Shabbat, right before sunset on Saturday, then I walked home.  OY!!!! Magic Moon!

 

#WeekendCoffeeShare Moving The Feast

February 11, 2017 9 Comments

The movable feast known as weekend coffee share is itself on the move. Our gracious hostess Diana has arranged to hand off the coffee party action to Nerd in the Brain next weekend.  We will still be a band of writers bonding over digital beverages and stories on the weekend.  I am sure the move will not disrupt anyone. Thank you Diana, for finding us a new address to continue the party.  If we were having coffee today I would invite you to taste some of the bread I just brought home from Barrio Bread.  It is still warm, made from local grains, and crusty like crazy fire .  I just had a smoked mozzarella sandwich, grilled, with all the trimmings.  I can whip one up for you while you relax and tell me how you have been and what you have planned.  We are very proud of this bakery, and would love for you to try our local organic, totally groovy food products. Our city is a UNESCO culinary heritage city because of our deep agricultural traditions and knowledge. I love to show it off to tourists.

It is warm here, and the peach tree is budding out.  The grapefruit is still very full of fruit, although I am juicing like crazy.  I hope you will help yourself to a big glass of ruby red grapefruit juice, with or without whipped vodka, as you tell me about your writing this week.  Mine is rolling along, with the weekly photo prompt working for me very well. This week I wrote a short poem, still on the depressing side, a thinly veiled reference to current politics. The prompt picture was a fire, which gave lots of leeway.  I wrote about pants and vanities on fire, since I feel this is our current backdrop for news in the real world.  I plan to continue the once a week fiction with Sue Vincent’s prompts because it is inspirational to read all the other takes on the same picture.  I do want to write more fiction someday.  This is a good warm up for that day.  I like taking a break from just the facts.

I am enjoying my correspondence challenge #InCoWriMo more than I imagined I would.  I have gotten mail from several people I do not know, and a couple I know in on-line relationships.  It is a blast to both send and receive the snail mail.  Most of my pen pals have great penmanship and sealing wax, etc.  I admire it, but that is not what I have to offer. My correspondence has enclosures and a little bit of art.  My biggest advantage is all the cards and specialty paper I have collected around the world. I have started to enclose extra postcards so my pen pals can send them forward, and I get rid of twice as much collected choice paper. I also send a temporary tattoo and my biz card.  Today I mailed some hollyhock seeds to Kentucky to a perfect stranger…Perfect!!

#InCoWriMo

#InCoWriMo

I send or hand deliver more than one letter a day. I may get carried away with this and just keep mailing letters until all my paper is gone. It is so much fun, and I do have the supplies.  I am meeting people and getting such a thrill out of checking my mailbox every day.  I guess it is like riding a bike because I used to be a big letter writer, but not for many years.  If anyone in coffee share wants to receive mail from me in February please send me your snail mail address on this secure form.  I promise I have no reason to share it with anyone and will only use it to send you handwritten notes and surprise gifts from my exotic stash.

If we were having coffee today, I would recommend the grapefruit juice and invite you to stick around to go with us later to the local beer garden and metal arts village where there will be yoga with a DJ followed by live music, fire performers, stilts, acrobats on silk, and lots of hipsters.  We will rock the full snow moon in our summer clothing.  It is free and all in the hood.  Stay and soak up Tucson before you go back home. For those of you who want to read, write, or post this week visit Diana here. See you next week at Nerd on the Brain.  Cheers!

#WeekendCoffeeShare

#WeekendCoffeeShare

 

Full Moon/Eclipse in Leo: The Return of the Feminine

February 10, 2017 1 Comment

Time to shine

cathy towle spirit wisdom | medium & shaman | 2013 Best Psychic Medium | sustainability expert

The Full Snow Moon/Eclipse in Leo + Comet 45P/ Honda-Mrkos-Pajdusakova
February 10, 2017 at 7:32 p.m. EDT

IMG_7204.PNG.pngComet 45P/ Honda-Mrkos-Pajdusakova

This is one of my favorite times of the year, the Snow moon, and with a fresh blanket of snow in my neck of the woods in Brooklyn. I think it’s the first real snow I have seen all winter here, and I really love the show mother earth put on today. We have an amazing portal to higher things opening on this Full Moon, and I am in awe of its generosity, opportunity and potential. Contradictions, upsets, openings, beginnings and the containment of opposites, so we can peel back the layer of mist that has caused so much confusion to us all. So many things going on. Let’s get to it!

Personally, Leo moon in the 12th house means it’s a time of finding out what makes you shine, what your…

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