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Veridis Visconti, 17th Great-Grandmother, Duchess Austria

December 13, 2016 1 Comment

Veridis Duchess Austria Visconti

Veridis Duchess Austria Visconti

My 17th great-grandmother was born into a noble family in trouble with the papacy.    Veridis ( sometimes spelled Viridis) was born in Milan in 1352.  Her father was excommunicated 1363 for opposing the Pope in Rome.  She is buried at the  Cistercian monastery in Sittich ,Obcina, Ljubljana, in modern and Slovenia.  Her husband, the duke, died in Lucerne Switzerland, leaving her a widow at the age of 34.

Veridis Duchess Austria Visconti

Veridis Duchess Austria Visconti

Veridis Duchess Austria Visconti (1352 – 1414)
17th great-grandmother
Ernst I “Ironside” Archduke of Austria Habsburg (1377 – 1424)
son of Veridis Duchess Austria Visconti
Katharina Archduchess Austria Von Habsburg (1420 – 1493)
daughter of Ernst I “Ironside” Archduke of Austria Habsburg
Christof I VanBaden (1453 – 1527)
son of Katharina Archduchess Austria Von Habsburg
Beatrix Zahringen (1492 – 1535)
daughter of Christof I VanBaden
Sabine Grafin VonSimmern (1528 – 1578)
daughter of Beatrix Zahringen
Marie L Egmond (1564 – 1678)
daughter of Sabine Grafin VonSimmern
Richard Sears (1590 – 1676)
son of Marie L Egmond
Silas Sears (1638 – 1697)
son of Richard Sears
Silas Sears (1661 – 1732)
son of Silas Sears
Sarah Sears (1697 – 1785)
daughter of Silas Sears
Sarah Hamblin (1721 – 1814)
daughter of Sarah Sears
Mercy Hazen (1747 – 1819)
daughter of Sarah Hamblin
Martha Mead (1784 – 1860)
daughter of Mercy Hazen
Abner Morse (1808 – 1838)
son of Martha Mead
Daniel Rowland Morse (1838 – 1910)
son of Abner Morse
Jason A Morse (1862 – 1932)
son of Daniel Rowland Morse
Ernest Abner Morse (1890 – 1965)
son of Jason A Morse
Richard Arden Morse (1920 – 2004)
son of Ernest Abner Morse
Pamela Morse
You are the daughter of Richard Arden Morse

Viridis Visconti (1352–1414) was an Italian noblewoman, a daughter of Bernabò Visconti and his wife Beatrice Regina della Scala. By her marriage to Leopold III, Duke of Austria, Viridis was Duchess consort of Austria, Styria and Carinthia, she was also Countess consort of Tyrol.

Viridis was born in Milan, Italy and was the second of seventeen children.
Her sister, Taddea Visconti married Stephen III, Duke of Bavaria and was mother of Isabeau of Bavaria, wife of Charles VI of France. Viridis and the rest of her sisters secured politically-advantageous marriages.
Her maternal grandparents were Mastino II della Scala and his wife Taddea da Carrara. Her paternal grandparents were Stefano Visconti and his wife Valentina Doria.
Viridis’ father, Bernabò was described as a cruel and ruthless despot. He was also an implacable enemy of the Church. He seized the papal city of Bologna, rejected the Pope and his authority, confiscated ecclesiastical property, and forbade any of his subjects to have any dealings with the Curia. He was excommunicated as a heretic in 1363 by Pope Urban V, who preached crusade against him.  When Bernabò was in one of his frequent rages, only the children’s mother, Beatrice Regina was able to approach him.

Viridis married Leopold III, Duke of Austria, son of Albert II, Duke of Austria and his wife Johanna of Pfirt. The couple had six children:
William
Leopold
Ernest the Iron
Frederick
Elisabeth (1378–1392)
Katharina (1385–?) Abbess of St. Klara in Vienna
Viridis was widowed in 1386 and so their eldest son, William became Duke of Austria.
William was engaged to Jadwiga of Hungary, youngest daughter of the neighboring king, was one of the first attempts of the House of Habsburg to extend their sphere of influence in Eastern Central Europe by marrying heiresses, a practice that gave rise to the phrase Bella gerant alii: tu felix Austria nube (Let others make war: thou happy Austria, marry). The wedding was broken off.
Viridis died in 1 March 1414 and out-lived at least three of six children, since her younger daughter, Katherine’s date of death is unknown. Viridis is buried in Sittich in Lower Carniola.

 

Source, Wikipedia

Obizzo Visconti, 22nd Great-grandfather

October 9, 2014 1 Comment

 Visconti Coat of Arms

Visconti Coat of Arms

Coat of Arms of the Visconti of Milan depicting the biscione, a serpent who appears to be swallowing a human.

The effectual founder of the Visconti of Milan, Ottone, wrested control of the city from the rival Della Torre family in 1277.
The family, once risen to power, loved to claim legendary versions about its origins. Fancy genealogies were en vogue at the time, while established facts reflect quite sober and almost humble beginnings in the lesser nobility. The branch of the Visconti family that came to rule Milan was originally entrusted with the lordship of Massino (nowadays Massino Visconti), a hamlet in lovely position over Lago Maggiore, where they were in charge since the twelfth century as archiepiscopal vassals.
It is thought that the Milanese Visconti had their origins in a family of capitanei (cfr. the modern surname Cattaneo) whom archbishop Landulf of Milan (978-998) had granted certain feudal holdings known as caput plebis (at the head, likely in geographical and not hierarchical sense, of the pieve, an ecclesiastical lesser subdivision). A document from the year 1157 says the Visconti were holders of the captaincy of Marliano (today Mariano Comense); late chronicler Galvano Fiamma confirms this version. Decades before that, surely before 1070, they had gained the public office of viscount, to be later inherited down the male line (Biscaro, ASL, “I maggiori dei Visconti di Milano”). Soon the family dispersed into several branches, some of which were entrusted fiefs far off from the Lombard metropolis; the one which gave the Medieval lords of Milan is said to be descended from Umberto (d. in the first half of the 12th century).
The Visconti ruled Milan until the early Renaissance, first as Lords, then, from 1395, with the mighty Gian Galeazzo who almost managed to unify Northern Italy and Tuscany, as Dukes. Visconti rule in Milan ended with the death of Filippo Maria Visconti in 1447. He was succeeded, after a short-lived republic, by his son-in-law Francesco I Sforza, who established the reign of the House of Sforza.

Visconti rulers of Milan
Ottone Visconti, Archbishop of Milan (1277 – 1294)
Matteo I Visconti (1294 – 1302; 1311 – 1322)
Galeazzo I Visconti (1322 – 1327)
Azzone Visconti (1329 – 1339)
Luchino I Visconti (1339 – 1349)
Bernabò Visconti (1349 – 1385)
Galeazzo II Visconti (1349 – 1378)
Matteo II Visconti (1349 – 1355)
Gian Galeazzo Visconti (1378 – 1402) {1st Duke of Milan & nephew of Bernabò Visconti}
Giovanni Maria Visconti (1402 – 1412)
Giacomo Visconti (1412 – 1447)

Obizzo Visconti

Obizzo Visconti

Obizzo Visconti (1198 – 1266)
is my 22nd great grandfather
Theobald Visconti (1220 – 1276)
son of Obizzo Visconti
Matteo I Visconti (1250 – 1322)
son of Theobald Visconti
Stefan Visconti (1289 – 1327)
son of Matteo I Visconti
Bernabo Lord Milan di Visconti (1319 – 1385)
son of Stefan Visconti
Veridis Duchess Austria Visconti (1352 – 1414)
daughter of Bernabo Lord Milan di Visconti
Ernst I “Ironside” Archduke of Austria Habsburg (1377 – 1424)
son of Veridis Duchess Austria Visconti
Katharina Archduchess Austria Von Habsburg (1420 – 1493)
daughter of Ernst I “Ironside” Archduke of Austria Habsburg
Christof I VanBaden (1453 – 1527)
son of Katharina Archduchess Austria Von Habsburg
Beatrix Zahringen (1492 – 1535)
daughter of Christof I VanBaden
Sabine Grafin VonSimmern (1528 – 1578)
daughter of Beatrix Zahringen
Marie L Egmond (1564 – 1584)
daughter of Sabine Grafin VonSimmern
Richard Sears (1590 – 1676)
son of Marie L Egmond
Silas Sears (1638 – 1697)
son of Richard Sears
Silas Sears (1661 – 1732)
son of Silas Sears
Sarah Sears (1697 – 1785)
daughter of Silas Sears
Sarah Hamblin (1721 – 1814)
daughter of Sarah Sears
Mercy Hazen (1747 – 1819)
daughter of Sarah Hamblin
Martha Mead (1784 – 1860)
daughter of Mercy Hazen
Abner Morse (1808 – 1838)
son of Martha Mead
Daniel Rowland Morse (1838 – 1910)
son of Abner Morse
Jason A Morse (1862 – 1932)
son of Daniel Rowland Morse
Ernest Abner Morse (1890 – 1965)
son of Jason A Morse
Richard Arden Morse (1920 – 2004)
son of Ernest Abner Morse
Pamela Morse
I am the daughter of Richard Arden Morse

OBIZZO Visconti (-after 1258). m FIORINA Mandelli, daughter of RUFFINO Mandelli & his wife Aldesia Pietrasanta.  Obizzo & his wife had two children:
a) TIBALDO Visconti (-beheaded Gallarate 1276). The Annales Mediolanenses record that “Archiepiscopum Ottonem…Tibaldi nepotis sui” was beheaded “in Galerate” in 1276 . m ANASTASIA Pirovano, niece of Cardinal Uberto Pirovano Archbishop of Milan, daughter of — (-1276, bur [Milan San Eustorgio]). The primary source which confirms her parentage and marriage has not yet been identified. Tibaldo & his wife had [four] children:
i) MATTEO [I] Visconti (Invorio 15 Jul 1250-Crescenzago 28 Jun 1322). Giovanni di Musso´s Chronicon Placentinum records that “Dominus Mafæus Vicecomes nepos Domini Ottonis Vicecomitis Archiepiscopi Mediolani” was installed as “Populi Mediolani Capitaneus” in 1287 and shortly after as “Dominus Generalis civitatis Mediolani” . Lord of Milan.
– see below.
ii) UBERTO Visconti (-22 Apr 1315, bur Milan Dominican Church). The Annales Mediolanenses record the death in 1315 of “Nobilis Miles Ubertus Vicecomes frater magni Matthæi Vicecomitis” and his burial “in conventu Fratrum Prædicatorum”.
iii) [STEFANO Visconti (-1327, bur Milan San Eustorgio). The Annales Mediolanenses record the death in 1327 of “nobilis Miles Stephanus Vicecomes” and his burial “apud Sanctum Eustorgium cum matre sua” . The source does not specify Stefano´s parentage but it is possible that he was another otherwise unrecorded brother of Matteo [I] Visconti Lord of Milan.]
iv) [OTTORINO Visconti ([12/14] Oct 1336, bur Milan San Eustorgio). The Annales Mediolanenses record the death in 1336 of “nobilis Miles Ottorinus Vicecomes” and his burial “in ecclesia Sancti Eustorgii” 15 Oct. His place of burial suggests that Ottorino may have been the brother of Stefano Visconti.]
b) PIETRO Visconti (-after 1301). The Annales Mediolanenses record that “Petrus Vicecomes Dominus Seprii et frater patris Matthæi” rebelled against “Matthæum Vicecomitem Dominum civitatis Mediolani” in 1301 but was captured and held “in castro de Serezano” . m —. The name of Pietro´s wife is not known. Pietro & his wife had one child:
i) daughter . Her parentage and marriage are confirmed by the Annales Mediolanenses which record that “Petrus Vicecomes Dominus Seprii et frater patris Matthæi” incited “Ruscam Dominum civitatis Cumanæ generum suum” to rebel against Matteo [I] Visconti Lord of Milan in 1301, the succeeding passage recording “Conradus Rusca Dominus civitatis Cumanæ” among the rebels . m CORRADO “Rusca” Signore di Cuma, son of — (-after 1301).

Squarcino Borri, 21st Great-grandfather

August 6, 2014 1 Comment

Squarcino Borri, also called Scarsini (1230-1277) was an Italian condottiero and lord of the lands of Santo Stefano Ticino.

Born in Santo Stefano Ticino in 1230, Squarcina was the son of Lanfranco of Borri (end of 12th – early 13th century), the local feudal lord of the city of Santo Stefano Ticino. The Borri family was one of the most respected in Milan, and counted among its ranks a saint, Monas of Milan, Bishop of Milan. Even in his youth, Squarcina (unlike his father) undertook a military career and placed himself at the head of the noble exiles from Milan after the Torriani took power in Milan. He remained a faithful supporter of the Visconti family and distinguished himself as a captain in the service of Ottone Visconti in the famous Battle of Desio in January 1277.
In 1254, he married Antonia (1236-?) of an unknown lineage, and they had a daughter Bonacossa Borri, who in 1269 married Matteo I Visconti, a future Lord of Milan. At the same time the family Borri were reconfirmed in their feudal rights over their lands, and the same Squarcina also became lord of the lands of Castellazzo de’ Stampi in Corbetta in 1275 and remained in office until his death in Invorio in 1277.

Squarcino Borri (1222 – 1277)
is my 21st great grandfather
Bonacossa Borri (1254 – 1321)
daughter of Squarcino Borri
Stefan Visconti (1289 – 1327)
son of Bonacossa Borri
Bernabo Lord Milan di Visconti (1319 – 1385)
son of Stefan Visconti
Veridis Duchess Austria Visconti (1352 – 1414)
daughter of Bernabo Lord Milan di Visconti
Ernst I “Ironside” Archduke of Austria Habsburg (1377 – 1424)
son of Veridis Duchess Austria Visconti
Katharina Archduchess Austria Von Habsburg (1420 – 1493)
daughter of Ernst I “Ironside” Archduke of Austria Habsburg
Christof I VanBaden (1453 – 1527)
son of Katharina Archduchess Austria Von Habsburg
Beatrix Zahringen (1492 – 1535)
daughter of Christof I VanBaden
Sabine Grafin VonSimmern (1528 – 1578)
daughter of Beatrix Zahringen
Marie L Egmond (1564 – 1584)
daughter of Sabine Grafin VonSimmern
Richard Sears (1590 – 1676)
son of Marie L Egmond
Silas Sears (1638 – 1697)
son of Richard Sears
Silas Sears (1661 – 1732)
son of Silas Sears
Sarah Sears (1697 – 1785)
daughter of Silas Sears
Sarah Hamblin (1721 – 1814)
daughter of Sarah Sears
Mercy Hazen (1747 – 1819)
daughter of Sarah Hamblin
Martha Mead (1784 – 1860)
daughter of Mercy Hazen
Abner Morse (1808 – 1838)
son of Martha Mead
Daniel Rowland Morse (1838 – 1910)
son of Abner Morse
Jason A Morse (1862 – 1932)
son of Daniel Rowland Morse
Ernest Abner Morse (1890 – 1965)
son of Jason A Morse
Richard Arden Morse (1920 – 2004)
son of Ernest Abner Morse
Pamela Morse
I am the daughter of Richard Arden Morse

Valentina Doria of Milan

April 23, 2014 5 Comments

Valentina Doria

Valentina Doria

My 19th great-grandmother was from a noble family that still has branches in parts of Europe carrying titles.  The Doria family was influential in northern Italy. She married Stefano Visconti, Duke of Milan, when she was 25:

Stefano Visconti (died 4 July 1327) was a member of the House of Visconti that ruled Milan from the 14th to the 15th century. He was the son of Matteo I Visconti.
In 1318 he married Valentina Doria, with whom he had three children: Matteo, Galeazzo and Bernabò, who shared the rule in Milan after his death.

They are buried in a very fancy tomb in the church of Sant’Eustorgio in Milan.  Now I have many reasons to return to Milan.

Valentina Doria (1293 – 1359)
is my 19th great grandmother
Bernabo Lord Milan di Visconti (1319 – 1385)
son of Valentina Doria
Veridis Duchess Austria Visconti (1352 – 1414)
daughter of Bernabo Lord Milan di Visconti
Ernst I “Ironside” Archduke of Austria Habsburg (1377 – 1424)
son of Veridis Duchess Austria Visconti
Katharina Archduchess Austria Von Habsburg (1420 – 1493)
daughter of Ernst I “Ironside” Archduke of Austria Habsburg
Christof I VanBaden (1453 – 1527)
son of Katharina Archduchess Austria Von Habsburg
Beatrix Zahringen (1492 – 1535)
daughter of Christof I VanBaden
Sabine Grafin VonSimmern (1528 – 1578)
daughter of Beatrix Zahringen
Marie L Egmond (1564 – 1584)
daughter of Sabine Grafin VonSimmern
Richard Sears (1590 – 1676)
son of Marie L Egmond
Silas Sears (1638 – 1697)
son of Richard Sears
Silas Sears (1661 – 1732)
son of Silas Sears
Sarah Sears (1697 – 1785)
daughter of Silas Sears
Sarah Hamblin (1721 – 1814)
daughter of Sarah Sears
Mercy Hazen (1747 – 1819)
daughter of Sarah Hamblin
Martha Mead (1784 – 1860)
daughter of Mercy Hazen
Abner Morse (1808 – 1838)
son of Martha Mead
Daniel Rowland Morse (1838 – 1910)
son of Abner Morse
Jason A Morse (1862 – 1932)
son of Daniel Rowland Morse
Ernest Abner Morse (1890 – 1965)
son of Jason A Morse
Richard Arden Morse (1920 – 2004)
son of Ernest Abner Morse
Pamela Morse
I am the daughter of Richard Arden Morse

Bernabo Visconti, Lord of Milan

February 27, 2014 4 Comments

Bernabo

Bernabo

My 18th great-grandfather probably poisoned his brother for territory.  He was surely excommunicated, and was the object of the anger of the Holy Roman Emperor, Charles IV.  This is exactly when my knowledge of Euro history is fuzzy. Venice was once a giant kingdom that included much of Austria….Bernabo was born in Milan.  Holy Roman Empire, Batman, this is confusing!!!!!

Bernabo Lord Milan di Visconti (1319 – 1385)
is my 18th great grandfather
Veridis Duchess Austria Visconti (1352 – 1414)
daughter of Bernabo Lord Milan di Visconti
Ernst I “Ironside” Archduke of Austria Habsburg (1377 – 1424)
son of Veridis Duchess Austria Visconti
Katharina Archduchess Austria Von Habsburg (1420 – 1493)
daughter of Ernst I “Ironside” Archduke of Austria Habsburg
Christof I VanBaden (1453 – 1527)
son of Katharina Archduchess Austria Von Habsburg
Beatrix Zahringen (1492 – 1535)
daughter of Christof I VanBaden
Sabine Grafin VonSimmern (1528 – 1578)
daughter of Beatrix Zahringen
Marie L Egmond (1564 – 1584)
daughter of Sabine Grafin VonSimmern
Richard Sears (1590 – 1676)
son of Marie L Egmond
Silas Sears (1638 – 1697)
son of Richard Sears
Silas Sears (1661 – 1732)
son of Silas Sears
Sarah Sears (1697 – 1785)
daughter of Silas Sears
Sarah Hamblin (1721 – 1814)
daughter of Sarah Sears
Mercy Hazen (1747 – 1819)
daughter of Sarah Hamblin
Martha Mead (1784 – 1860)
daughter of Mercy Hazen
Abner Morse (1808 – 1838)
son of Martha Mead
Daniel Rowland Morse (1838 – 1910)
son of Abner Morse
Jason A Morse (1862 – 1932)
son of Daniel Rowland Morse
Ernest Abner Morse (1890 – 1965)
son of Jason A Morse
Richard Arden Morse (1920 – 2004)
son of Ernest Abner Morse
Pamela Morse
I am the daughter of Richard Arden Morse

Visconti castle

Visconti castle

Bernabò Visconti (also called Barnabò) (1323 – 18 December 1385) was an Italian soldier and statesman, who was Lord of Milan.
Life
He was born in Milan, the son of Stefano Visconti and Valentina Doria. From 1346 to 1349 he lived in exile, until he was called back by his uncle Giovanni Visconti. On 27 September 1350 Bernabò married Beatrice Regina della Scala, daughter of Mastino II, Lord of Verona and Taddea da Carrara, and forged both a political and cultural alliance between the two cities. His intrigues and ambitions kept him at war almost continuously with Pope Urban V, the Florentines, Venice and Savoy. In 1354, at the death of Giovanni, he inherited the power of Milan, together with his brothers Matteo and Galeazzo. Bernabò received the eastern lands (Bergamo, Brescia, Cremona and Crema), that bordered the Veronese territories. Milan itself was to be ruled in turn by the three brothers. The vicious Matteo was murdered in 1355 at the order of his brothers, who divided his inheritance between them.
In 1356, after having offended the emperor, he pushed back a first attack upon Milan by the imperial vicar Markward von Raudeck, imprisoning him. In 1360 he was declared heretic by Innocent VI at Avignon and condemned by Emperor Charles IV. The ensuing conflict ended with a dismaying defeat at San Ruffillo against the imperial troops under Galeotto I Malatesta (29 July 1361). In 1362, after the death of his sister’s husband, Ugolino Gonzaga, caused him to attack also Mantua. Warring on several different fronts, in December of that year he sued for peace with the new pope, Urban V, through the mediation of King John II of France. However, having Barnabò neglected to return the papal city of Bologna and to present himself at Avignon, on 4 March 1363 he was excommunicated once more, together with his children, one of whom, Ambrogio, was captured by the Papal commander Gil de Albornoz. With the peace signed on 13 March 1364, Visconti left the occupied Papal lands, in exchange for the raising of the ban upon a payment of 500,000 florins.
In spring 1368 Visconti allied with Cansignorio della Scala of Verona, and attacked Mantua, still ruled by Ugolino Gonzaga. The situation was settled later in the year through an agreement between him and emperor. Two years later he besieged Reggio, which he managed to acquire from Gonzaga in 1371. The following war against the Este of Modena and Ferrara raised again Papal enmity against the Milanese, now on the part of Gregory XI. In 1370, he ordered the construction of the Trezzo Bridge, then the largest single-arch bridge in the world.
In 1373, the pope sent two papal delegates to serve Bernabò and Galeazzo their excommunication papers (consisting of a parchment bearing a leaden seal rolled in a silken cord). Bernabò, infuriated, placed the two papal delegates under arrest and refused their release until they had eaten the parchment, seal, and silken cord which they had served him. He managed to resist, despite also the outbreak of a plague in Milan, whose consequences he suppressed with frantic energy.[2] In 1378 he allied with the Republic of Venice in its War of Chioggia against Genoa. His troops were however defeated in September 1379 in the Val Bisagno.
Bernabò, whose despotism and taxes had enraged the Milanese — he is featured among the exempla of tyrants as victims of Fortune in Chaucer’s[3] Monk’s Tale as “god of delit and scourge of Lumbardye” — was deposed by his nephew Gian Galeazzo Visconti in 1385. Imprisoned in the castle of Trezzo, he was poisoned in December of that year.
The funerary monument of Bernabò Visconti, with an equestrian statue, together with that of his consort, had been made beforehand, in 1363. The sculptures by Bonino da Campione were intended for the church of San Giovanni in Conca. They now stand in the Castello Sforzesco in Milan.
Children
Bernabò was an ally of Stephen II, Duke of Bavaria: three of his daughters were married with Stephen’s descendants. His issue include:
Viridis (1352- 1414), married Leopold III, Duke of Inner Austria and were the parents of Ernest, Duke of Austria the father of Frederick III, Holy Roman Emperor.
Agnese (1362- executed 1391), married Francesco I Gonzaga
Taddea (1351-28 September 1381), married Stephen III, Duke of Bavaria. She was the mother of Louis VII of Bavaria and Isabeau of Bavaria.
Marco (November 1353- 1382), married Elisabeth of Bavaria.
Ludovico (1358- 7 March 1404), married Violante Visconti (1353- November 1386), daughter of Galeazzo II Visconti, and widow of Lionel of Antwerp.
Rodolfo (d.1388), Lord of Parma
Carlo (September 1359- August 1403), married Beatrice, daughter of John II of Armagnac and sister of John III of Armagnac.
Valentina (d.1393), married Peter II of Cyprus
Caterina (1361- poisoned 17 October 1404,[4]) married her cousin Gian Galeazzo Visconti as his second wife. She was the mother of Gian Maria Visconti and Filippo Maria Visconti, successive dukes of Milan. She acted as regent for her son Gian Maria during his minority.
Lucia Visconti (1372- 14 April 1424), betrothed 1. Louis II of Anjou and married 2. Edmund Holland, 4th Earl of Kent
Maddalena (1366- 17 July 1404), married Frederick, Duke of Bavaria and was mother of Henry XVI of Bavaria.
Mastino (d.1404), married Antonia della Scala (d. 1400), daughter of Cangrande II della Scala.
Anglesia (d.12 October 1439), married Janus of Cyprus
Giammastino (1370- 19 June 1405), married Cleofa (d.1403) daughter of Cangrande II della Scala.
Elisabetta (1374- 2 February 1432), married Ernest, Duke of Bavaria and was the mother of Albert III, Duke of Bavaria.
Antonia (1360-26 March 1405), married Eberhard III, Count of Württemberg
His illegitimate offspring by Donnina del Porri, legitimated in a ceremony after the death of his wife in 1384,[5] were as follows:
Palamede (d. 1402).
Lancelloto.
Sovrana, married Giovanni da Prato.
Ginevra, married Leonardo Malaspina (d. 1441).
Enrica, married Franchino Rusca.
In addition, Bernabò had other illegitimate offspring by other mistresses:[6]
—With Beltramola Grassi:
Ambrogio (1343 – killed in battle Caprino Bergamasco, 17 August 1373), condottiero and Governor of Pavia.
Isotta (d. 1388), married in 1378 to Count Lutz von Landau, condottiero under the name of Lucio Land (d. 1398).
Ettore (d. 1413), who briefly took the Lordship of Milan (16 May – 12 June 1412), married Margherita Infrascati.
Riccarda, married Bernard, Seigneur de La Salle (d. 1391).
—With Montanina de Lazzari:
Sagramoro (d. 1385), Lord of Brignano, married Achiletta Marliani.
Donnina (1360 – 1406), married in 1377 to Sir John Hawkwood.
—With Giovanolla Montebretto:
Bernarda (d. 1376), married Giovanni Suardi.
Valentia, married Antonio Gentile Visconti, Lord of Belgioioso.
Bibliography
Pizzagalli, Daniela (1994). Bernabò Visconti. Milan: Rusconi.
Footnotes
^ Girolamo Porro, engraved title page in Scipion Barbuo, Sommario delle vite de’ duchi di Milano, cosi Visconti, come Sforzeschi (Venice: Girolamo Porro, 1574)
^ For his plague regulations for Milan, see Rosemary Horrox, The Black Death(1994) III.65, p 203.
^ Chaucer had been sent to Lombardy in 1378 on behalf of the young King Richard II to seek the support of Bernabò and Sir John Hawkwood on behalf of the English war effort against France. His epistola metrica III.29 was tacitly addressed to Bernabò (Ernest H. Wilkings, The ‘Epistolae Metricae’ of Petrarch, (Edizioni di Storia e Letteratura), p. 11.
^ Charles Cawley, Medieval Lands, Lords of Milan
^ ” Bernabò Visconti seems to have gone through some sort of marriage ceremony to legitimate his children by Donnina del Porri” (H.S. Ettlinger, “Visibilis et Invisibilis: The Mistress in Italian Renaissance Court Society”, Renaissance Quarterly, 1994.
^ Complete Genealogy of the House of Visconti
Persondata Name Bernabò Visconti Alternative names Short description Lord of Milan Date of birth 1323 Place of birth Date of death Place of death 1385 Preceded by
Cardinal Giovanni Visconti, Archbishop of Milan Lord of Milan
1349–1385 Succeeded by
Gian Galeazzo Viscont

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