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Veridis Visconti, 17th Great-Grandmother, Duchess Austria

December 13, 2016 1 Comment

Veridis Duchess Austria Visconti

Veridis Duchess Austria Visconti

My 17th great-grandmother was born into a noble family in trouble with the papacy.    Veridis ( sometimes spelled Viridis) was born in Milan in 1352.  Her father was excommunicated 1363 for opposing the Pope in Rome.  She is buried at the  Cistercian monastery in Sittich ,Obcina, Ljubljana, in modern and Slovenia.  Her husband, the duke, died in Lucerne Switzerland, leaving her a widow at the age of 34.

Veridis Duchess Austria Visconti

Veridis Duchess Austria Visconti

Veridis Duchess Austria Visconti (1352 – 1414)
17th great-grandmother
Ernst I “Ironside” Archduke of Austria Habsburg (1377 – 1424)
son of Veridis Duchess Austria Visconti
Katharina Archduchess Austria Von Habsburg (1420 – 1493)
daughter of Ernst I “Ironside” Archduke of Austria Habsburg
Christof I VanBaden (1453 – 1527)
son of Katharina Archduchess Austria Von Habsburg
Beatrix Zahringen (1492 – 1535)
daughter of Christof I VanBaden
Sabine Grafin VonSimmern (1528 – 1578)
daughter of Beatrix Zahringen
Marie L Egmond (1564 – 1678)
daughter of Sabine Grafin VonSimmern
Richard Sears (1590 – 1676)
son of Marie L Egmond
Silas Sears (1638 – 1697)
son of Richard Sears
Silas Sears (1661 – 1732)
son of Silas Sears
Sarah Sears (1697 – 1785)
daughter of Silas Sears
Sarah Hamblin (1721 – 1814)
daughter of Sarah Sears
Mercy Hazen (1747 – 1819)
daughter of Sarah Hamblin
Martha Mead (1784 – 1860)
daughter of Mercy Hazen
Abner Morse (1808 – 1838)
son of Martha Mead
Daniel Rowland Morse (1838 – 1910)
son of Abner Morse
Jason A Morse (1862 – 1932)
son of Daniel Rowland Morse
Ernest Abner Morse (1890 – 1965)
son of Jason A Morse
Richard Arden Morse (1920 – 2004)
son of Ernest Abner Morse
Pamela Morse
You are the daughter of Richard Arden Morse

Viridis Visconti (1352–1414) was an Italian noblewoman, a daughter of Bernabò Visconti and his wife Beatrice Regina della Scala. By her marriage to Leopold III, Duke of Austria, Viridis was Duchess consort of Austria, Styria and Carinthia, she was also Countess consort of Tyrol.

Viridis was born in Milan, Italy and was the second of seventeen children.
Her sister, Taddea Visconti married Stephen III, Duke of Bavaria and was mother of Isabeau of Bavaria, wife of Charles VI of France. Viridis and the rest of her sisters secured politically-advantageous marriages.
Her maternal grandparents were Mastino II della Scala and his wife Taddea da Carrara. Her paternal grandparents were Stefano Visconti and his wife Valentina Doria.
Viridis’ father, Bernabò was described as a cruel and ruthless despot. He was also an implacable enemy of the Church. He seized the papal city of Bologna, rejected the Pope and his authority, confiscated ecclesiastical property, and forbade any of his subjects to have any dealings with the Curia. He was excommunicated as a heretic in 1363 by Pope Urban V, who preached crusade against him.  When Bernabò was in one of his frequent rages, only the children’s mother, Beatrice Regina was able to approach him.

Viridis married Leopold III, Duke of Austria, son of Albert II, Duke of Austria and his wife Johanna of Pfirt. The couple had six children:
William
Leopold
Ernest the Iron
Frederick
Elisabeth (1378–1392)
Katharina (1385–?) Abbess of St. Klara in Vienna
Viridis was widowed in 1386 and so their eldest son, William became Duke of Austria.
William was engaged to Jadwiga of Hungary, youngest daughter of the neighboring king, was one of the first attempts of the House of Habsburg to extend their sphere of influence in Eastern Central Europe by marrying heiresses, a practice that gave rise to the phrase Bella gerant alii: tu felix Austria nube (Let others make war: thou happy Austria, marry). The wedding was broken off.
Viridis died in 1 March 1414 and out-lived at least three of six children, since her younger daughter, Katherine’s date of death is unknown. Viridis is buried in Sittich in Lower Carniola.

 

Source, Wikipedia

#Weekendcoffeeshare Bad Hofgastien, Austria

March 22, 2015 3 Comments

pay with a poem

pay with a poem

Today is World Poetry Day, 21 Mar, 2015. If we were having coffee today I would invite you to use your transporter cloak to travel to Austria for a special offer. Bäckerei Konditorei Cafe Confiserie Bauer Mühlbach/Hochkönig in Bad Hofgastein, Austria is one of many coffee shops honoring the day by accepting poems for payment.  This lovely town near Salzburg has it all, hot springs, ski area, and a jolly friendly populace.  I went there once for Carnival and had more fun than a barrel of monkeys.  The video below shows some of the town in costume ready to parade and party for Fasching (carnival).  When I was there the costume parade marched around the spa, playing music around the indoor pools.  It was hysterical to see from the water, where I was at the time.  Later we danced the night away with Austrians and our friends who came down from Germany to meet us.  It was one of the most festive occasions I have attended in my life, unforgettable.  Make sure you take a dip in the thermal water before you leave.  It is wonderful for the body and the soul.

I have been writing, reading, and studying poetry in preparation for April, which is poetry month.  I endeavor to write a poem every day in April, and I hoped that some study and preparation would bring better results this year.  Once immersed in poems and words, I hardly care if my own writing improves.  I just think it is fun and enriching to explore the works of written fancy.  I have been learning about the lives of the poets as well, which is maybe the most interesting facet of the study.  Poets come from every direction and occupation.  There is no common denominator. They start writing at all ages, and are both self-taught and learned.  I find this to be inspiring because it means we all have voice, just waiting to be discovered and used.  I enjoy the process of developing the sense of poetic timing and sounds, along with subjects that matter.  I am learning that it takes time and concentration to create finished works, so I am patient about my own output.  It is enjoyable in itself, so I do it for the fun rather than for my own legacy as a writer.

I look forward to hearing how your week has gone and what is new in your life, gentle reader.  After we catch up on current events we need to sit and create our poems to pay for these fancy coffees.  The Austrians invented the coffee-house culture, and they are no slouches when it comes to variety.  They always serve coffee with a glass of water, which I have not seen anywhere else in the world.  The crystal light fixtures, the formal service, and the perfectly prepared drinks set the right atmosphere for a long luxurious talk about everything and nothing.  The view of the mountains is even poetic. It should be fairly easy to create a poem here in this place of beauty to pay for our coffee.  Thanks for joining me here for World Poetry Day.

#Weekendcoffeeshare

#Weekendcoffeeshare

Gertrude of Austria

July 6, 2014 7 Comments

Gertrude of Austria

Gertrude of Austria

My 24th great-grandmother died at age 30 after she had 4 children.

Gertrude of Babenberg (c. 1118 – 8 April 1150) was the first wife of Vladislaus II of Bohemia and the Duchess of Bohemia. She was the daughter of count Leopold III, Margrave of Austria and his wife Agnes of Germany.

Gertrude married Duke of Bohemia in 1140. Through her mother, she was half-sister of Conrad III of Germany, so she was a good catch for Vladislaus. In the time of siege of Prague by Conrad II of Znojmo (1142) she successfully defended Prague Castle, together with her brother-in-law Děpolt, while Vladislaus asked Conrad III of Germany for help.
She was took share in Vladislaus founding activity and thanks to her the duke invited to Czech lands new religious orders. She gave birth to four children and died in 1150, at the age of 30.
Issue
Frederick, Duke of Bohemia
Svatopluk, married a daughter of Geza II of Hungary
Vojtech, archbishop of Salzburg as Adalbert III
Agnes (died 7 June 1228), abbess of St George of Prague
Literature
ŽEMLIČKA, J. Čechy v době knížecí 1034–1198. Praha : NLN, 2002. 660 p. ISBN 80-7106-196-4.

Gertrud Austria (1119 – 1150)
is my 24th great grandmother
Fredrich Bohemia (1141 – 1189)
son of Gertrud Austria
Lidmila Bohemia (1170 – 1240)
daughter of Fredrich Bohemia
OTTO II Wittelsbach of Bavaria (1206 – 1253)
son of Lidmila Bohemia
Elisabeth Wittelsbach Duchess Bavaria (1227 – 1273)
daughter of OTTO II Wittelsbach of Bavaria
Consort Elisabeth the Romans Carinthia (1263 – 1313)
daughter of Elisabeth Wittelsbach Duchess Bavaria
Albrecht Albert II ‘The Wise’ Duke of Austria Habsburg (1298 – 1358)
son of Consort Elisabeth the Romans Carinthia
Leopold III “Duke of Austria” Habsburg (1351 – 1386)
son of Albrecht Albert II ‘The Wise’ Duke of Austria Habsburg
Ernst I “Ironside” Archduke of Austria Habsburg (1377 – 1424)
son of Leopold III “Duke of Austria” Habsburg
Katharina Archduchess Austria Von Habsburg (1420 – 1493)
daughter of Ernst I “Ironside” Archduke of Austria Habsburg
Christof I VanBaden (1453 – 1527)
son of Katharina Archduchess Austria Von Habsburg
Beatrix Zahringen (1492 – 1535)
daughter of Christof I VanBaden
Sabine Grafin VonSimmern (1528 – 1578)
daughter of Beatrix Zahringen
Marie L Egmond (1564 – 1584)
daughter of Sabine Grafin VonSimmern
Richard Sears (1590 – 1676)
son of Marie L Egmond
Silas Sears (1638 – 1697)
son of Richard Sears
Silas Sears (1661 – 1732)
son of Silas Sears
Sarah Sears (1697 – 1785)
daughter of Silas Sears
Sarah Hamblin (1721 – 1814)
daughter of Sarah Sears
Mercy Hazen (1747 – 1819)
daughter of Sarah Hamblin
Martha Mead (1784 – 1860)
daughter of Mercy Hazen
Abner Morse (1808 – 1838)
son of Martha Mead
Daniel Rowland Morse (1838 – 1910)
son of Abner Morse
Jason A Morse (1862 – 1932)
son of Daniel Rowland Morse
Ernest Abner Morse (1890 – 1965)
son of Jason A Morse
Richard Arden Morse (1920 – 2004)
son of Ernest Abner Morse
Pamela Morse
I am the daughter of Richard Arden Morse

Albert I, King of Germany Habsburg

February 28, 2014 4 Comments

Albert I King of Germany

Albert I King of Germany

My 19th great grandfather was born in current day Switzerland and married well:

Albert I of HabsburgKing of Germany
(formally King of the Romans)Reign27 July 1298 – 1 May 1308CoronationUncrownedGermanAlbrecht I, römisch-deutscher König, Herzog von Österreich und der Steiermark, Markgraf von MeißenTitlesDuke of Austria
Duke of Styria
Margrave of MeißenBornJuly , 1255
Rheinfelden, Free Imperial CityDiedMay 1, 1308 (aged 52)
Königsfelden, Breisgau, Further AustriaPredecessorAdolf of NassauSuccessorHenry VII, Count of LuxembourgConsortElisabeth of Gorizia-TyrolOffspringRudolph I, King of Bohemia
Frederick the Fair, King of the Romans
Leopold I, Duke of Austria
Albert II, Duke of Austria
Anna, Duchess of Brieg
Agnes, Queen of Hungary
Elisabeth, Duchess of Lorraine
Catherine, Duchess of Calabria and three others Royal HouseHouse of HabsburgFatherRudolph I, King of the RomansMotherGertrude of Hohenburg

Albert I of Habsburg (German: Albrecht I) (July 1255 – May 1, 1308) was King of the Romans, Duke of Austria, and eldest son of German King Rudolph I of Habsburg and Gertrude of Hohenburg.
He was the founder of the great house of Habsburg invested with the duchies of Austria and Styria, together with his brother Rudolph II, in 1282. In 1283 his father entrusted him with their sole government, and he appears to have ruled them with conspicuous success. Rudolph I was unable to secure the succession to the German throne for his son, and on his death in 1291, the princes, fearing Albert’s power, chose Adolf of Nassau-Weilburg as king. A rising among his Swabian dependents compelled Albert to recognize the sovereignty of his rival, and to confine himself for a time to the government of the Habsburg territories.
He did not abandon his hopes of the throne, however, which were eventually realised. In 1298, he was chosen German king by some of the princes, who were dissatisfied with Adolf. The armies of the rival kings met at the Battle of Göllheim near Worms, where Adolf was defeated and slain. Submitting to a new election but securing the support of several influential princes by making extensive promises, he was chosen at Frankfurt on July 27, 1298, and crowned at Aachen on August 24.
Albert married Elisabeth, daughter of Meinhard II, count of Gorizia and Tyrol, who was a descendant of the Babenberg margraves of Austria who predated the Habsburgs’ rule. The baptismal name Leopold, patron saint margrave of Austria, was given to one of their sons. Elisabeth was in fact better connected to mighty German rulers than her husband: a descendant of earlier kings, for example Emperor Henry IV, she was also a niece of dukes of Bavaria, Austria’s important neighbors.
Although a hard, stern man, Albert had a keen sense of justice when his own interests were not involved, and few of the German kings possessed so practical an intelligence. He encouraged the cities, and not content with issuing proclamations against private war, formed alliances with the princes in order to enforce his decrees. The serfs, whose wrongs seldom attracted notice in an age indifferent to the claims of common humanity, found a friend in this severe monarch, and he protected even the despised and persecuted Jews. Stories of his cruelty and oppression in the Swiss cantons did not appear until the 16th century, and are now regarded as legendary.
Albert sought to play an important part in European affairs. He seemed at first inclined to press a quarrel with France over the Burgundian frontier, but the refusal of Pope Boniface VIII to recognize his election led him to change his policy, and, in 1299, he made a treaty with Philip IV of France, by which his son Rudolph was to marry Blanche, a daughter of the French king. He afterwards became estranged from Philip, but in 1303, Boniface recognized him as German king and future emperor; in return, Albert recognized the authority of the pope alone to bestow the imperial crown, and promised that none of his sons should be elected German king without papal consent.
Albert had failed in his attempt to seize Holland and Zeeland, as vacant fiefs of the Empire, on the death of Count John I in 1299, but in 1306 he secured the crown of Bohemia for his son Rudolph on the death of King Wenceslaus III. He also renewed the claim made by his predecessor, Adolf, on Thuringia, and interfered in a quarrel over the succession to the Hungarian throne. His attack on Thuringia ended in his defeat at Lucka in 1307 and, in the same year, the death of his son Rudolph weakened his position in eastern Europe. His action in abolishing all tolls established on the Rhine since 1250, led the Rhenish archbishops and the count palatine of the Rhine to form a league against him. Aided by the towns, however, he soon crushed the rising.
He was on the way to suppress a revolt in Swabia when he was murdered on May 1, 1308, at Windisch on the Reuss River, by his nephew John of Swabia, afterwards called “the Parricide” or “John Parricida”, whom he had deprived of his inheritance.
Titles
Albert, by the grace of God king of the Romans, duke of Austria and Styria, lord of Carniola, over the Wendish Mark and of Port Naon, count of Habsburg and Kyburg, landgrave of Alsace
Family
Albert and his wife Elizabeth had twelve children:
Rudolph III (ca. 1282 – 4 July 1307, Horažďovice), Married but line extinct and predeceased his father.
Frederick I (1289 – 13 January 1330, Gutenstein). Married but line extinct.
Leopold I (4 August 1290 – 28 February 1326, Strassburg). Married, had issue.
Albert II (12 December 1298, Vienna – 20 July 1358, Vienna).
Heinrich (1299 – 3 February 1327, Bruck an der Mur). Married but line extinct.
Meinhard, 1300 died young.
Otto (23 July 1301, Vienna – 26 February 1339, Vienna). Married but line extinct.
Anna 1280?, Vienna – 19 March 1327, Breslau), married:
in Graz ca. 1295 to Herman, Margrave of Brandenburg-Salzwedel;
in Breslau 1310 to Duke Henry VI the Good.
Agnes (18 May 1281 – 10 June 1364, Königsfelden), married in Vienna 13 February 1296 King Andrew III of Hungary.
Elisabeth (d. 19 May 1353), married 1304 Frederick IV, Duke of Lorraine.
Catherine (1295 – 18 January 1323, Naples), married Charles, Duke of Calabria in 1316.
Jutta (d. 1329), married Ludwig V, Count of Öttingen in Baden, 26 March 1319.

Ancestry

Ancestors of Albert I of Germany 16. Albert III, Count of Habsburg 8. Rudolph II, Count of Habsburg 17. Ida von Pfullendorf 4. Albert IV, Count of Habsburg 18. Gottfried von Staufen 9. Agnes of Staufen 2. Rudolph I of Germany 20. Hartmann III, Count of Kiburg and Dillingen 10. Ulrich, Count of Kiburg and Dillingen 21. Richenza von Lenzburg 5. Heilwig of Kiburg 22. Berthold IV, Duke of Zähringen 11. Anna von Zähringen 23. Heilwig of Frohburg 1. Albert I of Germany 24. Burckhard III, Count of Hohenburg 12. Burckhard IV, Count of Hohenburg 6. Burckhard V, Count of Hohenburg 3. Gertrude of Hohenburg 28. Rudolph I, Count Palatine of Tübingen 14. Rudolph II, Count Palatine of Tübingen 29. Mechtild of Gleiberg, Countess of Giessen 7. Mechtild of Tübingen 30. Henry, Margrave of Ronsberg 15. unnamed 31. Udilhild of Gammertingen [edit] References and external linksWikimedia Commons has media related to: Albert I of Habsburg
This article incorporates text from a publication now in the public domain: Chisholm, Hugh, ed (1911). Encyclopædia Britannica (Eleventh ed.). Cambridge University Press.
Albert I of Germany
House of Habsburg
Born: 1255 Died: 1308German royaltyRegnal titlesPreceded by
AdolfKing of Germany(formally King of the Romans)
1298–1308Succeeded by
Henry VIIMargrave of Meißen
1298–1307
With: Dietrich II (1291–1307)Friedrich I (1291–1323)Succeeded by
Friedrich IIPreceded by
King Rudolph IDuke of Austria and Styria
1282–1308
With: Rudolph II (1282–83)Rudolph III (1298–1307)Succeeded by
Frederick III the Fairand Leopold I

Albert I King of Germany Habsburg (1248 – 1308)
is my 19th great grandfather
Albrecht Albert II ‘The Wise’ Duke of Austria Habsburg (1298 – 1358)
son of Albert I King of Germany Habsburg
Leopold III “Duke of Austria” Habsburg (1351 – 1386)
son of Albrecht Albert II ‘The Wise’ Duke of Austria Habsburg
Ernst I “Ironside” Archduke of Austria Habsburg (1377 – 1424)
son of Leopold III “Duke of Austria” Habsburg
Katharina Archduchess Austria Von Habsburg (1420 – 1493)
daughter of Ernst I “Ironside” Archduke of Austria Habsburg
Christof I VanBaden (1453 – 1527)
son of Katharina Archduchess Austria Von Habsburg
Beatrix Zahringen (1492 – 1535)
daughter of Christof I VanBaden
Sabine Grafin VonSimmern (1528 – 1578)
daughter of Beatrix Zahringen
Marie L Egmond (1564 – 1584)
daughter of Sabine Grafin VonSimmern
Richard Sears (1590 – 1676)
son of Marie L Egmond
Silas Sears (1638 – 1697)
son of Richard Sears
Silas Sears (1661 – 1732)
son of Silas Sears
Sarah Sears (1697 – 1785)
daughter of Silas Sears
Sarah Hamblin (1721 – 1814)
daughter of Sarah Sears
Mercy Hazen (1747 – 1819)
daughter of Sarah Hamblin
Martha Mead (1784 – 1860)
daughter of Mercy Hazen
Abner Morse (1808 – 1838)
son of Martha Mead
Daniel Rowland Morse (1838 – 1910)
son of Abner Morse
Jason A Morse (1862 – 1932)
son of Daniel Rowland Morse
Ernest Abner Morse (1890 – 1965)
son of Jason A Morse
Richard Arden Morse (1920 – 2004)
son of Ernest Abner Morse
Pamela Morse
I am the daughter of Richard Arden Morse

Krampus, Shmutzli, and St. Nick

November 26, 2012 2 Comments

The 6 of December is St Nicholas Day. In Europe the popular Krampus, also known as Shmutzli in Switzerland, is St. Nick’s full time side kick. In Austria Krampus is much more popular than the saint, representing old time winter. I have been in Vienna on Krampus night, when people dressed more or less like gorillas run around with big sticks frightening pedestrians. I also saw 6 Krampuses on Austrian television creating a hexagon with the big sticks and circle dancing. The Euros are not afraid to link the ancient religions to the present day. In fact, that is what makes them Euros. They may not know the enitre history of traditional local customs, but they have an strong affinity with preservation of  provincial attitudes and ancient practices. The ancestors make them do it.

In Switzerland Santa is paid by neighbors to come to your house and scare you on Dec. 6.  Your parents give him alcohol and tell him all about your worst behavior.  Shmutzli is with him carrying a sack of ashes.  My friend Edith lived at the end of Santa’s route in her village, so he was pretty schnockered on schnapps by the time he arrived at her home.  She remembers he smelled like alcohol and pretended to put her in his sack to haul her away from home for bad behavior, of which he knew every detail.  She was really scared of St. Nick.  During the three weeks between 6 Dec. and 25 Dec. the kids conspicuously make efforts to amend the problem disobedience chastised by St Nick that frightening night.  On Dec. 25 the baby Jesus will fly through the window to leave oranges and walnuts to well reformed children.  The customs vary from place to place, with the Swiss love of regional tradition and language.  What is the same about all the places I have visited during the dead of winter in Europe is a community effort to scare away the winter blues and share light.  They still have plenty of real fires on the streets roasting real chestnuts and warming up the spiced hot wine they serve in seasonal huts set up for the purpose.  These pop up specialty bars often sell a regional specialty they make each year at the time.  There is a big effort to create warmth outdoors with food, alcohol, festivals, fires and lights.  These efforts are less personal and more spread across the community, with less focus on the large material haul (or obligation if you are the parent), more on the party atmosphere shared with neighbors.

We Americans may be overlooking some important lessons about stress, greed, and balance that Krampus represents.  By teaching kids that a never ending stream of new material objects flowing steadily, but gushing and flooding the world in December, is the key to satisfaction and fulfillment we may be creating a new kind of Christmas monster.  I am in favor of importing Shmutzli to the US, as a new superhero action figure and video game.

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