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Beatrice de Savoy, Countess de Provence 23rd Great-Grandmother

September 5, 2016 10 Comments

Beatrice de Savoy Countess de Provence (1205 - 1267) 23rd great-grandmother

Beatrice de Savoy Countess de Provence (1205 – 1267)
23rd great-grandmother

She was born as the second child of Thomas I and Beatrice de Geneve. She married Raimond Berenger de Provence in 1219. After two miscarriages she bore him a son and four daughters. Her son died young. The two elder daughters were married to reigning kings while the husbands of the younger two later rose to that rank. She was buried at the chapel in the Chateau de Menuet near Les Échelles. Her mausoleum was desecrated during the revolution and only her skull could be saved. It was deposited in her brother Bonifaces grave.

Beatrice of Savoy was Countess of Provence from December 1220 – 19 August 1245
Her spouse was Ramon Berenguer IV, Count of Provence.  Their children were:

Margaret, Queen of France
Eleanor, Queen of England
Sanchia, Queen of Germany
Beatrice, Queen of Sicily
Raymond of Provence
She was from the House of Savoy (by birth) and House of Aragon (by marriage)

Beatrice of Savoy was the daughter of Thomas I of Savoy and Margaret of Geneva. She was Countess consort of Provence by her marriage to Ramon Berenguer IV, Count of Provence.
Her paternal grandparents were Humbert III, Count of Savoy, and Beatrice of Viennois. Her maternal grandparents were William I, Count of Geneva and Beatrice de Faucigny. Beatrice of Savoy’s mother, Margaret was betrothed to Philip II of France. While Margaret was travelling to France for her wedding, she was captured by Beatrice’s father, Thomas. He took her back to Savoy and married her himself. Thomas’ excuse was that Philip II was already married, which was true.

Beatrice was the tenth of fourteen children born to her parents. Her siblings included: Amadeus IV, Count of Savoy; Thomas II of Piedmont; Peter II, Count of Savoy; Philip I, Count of Savoy; Boniface of Savoy, Archbishop of Canterbury; Avita the Countess of Devon; and Margherita of Savoy wife of Hartmann I of Kyburg.
Beatrice betrothed on 5 June 1219 to Ramon Berenguer IV, Count of Provence; they married in December 1220. She was a shrewd and politically astute woman, whose beauty was likened to that of a second Niobe by Matthew Paris. Ramon and Beatrice of Savoy had four daughters, who all lived to adulthood, and married kings. Their only son, Raymond died in early infancy.[2]

Margaret, Queen of France (1221–1295), wife of Louis IX of France
Eleanor, Queen of England (1223–1291), wife of Henry III of England
Sanchia, Queen of Germany (1228–1261), wife of Richard, Earl of Cornwall
Beatrice, Queen of Sicily (1231–1267), wife of Charles I of Sicily
Raymond of Provence, died young
At the English court[edit]
In 1242, Beatrice’s brother Peter was sent to Provence by Henry III to negotiate the marriage of Sanchia to Richard. Another brother, Philip, escorted Beatrice and Sanchia to the English court in Gascony, arriving in May 1243. There they joined Henry, Eleanor, and their baby, Beatrice of England. Henry was very happy at this occasion and gave many gifts to the various relatives.

In November 1243, Beatrice and Sanchia travelled to England for the wedding. This wedding did much to strengthen the bond between Richard and Henry III. She further strengthened the unity of the English royal family by convincing Henry III to help pay the debts of his sister Eleanor and her husband Simon de Montfort, who had often been at odds with Henry.[5] In January 1244, Beatrice negotiated a loan for her husband from Henry of four thousand marks, offering the king five Provençal castles as collateral.
When Ramon Berenguer died on 19 August 1245, he left Provence to his youngest daughter, and his widow was granted the usufruct of the county of Provence for her lifetime. Beatrice’s daughter and namesake then became one of the most attractive heiresses in medieval Europe. Frederick II, Holy Roman Emperor sent a fleet and James I of Aragonsent an army to seize her, so Beatrice placed herself and her daughter in a safe fortress in Aix, secured the trust of its people then sent to the Pope for his protection. The Pope was also a target for Frederick’s military incursions in France. In Cluny during December 1245, a secret discussion, between Pope Innocent IV, Louis IX of France, his mother Blanche of Castile, and his brother Charles of Anjou, took place. It was decided that in return for Louis IX supporting the Pope militarily, the Pope would allow Charles of Anjou, youngest brother to the French King, to marry Beatrice of Provence. Mother and daughter were satisfied with this selection.[7] But Provence was to never go to France outright through Charles. It was agreed that if Charles and Beatrice had children, the county would go to them; if there was no issue, then the county would go to Sanchia of Provence. If Sanchia died without an heir, Provence would go to the King of Aragon.

Henry protested the selection, arguing that he had not yet received the full dowry for Eleanor nor his brother for Sanchia. He also still had the castles in Provence against the loan he had made to the former count.

When Charles took over the administration of Provence in 1246, he did not respect Beatrice’s rights within the county. She sought the aid of Barral of Baux and the Pope in protecting her rights within the area. The citizens of Marseille,Avignon, and Arles joined this resistance to Capetian control. In 1248, Charles began to seek peace with her so that he could join his brother’s crusade. A temporary truce was reached to allow this.

In 1248, she travelled back to England with her brother Thomas, to see their family there.

In 1254, as Louis was returning from his crusade by way of Provence, Beatrice petitioned him for a more permanent resolution of the dispute with Charles. The French queen Margaret joined the petition, noting that Charles had not respected her dowry either. Beatrice travelled with them back to Paris. As the year progressed, Henry and his wife were invited to travel to Paris, and eventually all four daughters joined their mother there for Christmas.[11]

The generally good relationship among the four sisters did much to improve the relationship of the French and English kings. It brought about the Treaty of Paris in 1259, where differences were resolved.[12] Beatrice and all her four daughters participated in the talks.[13] While the family was still gathered, Louis IX finally persuaded Beatrice to surrender her claims and control in Provence in exchange for a sizable pension to be paid to her. Charles also paid back the loan henry had made to the previous count, clearing his claims in the county.[14]

In 1262, Beatrice was part of the family discussion to try again to bring peace between Henry and Simon de Montfort. When Henry was captured in 1264, Beatrice’s brother Peter II, Count of Savoy took his army to join the efforts to free the king. He left Beatrice in charge of Savoy while he was gone.

Beatrice outlived her third daughter Sanchia and came close to outliving her youngest daughter Beatrice, who died months after her mother (Beatrice the elder died in January, Beatrice the younger died in September). Beatrice of Savoy died on 4 January 1267.

Beatrice de Savoy Countess de Provence (1205 – 1267)
23rd great-grandmother
Eleanor Berenger (1223 – 1291)
daughter of Beatrice 1205 de SavoyCountess de Provence
Edward I “the Longshanks” Plantagenet (1239 – 1307)
son of Eleanor Berenger
Elizabeth of Rhuddlan Princess of England Plantagenet (1282 – 1316)
daughter of Edward I “the Longshanks” Plantagenet
William Earl of Northampton De Bohun (1312 – 1360)
son of Elizabeth of Rhuddlan Princess of England Plantagenet
Lady Elizabeth Countess Arundel Countess DeBohun (1350 – 1385)
daughter of William Earl of Northampton De Bohun
Elizabeth Duchess Norfolk Fitzalan (1366 – 1425)
daughter of Lady Elizabeth Countess Arundel Countess DeBohun
Lady Joan De Goushill Baroness Stanley (1402 – 1459)
daughter of Elizabeth Duchess Norfolk Fitzalan
Countess Elizabeth Sefton Stanley (1429 – 1459)
daughter of Lady Joan De Goushill Baroness Stanley
Thomas Sir 8th Earl of Sefton Molyneux (1445 – 1483)
son of Countess Elizabeth Sefton Stanley
Lawrence Castellan of Liverpool Mollenaux (1490 – 1550)
son of Thomas Sir 8th Earl of Sefton Molyneux
John Mollenax (1542 – 1583)
son of Lawrence Castellan of Liverpool Mollenaux
Mary Mollenax (1559 – 1598)
daughter of John Mollenax
Gabriell Francis Holland (1596 – 1660)
son of Mary Mollenax
John Holland (1628 – 1710)
son of Gabriell Francis Holland
Mary Elizabeth Holland (1620 – 1681)
daughter of John Holland
Richard Dearden (1645 – 1747)
son of Mary Elizabeth Holland
George Dearden (1705 – 1749)
son of Richard Dearden
George Darden (1734 – 1807)
son of George Dearden
David Darden (1770 – 1820)
son of George Darden
Minerva Truly Darden (1806 – 1837)
daughter of David Darden
Sarah E Hughes (1829 – 1911)
daughter of Minerva Truly Darden
Lucinda Jane Armer (1847 – 1939)
daughter of Sarah E Hughes
George Harvey Taylor (1884 – 1941)
son of Lucinda Jane Armer
Ruby Lee Taylor (1922 – 2008)
daughter of George Harvey Taylor
Pamela Morse
I am the daughter of Ruby Lee Taylor

Ramon Berenguer IV, Count of Provence and Forcalquier

June 8, 2016 2 Comments

Ramon Berenguer & Beatrice of Savoy

Ramon Berenguer & Beatrice of Savoy

My 23rd great grandfather was a nobleman born in France in 1198.  He died Jul. 19, 1245 and is buried at Eglise Saint Jean de Malte, Aix-en-Provence, Departement des Bouches-du-Rhone, Provence-Alpes-Cote d’Azur, France.  I want to visit his grave someday.  I love the Cote d’Azur.

Ramon was Count of Provence and Forcalquier. He was the only son of Alfonso II de Provence, who died 1209 during an epidemic in Palermo and Gersend de Sabran, Countess of Forcalquier. He married Beatrice of Savoy in 1220 who bore him five children. Their only son Raymond died young and their four daughters Marguerite, Eleanor, Sanchia and Beatrice were all married to kings.

Ramon Berenguer IV de Provence Saint (1195 – 1245)
23rd great-grandfather
Eleanor Berenger (1223 – 1291)
daughter of Ramon Berenguer IV de Provence Saint
Edward I “the Longshanks” Plantagenet (1239 – 1307)
son of Eleanor Berenger
Elizabeth of Rhuddlan Princess of England Plantagenet (1282 – 1316)
daughter of Edward I “the Longshanks” Plantagenet
William Earl of Northampton De Bohun (1312 – 1360)
son of Elizabeth of Rhuddlan Princess of England Plantagenet
Lady Elizabeth Countess Arundel Countess DeBohun (1350 – 1385)
daughter of William Earl of Northampton De Bohun
Elizabeth Duchess Norfolk Fitzalan (1366 – 1425)
daughter of Lady Elizabeth Countess Arundel Countess DeBohun
Lady Joan De Goushill Baroness Stanley (1402 – 1459)
daughter of Elizabeth Duchess Norfolk Fitzalan
Countess Elizabeth Sefton Stanley (1429 – 1459)
daughter of Lady Joan De Goushill Baroness Stanley
Thomas Sir 8th Earl of Sefton Molyneux (1445 – 1483)
son of Countess Elizabeth Sefton Stanley
Lawrence Castellan of Liverpool Mollenaux (1490 – 1550)
son of Thomas Sir 8th Earl of Sefton Molyneux
John Mollenax (1542 – 1583)
son of Lawrence Castellan of Liverpool Mollenaux
Mary Mollenax (1559 – 1598)
daughter of John Mollenax
Gabriell Francis Holland (1596 – 1660)
son of Mary Mollenax
John Holland (1628 – 1710)
son of Gabriell Francis Holland
Mary Elizabeth Holland (1620 – 1681)
daughter of John Holland
Richard Dearden (1645 – 1747)
son of Mary Elizabeth Holland
George Dearden (1705 – 1749)
son of Richard Dearden
George Darden (1734 – 1807)
son of George Dearden
David Darden (1770 – 1820)
son of George Darden
Minerva Truly Darden (1806 – 1837)
daughter of David Darden
Sarah E Hughes (1829 – 1911)
daughter of Minerva Truly Darden
Lucinda Jane Armer (1847 – 1939)
daughter of Sarah E Hughes
George Harvey Taylor (1884 – 1941)
son of Lucinda Jane Armer
Ruby Lee Taylor (1922 – 2008)
daughter of George Harvey Taylor
Pamela Morse
I am the daughter of Ruby Lee Taylor

in Church Saint-Jean-de-Malte, Aix-en-Provence, France

in Church Saint-Jean-de-Malte, Aix-en-Provence, France

 

 

Ramon Berenguer IV (1195 – 19 August 1245), Count of Provence and Forcalquier, was the son of Alfonso II of Provence and Garsenda of Sabran, heiress of Forcalquier. After his father’s death (1209), Ramon was imprisoned in the castle of Monzón, in Aragon until he was able to escape in 1219 and claim his inheritance. He was a powerful and energetic ruler who added Forcalquier to his domain. Giovanni Villani in his Nuova Cronica had this to say about Raymond:
Count Raymond was a lord of gentle lineage, and kin to them of the house of Aragon, and to the family of the count of Toulouse, By inheritance Provence, this side of the Rhone, was his; a wise and courteous lord was he, and of noble state and virtuous, and in his time did honourable deeds, and to his court came all gentle persons of Provence and of France and of Catalonia, by reason of his courtesy and noble estate, and he made many Provençal coblas and canzoni of great worth.
On 5 June 1219, Ramon married Beatrice of Savoy, daughter of Thomas I of Savoy. She was a shrewd and politically astute woman, whose beauty was likened by Matthew Paris to that of a second Niobe. Along with two stillborn sons (1220 & 1225), Ramon and Beatrice had four daughters, all of whom married kings.
Margaret of Provence (1221–1295), wife of Louis IX of France
Eleanor of Provence (1223–1291), wife of Henry III of England
Sanchia of Provence (1228–1261), wife of Richard of Cornwall, king of Germany
Beatrice of Provence (1234–1267), wife of Charles I of Sicily
Ramon Berenguer IV died in Aix-en-Provence. At least two planhs (Occitan funeral laments) of uncertain authorship (one possibly by Aimeric de Peguilhan and one falsely attributed to Rigaut de Berbezilh) were written in his honour.

Maria Jeanne, Countess of Ponthieu, Dammartin

June 7, 2016

Burial: Abbey of Valloires Argoules Departement de la Somme Picardie, France

Burial: Abbey of Valloires Argoules Departement de la Somme Picardie, France

My 23rd great-grandmother was born Apr. 19, 1199. She was a noblewoman.   Her title was Countess of Ponthieu and Montreuil. She was the only child and heiress of Guillaume II de Ponthieu and Alix de France. She married Simon de Dammartin and bore him four daughters. In 1241 she remarried Matthieu de Montmorency who was killed in the Battle of Mansurah in 1250.  She died Sep.,1250

Maria Jeanne, Countess of Ponthieu & Montreuil, Dammartin (1199 – 1250)
23rd great-grandmother
Queen Consort Joan (Castile and León) (Countess Ponthieu) DeDammartin (1216 – 1279)
daughter of Maria Jeanne, Countess of Ponthieu & Montreuil, Dammartin
Eleanor Castille Princess of Castille and Leon (1241 – 1290)
daughter of Queen Consort Joan (Castile and León) (Countess Ponthieu) DeDammartin
Elizabeth of Rhuddlan Princess of England Plantagenet (1282 – 1316)
daughter of Eleanor Castille Princess of Castille and Leon
William Earl of Northampton De Bohun (1312 – 1360)
son of Elizabeth of Rhuddlan Princess of England Plantagenet
Lady Elizabeth Countess Arundel Countess DeBohun (1350 – 1385)
daughter of William Earl of Northampton De Bohun
Elizabeth Duchess Norfolk Fitzalan (1366 – 1425)
daughter of Lady Elizabeth Countess Arundel Countess DeBohun
Lady Joan De Goushill Baroness Stanley (1402 – 1459)
daughter of Elizabeth Duchess Norfolk Fitzalan
Countess Elizabeth Sefton Stanley (1429 – 1459)
daughter of Lady Joan De Goushill Baroness Stanley
Thomas Sir 8th Earl of Sefton Molyneux (1445 – 1483)
son of Countess Elizabeth Sefton Stanley
Lawrence Castellan of Liverpool Mollenaux (1490 – 1550)
son of Thomas Sir 8th Earl of Sefton Molyneux
John Mollenax (1542 – 1583)
son of Lawrence Castellan of Liverpool Mollenaux
Mary Mollenax (1559 – 1598)
daughter of John Mollenax
Gabriell Francis Holland (1596 – 1660)
son of Mary Mollenax
John Holland (1628 – 1710)
son of Gabriell Francis Holland
Mary Elizabeth Holland (1620 – 1681)
daughter of John Holland
Richard Dearden (1645 – 1747)
son of Mary Elizabeth Holland
George Dearden (1705 – 1749)
son of Richard Dearden
George Darden (1734 – 1807)
son of George Dearden
David Darden (1770 – 1820)
son of George Darden
Minerva Truly Darden (1806 – 1837)
daughter of David Darden
Sarah E Hughes (1829 – 1911)
daughter of Minerva Truly Darden
Lucinda Jane Armer (1847 – 1939)
daughter of Sarah E Hughes
George Harvey Taylor (1884 – 1941)
son of Lucinda Jane Armer
Ruby Lee Taylor (1922 – 2008)
daughter of George Harvey Taylor
Pamela Morse
I am the daughter of Ruby Lee Taylor

Marie de Ponthieu (before 17 Apr 1199-Sep 1250). Daughter of Guillaume II “Talvas” de Ponthieu and Alix de France. The De Rebus Hispaniæ of Rodericus Ximenes names “Mariam…mater Joannæ Reginæ Castellæ et Legionis” as the daughter of “Comitis de Pontivo” and his wife “Adelodis” daughter of “Ludovico Regi Francorum” (and his wife “Elisabeth”, an error for Constanza). “Willelmus comes Pontivi et Monstreoli” donated property to the church of Saint Giosse, with the consent of “Marie filie mee et Aelis uxoris mee”, by charter dated 1205. “Willelmus comes Pontivi et Monstreoli…et Aalais uxor mea comitissa Pontivi et Maria filia mea” granted concessions by charter dated 1207. “Willelmus comes Pontivi et Monstreoli” granted rights to one of his vassals, with the consent of “Aalis, uxoris mee Ludovici regis filie et Marie filie mee”, by charter dated Aug 1208. “Renaldus comes Bolonie” confirmed the marriage contract between “Guillelmum comitem Pontivi et Mariam eiusdem comitis filiam” and “Simonem fratrem meum” by charter dated Sep 1208. “Willelmus comes Pontivi et Monstreoli” granted rights to the commune of Maioc, with the consent of “Aalis, uxoris mee et Symonis de Bolonia, generis mei, et Marie filie mee, uxoris eius”, by charter dated 1209. “Guilelmus comes Pontivi et Monstrolii” donated property to Saint-Maurice d’Agaune, for the souls of “Alaidis uxoris meæ et Mariæ filiæ meæ”, by charter dated Mar 1210. “Willaume comte de Pontieu et de Montreuil” agreed a concession made by one of his vassals, with the consent of “Aalis sa femme et de Marie leur fille” by charter dated Nov 1211.
She succeeded her father in 1221 as Countess de Ponthieu. Louis VIII King of France confirms an agreement with “consanguinea nostra Maria comitissa Pontivi” related to rights of her “filios et filios quos susceperat a Simone fratre comitis Renaldi Bolonie” by charter dated 1225. “Symon comes Pontivi et Monsteroli et Maria uxor mea” confirmed a donation of property to the abbey of Notre-Dame d’Ourscamp by “Johannes comes Pontivi” by charter dated 2 Mar 1230. “Maria comitissa Pontivi et Monstreoli” donated property to the church of Boulogne in memory of “Symon comes Pontivi et Monstreoli…maritus meus” by charter dated Oct 1239. “Matheus comes Pontivi et Monstreoli et Maria uxor eius, comitissa” noted property sales by charter dated Sep 1242. “Matheus de Montemorenc. comes Pontivi et Monsterolii dominus de Atechi” donated property, with the consent of “Maria comitissa Pontivi et Monsterolii uxor mea”, by charter dated Feb 1246.
Married firstly (contract Sep 1208) Simon de Dammartin, Comte de Aumale, son of Aubry II, Comte de Dammartin & his wife Mathilde [Mabile] de Clermont-en-Beauvaisis ( – 21 Sep 1239). Comte Simon & his wife had four children: Jeanne, Mathilde, Phillipa and Marie.
Married secondly (Sep 1240/15 Dec 1241) Mathieu de Montmorency, Seigneur d’Attichy, son of Mathieu II, Seigneur de Montmorency ( – killed in Battle Mansurah 8 Feb 1250).

Ermengarde Blanche D Anjou Countess Gastinois

October 4, 2015 1 Comment

 

 Ermengarde Blanche D Anjou Countess Gastinois

Ermengarde Blanche D Anjou Countess Gastinois

My 29th great-grandmother, Ermengarde of Anjou (c. 1018 – 18 March 1076), daughter of Count Fulk III of Anjou and Hildegarde of Sundgau, was born in Angers and was murdered at the Church of Fleurey-sur-Ouche, Côte-d’Or.

Ermengarde-Blanche of Anjou was a French noblewoman who was first Countess of Chateau-Landon and secondly Duchess of Burgundy. She is also called Hermangarde in some sources. Ermengarde-Blanch was the heiress of the countship of Anjou and is an ancestress of the House of Plantagenet.

Ermengarde-Blanc he was the daughter of Count Fulk III of Anjou and Hildegarde.  She was involved in two marriage alliances that greatly benefited her father and brother as counts of Anjou. She was first contracted to marry Geoffrey II, Count of Gâtinais, called Ferréol , who was also lord of Château-Landon.  It was important marriage to return Château-Landon to the counts of Anjou.  It took between twelve and eighteen months to arrange the marriage. Meanwhile Fulk paid a great deal of attention to Château-Landon. He and his wife, Hildegarde, founded the abbey of Le Ronceray.  Originally a church dedicated to St. Mary, Hildegard was very active in its rebuilding into an abbey. They gave the abbey many gifts including the forest of Lattay. They gave more gifts to this abbey than any other church or religious house. Her two sons of this marriage, Geoffrey III and Fulk both became counts of Anjou after her brother Geoffrey II Martel. Among her descendants are the Plantagenet (or Angevin) kings of England.

After her husband Geoffrey died Ermengarde-Blanche married Robert I Capet, Duke of Burgundy.  Robert was the son of King Robert II of France. Because both Ermengarde and her second husband Robert Capet were both descendants of Ingelger, they were related by blood.  This was found in charts prepared at the monastery of Saint-Aubin at Angers between 1048 and 1052. The ancestral charts show how closely the Angevin and Capet families were related. The charts were probably created over concerns of who Ermengarde and Robert’s daughter Hildegarde could or could not marry. Ermengarde-Blanche died at Fleury-sur-Ouche on 18 March 1076. Robert died three days later at the same place on 21 March 1076.

Ermengarde Blanche D Anjou Countess Gastinois (1018 – 1076)
is my 29th great grandmother
Fulk Le Rechin Rude Anjou (1043 – 1109)
son of Ermengarde Blanche D Anjou Countess Gastinois
FULK V The Younger King of Jerusalem ANJOU * (1092 – 1143)
son of Fulk Le Rechin Rude Anjou
Sibilla Anjou (1105 – 1165)
daughter of FULK V The Younger King of Jerusalem ANJOU *
Marguerite De LORRAINE (1135 – 1194)
daughter of Sibilla Anjou
Isabelle De Hainault (1170 – 1190)
daughter of Marguerite De LORRAINE
Louis VIII France (1187 – 1226)
son of Isabelle De Hainault
Charles I King of Jerusalem and Naples (1227 – 1285)
son of Louis VIII France
Charles NAPLES (1254 – 1309)
son of Charles I King of Jerusalem and Naples
Marguerite Sicily Naples (1273 – 1299)
daughter of Charles NAPLES
Jeanne DeVALOIS (1294 – 1342)
daughter of Marguerite Sicily Naples
Philippa deHainault (1311 – 1369)
daughter of Jeanne DeVALOIS
John of Gaunt – Duke of Lancaster – Plantagenet (1340 – 1399)
son of Philippa deHainault
Elizabeth Plantagenet (1363 – 1425)
daughter of John of Gaunt – Duke of Lancaster – Plantagenet
John Holland (1395 – 1447)
son of Elizabeth Plantagenet
Henry Holland (1430 – 1475)
son of John Holland
Henry Holland (1485 – 1561)
son of Henry Holland
Henry Holland (1527 – 1561)
son of Henry Holland
John Holland (1556 – 1628)
son of Henry Holland
Gabriell Francis Holland (1596 – 1660)
son of John Holland
John Holland (1628 – 1710)
son of Gabriell Francis Holland
Mary Elizabeth Holland (1620 – 1681)
daughter of John Holland
Richard Dearden (1645 – 1747)
son of Mary Elizabeth Holland
George Dearden (1705 – 1749)
son of Richard Dearden
George Darden (1734 – 1807)
son of George Dearden
David Darden (1770 – 1820)
son of George Darden
Minerva Truly Darden (1806 – 1837)
daughter of David Darden
Sarah E Hughes (1829 – 1911)
daughter of Minerva Truly Darden
Lucinda Jane Armer (1847 – 1939)
daughter of Sarah E Hughes
George Harvey Taylor (1884 – 1941)
son of Lucinda Jane Armer
Ruby Lee Taylor (1922 – 2008)
daughter of George Harvey Taylor
Pamela Morse
I am the daughter of Ruby Lee Taylor

Anjou Coat of Arms

Anjou Coat of Arms

Bertrade de Montfort

June 13, 2014 1 Comment

My 28th great grandmother married the king of France when both she and he were already married.

Bertrade de Montfort (1059 – 1115)
is my 28th great grandmother
Louis VI France ( – 1180)
son of Bertrade de Montfort
Louis VII France (1119 – 1180)
son of Louis VI France
Philippe Auguste II France (1165 – 1223)
son of Louis VII France
Louis VIII France (1187 – 1226)
son of Philippe Auguste II France
Charles I King of Jerusalem and Naples (1227 – 1285)
son of Louis VIII France
Charles NAPLES (1254 – 1309)
son of Charles I King of Jerusalem and Naples
Marguerite Sicily Naples (1273 – 1299)
daughter of Charles NAPLES
Jeanne DeVALOIS (1294 – 1342)
daughter of Marguerite Sicily Naples
Philippa deHainault (1311 – 1369)
daughter of Jeanne DeVALOIS
John of Gaunt – Duke of Lancaster – Plantagenet (1340 – 1399)
son of Philippa deHainault
Philippa Plantagenet (1370 – 1415)
daughter of John of Gaunt – Duke of Lancaster – Plantagenet
Beatrix DePinto (1403 – 1447)
daughter of Philippa Plantagenet
John Fettiplace (1427 – 1464)
son of Beatrix DePinto
Richard Fettiplace (1460 – 1511)
son of John Fettiplace
Anne Fettiplace (1496 – 1567)
daughter of Richard Fettiplace
Mary Purefoy (1533 – 1579)
daughter of Anne Fettiplace
Susanna Thorne (1559 – 1586)
daughter of Mary Purefoy
Gov Thomas Dudley (1576 – 1653)
son of Susanna Thorne
Anne Dudley (1612 – 1672)
daughter of Gov Thomas Dudley
John Bradstreet (1652 – 1718)
son of Anne Dudley
Mercy Bradstreet (1689 – 1725)
daughter of John Bradstreet
Caleb Hazen (1720 – 1777)
son of Mercy Bradstreet
Mercy Hazen (1747 – 1819)
daughter of Caleb Hazen
Martha Mead (1784 – 1860)
daughter of Mercy Hazen
Abner Morse (1808 – 1838)
son of Martha Mead
Daniel Rowland Morse (1838 – 1910)
son of Abner Morse
Jason A Morse (1862 – 1932)
son of Daniel Rowland Morse
Ernest Abner Morse (1890 – 1965)
son of Jason A Morse
Richard Arden Morse (1920 – 2004)
son of Ernest Abner Morse
Pamela Morse
I am the daughter of Richard Arden Morse

Bertrade de Montfort (c. 1070-February 14, 1117) was the daughter of Simon I de Montfort and Agnes, Countess of Evreux. Her brother was Amauri de Montfort. The oft-married Count Fulk IV of Anjou was married to the mother of his son in 1089, when the lovely Bertrade caught his eye. According to the chronicler John of Marmoutier: The lecherous Fulk then fell passionately in love with the sister of Amaury of Montfort, whom no good man ever praised save for her beauty. For her sake, he divorced the mother of Geoffrey II Martel… Bertrade and Fulk were married, and they became the parents of a son, Fulk, but in 1092 Bertrade left her husband and took up with King Philip I of France. Philip married her on May 15, 1092, despite the fact that they both had spouses living. He was so enamoured of Bertrade that he refused to leave her even when threatened with excommunication. Pope Urban II did excommunicate him in 1095, and Philip was prevented from taking part in the First Crusade. Astonishingly, Bertrade persuaded Philip and Fulk to be friends. Bertrade and Philipe had three children together: Philippe de France, Count of Mantes (living in 1123) Fleury de France, seigneur of Nangis (living in 1118) Cecile of France (died 1145), married (1) Tancred, Prince of Galilee; married (2) Pons of Tripoli According to Orderic Vitalis, Bertrade was anxious that one of her sons succeed Philip, and sent a letter to King Henry I of England asking him to arrest her stepson Louis. Orderic also claims she sought to kill Louis first through the arts of sorcery, and then through poison. Whatever the truth of these allegations, Louis succeeded Philippe in 1108. Bertrade lived on until 1117; William of Malmesbury says: “Bertrade, still young and beautiful, took the veil at Fontevraud Abbey, always charming to men, pleasing to God, and like an angel.” Her son from her first marriage was Fulk V of Anjou who later became King of Jerusalem. The dynasties founded by Fulk’s sons ruled for centuries, one of them in England (Plantagenet), the other in Jerusalem.

Sources Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America Before 1700 By Frederick Lewis Weis, Lines 50-25, 118-23. Orderic Vitalis William of Malmesbury

Eleanor DeChatellerault

April 29, 2014 7 Comments

My 26th great-grandmother had a famous mother who was nicknamed Dangereuse because she was such a tart.  This matrilineal danger ran deep.  These women were powerful, each in her own way:

Aenor ( aka Eleanor) of Châtellerault, duchess of Aquitaine (Châtellerault, Vienne, France, c. 1103, – March 1130 in Talmont) was the mother of Eleanor of Aquitaine, arguably the most powerful woman in Europe of her generation.
Aenor was a daughter of Viscount Aimery I of Châttellerault and his wife, Dangereuse de L’ Isle Bouchard (d. 1151). Aenor married William X of Aquitaine, the son of her mother’s lover, and had three children with him:
Eleanor of Aquitaine, Duchess of Aquitaine, and wife of both Louis VII of France, and Henry II of England. Petronilla of Aquitaine, wife of Raoul I, Count of Vermandois.
William Aigret (who died at the age of four) The county “Châtelherault” later became a title belonging to the Dukes of Hamilton.

 

Eleanor DeChatellerault (1105 – 1130)

is my 26th great grandmother

Eleanor of Aquitane (1130 – 1204)

daughter of Eleanor DeChatellerault
Eleanor Spain Plantagenet (1162 – 1214)
daughter of Eleanor of Aquitane
Berenguela CASTILE LEON (1181 – 1244)
daughter of Eleanor Spain Plantagenet
Saint Ferdinand Castile amp Leon (1199 – 1252)
son of Berenguela CASTILE LEON
Alfonso X Wise Castile Leon amp Galicia (1221 – 1284)
son of Saint Ferdinand Castile amp Leon
Sancho Brave Castile Leon (1258 – 1295)
son of Alfonso X Wise Castile Leon amp Galicia
Beatrice Sanchez Infanta Castile (1293 – 1359)
daughter of Sancho Brave Castile Leon
Peter I Portugal Cruel Algarve (1320 – 1367)
son of Beatrice Sanchez Infanta Castile
John I DePinto (1358 – 1433)
son of Peter I Portugal Cruel Algarve
Beatrix DePinto (1403 – 1447)
daughter of John I DePinto
John Fettiplace (1427 – 1464)
son of Beatrix DePinto
Richard Fettiplace (1460 – 1511)
son of John Fettiplace
Anne Fettiplace (1496 – 1567)
daughter of Richard Fettiplace
Mary Purefoy (1533 – 1579)
daughter of Anne Fettiplace
Susanna Thorne (1559 – 1586)
daughter of Mary Purefoy
Gov Thomas Dudley (1576 – 1653)
son of Susanna Thorne
Anne Dudley (1612 – 1672)
daughter of Gov Thomas Dudley
John Bradstreet (1652 – 1718)
son of Anne Dudley
Mercy Bradstreet (1689 – 1725)
daughter of John Bradstreet
Caleb Hazen (1720 – 1777)
son of Mercy Bradstreet
Mercy Hazen (1747 – 1819)
daughter of Caleb Hazen
Martha Mead (1784 – 1860)
daughter of Mercy Hazen
Abner Morse (1808 – 1838)
son of Martha Mead
Daniel Rowland Morse (1838 – 1910)
son of Abner Morse
Jason A Morse (1862 – 1932)
son of Daniel Rowland Morse
Ernest Abner Morse (1890 – 1965)
son of Jason A Morse
Richard Arden Morse (1920 – 2004)
son of Ernest Abner Morse
Pamela Morse
I am the daughter of Richard Arden Morse

Sibilla Anjou, 25th Great-Grandmother

March 14, 2014 3 Comments

Sibilla Anjou

Sibilla Anjou

My 25th great grandmother was from the House of Anjou (like the pear) .  Her father, Fulk, was a crusader who is buried at the Church of the Holy Sepulchre in Jerusalem, as King of Jerusalem, which is a very big deal, and pretty creepy. I have been there but did not think to look for my ancestors at the time.  The Anjous are Plantagenets in that way that royal Euros had lots of different names and houses.  The crusade thing is equally confusing.  This is how the Anjous took over the English throne:

The Plantagenets are also called Angevins, because their immediate paternal progenitors were Counts of Anjou, an autonomous county in northern France. They descend in the male line from from the Counts of Gatinais, one of whom had married an heiress to the county, her Anjou ancestors deriving from an obscure 9th century nobleman named Ingelger.  It is due to this lineage that the Plantagenets are sometimes referred to as the First House of Anjou. One of the more notable Counts was Fulk, a crusader who became King of Jerusalem. It was his son, Geoffrey, nicknamed Plantagenet, who gave his name to the dynasty, and Fulk’s grandson, Henry, was the first of the family to rule England.
Henry’ s claim to the English throne came through his mother, the Empress Matilda, who had claimed the crown as the daughter of Henry I of England. Empress Matilda’s brother William Adelin had died in the wreck of the White Ship, leaving Matilda her father’s only surviving legitimate child.  However, on Henry’s death in 1135, Matilda’s cousin Stephen of Blois was supported by much of the Anglo-Norman nobility, and was able to have himself crowned instead.  A tightly fought civil war known as The Anarchy ensued, with Matilda gaining support from her illegitimate half-brother, Robert, 1st Earl of Gloucester.  The balance swayed both ways during the war, Matilda gained control at one point and carried the title “Lady of the English” before Stephen forced her out to Anjou. Unrest and instability continued throughout Stephen’s reign, while on the continent, Geoffrey managed to take control of the Duchy of Normandy for the Angevins in 1141 but seemingly showed no interest in campaigning across the Channel.

Sibilla went to Jerusalem where her father married the queen. Later she became a nun, like lots of my royal female ancestors:

Sibylla of Anjou (c. 1112-1165) was a daughter of Fulk V of Anjou and Ermengarde of Maine, and wife of William Clito and Thierry, Count of Flanders.

In 1123 Sibylla married to William Clito, son of the Norman Robert Curthose and future Count of Flanders. Sibylla brought the County of Maine to this marriage, which was annulled in 1124 on grounds of consanguinity. The annulment was made by Pope Honorius II upon request from Henry I of England, William’s uncle; Fulk opposed it and did not consent until Honorius excommunicated him and placed an interdict over Anjou. Sibylla then accompanied her widower father to the crusader Kingdom of Jerusalem, where he married Melisende, the heiress of the kingdom, and became king himself in 1131. In 1139 she married Thierry, Count of Flanders, who had arrived on his first pilgrimage to the Holy Land.

She returned to Flanders with her new husband, and during his absence on the Second Crusade the pregnant Sibylla acted as regent of the county. Baldwin IV, Count of Hainaut took the opportunity to attack Flanders, but Sibylla led a counter-attack and pillaged Hainaut. In response Baldwin ravaged Artois. The archbishop of Reims intervened and a truce was signed, but Thierry took vengeance on Baldwin when he returned in 1149.

In 1157 she travelled with Thierry on his third pilgrimage, but after arriving in Jerusalem she separated from her husband and refused to return home with him. She became a nun at the convent of St. Lazarus in Bethany, where her step-aunt, Ioveta of Bethany, was abbess. Ioveta and Sibylla supported Queen Melisende and held some influence over the church, and supported the election of Amalric of Nesle as Latin Patriarch of Jerusalem over a number of other candidates. Sibylla died in Bethany in 1165.

With Thierry she had six children:

  • Philip, Count of Flanders
  • Matthew, Count of Boulogne, married Marie of Boulogne
  • Margaret, Countess of Flanders and Hainaut, married Baldwin V, Count of Hainaut
  • Gertrude
  • Matilda
  • Peter
Sibilla Anjou (1105 – 1165)
is my 25th great grandmother
daughter of Sibilla Anjou
daughter of Marguerite De LORRAINE
son of Isabelle De Hainault
son of Louis VIII France
son of Charles I King of Jerusalem and Naples
daughter of Charles NAPLES
daughter of Marguerite Sicily Naples
daughter of Jeanne DeVALOIS
son of Philippa deHainault
daughter of John of Gaunt – Duke of Lancaster – Plantagenet
daughter of Joan DeBeaufort
son of Duchess of York Lady Cecily DeNeville
son of Henry Holland
son of Henry Holland
son of John Holland
son of Francis Gabriell Holland
daughter of John Holland
son of Mary Elizabeth Holland
son of Richard Dearden
son of George Dearden
son of George Darden
daughter of David Darden
daughter of Minerva Truly Darden
daughter of Sarah E Hughes
son of Lucinda Jane Armer
daughter of George Harvey Taylor
I am the daughter of Ruby Lee Taylor

Sibilla d’Anjou born about 1105 Anjou, France died 1165/67

father: *Foulques V “le Jeune” Count of Anjou & King of Jerusalemborn 1092 Anjou, France
died 10 November 1143 Jerusalem, Holy Landburied Church Of Holy Sepulchre, Jerusalem, Holy Land

mother: *Ermengarde (Ermentrude) du Maineborn about 1096 Maine, France
died 1126 Maine, Francemarried 11 July 1110 France

siblings:
*Geoffrey V “le Bon” Plantagenet born 24 August 1113 Anjou, France; died 7 September 1151 Chateau, France
Mathilde d’Anjou born about 1104 Angers, Maine-et-Loire, France; died 1154 Fontevrault Abbey, Fontevrault, Maine-et-Loire, France
Elias d’Anjou born about 1111 Anjou, France; died 15 January 1151 St Serge Abbey, Angers, Anjou, France buried L’Abbey des Sergela, Angers, France

spouse: *Dietrich (Thierry) d’ Alsaceborn about 1099 Alsace, France
died 17 January 1168married 1134

children:
*Marguerite de Lorraine born about 1135 Alsace, France died 15 November 1194
*Matthieu d’ Alsace born about 1137 Flanders, Belgium died 1214 buried St. Judoc, Ponthieu, France

Isabelle de Hainault, 23rd Great-Grandmother

March 12, 2014 10 Comments

Isabelle de Hainault

Isabelle de Hainault

queen consort of France

queen consort of France

Isabelle gives birth

Isabelle gives birth

Isabella of Hainault (Valenciennes, 5 April 1170 – 15 March 1190, Paris) was queen consort of France as the first wife of King Philip II of France.

Early life

Isabella was born in Valenciennes on 5 April 1170, the daughter of Baldwin V, Count of Hainaut, and Margaret I, Countess of Flanders. At the age of one, her father had her betrothed to Henry, the future Count of Champagne. He was the nephew of Adèle of Champagne, who was Queen of France. In 1179, both their fathers swore that they would proceed with the marriage, but her father later agreed to her marrying Philip II of France.

Queen of France

She married King Philip on 28 April 1180 at Bapaume and brought as her dowry the county of Artois. The marriage was arranged by her maternal uncle Philip, Count of Flanders, who was advisor to the King.

Isabella was crowned Queen of France at Saint Denis on 28 May 1180. As Baldwin V rightly claimed to be a descendant of Charlemagne, the chroniclers of the time saw in this marriage a union of the Carolingian and Capetian dynasties.

The wedding did not please the queen mother, since it had meant the rejection of her nephew and the lessing of influence for her kinsmen. Though she received extravagant praise from certain annalists, she failed to win the affections of Philip due to her inability to provide him with an heir; although she was only 14 years old at the time. Meanwhile, King Philip in 1184, was waging war against Flanders, and angered at seeing Baldwin support his enemies, he called a council at Sens for the purpose of repudiating her. According to Gislebert of Mons, Isabella then appeared barefooted and dressed as a penitent in the town’s churches and thus gained the sympathy of the people. Her appeals angered them so much that they went to the palace and started shouting loud enough to be heard inside.

Robert, the king’s uncle, successfully interposed and no repudiation followed as repudiating her would also have meant the loss of Artois to the French crown.

Finally, on 5 September 1187, she gave birth to the needed heir, the future King Louis VIII of France.

Death

Her second pregnancy was extremely difficult; on 14 March 1190, Isabella gave birth to twin boys named Robert and Philip. Due to complications in childbirth, Isabella died the next day, and was buried in the cathedral of Notre Dame in Paris. She was not quite 20 years old and was mourned for greatly in the capital, since she had been a popular queen.

The twins lived only four days, both having died on 18 March 1190. Her son Louis succeeded her as Count of Artois. Isabella’s dowry of Artois eventually returned to the French Crown following the death of King Philip, when her son Louis became king.

Isabelle De Hainault (1170 – 1190)

is my 23rd great grandmother
Louis VIII France (1187 – 1226)
son of Isabelle De Hainault
Charles I King of Jerusalem and Naples (1227 – 1285)
son of Louis VIII France
Charles NAPLES (1254 – 1309)
son of Charles I King of Jerusalem and Naples
Marguerite Sicily Naples (1273 – 1299)
daughter of Charles NAPLES
Jeanne DeVALOIS (1294 – 1342)
daughter of Marguerite Sicily Naples
Philippa deHainault (1311 – 1369)
daughter of Jeanne DeVALOIS
John of Gaunt – Duke of Lancaster – Plantagenet (1340 – 1399)
son of Philippa deHainault
Joan DeBeaufort (1375 – 1440)
daughter of John of Gaunt – Duke of Lancaster – Plantagenet
Duchess of York Lady Cecily DeNeville (1415 – 1495)
daughter of Joan DeBeaufort
Henry Holland (1485 – 1561)
son of Duchess of York Lady Cecily DeNeville
Henry Holland (1527 – 1561)
son of Henry Holland
John Holland (1556 – 1628)
son of Henry Holland
Francis Gabriell Holland (1596 – 1660)
son of John Holland
John Holland (1628 – 1710)
son of Francis Gabriell Holland
Mary Elizabeth Holland (1620 – 1681)
daughter of John Holland
Richard Dearden (1645 – 1747)
son of Mary Elizabeth Holland
George Dearden (1705 – 1749)
son of Richard Dearden
George Darden (1734 – 1807)
son of George Dearden
David Darden (1770 – 1820)
son of George Darden
Minerva Truly Darden (1806 – 1837)
daughter of David Darden
Sarah E Hughes (1829 – 1911)
daughter of Minerva Truly Darden
Lucinda Jane Armer (1847 – 1939)
daughter of Sarah E Hughes
George Harvey Taylor (1884 – 1941)
son of Lucinda Jane Armer
Ruby Lee Taylor (1922 – 2008)
daughter of George Harvey Taylor
Pamela Morse
I am the daughter of Ruby Lee Taylor

Joan I Navarre, 22nd Great-Grandmother

December 30, 2013 8 Comments

Jeanne I Navarre married the king of France when she was 13 years old.  She founded a college and died either in childbirth or was killed by her husband.

In 1274, upon the death of her father, she became Countess of Champagne and Queen regnant of Navarre. Her mother Queen Blanche was her guardian and regent in Navarre. Various powers, both foreign and Navarrese, sought to take advantage of the minority of the heiress and the “weakness” of the female regent, which caused Joan and her mother to seek protection at the court of Philip III of France.

At the age of 13, Joan married the future Philip IV of France on August 16, 1284, becoming Queen of France a year later. Their three surviving sons would all become Kings of France, in turn, and their only surviving daughter Queen consort of England. Queen Joan founded the famous College of Navarre in Paris.

Joan led an army against the Count de Bar when he rebelled against her.

Joan died in 1305 either in childbirth or one chronicler even accused her husband of having killed her. Her personal physician was the inventor Guido da Vigevano. Following her death the crowns of Navarre and France were united for almost half a century.
Family Name:de Blois Given Names:Joan

Titles: Countess of Champagne (1274 – 1305)
Queen of Navarre (1274 – 1305)

Born:14 Jan 1273
Bar-sur-Seine, France Died:2 Apr 1305
Vincennes, Paris, France
(Age 32)
English/Scottish Royal Blood: 11.71875%

Father:Henry I, King of Navarre (Henry III of Champagne) About 1210
– 1274
Mother:Blanche d’Artois (daughter of Robert I, Count of Artois)
About 1247 – 2 May 1302

Marriage: Philip IV, King of France (The Fair) About 1268 – 29 Oct
1314
Date: 16 Aug 1284His Age: 17Her Age: 12
Place: Unknown place
Offspring:
+2 Louis X, King of France 1289 – May 1316
+4 Isabel of France (wife of King Edward II) 1292 – 22 Aug 1358
+2 Philip V, King of France (The Tall) 1294 – 3 Jan 1322
+3 Charles IV, King of France (The Fair) 1294 – 1 Feb 1328

Notes:
Joan was a patron of the arts and founded the college of Navarre.

Joan died in childbirth.

Jeanne Joan I Navarre (1273 – 1305)
is my 22nd great grandmother
Lady Isabella England D Capet (1292 – 1358)
daughter of Jeanne Joan I NAVARRE
Edward Plantagenet (1312 – 1377)
son of Lady Isabella England D Capet
John Gaunt Plantagenet (1340 – 1399)
son of Edward Plantagenet
John Marquis Somerset BEAUFORT (1374 – 1410)
son of John Gaunt Plantagenet
Joan Beaufort (1407 – 1445)
daughter of John Marquis Somerset BEAUFORT
Joan Stewart (1428 – 1486)
daughter of Joan Beaufort
John Gordon (1450 – 1517)
son of Joan Stewart
Robert Lord Gordon (1475 – 1525)
son of John Gordon
Catherine Gordon (1497 – 1537)
daughter of Robert Lord Gordon
Lady Elizabeth Ashton (1524 – 1588)
daughter of Catherine Gordon
Capt Roger Dudley (1535 – 1585)
son of Lady Elizabeth Ashton
Gov Thomas Dudley (1576 – 1653)
son of Capt Roger Dudley
Anne Dudley (1612 – 1672)
daughter of Gov Thomas Dudley
John Bradstreet (1652 – 1718)
son of Anne Dudley
Mercy Bradstreet (1689 – 1725)
daughter of John Bradstreet
Caleb Hazen (1720 – 1777)
son of Mercy Bradstreet
Mercy Hazen (1747 – 1819)
daughter of Caleb Hazen
Martha Mead (1784 – 1860)
daughter of Mercy Hazen
Abner Morse (1808 – 1838)
son of Martha Mead
Daniel Rowland Morse (1838 – 1910)
son of Abner Morse
Jason A Morse (1862 – 1932)
son of Daniel Rowland Morse
Ernest Abner Morse (1890 – 1965)
son of Jason A Morse
Richard Arden Morse (1920 – 2004)
son of Ernest Abner Morse
Pamela Morse
I am the daughter of Richard Arden Morse

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