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Cecily Bonville, 17th Great Grandmother

August 11, 2013 5 Comments

Cecily Bonville

Cecily Bonville

Grave

Grave

Cecily Bonville, 7th Baroness Harington and 2nd Baroness Bonville (c. 30 June 1460 – 12 May 1529) was an English peeress, who was also Marchioness of Dorset by her first marriage to Thomas Grey, 1st Marquess of Dorset, and Countess of Wiltshire by her second marriage to Henry Stafford, 1st Earl of Wiltshire.

The Bonvilles were loyal supporters of the House of York during the series of dynastic civil wars that were fought for the English throne, known as the Wars of the Roses (1455 –1485). When she was less than a year old, Cecily became the wealthiest heiress in England after her male relatives were slain in battle, fighting against the House of Lancaster.

Cecily’s life after the death of her first husband in 1501, was marked by an acrimonious dispute with her son and heir, Thomas Grey, 2nd Marquess of Dorset. This was over Cecily’s right to remain sole executor of her late husband’s estate and to control her own inheritance, both of which Thomas challenged following her second marriage to Henry Stafford; a man many years her junior. Their quarrel required the intervention of King Henry VII and the royal council.

Lady Jane Grey, Lady Catherine Grey and Lady Mary Grey were her great-granddaughters. All three were in the Line of Succession to the English throne, with Jane, the eldest, having reigned as queen for nine days in 1553.

Cecily Bonville

Cecily Bonville

Cecily Bonville

Cecily Bonville

Cecily Marchioness Dorset Bonville (1460 – 1530)

is my 17th great grandmother
son of Cecily Marchioness Dorset Bonville
daughter of Thomas Marquess Dorset Knight Grey
daughter of Elizabeth Grey
daughter of Margaret Audley
daughter of Margaret Howard
son of Lady Ann Dorset
son of Robert Lewis
daughter of Robert Lewis
son of Ann Lewis
son of Joshua Morse
son of Joseph Morse
son of Joseph Morse
son of Joseph Morse III
son of John Henry Morse
son of Abner Morse
son of Daniel Rowland Morse
son of Jason A Morse
son of Ernest Abner Morse
I am the daughter of Richard Arden Morse
The Bonville family was involved in the War of the Roses, and a famous feud:

The Bonville-Courtenay Feud was an episode in the War of the Roses in 15th centuryEngland. Often local concerns can dictate choice of side in civil wars. These two rival families lived in south-western England (DevonCornwallSomerset). The Courtenays held the peerage Earldom of Devon and the Bonvilles were titled Lord Harington. Their dispute concerned the Stewardship of the Duchy of Cornwall. This was not a sinecure but rather a prestigious and financially rewarding position. Rival claims to this position triggered the feud. The feud led to considerable local bitterness and even murder. It was ended by government intervention. The War of the Roses was a time of shifting allegiances in British history as the tide of War presented opportunity for advancement to various factions. A similar feud was the Percy-Neville feud also at this time. In Ireland there was strife between the Butler family, Earls of Ormond versus the Fitzgerald line, Earls of Desmondand Kildare. Many senior members of the Bonville and Courtenay families were killed in the battles and skirmishes of the War of the Roses. This feud is relevant to Local History, Family History/Genealogy and the History of England specifically the War of the Roses.

In 1441 Devon was appointed to the lucrative stewardship of the Duchy of Cornwall, an office Henry VI had already conferred on Sir William Bonville [1] in 1437, Bonville was aWest Country gentleman whose growing influence at court threatened Courtenay domination in the region. He was punished after the skirmish at Dartford. Later conflict between Devon and Bonville’s party led to the murder of Nicholas Radford [2]. Imprisoned in the Tower of London as punishment,Devon was released in 1457 by authority of QueenMargaret of Anjou.

Quote

Nor [3]did the nobility act as though dynastic considerations were decisive. Richard Neville, Earl of Warwick, moved his support from the House of York (Edward IV) to theHouse of Lancaster (Henry VI) when it suited his own ambitions. When Lord Bonville shifted his support from Lancaster to York, his local rival the Earl of Devon switched his backing to the Lancastrians

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