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Sarah Allerton, 13th Great-Grandmother

June 14, 2017 7 Comments

London

London

Sarah Allerton was born in London in 1588, and died in Plymouth Colony in 1633.  She arrived in the new world on the ship Anne with her third husband in 1632 after my 13th great-grandfather had sailed on the Mayflower then died shortly after arrival in the colony.  Her brother Isaac was a signer of the Mayflower Compact as well, and assistant to Governor Bradford in America.  Isaac later disgraced himself, moved to New Amsterdam, and became known as the first Yankee trader.

Sarah Allerton’s parents are not given but information is provided by unknown sources. Her parents would have been Edward Allerton, b. 1555 St. Dionis, Backchurch, London, England, died 1590 England, and Rose Davis, b. ca. 1559 in St. Peters, Corningshire, died June 1596 in England. Edward’s father was William Allerton, b. 1529. Sarah however certainly had at least two brothers. Isaac’s will also mentions a “brother Breuster”. The two siblings were:

1) Isaac Allerton, b. ca. 1586. He was one of the more famous of the Pilgrim Fathers. He was originally a tailor in London and was married in Leyden, the same day as his sister, 4 November 1611, to Mary Norris of Newbury, England, b. ca. 1588.
He came over on the Mayflower, with his wife and three children, and became First Assistant (1621 to ca. 1631) to Governor Bradford. Mary Norris died in childbirth, with a stillborn son, the first winter. She died 25 February 1620/1 on the Mayflower, while the first houses were still being built at Plymouth. In ca. 1626 he married Fear Brewster, b. 1606 at Scrooby, England , daughter of William and Mary Brewster, William being one of the most famous Pilgrims. Fear had arrived in Plymouth in July 1623, on the Anne, the same ship that brought Mary Priest and her two children.
Isaac was well known for his unscrupulous dealings with fellow Pilgrims and eventually left the colony in disgrace in the 1630’s when he lost the support of William Brewster. “A most enterprising man, he engaged in commercial pursuits at Marblehead and in Maine and later resided at New Amsterdam.” . He is often remembered as “the first Yankee trader”. Fear died in Plymouth before 12 December 1634. Isaac Allerton was probably married a third time to Joanna Swinnerton, before 1644, probably New Haven, CT. There were no known children from this marriage. He died insolvent between 1 and 12 February 1658/9 in New Haven, CT. Joanna was still living in 1684. Isaac’s children were (Sarah and Isaac were by his second wife):
Bartholomew, b. ca. 1612, in Leyden, Holland. Bartholomew returned to England. He first married Margaret _____ and then Sarah Fairfax, prob. in Rumbough, Suffolk, England. He died between 15 October 1658 and 19 February 1658/9, prob. at Bramfield, Suffolk, England. Four children are recorded.
Remember, b. ca. 1614 in Leyden. She m. Moses Maverick, before 6 May 1635 and died between 12 Sept. 1652 and 22 Oct. 1656. Moses lived in Lynn, Salem, and at Marblehead (all MA) in the time they were married. They had seven children, born at Lynn and Salem. Moses remarried in Boston to Eunice (Cole) Roberts by whom he had four children.
Mary, b. June 1616, m. Thomas Cushman, ca. 1636, in Plymouth, MA. Cushman came to Plymouth in 1621 on the Fortune. They had eight children. She died 28 November 1699, Plymouth, MA, the last survivor of those who came on the Mayflower. One of her grandchildren, Allerton Cushman, married in 1726 to Elizabeth Sampson, cousin of Benjamin Sprague.
Child, buried St. Peters, Leyden, 5 February 1620.
Stillborn son, b. 22 December 1620 on the Mayflower, Plymouth Harbor.
Sarah, b. ca. 1627 in Plymouth, died young before 1651.
Isaac Allerton, Jr., b. between 22 May 1627 and 1630, Plymouth, MA. He married first to Elizabeth _____, ca. 1652 (2 children) and then to Elizabeth Willoughby, a widow of Overzee and Colclough, ca. 1663, in Norfolk County, VA. Elizabeth was born in 1635 in England (12). They had three children, all born in Westmoreland Co, VA. Isaac became the first Plymouth student at Harvard (he graduated according to in 1650) and later went into business and made a fortune himself. He died Westmoreland Co., VA in 1702.
As is the case for Degory Priest, a General Society of Mayflower Descendents book is available on the first five generations of Isaac Allerton’s descendents. A somewhat earlier and shorter version, covering four generations, was published in 1996. Isaac Allerton has apparently a relatively small number of descendants compared to other Mayflower passengers, but is an ancestor to Presidents Zachary Taylor and Franklin D. Roosevelt (the latter also descended from Degory Priest through Sarah). The presidents are both thus our very remote (!) relatives: President Zachary Taylor (1784-1850), through Isaac Allerton Jr., was a 5th cousin to Mary (Scott) Wisdom; President Franklin D. Roosevelt (1882-1945), through Degory Priest, was an 8th cousin to Paul Graham.

2) Sarah Allerton, b. ca. 1588 at London . She was first married to John Vincent and then married to Degory Priest as noted above. Having received word of her husband’s death, she remarried on 13 November 1621 in Leyden, to Godbert Godbertson (name used in but also often called Cuthbert Cuthbertson). They arrived in July-August of 1623 on the Anne with their three children (two by Degory Priest). It is possible that there were two additional children with them by the first marriage of Godbertson (I think there is a reference to five children that arrived with them in and see also mention of three Cuthbertson below). Francis Sprague, another of my ancestors, was also a passenger. Godbert (ca. 1590-633), a Dutch Walloon, was a hat-maker in Leyden. He had been married previously in 1617 to Elizabeth Kendall. He became a “purchaser”, i.e., a shareholder in the Pilgrim Company when it was formed in 1626. He died seven years later, in Plymouth, of “infectious fever”. She died in Plymouth before 24 October 1633. On 11 November 1633 their son-in-law Phineas Pratt was appointed “to take possession of the personal property of Cuthbert Cuthbertson and his wife Sarah”.

Sarah ALLERTON (1588 – 1633)
13th great-grandmother
Mary Priest (1613 – 1689)
daughter of Sarah ALLERTON
Daniel Pratt (1640 – 1680)
son of Mary Priest
Henry Pratt (1658 – 1745)
son of Daniel Pratt
Esther Pratt (1680 – 1740)
daughter of Henry Pratt
Deborah Baynard (1720 – 1791)
daughter of Esther Pratt
Mary Horney (1741 – 1775)
daughter of Deborah Baynard
Esther Harris (1764 – 1838)
daughter of Mary Horney
John H Wright (1803 – 1850)
son of Esther Harris
Mary Wright (1816 – 1873)
daughter of John H Wright
Emiline P Nicholls (1837 – )
daughter of Mary Wright
Harriet Peterson (1856 – 1933)
daughter of Emiline P Nicholls
Sarah Helena Byrne (1878 – 1962)
daughter of Harriet Peterson
Olga Fern Scott (1897 – 1968)
daughter of Sarah Helena Byrne
Richard Arden Morse (1920 – 2004)
son of Olga Fern Scott
Pamela Morse
I am the daughter of Richard Arden Morse

Visit To Plymouth Plantation

November 23, 2016 6 Comments

cannons above church Plymouth

cannons above church Plymouth

Pilgrims

Pilgrims

Pilgrim

Pilgrim

miller's take

miller’s take

mill pond

mill pond

When I visited Plymouth Plantation to see how my ancestors had lived the Mayflower was out of town being repaired. That did not bother me. I filled my day visiting at the museums of the living culture, including the grain mill extension in town.  The details are fabulous and the actors doing the recreation are very knowledgeable and professional at their work.  My personal ancestors were not on hand the day I went, but I did see the recreations of their homes.  I also spent time in the cemetery and the church.  The whole town is kind of preserved, with a definite Mayflower Pilgrim theme.

I was most interested in the Wampanoag section of the display. I thought for years I was a descendant of Quadequina, a member of the first Thanksgiving party.  I was thrilled to be a Wamp, but later my first cousin discovered an error in my research.  I had to cut that branch from the tree and begin again in the 1700s in South Carolina.  I was super distressed at this news, which at first I was unwilling to accept.  I was furious at my cousin, but had to face the reality that I had based my conclusions on specious data.  I had mistaken one John Taylor in South Carolina for another, and that was all it took to lead me astray.  It was a bummer.  I was just a wanna be Wampanoag after all.  It was a sad day when I had to admit that.

I stayed on Cape Cod where many of my ancestors moved after they had had it with the Plymouth bureaucracy and religious police.  The whole area is filled with history.  Even though my dreams of being a Wampanoag were dashed I enjoyed learning about the tribe and their struggle today.  My relationship to them is purely intellectual, but I still love the People of The First Light.  I love them more than I love the Pilgrims, who turned out to be pretty religious crazy.  That whole story about religious freedom and Plymouth has been stilted quite a bit.  They had no use for religious freedom other than their own specific brand of religious practice.  They forced everyone to go to their church and obey their church’s rules. That is why many of my ancestors left for Cape Cod and later for Rhode Island.  Those oppressive Pilgrims were just too intrusive to have as neighbors.

I hope to go back to Plymouth some day.  I now have done more research and more people to find in the vicinity.  I also hope I will revisit Williamsburg, VA because many of my ancestors were living down there in the 1600’s too.  If you have a chance to go see the exhibits at Plimouth Plantation Thanksgiving will never be the same for you.  You will see a clearer picture of what really happened in history.

Thomas Little, Tenth Great-Grandfather

September 28, 2016 3 Comments

His name is on the monument dedicated to the early settlers of Green Harbor at the Winslow Cenetery in Marshfield, Mass.

His name is on the monument dedicated to the early settlers of Green Harbor at the Winslow Cenetery in Marshfield, Mass.

The first record of Thomas Little in the new world was on the tax list of March 25, 1633. It is not known on which ship he had arrived.  He moved to Marshfield, which is 14 miles from Plymouth.  In the 1600’s 14 miles was a very long distance to travel.  He was the constable in Marshfield, MA, in June of 1662.

Thomas married Anna Warren on April 19, 1633, in Plymouth Colony. They were the parents of about nine children.

Thomas Little, lawyer

Thomas Little, lawyer

Thomas Little was born in England before 1608 based on his marriage (Anderson, Great Migration). The Ancestral file, without documentation, lists his origin as Devon which is also known as Devonshire with Exeter as the county seat. According to many writers, he arrived at Plymouth, Massachusetts in 1630, but it is not positively known when, or on what ship he came. The earliest date in the Plymouth records is January 2nd, 1632/3, when he was taxed. He married, April 19th, 1633, Ann, born in England about 1612, daughter of Richard and Elizabeth Warren, who were Mayflower passengers (Avery 127, 129; NEHGR XIII, 279). Avery writes that Thomas Little came from England to Plymouth in 1630. He was a lawyer, and his coat of arms is still preserved at the old homestead in the house of Luther Little at Sea View, Massachusetts known as Littletown (Avery 126-127).
Thomas Little and Ann Warren had nine children as listed by Avery, Anderson in the “Great Migration,” and various others. Abigail married Josiah Keene; Patience married Joseph Jones; Ruth apparently unmarried; Hannah married Stephen Tilden; Mercy married John Sawyer; Isaac married Bethia Thomas; Ephraim married at Scituate Mary Sturtevant; Thomas died in King Phillips War; and Samuel married Sarah Gray (Anderson, Great Migration).
Thomas Little bought a shallop in 1633, and was enrolled for military service in August, 1643, at Plymouth, as was every other male in the Colony between 16 and 60 on that date (Avery 129-130).
His first residence was at Plymouth where he was a “Keeper of the Colony of New Plymouth books.” He was assessed 18 shillings in Plymouth tax lists of 1633 and 1634. In 1647, he had five acres of upland meadow on “Indian Brook,” listed as within the limits of the township of Plymouth, retaining that land in 1655. But in 1664, Jonathan Morey expressed an interest in the land that was “sometimes Thomas Little’s. Prior to that, in 1652, Thomas Little and his wife Ann sold a house and land on the Eel river in the township of Plymouth (a former residence). On 3 June 1662, Thomas Little had rights confirmed to a farm at Marshfield, and on 3 October 1665 was granted a hundred acres on which he settled title by 1 May 1666. Back in June 1662, he was a Marshfield Constable (Anderson, Great Migration, quoting Plymouth Records).
In his will, dated 17 May 1671, Thomas Little, Sr. bequeathed to “my loving wife all my housing and all of my land, upland and meadow on that side of the brook I now dwell, except only the meadow I purchased of Thomas Tildin and Morris Trewant.” He left land to sons Isacke and Ephraim land on the other side of the brook; all his land at Namassakett upland and meadow to his younger sons Thomas and Samuel, excepting an identified upland to grandson John Jones; a featherbed and furniture to Ephraim; the whole stock of cattle to be equally divided amongst all his children; and other dispositions. Administration of the estate was granted to Anna Little, his wife, on 14 August, 1662.(Anderson, Great Migration listing sources).
Thomas Little was buried at Marshfield, March 12, 1671. His widow died after February 19, 1675 (Avery 129-130).
There is some confusion from 28 October 1633 when a grant of land to Richard Warren was returned to court for failure to erect a building; the land was to be regranted to a Mr. Ralph Fogg upon his satisfactory payment to Widow Warren for her fence remaining there (PCR 1:18). But on 7 March 1636, “it is agreed upon, by the consent of the whole court, that Elizabeth Warren, widow, the relict of Mr. Richard Warren, deceased, shall be entered, and stand, and be purchaser instead of her said husband, as well because that (he dying before he had performed the said bargain) the said Elizabeth performed the same after his decease, and also for the establishing of the lots of lands givern formerly by her unto her sons-in-law Richard Church, Robert Bartlett, and Thomas Little, in marriage with their wives, her daughters” [PCR 1:54; 2:177]. On 5 May 1640, “Richard Church, Rob(er)te Bartlett, Thomas Little, and Mrs. Elizabeth Warren are granted enlargements at the heads of their lots to the foot of the Pyne Hills, leaving a way betwixt them and the Pyne Hills, for cattle and carts to pass” (PCR: 1:52). Ann Warren born est 1613, m. Thomas Little at Plymouth 19 April 1633 (PCR 1:13)

Thomas Little (1609 – 1675)
10th great-grandfather
William Little (1640 – 1731)
son of Thomas Little
William Little (1660 – 1740)
son of William Little
William Little Jr (1685 – 1756)
son of William Little
Jeanette Little (1713 – 1764)
daughter of William Little Jr
Andrew Armour (1740 – 1801)
son of Jeanette Little
William Armor (1775 – 1852)
son of Andrew Armour
William Armer (1790 – 1837)
son of William Armor
Thomas Armer (1825 – 1900)
son of William Armer
Lucinda Jane Armer (1847 – 1939)
daughter of Thomas Armer
George Harvey Taylor (1884 – 1941)
son of Lucinda Jane Armer
Ruby Lee Taylor (1922 – 2008)
daughter of George Harvey Taylor
Pamela Morse
I am the daughter of Ruby Lee Taylor

John Crowell, Tenth Great-Grandfather

September 13, 2016 1 Comment

family history

family history

My tenth great-grandfather was part of the Great Migration. He moved to Cape Cod in January of 1639.   Many Pilgrims who moved out to Cape Cod got in trouble with the Plymouth church. In those days reaching villages on Cape Cod was a long hard  journey from Plymouth.   Some of my ancestors who lived on Cape Cod became (or already were) Quakers, and some moved to Rhode Island to escape the oppressive Pilgrim Fathers.

On January 7, 1639 the court record refers to the land grant to the first settlers John Crow, Thomas Howes, and Anthony Thacher as “the lands of Mattacheeset, now called Yarmouth”. This is considered the first usage of the name.
“Yarmouth” to represent the new township to the east of Barnstable.

Plymouth Colony: Its History and People 1620-1691 Part One: Chronological Histories Chapter 3: The Founding of Towns (1633-1643) Yarmouth On 7 January 1638/39, the Court of Assistants granted lands at “Mattacheeset, now called Yarmouth” to Mr. Anthony Thatcher, Mr. Thomas Howes, Mr. John Crow, and John Coite “to be enquired of.” Coite might have been the man of that name of Marblehead, but apparently he did not move to Plymouth Colony. Thatcher, Howes, and Crow were proposed [p.66] as freemen of Yarmouth, along with Mr. Marmaduke Mathews, Philip Tabor, William Palmer, Samuel Rider, William Lumpkin, and Thomas Hatch. It was also specifically noted that “Old Worden (dead),” Burnell, Wright, and Wat Deville were “Psons there excepted against,” probably meaning they were not eligible to be given freemen status, and showing that some form of settlement had already been in existence. In fact, on 4 September 1638 the General Court ordered the inhabitants of Sandwich and “Mattacheese or Yarmouth” to build a bridge over the Eel River (which was just a bit south of Plymouth town, and had to be crossed for travel between Plymouth and the Cape). On 5 March 1638/39 William Palmer was authorized by the General Court to be the one at Yarmouth who would exercise inhabitants in arms, and William Chase was elected constable there. It is apparent that earlier the Plymouth Court had granted land at Yarmouth to others also, for on 1 April 1639 it noted that lands at Mattacheese (another confusion of the names, for it should have been Mattacheeset) were granted to persons who should have inhabited there long ago, but did not, and the grantees “are not likely to come to inhabite there in their owne persons, and lest such as are there should receive in unto them unworthy persons, whereof the Court hath lamentable experience …, the Court doth order that onely such of them wch at present are there shall remayne & make use of some lands for their present necessity, but shall not divide any portions of lands there either to themselves or any others
American Genealogical-Biographical Index (AGBI)

John Sr Crowell (1590 – 1673)
10th great-grandfather
Yelverton Crowell (1621 – 1683)
son of John Sr Crowell
Elishua Crowell (1643 – 1708)
daughter of Yelverton Crowell
Yelverton Gifford (1676 – 1772)
son of Elishua Crowell
Ann Gifford (1715 – 1795)
daughter of Yelverton Gifford
Frances Congdon (1738 – 1755)
daughter of Ann Gifford
Samuel Thomas Sweet (1765 – 1844)
son of Frances Congdon
Valentine Sweet (1791 – 1858)
son of Samuel Thomas Sweet
Sarah LaVina Sweet (1840 – 1923)
daughter of Valentine Sweet
Jason A Morse (1862 – 1932)
son of Sarah LaVina Sweet
Ernest Abner Morse (1890 – 1965)
son of Jason A Morse
Richard Arden Morse (1920 – 2004)
son of Ernest Abner Morse
Pamela Morse
I am the daughter of Richard Arden Morse

The Crowell family in North Dennis is descended from John Crow, who came, it is said, from Wales in 1635, to Charlestown, where he and his wife, Elishua, joined the church. It is probable that they sojourned there until 1639, when Mr. Crow came with Anthony Thacher and Thomas Howes to Yarmouth, with a grant from the court, having previously taken the oath of allegiance. All the first settlers
selected spots for their homes adjacent to good springs of water. The brook that flows through the village of North Dennis had numerous fine flowing springs to supply the need of the first comers. John Crow built his home north of the center of the present village, near the spot where the late Philip Vincent lived. His land, much of which is still owned by his descendants, was east of Indian Fields, and extended from the shore to the top of the hills back of the settlement. John Crow was a man of character and influence in the infant town of Yarmouth, filling many important offices. He died in 1673. His sons were: John, Samuel and Thomas. John married Mehitable. daughter of Rev. John Miller of Yarmouth. A grandson of John Crow, sr., whose name was John, was the first person buried in the North Dennis cemetery. He died in 1727. The name about that time had developed into Crowell. The offspring of John Crow are now to be found in all parts of the country, occupying important positions, with honor and credit to the name. Those who have remained upon the hereditary acres have produced in every generation men of ability and distinction. The late Hon. Seth Crowell and his cousin, Capt. Prince S. Crowell, and Mr. William Crowell, the well-known cranberry grower and seller, are illustrations of the character of the Crowells in the seventh generation. The family has never been large in North Dennis. Two pews in the old church sufficed to accommodate their needs for sitting room. Many of the family, before the old meeting house was torn down in 1838, had become desciples of John Wesley and left the church of their fathers.
Mr. Jeremiah Crowell, a descendant in the fourth generation from the grantee, John Crow, was for two generations a village celebrity. He lived in what was called “Crow Town,” just outside the western limits of Indian Field. The public highway went no farther east than his house in his day. The county road went through the woods south of Scargo hill. Mr. Crowell constructed a globe with the four quarters of the earth marked upon it. This was received by the Nobscusset children with open-eyed wonder. It was to be seen only, however, upon payment of one cent per head. He had besides a mammoth kite with a string a mile long, with a tail of wondrous length. He kept a daily journal of passing events, such as the capture of a whale, the arrival home of the Cod fishermen, the state of the weather, and the direction of the wind. But his great effort was the building of a pair of wings and attempting to fly. This was an achievement beyond his power to accomplish. The flying he regarded as practical and easy, but the alighting was difficult. He died at an advanced age, about the close of the last century.

Richard Masterson, Tenth Great-Grandfather

August 21, 2016 3 Comments

Masterson Coat of Arms

Masterson Coat of Arms

My 10th great-grandfather was a deacon of the church in Leiden, Holland.  He arrived in Plymouth in 1629 and died four years later.

Richard Masterson lived in Sandwich, Kent. He and several others were brought before church courts for criticizing the Church of England and the Book of Common Prayer, as well as for non-attendance at services. He was excommunicated several times. Richard Masterson was in Leiden by 7 Oct 1611. He was a wool comber by occupation. He bought a house on the Uiterstegracht on 2 Jan 1614, the sale of which was the subject of years of negotiation by his wife’s second husband. With four others, he wrote a letter from Leiden to William Bradford in 1625 about their hopes of emigrating to New England. From Michael Paulick’s research, it would seem that Masterson traveled between Leiden and Sandwich. Richard Masterson arrived in New England in 1629 from Leiden. Nathaniel Morton in his history of the Plymouth church described Masterson as a “holy man” and “experienced saint,” “the said Richard Masterson having bin officious with parte of his estate for publick Good; and a man of Abillitie as a second steven to defend the truth by sound argument Grounded on the scriptures of truth…” He died in 1633 in the epidemic of infectious fever and Mary Masterson married Rev. Ralph Smith, the minister for Plymouth until 1636. They moved to Manchester by 1645, and Ipswich by 1652.

Richard Masterson (1590 – 1633)
10th great-grandfather
Sarah Masterson (1612 – 1714)
daughter of Richard Masterson
Margaret Wood (1635 – 1693)
daughter of Sarah Masterson
Elizabeth Manchester (1667 – 1727)
daughter of Margaret Wood
Dr. James Sweet (1686 – 1751)
son of Elizabeth Manchester
Thomas Sweet (1732 – 1813)
son of Dr. James Sweet
Samuel Thomas Sweet (1765 – 1844)
son of Thomas Sweet
Valentine Sweet (1791 – 1858)
son of Samuel Thomas Sweet
Sarah LaVina Sweet (1840 – 1923)
daughter of Valentine Sweet
Jason A Morse (1862 – 1932)
son of Sarah LaVina Sweet
Ernest Abner Morse (1890 – 1965)
son of Jason A Morse
Richard Arden Morse (1920 – 2004)
son of Ernest Abner Morse
Pamela Morse
I am the daughter of Richard Arden Morse

Richard and Mary were among the Puritans in Leyden, Holland, but did not immigrate until 1629 on the second “Mayflower.” Their nephew John Ellis also made the voyage.

!Initial source: Family group sheet in the FGRA collection of the Family History Library, Salt Lake City, Utah, submitted by Edith Haddon
Littleford, 330 E 19th St, Idaho Falls, Idaho. Her source: Rec of Jewell David, Rt1 Box 822, Kent, Washington.

In “NEHGR” vol. 119 pg 162 is the extracted record of the marriage, “Archives of Leyden – Banns: the 1st; Nov. 9, 1619 – Richard
Masterson,woolcomber from Sandwich in England, accompanied by Wiliam Talbot and John Ellis, his brother-in-law with Mary Goodall, spinster, from Leiston , in England acc. by Elisabeth Keble and Mary Wing her acquaintnces.” The second banns were published Nov. 16th, the third banns Nov. 23rd and the marriage was performed “before Alpphen and Tetrolde, bailiffs this XXiii November 1619.” There is an article in “NEHGR” vol 144 (1990) pg 24, titled “The Mary Atwood Sampler”. It has an account of Richard and Mary (Goodall) Masterson which says “Richard Masterson, who was in Leyden, Holland, as early as 1611, was a woolcomber from Sandwich, England, according to the record of his marriage in Leyden 23 November 1619 to Mary Goodall, a spinster from ‘Leessen,’ England [perhaps Leiston in Suffolk?] (D. Plooij and J. Rendel Harris, “Leyden Documents Relating to the Pilgrim Fathers” [Leyden, 1920], IX, XL).

Richard died in 1633 when an ‘infectious fever of which many fell very sick and upwards of 20 persons died’ struck the Plymouth settlement (Samuel Eliot Morison, “Of Plymouth Plantation: 1620-1647 by William Bradford” [New York, 1975], 160). Mary (Goodall) Masterson married, second, before 1 July 1633 Rev. Ralph Smith of Plymouth. Mary, who ‘in 1650, according to a note of [Ralph] Smith, was sixty years old, died in 1659’ (D. Plooij, “The Pilgrim Fathers from the Dutch Point of View” [New York, 1932], 116.

An article, “The Sandwich Separatists”, by Michael R. Paulick, published in”NEHGR” vol 154 pg 353-369, names, on page 355, the wife of John Ellis, who was called brother-in-law in the Leiden marriage record of Richard Masterson. It quotes the parish register of St. Peter’s, Sandwich, Kent, England, giving the marriage of John Ellys and Blandyna Maistersonne. However, it says no baptismal record has been found for either of them but the baptisms of six of their children were listed. This article gives more detail about the separatist” movement in Sandwich and some of the activities of Richard Masterson. It quotes a 1977 history of Kent by Peter Clark that “by 1600 there was a signigicant group of vociferous left-wing radicals and separatists standing outside the mainstream of Kentish Puritanism.”

On page 358 is a quote from the records of the Sandwich Deanery: “To the 2 and 3 article wee presente Thomas Allen and Thomas Baker and
Richard Masterson for affirming that the forme of gods worshipp in the Churche of England established by lawe and contained in the booke of Common Prayer and administracion of the sacraments is a corrupt & unlawfull worshipp and repugnant to the scriptures and that the rites and ceremonyes in the Churche of England by lawe established are wicked anechristin & superstitious and suche as religiows godlie menn cannott neather maye with good conscience use or approve of. To the 65 article wee presente the saide Thomas Allen Thomas Baker
Richard Masterson & Abigaell Atkins for not frequenting there parishe churche one sondayes to heere divine service.

To the 66 (article) wee presente the saide Thomas Allen Thomas Baker & Richard Masterson & Abigaell Atkins for recusants which forebears to come to churche to common prayer & to heere gods word preached.” The article goes on to say “Richard Masterson was summoned but failed
to appear on 2 and 26 July, 22 October, 3 and 13 December 1613, and was excommunicated 17 January 1613/14 along with Allen, Baker, and
Atkins, the sentence delivered 13 February 1613[/14] by Harimus White, minister. [“Comperta and Detecta Book,” Sandwich Deanery, f59v,
ff59v-60r, f60v, f61r.]”

“The Book of Common Prayer established the form of Protestant worship and was enforced by the 1559 Act for the Uniformity of Common Prayer and Divine Service. This Act required ‘strict church attendance and rigid adherence to the Book of Common Prayer.’ All ministers of any parish were required to follow the written order of service for matins (morning service), evensong, and the administration of the sacraments. Substantial fines were imposed on any citizen who declared or spoke ‘anything in the derogation, depraving, or despising of the same book…’ or who refused to attend church services. [David Cressy and Lori Anne Ferrell, “Religion & Society in Early Modern England” (…1996), 56-59.] Separatists held the view that only services that were contained in the scriptures should be followed and all other forms of worship of man’s invention were ‘antechristin’.”

It quotes a letter written by the rector of St. Peter’s and other Sandwich ministers in 1613 to the Privy Council of James I, which said “many notablesectes and heresies” were being spread among the people “by such as have recourse unto the towns of Amsterdam, and other partes beyond the seaes” and among the “chiefest sowers” were “Richard Masterson the ellder and Richard Masterson the younger, Thomas Allen and John Ellis”

The article says “The reference to two Richard Mastersons is puzzling; so far, examination of the parish registers of Sandwich shows no trace of a Richard Masterson elder or younger. These terms were commonly – but by no means always – used for father and son or uncle and Nephew. Richard Masterson of St. Peter’s appears only in the ecclesiatical court records. Richard of Leiden was unmarried until 1619 so he had no children to baptize.[36] The note indicated by this number says “It should be noted that the St. Peter’s and St. Mary’s registers are particularly difficult to read, illegible in some areas. A John Maisterson is named in St. Peter’s parish register but his will of 1620 does not indicate any connection with Richard or Blandyna …” “It is possible that the Privy Council confused a Richard Marston with Richard Masterson. The pronunciation of both names with an English long ‘a’ might have sounded similar and perhaps led to a mix-up. Marston apparently had a Separatist reputation….”

The article went on to quote a warning letter to the mayor and stated that the law prohibited these activities and that those accused were fortunate in receiving only an “admonishon and reprehension”. However, “Richard Masterson was summoned 4 and 14 November 1614, and
excommunicated on 28 November 1614.” Still he continued and “had soon returned from Leiden as a professed Brownist or Separatist.” He
was summoned again 10 June 1616 with the following: “To the 2 article wee have one Richard Masterson whoe refuseth to come to our church
traduceth our service and ceremonyes ys a professed Brownest or Separest and hathe formerlye ben often presented and stubbornelye hath stood longe excommunicated and continuallye endeavoreth to infecte others with the same leavin soe that we are greived that the
performaunce of our duetyes herein hat noe better effecte.” He was excommunicated again on the 28th, and yet again on 20 December.
Further in the article it says “When Richard Masterson died in 1633 he was described by Bradford as one of the ‘ancient friends which have lived in Holland.’ If there was a single Richard Masterson, there is evidence that he might have been moving between Leiden and Sandwich. He is recorded in both locations at various times as follows:
7 Oct. 1611 betrothat in Leiden; called acquaintance of Isaac Allerton
2 July 1613 excommunicated in Sandwich with Allen, Baker, and Atkins
4 Nov. 1614 At Sandwich, ‘Lyeinge at Mr. Varall’s,’ excommunicated
22 Jan 1614/15 Leiden, various lawsuits 1612-1615 [Register 143:206]

Jan. 1615 Leiden, purchased house from Roger Wilson 10 Jun 1616 Sandwich, excommunicated as ‘Brownist or Separatist’ Dec. 1616 Sandwich, excommunicated with Mary Plofer for slander 4 Sept. 1618 Letter from Sabin Staresmore in London to John Carver March 1619 Leiden, certificate of good behavior includes Roger Wilson Perhaps his master, Christopher Verrall, who was wealthy and had powerful connections in Sandwich, had actually ‘underhand may[n]teyned and protected the offendors,’ as the Privy Council had accused him of doing. If Richard Masterson was not working with Verrall’s permission it is difficult to understand how he could maintain employment as a servant and travel back and forth between Sandwich and Leiden before Verral’s death in 1615. It is unlikely that any of those who had ‘recourse’ to Leiden made the trip between the two countries without the full knowledge of the other Leiden Separatists.”

The will of Christopher Verral is included in “Appendix” at the end of the article. It is long and difficult to understand but one sentence says “I do forgive my man Richard Masterson all the money which he oweth me and I give him 20s. to make him a ring in token of my good will.”

Letter sent to William Bradford and William Brewster by Richard Masterson and others
To our most dear, and entirely beloved bretheren, Mr. William Bradford and Mr. William Brewster, grace mercy and true peace be multiplied, from God our Father, through our Lord Jesus Christ. Amen.

Most dear christian friends and brethren, as it is no small grief Unto you, so is it no less unto us, that we are constrained to live thus disunited each from other, especially considering our affections each unto other, for the mutual edifying and comfort of both, in these evil days wherein we live: if it pleased the Lord to bring us again together, than which as no outward thing could be more comfortable unto us, or is more desired of us, if the Lord see it good; so see we no hope of means of accomplishing the same, except it come from you, and therefore, must with patience rest in the work and will of God, performing our duties to him and you assunder; whom we are not any way able to help, but by our continual prayers to him for you, and sympathy of affections with you, for the troubles which befal you; till it please the Lord to reunite us again. But our dearly beloved brethren, concerning your kind and respective letter, howsoever written by one of you, yet as we continue with the consent (at least in afection) of you both, although we cannot answer your desire and expectation, by reason it hath pleased the Lord to take to himself out of this miserable world our dearly beloved pastor, yet for ourselves we are minded as formerly, to come unto you, when and as the Lord affordeth means, though we see little hope thereof at present, as being unable of ourselves, and that our friends will help us we see little hope. And now, brethren, what shall we say further unto you; our desires and prayers to God, is (if such were his good will and pleasure) we might be reunited for the edifying and mutual comfort of both, which, when he sees fit, he will accomplish. In the mean time, we commit you unto him and to the word of his grace; whom we beseech to guide and direct both you and us, in all his ways, according to that, his word, and to bless all our lawful endeavours, for the glory of his name and good of his people. Salute, we pray you, all the church and brethren with you to whom we would have sent this letter. If we knew it could not be prejudicial unto you, as we hope it cannot; yet fearing the worst, we thought fit either to direct it to you, our two beloved brethen, leaving it to your goodly wisdom and discretion, to manifest our mind to the rest of our loving friends and brethren, as you see most convenient. And thus intreating you to remember us in your prayers, as we also do you; we for this time command you and all your affairs to the direction and protection of the Almighty, and rest,

Your assured loving friends

And brethren in the Lord,

FRANCIS JESSOPP,

THOMAS NASH,

THOMAS BLOSSOM,

ROGER WHITE,

RICHARD MAISTERSON.

John Atwood, Tenth Great-Grandfather

August 12, 2016 5 Comments

Atwood Coat of Arms

Atwood Coat of Arms

John Wood, the oldest immigrant ancestor of the Wood family, came to Massachusetts in 1635 aboard the ship Matthew. Most of his adult children followed him to America soon after.

John Wood is also known as John Atwood in some records; his baptismal name is “Johanem Wood” according to E. F. Atwood; however, I have yet to locate that record, so it may be a mistake. In the Sanderstead parish birth records his name is recorded as “Johannes” (not Johanem) with a date of 4 Feb 1582. Johannes is the Latinized version of John, often used in official records. He was a twin to Dericke who died in infancy. His baptism was recorded in both Sanderstead and Gatton parishes. It is not known why his birth was recorded at Gatton (a parish that is also located in Surrey, about three miles from Reigate), but it leads me to speculate that John’s mother may have originally come from that parish.

From the Sanderstead Parish Register of baptism records:

1582 Feb 4, Johannes t Dericke Woode gemille Nicholaj Woode

translation: 1582 Feb 4, John and twin Derick Wood born to twin bearing (father) Nicholas Wood

Since John Wood was baptised in Sanderstead, Surrey, England on 4 February 1582, it is likely that he was born about that time because it was customary to baptise infant children. He was probably born in Sanderstead since that is where his father, Nicholas and mother Olive (Harman) had a home. The Wood family had been associated with Sanderstead since about 1400 and had constructed a manor house there known as “Sanderstead Court.” The title to the lands in Sanderstead are somewhat confusing at this point in time and it is not entirely clear whether the family was actually living at Sanderstead Court or in one of the other houses in the parish.

John Wood married Joan Coleson of Saint Martin’s Parish, London in the summer of 1612. They had at least seven children, all born in England, five were sons and two were daughters. Johanna and Agnes are questionable children; they are included here until their ancestry is confirmed fully. Philip is sometimes included as a child of John and Joan, however, this is not the case. Most of the other children were baptised at St. Martins in the Fields church in London. E. F. Atwood believes that after the birth of his second son, John (in 1613), he and his family moved to Chancery Lane in London. He does not provide documentation for this assertion, however.

John was a “leather seller” in England. A notation in The Gentleman’s Magazine in 1848 indicates that John Atwood was a member of the Leatherseller’s Company on 22 January 1628; he sponsored a man with a highly unusual name to membership in the guild–Praysgod Barbone. Leather sellers were involved in selling, whiting, sorting and staking leather, and they belonged to a guild in London that regulated the trade; their guild hall was a large and elaborate building and they derived both social and financial benefits from belonging to the guild. Leather craftsmen making leather goods and parchment could also belong to this guild. Leather was an essential product with many uses during this time.

When John’s father, Nicholas, died in 1586, he left his estate to his youngest son Richard. Normally the oldest son would inherit his father’s estate, so this was an unusual bequest. Richard died 17 years later in about 1603 and his estate was inherited by the oldest brother in the family, Harman. According to court documents summarized by E. F. Atwood in Ancestry of Harman Atwood, John sued his older brother on 1 Feb 1631 saying he should be the heir of the estate, not Harman:

“Harman Atwood doth confess that he hath a copy of a Court role, dated 37 Henry 8 (1546-47) which proves that Nicholas Wood was the heir, that Thomas Wood, a young son, had certain manor lands settled on him by his father, John Wood, and that on the death of said Thomas, Nicholas Wod was possessed of said lands, according to the custom of said manor.”

Atwood maintains that this proceeding was used to simply sort out ownership of various Wood/Atwood lands, and that it was not filed in anger over John’s perceived disinheritence. King Henry had taken some lands belonging to the Wood/Atwood family some years before when he dissolved the monastaries in England. The land the Wood/Atwood family owned had previously belonged to the monastary, and it may well have been a legal maneuver by the Wood/Atwood family to clarify their rightful ownership of lands in Sanderstead parish and elsewhere. It is probably from this incident that E. F. Atwood says that some of John’s descendants claim he left for America after being disinherited.

I believe that Atwood is probably correct because if John was unhappy with his brother Harman after Richard’s death it seems unlikely that he would have named his own son “Harman” in 1612. E. F. Atwood’s conclusion is that this suit was merely a legal technicality to sort out ownership rights of Sanderstead. This conclusion would indicate that John did not leave England because of dissatisfaction with his inheritance, but for other reasons–possibly religious, possibly financial, or possibly for adventure.

It is not known what prompted John to leave England for the new colonies in America in 1635, but we can make a few guesses based on John’s personal circumstances as well as the political and religious climate in England at the time. James I, the English King (1566 – 1625), faced opposition on many fronts. James did not trust the growing Puritan movement in England, and viewed it as a threat to his royal control of the church. Tensions continued to increase after James was succeeded by his son, Charles I, and finally reached a breaking point with the English Civil Wars.

Many Puritans, who became known as Dissenters, faced discrimination and persecution in England. They sought to “purify” the Church of England and objected to many of its ceremonies such as exchanging rings during marriage, inviting “evil doers” to share in communion, using the sign of the cross in baptism, etc. Many of the Dissenters’ preachers were driven to ruin by the King through excessive taxation. This persecution lead to the first of several exoduses of Puritans, the first of which was to Leyden, Netherlands in about 1605. Most Puritans only stayed in the Netherlands for 10-15 years, however, and many eventually moved to America. The first group of Puritans arrived on the Mayflower in 1620 and founded the Plymouth Colony.

John may have well have been prompted by religious convictions to leave his English homeland and settle in the predominatly Puritan Plymouth Colony. We know that three of his sons married into staunch Puritan families after arriving in America. At least one leather seller in London was persecuted by the King for his beliefs and burned at the stake while John lived in London.

John may have also been motivated by financial considerations. As a younger son, John had been forced to fend for himself financially. It seems that his older brother, also named John (born 1576) had knowledge of the Plymouth Colony for he was recognized by the Treasurer of the stock company that funded the colony as a “special friend.” John’s brother’s relationship to the Plymouth Colony may have had an impact on John. It is also possible that since he had not been successful in his law suit against his brother Harman for a share in his father’s estate, John may have felt that the New World offered more oppotunity than London.
It is believed that John left England on 21 May 1635 aboard the Matthew. John’s name appears in the ship’s register in London, with 131 others; they were first transported to Saint Christopher’s Island (now known as St. Lucia), an island in the Leeward chain in the Caribbean. Richard Goodladd, owner and master of the Matthew per a warrant from the Earl of Carlisle. Before they were allowed to leave England they were compelled to take an oath of allegiance that they would be loyal to their King and their mother country.

Shortly after arriving in Plymouth, he was admitted as a freeman on 3 Jan 1636 which meant that he took an oath of allegiance to the Colony and could vote in elections and participate in the governemntal life of the colony:
“Mr. John Atwood, John Jenkin, John Weekes, Josiah Cooke, Willm Paddy, Robte Lee, Nathaniell Morton, Edward Forster, Georg Lewes, and Barnard Lumbard were made free this Court and sworn accordingly.” (The Wood family relationship with the Morton family would continue for many years.)

John’s wife, Joan, also came to America, but it appears that she did not sail with him on the Matthew since her name is not listed on the ship’s manifest. She came over on a later voyage, however, it is not clear which ship brought her.

From records of land transactions we know that John purchased land in Plymouth next to John Dunham shortly after his arrival. The land was granted to John Wood on 7 November 1636:

“had divers porcons allowed them, 3 acres in breadth & two in length, next to the land of John Dunham the elder…” The others were John Dunham Jr., John Wood, Samuell Eedy, Web Addy, Josiah Cooke, Thomas Atkinson, and Joshua Pratt, “All wch psons haue or are to build in the towne of Plym., and these lands to belong to their dwelling howses there, & not to be sold fro their howses.”

Citation: 7 Nov 1636 Plymouth Colony Records, Vol. 1:46

The following summer, in 1638, William Bradford describes an interesting incident that undoubtedly would have made an impression on John:

“This year, aboute the 1. or 2 or June, was a great and fearfull earthquake; it was in this place heard before it was felte. it came with a rumbling noyse, or low murmure, like unto remoate thunder; it came from the norward, and passed southward. As the noyse aproached nerer, they earth began to shake, and came at lenght with that violence as caused platters, dishes, and such like things a stoode upon shelves to clatter an d fall downe; yea, persons were afraid of the houses themselves. It so fell oute that at the same time diverse of the cheefe of this towne were mett together at one house, conferring withsome of their friends that wre upon their removall from the place, (as if the Lord would herby shew the signes of his displeasure, in their shaking a peeces and removalls one from an other.) How ever it was very terrible for the time, and as the men were set talking in the house, some women and others were without the dores, and the earth shooke with that vilence as they could not stand without catching hould of the posts and pails that stood next them; but the vilence lasted not long. And about halfe an hower, or less, came an other noyse and shaking, but nether so loud nor strong as the former, but quickly passed over; and so it ceased. it was not only on the sea coast, but the Indeans felt it with in land; and some ships that wre upon the coast were shaken by it. So powerfull is the mighty hand of the Lord, as to make both the earth and sea to shake, and the mountaines to tremble before him, when he pleases; and who can stay his hand?”

Citation: Bradford, Of Plymouth Plantation

Four of John’s adult sons also came to America after him:

Stephen went to Eastham, Mass. in about 1648-50

John to Plymouth, Mass. in about 1636

Henry to Middleborough, Mass. in about 1641

Harman to Boston, Mass. in about 1642

It is possible that his other son, William, also came to Charlestown, Mass. (this is based on speculation by E. F. Atwood in Ye Atte Wode Annals).

Three of John’s sons married into prominent Puritan families:

John Wood married Sarah Masterson in 1642 in Plymouth. She was the daughter of Richard Masterson who had been a Deacon at Leyden, Holland, the first home of the Puritans.

Henry married Abigail Jenney in 1644 in Plymouth. She was the daughter of Capt. John Jenney and Sarah Carey who had first gone to Leyden, Holland before coming to America.

Stephen married Abigail Dunham in 1644 in Plymouth. She was the daughter of John Dunham and Abigail Barlow who had originally gone to Leiden, Holland and married there on 22 Oct 1622.

John only lived eleven years in his new American homeland. He died on 27 Feb 1644 in the Plymouth Colony. His will is dated 20 Oct 1643, and was proved on 5 Jun 1644.

E. F. Atwood in Ye Atte Wode Annals (1930) has provided a copy of the suit John filed against Harman in London in 1631. In this suit he is identified as the son of Nicholas and is also identified as a “leather seller:”

Chrles iw. 15-33. Wood Alias Atwood Vs. Atwood. Feb 1, 1631.

Humbly comlayning, your orator, John Wood, alias Attwood, of the City of London, leather seller, that whereas Nicholas Wood, alias Attwood, late of Sanderstead cum Longhurst, County Surrey, deceased father to your orator, was siezed of lands, etc., in Sanderstead, and did, about 28 Elizabeth [1586], convey on parcel of lands called Mancocke and another parcel lying by Parkland, in the bottom towards Comes Wood Head, and a parcel lying by Mitheley, Great Burye, called Opeley, and one close lying at Ledowne, and one parcel abutting upon the house of Henrie Best, all which lands, the said Nicholas Wood alias Atwood, did convey for the use of Oliphe, his wife, for her life, and for the use of Ritchard Wood alias Attwood, his youngest sonne, and after the death of the said Nicholas and Ritchard, the said Oliphe, about 1603, also died; after whose death, the lands descended unto your orator, as youngest sonne of the said Nicholas. But now Harman Wood, alias Attwood, being the eldest son of your orator’s father, and lord of the said manor of Sanderstead cum Longhurst, hath entered the said premises and pretends to disenherit your orator of the same.

ANSWER of Harman Atwood, Gent., Says bill of complaint it devised by the complainant without just cause and denies that he combined with Thomas Collett, the steward of said manor, concerning any controversy and says the complainant has no right or title to said premises. he doth confess that he hath a copy of a Court Role, dated 37 Henry 8 (1546-7) which proves that Nicholas Wood was the heir, that Thomas Wood, a younger son, had certain manor lands settled on him by this father, John Wood, and that on the death of said Thomas, Nicholas Wood was possessed of said lands, according to the custom of said manor.

Note [by E. F. Atwood]: “The above is merely an abstract made for genealogical purposes, hence does not always conform to exact wording of the original. It seems clear that the leather seller was never meant by Nicholas to inherit these lands, but thence comes our traditions of disinheritance, etc. As (Sanderstead manor was confiscated a few years earlier, yet John and Nicholas were left undisturbed in possession of lands bought by Peter in 1346, a Court Roll was necessary to avoid confusion as to titles of the two lands called Sanderstead Manor, one owned by the Greshams and one by the Wood-Atwoods.”

Born John Attwood, John was was the last in his direct line to have a coat of arms. He was descended from knights of the shire, bodyguards of English kings and members of parliament. He was a younger son of his father, Nicolas Atwood. Therefore, he did not expect to inherit an estate. John chose to seek his fortune in the American colony of Plymouth. When John learned that his older brothers had died without eligible issue for his father’s title, he sailed to England to claim it. But his youngest brother, who had remained in England, had secured it from the courts before John was able to to gain his rightful title and estate. John returned to Plymouth, and his name was changed to Wood. Some of his American relatives kept the the name Atwood. He, his son Henry Wood, and grandson John Wood were sometimes called Atwood and confused with people

John Atwood (1582 – 1644)
10th great-grandfather
John Thomas Wood (1614 – 1675)
son of John Atwood
Margaret Wood (1635 – 1693)
daughter of John Thomas Wood
Elizabeth Manchester (1667 – 1727)
daughter of Margaret Wood
Dr. James Sweet (1686 – 1751)
son of Elizabeth Manchester
Thomas Sweet (1732 – 1813)
son of Dr. James Sweet
Samuel Thomas Sweet (1765 – 1844)
son of Thomas Sweet
Valentine Sweet (1791 – 1858)
son of Samuel Thomas Sweet
Sarah LaVina Sweet (1840 – 1923)
daughter of Valentine Sweet
Jason A Morse (1862 – 1932)
son of Sarah LaVina Sweet
Ernest Abner Morse (1890 – 1965)
son of Jason A Morse
Richard Arden Morse (1920 – 2004)
son of Ernest Abner Morse
Pamela Morse
I am the daughter of Richard Arden Morse

My tenth great-grandfather immigrated to American in 1635 in the Pilgrim ship the “Mathew”.

John Wood, imigrant ancestor, 1635, arrived at Plymouth Colony; married Joan Coleson of Saint Martin’ England, who did not come with her husband, but later ship. John’s name appears in the register in London, with others; they were first transported to Saint Christophers, in the ship, Mathew, Richard Goodladd, owner and master, 21st May 1635. Before they were allowed to leave England they were compelled to take the oath of allegiance that they would be true to their mother country– “ye oath of allegiance supreme”. During the reign of Queen Elizabeth the Puritans fared badly in England, many men and women being arrested and thrown into prison because they sought to retain their own religious beliefs which were deemed contrary to the teachings of the Church of England. Many of them fled to Holland. On the death of Queen Elizabeth, she was succeeded by King James who was more lenient with the Puritans and freely allowed them to emigrate to America, the first settlement etablished in Virginia being called Jamestown. Later (1620) the Puritans came to Plymouth. Still later, many settled in Boston and Boston became the capital of Massachusetts Bay Colony.
John Wood landed first at Boston, but soon removed to Plymouth. The record of his baptism in England gives the date 24th December 1614. He became “propr.” of Plymouth Massachusetts, 1635-36; he owned land, was constable and on the grand jury. March 25th was recognized as New Year in England and her colonies. His wife Joan Coleson dying soon thereafter he removed to another section of Plymouth which later became the town of Plympton. While there the son John Wood married Sarah Masterson, daughter of Richard Masterson, who had been a deacon at Leyden, Holland, and whose wife was Mary Goodsell of Lancaster (married 26th November 1619). John Wood later moved to Portsmouth on the Island of New Port which was then a part of Massachusetts. Children of John and Sarah (Masterson) were: Thomas, Henry, Walter, William, John, Elizabeth. The records most frequently mention the sons Thomas and John. The father died in 1643-44, The son John Wood, died about 1675.

Puritan Blue Laws

July 20, 2015 1 Comment

Blue laws in Plymouth Colony were created to keep Sabbath exactly the way the Puritans wanted it to be kept.  The Puritans had no tolerance for other religious views, or for slacker Puritans.  The criminal justice system was used to fine and persecute those found guilty of profaning the Lord’s day.  It did not take much to arouse the ire of these founding fathers.  The laws evolved very slowly over time, but still represent a will to control what happens on Sunday. In Plymouth you would be fined for walking anywhere but to church from Saturday at sundown until Sunday at sundown.  This was a no laughing/no smiling kind of religious day and they were serious about preserving it.  The Pilgrims of the Mayflower would freak right out about the televised football games, a tradition many associate with Thanksgiving.

Elizabeth Walker Warren, 13th Great Grandmother

May 13, 2015 6 Comments

buried in Plymouth

buried in Plymouth

My 13th great-grandmother arrived in Plymouth Colony in 1623 on the ship Ann.  Her husband was a Mayflower Compact signer.  She lived a long and, for her time, independent life.  We know a lot about her:

A WOMAN OF VALOR : ELIZABETH WARREN OF PLYMOUTH COLONY by Peggy M. Baker
Director & Librarian, Pilgrim Society & Pilgrim Hall Museum

“A woman of valor, who can find? Far beyond pearls is her value… Give her the fruit of her hands, and she will be praised at the gates by her very own deeds.”
Proverbs 31:10
The “Pilgrim Mothers” are mysteries. These intrepid women of 17th century Plymouth Colony are known by their husbands and known by their children. Their own lives, however, are seen only in glimpses, pale images reflected off the activities of the families which revolved around them. The women themselves are almost invisible. While the court records of Plymouth Colony reveal much about the daily activities of the law-abiding men of the Colony, they tell us little about the women (except for those few women who broke the law). There was, in fact, no officially recognized role for the law-abiding married woman. The activities and contributions of those women, although vital to the survival and success of the Colony, are nowhere registered or officially acknowledged.
According to the accepted legal convention of the times, all married women, even those conducting business independently, were regarded as representatives of their husbands. Only widows could be legally recognized as agents in their own right. Very few widows availed themselves of the privileges and the responsibilities that such independent status would entail.
One Pilgrim woman, however, breaks through the patriarchal conventions of 17th century society. By the longevity of her widowhood and by the independence of her actions, Elizabeth Warren emerges from the collective category of “Pilgrim Mother” as a highly individual woman.
Elizabeth Warren appears full-grown on the shores of American history. Nothing is known of her English background, apart from her marriage to Richard Warren. Richard was one of the 102 passengers on the Mayflower, that sailed into Plymouth Harbor in December 1620.
Many of the Mayflower passengers traveled as families. Some families, however, with many young children or other family responsibilities, or those thought (in Pilgrim William Bradford’s words) “most unfit to bear the brunt of this hard adventure,” separated. The men sailed in 1620 and the women and children delayed their sailing, planning on joining their menfolk after the Colony was established. Richard Warren was among the men who sailed alone in 1620.
According to family tradition, Richard Warren brought with him on the Mayflower a particularly treasured (and very portable) family possession – a large linen damask napkin, woven in the Netherlands c.1600, now on display at Pilgrim Hall Museum in Plymouth, Massachusetts.
The napkin’s woven design forms horizontal bands. One band shows a series of symbols – maces encircled by laurel branches and flanked by winged cherubs — representing the city of Amsterdam, with the words “Amster Dam” appearing beneath each symbol. Another band shows the city with houses, churches and canal bridges. The harbor below has rows of small boats with festive figures that appear to be dancing among barrels and boxes on the near shore.

The Warren family was separated for three years. One small ship, the Fortune, arrived in Plymouth in 1621 carrying a number of “lusty young men, and many of them wild enough” to supplement the fledgling Colony’s manpower. It was not until 1623 that two ships, the Anne and the Little James, arrived in Plymouth carrying 80-some new immigrants to Plymouth Colony, including members of the separated families. Among them were Fear and Patience Brewster, the daughters of Mayflower passengers William and Mary Brewster, as well as Samuel Fuller’s wife Bridget. Francis Cooke, who had voyaged on the Mayflower with his teenage son John, was joined by his wife, Hester, and their three younger children Jane, Jacob and Hester. Richard Warren was reunited by his wife Elizabeth and the five Warren daughters, Mary, Anna, Sarah, Elizabeth and Abigail.
The Warrens joined in the life of the small but growing agricultural community : Richard would have played a role in public affairs and worked the fields. Elizabeth would have run the large household that included not only the immediate family but also their farm workers and hired help. On occasion, she would have joined Richard in the fields. The Warren home would have been small and modestly furnished.
Very little furniture survives from the early years of Plymouth Colony. Most pieces were simple and sturdy, suited to life in a frontier community. The Warren “joint stool,” so-named for its joined mortise-and-tenon construction, would have been used both as seating furniture and as a table. The Warren stool is now in the collections of Pilgrim Hall Museum.
Two sons were born to the Warrens after Elizabeth’s 1623 arrival in Plymouth Colony. Their birth dates are not recorded but evidence of their presence can be found in the “1627 Division of Cattle.”
In 1627, the Colony’s livestock, formerly held in common, was divided among the Colony’s residents. Every person living in Plymouth in 1627 was assigned to a “Lot,” generally arranged by family group, and the name of every resident was individually recorded in Plymouth Colony Records Volume I. Listed there we find not only Richard and Elizabeth and their five daughters, but also the names of their two young sons, Nathaniel and Joseph Warren.
Richard Warren died in 1628. Elizabeth, left a widow with 7 children (five young women, ranging from early teens to probably early twenties, and two small boys under the age of 5), never remarried. Elizabeth outlived her husband Richard by 45 years.

Unlike the majority of Plymouth Colony women, Elizabeth Warren’s name appears regularly in the records of Plymouth Colony during the long period of her widowhood. She appears first as paying the taxes owed by all heads of household. She appears next as executor of her husband’s estate.
Elizabeth then appears as one of the Plymouth Colony “Purchasers.” In 1626, 53 (male) citizens of Plymouth Colony agreed to underwrite some of the Colony’s debt in a complicated arrangement with its financial backers. Richard Warren was one of the original 1626 Purchasers. The list of the names of the Purchasers did not appear in the Plymouth Colony Records, however, until several years had passed. During that time, Richard Warren had died. In a startling break with tradition, the list of Purchasers does not contain the name of Richard Warren but, instead, “Elizabeth Warren, widow.” The Court felt it necessary to explain this unprecedented move, noting that Elizabeth was listed in Richard’s stead because Richard, “dying before he had performed the bargain, the said Elizabeth performed the same after his decease.”
In 1635, Elizabeth Warren appears in the Records of Plymouth Colony in a totally new role. No longer seen as acting to fulfill the obligations of her long-deceased husband Richard, Elizabeth now enters the recorded life of the Colony as a totally independent agent. We have not only a court case involving Elizabeth, we hear an echo of her actual words.
Elizabeth brought her servant Thomas Williams before the Court for “speaking profane & blasphemous speeches against the majesty of God.” In a disagreement between mistress and servant, Elizabeth Warren had exhorted Thomas Williams “to fear God and do his duty. He answered, he neither feared God, nor the devil.” Although Governor William Bradford advocated “bodily punishment,” the judgment of the Court was that a reproof was sufficient, Williams having “spoken in passion and distemper,” and making “humble acknowledgment of his offense.”
Elizabeth’s activities continue to be documented to an unusual extent in theRecords of Plymouth Colony. In the late 1630s, she appears in the Records deeding land from the Warren holdings in Plymouth’s Eel River Valley to her sons-in-law.
The Warren daughters had matured and married: Mary to Anne passenger Robert Bartlett, Anna to Thomas Little, Sarah to Mayflower passenger John Cooke, Elizabeth to Richard Church and Abigail to Anthony Snow. Relations within the large extended family seemed amicable.

In 1652, however, trouble suddenly loomed! Elizabeth’s deeds to her sons-in-law, deeds that had been executed 15 years previously, were challenged by persons unnamed. The Plymouth Colony Records report a petition brought by Elizabeth’s son-in-law Robert Bartlett asking for clarification of Elizabeth’s right to deed land because “sundry speeches have passed from some who pretend themselves to be the sole and right heirs unto the lands on which the said Robert Bartlett now liveth, at the Eel River, in the township of Plymouth, which he, the said Robert, had bestowed on him by his mother-in-law Mistress Elizabeth Warren.”
The Court decided, unequivocally, in Elizabeth’s favor, finding that she had the power to give the land, since she had been “by an order of Court bearing date March the 7th, 1637, and other acts of the Court before, invested into the state and condition of a Purchaser.”The Court once again ratified and confirmed her status as a Purchaser and specifically ruled that Elizabeth Warren had the right to dispose of her lands, including the gifts of land she had made to her sons-in-law. Even this clear-cut Court ruling was insufficient to settle the quarrel. And as the dispute continued, the identity of those “who pretend themselves to be the sole and right heirs” was revealed to be Elizabeth’s own son Nathaniel Warren and his grandmother-in-law Jane Collier.
Nathaniel, now married and in his mid-to-late 20s, claimed that he “hath right unto as heir unto the lands of Mr. Richard Warren, deceased.” The two sides in the quarrel agreed to submit the argument to arbitration, each choosing 2 members to sit on the 4-man arbitration panel. Elizabeth Warren chose William Bradford and Thomas Willett. Nathaniel Warren chose Thomas Prence and Myles Standish.

The arbitration panel came swiftly to its unanimous conclusion. Nathaniel Warren received an acknowledgment of his right to share in the Warren lands. The panel confirmed what had never seemed to be in doubt, namely that Nathaniel could continue to hold the land he currently possessed. Nathaniel was also granted 2/3 of the Warren “Purchase Lands” which had not as yet been assigned and possession, after Elizabeth’s death, of 3 acres of land near his current holdings.
The major finding of the arbitration panel, however, must have come as a severe shock to young Nathaniel! The expected outcome by law and by custom would certainly have favored Elizabeth’s son. But, far from vindicating his patriarchal claims, the panel issued a stunning and resounding confirmation of Elizabeth’s status as head of her household and of her authority to act as an independent agent. The panel not only found that she “shall enjoy all the rest of her lands and all of them to whom she hath already at any time heretofore disposed any part thereof by gift, sale or otherwise, or shall hereafter do the same, to them and their heirs for ever without any trouble or molestation” but severely rapped Nathaniel’s unfilial knuckles. The Court concluded by bidding Nathaniel to
forever cease all other or further claims, suits, questions, or any molestations or disturbance at any time hereafter concerning the premises, but that his said mother and all her children, or any other to whom she has any way disposed any lands or shall hereafter do the same, but that they may quietly and peaceably possess and enjoy the same.

Elizabeth Warren seems, indeed, to have quietly and peaceably enjoyed the remainder of her days. When she died in 1673, this remarkable woman received the unprecedented but well-earned tribute of a eulogy in the Records of Plymouth Colony

Mistress Elizabeth Warren, an aged widow, aged above 90 years, deceased on the second of October, 1673. Who, having lived a godly life, came to her grave as a shock of corn fully ripe.

http://www.pilgrimhall.org

layout of the plots

layout of the plots

Elizabeth Jouatt Walker (1583 – 1673)
is my 13th great grandmother
Nathaniel Warren (1624 – 1667)
son of Elizabeth Jouatt Walker
Sarah Warren (1649 – 1692)
daughter of Nathaniel Warren
Elizabeth Blackwell (1662 – 1691)
daughter of Sarah Warren
Thomas Baynard (1678 – 1732)
son of Elizabeth Blackwell
Deborah Baynard (1720 – 1791)
daughter of Thomas Baynard
Mary Horney (1741 – 1775)
daughter of Deborah Baynard
Esther Harris (1764 – 1838)
daughter of Mary Horney
John H Wright (1803 – 1850)
son of Esther Harris
Mary Wright (1816 – 1873)
daughter of John H Wright
Emiline P Nicholls (1837 – )
daughter of Mary Wright
Harriet Peterson (1856 – 1933)
daughter of Emiline P Nicholls
Sarah Helena Byrne (1878 – 1962)
daughter of Harriet Peterson
Olga Fern Scott (1897 – 1968)
daughter of Sarah Helena Byrne
Richard Arden Morse (1920 – 2004)
son of Olga Fern Scott
Pamela Morse
I am the daughter of Richard Arden Morse

Richard & Elizabeth Warren appear often in the records of the 17th century:

Richard Warren : Mayflower passenger
“The names of those which came over first, in the year 1620, and were by the blessing of God the first beginners and in a sort the foundation of all the Plantations and Colonies in New England ; and their families … “Mr. Richard Warren, but his wife and children were left behind and came afterwards.”
William Bradford, Of Plymouth Plantation 1620-1647, ed.
Samuel Eliot Morison (New York : Knopf, 1991), p. 441-3.
It is possible that Elizabeth Warren and her daughters were also part of the original group that meant to travel to America. William Bradford notes that, when the Speedwell was determined to be unseaworthy,
“…it was resolved to dismiss her [the Speedwell] and part of the company, and proceed with the other ship [the Mayflower]. The which (though it was grievous and caused great discouragement) was put into execution. So after they had took out such provision as the other ship could well stow, and concluded both what number and what persons to send back, they made another sad parting; the one ship [the Speedwell] going back for London and the other [the Mayflower] was to proceed on her voyage. Those that went back were for the most part such as were willing so to do, either out of some discontent or fear they conceived of the ill success of the voyage, seeing so many crosses befall, and the year time so far spent. But others, in regard of their own weakness and charge of many young children were thought least useful and most unfit to bear the brunt of this hard adventure; unto which work of God, and judgment of their brethren, they were contented to submit.”
William Bradford, Of Plymouth Plantation 1620-1647, ed. Samuel Eliot Morison (New York : Knopf, 1991), p. 53.
Richard Warren : Signer of the Mayflower Compact
“I shall … begin with a combination made by them before they came ashore; being the first foundation of their government in this place. Occasioned partly by the discontented and mutinous speeches that some of the strangers amongst them had let fall from them in the ship: That when they came ashore they would use their own liberty, for none had power to command them, the patent they had being for Virginia and not for New England … And partly that such an act by them done, this their condition considered, might be as firm as any patent, and in some respects more sure. “The form was as followeth : IN THE NAME OF GOD, AMEN. We whose names are underwritten, the loyal subjects of our dread Sovereign Lord King James, by the Grace of God of Great Britain, France and Ireland King, Defender of the Faith, etc. Having undertaken, for the Glory of God and advancement of the Christian Faith and Honour of our King and Country, a Voyage to plant the First Colony in the Northern parts of Virginia, do by these presents solemnly and mutually in the presence of God and one of another, Covenant and Combine ourselves together into a Civil Body Politic, for our better ordering and preservation and furtherance of the ends aforesaid; and by virtue hereof to enact, constitute and frame such just and equal Laws, Ordinances, Acts, Constitutions and Offices, from time to time, as shall be thought most meet and convenient for the general good of the Colony, unto which we promise all due submission and obedience. In witness whereof we have hereunder subscribed our names at Cape Cod, the 11th of November, in the year of the reign of our Sovereign Lord King James, of England, France and Ireland the eighteenth, and of Scotland the fifty-fourth. Anno Domini 1620.”
William Bradford, Of Plymouth Plantation 1620-1647, ed. Samuel Eliot Morison (New York : Knopf, 1991), p. 75-76.
Richard Warren and the “First Encounter”
This story appears both in Mourt’s Relation, published in London in 1622, and (in a condensed version) in William Bradford’s Of Plymouth Plantation.

“Wednesday, the sixth of December [1620]. It was resolved our discoverers should set forth … So ten of our men were appointed who were of themselves willing to undertake it, to wit, Captain Standish, Master Carver, William Bradford, Edward Winslow, John Tilley, Edward Tilley, John Howland, and three of London, Richard Warren, Stephen Hopkins, and Edward Doten, and two of our seamen, John Alderton, and Thomas English. Of the ship’s company there went two of the master’s mates, Master Clarke and Master Coppin, the master gunner, and three sailors …
Mourt’s Relation, ed. Jordan D. Fiore (Plymouth, Mass. :
Plymouth Rock Foundation, 1985), p. 27-28.

” … the 6th of December [1620] they sent out their shallop again with ten of their principal men and some seamen, upon further discovery, intending to circulate that deep bay of Cape Cod. The weather was very cold and it froze so hard as the spray of the sea lighting on their coats, they were as if they had been glazed. Yet that night betimes they got down into the bottom of the bay, and as they drew near the shore they saw some ten or twelve Indians very busy about something. They landed about a league or two from them … they made themselves a barricado with logs and boughs as well as they could in the time, and set out their sentinel and betook them to rest, and saw the smoke of the fire the savages made that night. When morning was come they divided their company, some to coast along the shore in the boat, and the rest marched through the woods to see the land, if any fit place might be for their dwelling. They came also to the place where they saw the Indians the night before, and found they had been cutting up a great fish like a grampus …
“So they ranged up and down all that day, but found no people, nor any place they liked. When the sun grew low, they hasted out of the woods to meet with their shallop … of which they were very glad, for they had not seen each other all that day since the morning. So they made them a barricado as usually they did every night, with logs, stakes and thick pine boughs, the height of a man, leaving it open to leeward, partly to shelter them from the cold and wind (making their fire in the middle and lying round about it) and partly to defend them from any sudden assaults of the savages, if they should surround them; so being very weary, they betook them to rest. But about midnight they heard a hideous and great cry, and their sentinel called “Arm! arm!” So they bestirred them and stood to their arms and shot off a couple of muskets, and then the noise ceased. They concluded it was a company of wolves or such like wild beasts, for one of the seamen told them he had often heard such noise in Newfoundland.
“So they rested till about five of the clock in the morning; for the tide, and their purpose to go from thence, made them be stirring betimes. So after prayer they prepared for breakfast, and it being day dawning it was thought best to be carrying things down to the boat …
“But presently, all on the sudden, they heard a great and strange cry, which they knew to be the same voices they heard in the night, though they varied their notes; and one of their company being abroad came running in and cried, “Men, Indians! Indians!” And withal, their arrows came flying amongst them. Their men ran with all speed to recover their arms, as by the good providence of God they did. In the meantime, of those that were there ready, two muskets were discharged at them, and two more stood ready in the entrance of their rendezvous but were commanded not to shoot till they could take full aim at them. And the other two charged again with all speed, for there were only four had arms there, and defended the barricado, which was first assaulted. The cry of the Indians was dreadful, especially when they saw their men run out of the rendezvous toward the shallop to recover their arms, the Indians wheeling about upon them. But some running out with coats of mail on, and cutlasses in their hands, they soon got their arms and let fly amongst them and quickly stopped their violence …
“Thus it pleased God to vanquish their enemies and give them deliverance; and by his special providence so to dispose that not any one of them were either hurt or hit, though their arrows came close by them and on every side [of] them; and sundry of their coats, which hung up in the barricado, were shot through and through. Afterwards they gave God solemn thanks and praise for their deliverance, and gathered up a bundle of their arrows and sent them into England afterward by the master of the ship, and called that place the FIRST ENCOUNTER.”
William Bradford, Of Plymouth Plantation 1620-1647, ed. Samuel Eliot Morison (New York : Knopf, 1991), p. 68-72.
Richard Warren & the 1623 Division of Land
The 1623 Division of Land marked the end of the Pilgrims’ earlier system of land held in common by all. Governor Bradford explains it in this way: “And so assigned to every family a parcel of land, according to the proportion of their number, for that end, only for present use (but made no division for inheritance) and ranged all boys and youth under some family. This had very good success, for it made all hands very industrious, so as much more corn was planted than otherwise would have been by any means the Governor or any other could use, and saved him a great deal of trouble, and gave far better content. The women now went willingly into the field, and took their little ones with them to set corn; which before would allege weakness and inability; whom to have compelled would have been thought great tyranny and oppression.” William Bradford, Of Plymouth Plantation 1620-1647, ed.
Samuel Eliot Morison (New York : Knopf, 1991) p. 120

Plymouth Colony Records, Deeds, &c Vol. I 1627-1651 is the oldest record book of the Plymouth settlement. It begins with the 1623 Division of Land, recorded in the handwriting of Governor William Bradford. The lands of Richard Warren were among those designated as “their grounds which came first over in the May Floure, according as thier lotes were case” and are described in this way “these lye one the north side of the towne next adjoyning to their gardens which came in the Fortune.”
Richard Warren & the 1627 Division of Cattle
Plymouth Colony Records, Deeds, &c, Vol. I 1627-1651 also tells of the 1627 Division of Cattle:
“At a publique court held the 22th of May it was concluded by the whole Companie, that the cattell wch were the Companies, to wit, the Cowes & the Goates should be equally devided to all the psonts of the same company … & so the lotts fell as followeth, thirteene psonts being pportioned to one lot … ” “The ninth lot fell to Richard Warren & his companie Joyned with (2) him his wife Elizabeth Warren (3) Nathaniell Warren (4) Joseph Warren (5) Mary Warren (6) Anna Warren (7) Sara Warren (8) Elizabeth Warren (9) Abigall Warren (10) John Billington (11) George Sowle (12) Mary Sowle (13) Zakariah Sowle. To this lott fell one of the 4 black heyfers that came in the Jacob caled the smooth horned Heyfer and two shee goats.”
Richard Warren : a 1626 Purchaser
In 1621, King James I authorized the Council for New England to plant and govern land in this area. This Council granted the Peirce Patent, confirming the Pilgrims’ settlement and governance of Plymouth. Peirce and his associates, the merchant adventurers, were allotted 100 acres for each settler the Company transported. The Pilgrims had a contract with the Company stating all land and profits would accrue to the Company for 7 years at which time the assets would be divided among the shareholders. Most of the Pilgrims held some stock. The Pilgrims negotiated a more favorable contract with the Company in 1626. In 1627, 53 Plymouth freemen, known as “The Purchasers,” agreed to buy out the Company over a period of years. In turn, 12 “Undertakers” (8 from Plymouth and 4 from London) agreed to pay off Plymouth’s debts in return for trade benefits.
The list we have of the 1626 Purchasers comes from the Plymouth Colony Records (Vol. 2, p. 177). Because of some discrepancies in the names, it is usually assumed that the list was compiled several years after the actual agreement was negotiated. The Plymouth Colony Records do not list Richard Warren; instead “Elizabeth Warren, widdow” is listed even though Richard Warren was still living in 1626/1627.
Richard Warren : his death
“And seeing it hath pleased Him to give me [William Bradford] to see thirty years completed since these beginnings, and that the great works of His providence are to be observed, I have thought it not unworthy my pains to take a view of the decreasings and increasings of these persons and such changes as hath passed over them and theirs in this thirty years … “Mr. Richard Warren lived some four or five years and had his wife come over to him, by whom he had two sons before [he] died, and one of them is married and hath two children. So his increase is four. But he had five daughters more came over with his wife, who are all married and living, and have many children.”
William Bradford, Of Plymouth Plantation 1620-1647, ed.
Samuel Eliot Morison (New York : Knopf, 1991), p. 443-7.

“1628.
“This year died Mr. Richard Warren, who hath been mentioned before in this book, and was an useful instrument ; and during his life bore a deep share in the difficulties and troubles of the first settlement of the plantation of New Plimouth.”
Nathaniel Morton, New England’s Memorial
(Boston : John Usher, 1669)
Richard Warren’s burial site is unknown.
Elizabeth Warren in the Records of Plymouth Colony
1631 [a bequest in the will of Mary Ring] : “I give unto mrs Warren one woodden cupp with a foote as a token of my love.”
Mayflower Descendant, Vol. 1, p. 29-30.

1633 : “a misted [meerstead] that was granted formerly to Richard Warren, deceased, & forfeited by a late order, for want of building, the said misted was granted to Mr. Raph Fog & his heires forever, provided the said Raph w’thin twelve moneths build a dwelling howse upon the same, & allow the widow Warren so much for her fence remayning thereon …”
Plymouth Colony Records, Vol. 1, p. 18.

1633 : “According to an order in Court held the 2d of January, in the seaventh yeare of the raigne of o’r soveraigne lord, Charles, by the grace of God King of Engl., Scotl., France, & Irel., defendr of the faith, &c, the psons heere under menconed were rated for publike use … to be brought in by each pson as they are heere under written, rated in corne at vi [pence] bushell … Widow Warren … 12 s[hilling]s.”
Plymouth Colony Records, Vol. I, p. 9-10.
In 1634, she was also “rated” : “Widow Warren …. 9 [shillings].”
Plymouth Colony Records, Vol. 1, p. 26-27.

1633 [inventory] : “John. Thorp debtor to … To mrs Warren 01 10 08.”
Mayflower Descendant, Vol. 1, p. 160.

1635 : “At this Court, Thomas Williams, ye sarvant of widow Warren, was accused for speaking profane & blasphemous speeches against ye mauestie of God, which wer these : ther being some discention betweene him & his dame, shee, after other things, exhorted him to fear God & doe his duty ; he answered, he neither feared God, nor the divell ; this was proved by witneses, and confesed by himselfe. This, because ye Courte judged it to be spoken in passion & distemper, with reprove did let him pass, upon humble acknowledgmente of his offence ; though ye Gove’r would have had him punished wth bodly punishmente, as ye case seemed to require.”
Plymouth Colony Records, Vol. 1, p. 35.

1635 : “Thomas Clarke was plaintive against widow Warren, for taking a boat of his, which was lost in ye Eele River, wher she left it, by an extraordinary storme, in ye same place ; for which he demanded 15 [pounds] damage ; but ye jury aquite ye defendante, finding ye boat to be borowed, & laid in an ordinary place of saftie ; yet, for other considerations, they gave ye said Thomas Clarke 30 [shillings].”
Plymouth Colony Records, Vol. 1, p. 36.

1636/37 : “It is agreed upon, by the consent of the whole Court, that Elizabeth Warren, widdow, the relict of Mr. Richard Warren, deceased, shalbe entred, and stand, and bee purchaser instead of her said husband, as well because that (hee dying before he had pformed the said bargaine) the said Elizabeth pformed the same after his decease, as also for the establishing of the lotts of land given formly by her unto her sonnes in law, Richard Church, Robert Bartlett, and Thomas Little, in marriage with their wives, her daughters.”
Plymouth Colony Records, Vol. 1, p. 54.

1637 : “That Mrs Elizabeth Warren of the Eele River Widdow for and in consideracon of a Marriage already solempnized betwixt John Cooke the yeonger of the Rockey Noocke and Sarah her daughter doth acknowledge that shee hath given granted enfeoffed and confirmed unto the said John Cooke one lot of land lying at the Eele River containeing eighteene acrees or thereabouts and lying on the North side of Robert Bartletts lott formly also given the said Robert in Marriage w’th Mary another of the sd Mrs Warrens daughters …”
Plymouth Colony Records, Vol. 12, p. 27.

1637 : “whereas John Cooke hath a lott of land at the Eele River lying next to Robert Barlet containeing by estimacon eighteene acrees or thereabout given him by Mrs. Elizabeth Warren in marriage w’th his wyfe and Robte Bartlett hath a lott of land of like quantitie lying on the Duxborrow side … the said John Cooke & Robert Bartlett have exhcaunged the said lotts w’th eich other …”
Plymouth Colony Records, Vol. 12, p. 28.

1639 : “M’ris Elizabeth Warren Widdow for and in consideracon of a marriage already consummate betwixt Anthony Snow & Abigall her daughter Hath freely & absolutely given granted assigned & made over unto the said Anthony Snow All that her house scituate nere the place called Wellingsly (alis) Hobs Hole …”
Plymouth Colony Records, Vol. 12, p. 53.

1640 : “Richard Church, Robte Bartlett, Thomas Little, & Mrs Elizabeth Warren are graunted enlargement at the head of their lotts to the foote of the Pyne Hills, leaveing a way betwixt them and the Pyne Hills, for cattell & cart to passe by.”
Plymouth Colony Records, Vol. 1, p. 152.

1644 [from the will of Stephen Hopkins] : “I do bequeath by this my will to my sonn Giles Hopkins my great Bull w’ch is now in the hands of m’ris Warren Also I do give to Stephen Hopkins my sonn Giles his sonne twenty shillings in m’ris Warrens hands for the hire of the said Bull”
Mayflower Descendant, Vol. 2, p. 12.

1651 : “The Names of those that have Interest and proprieties in the Townes land att Punchkateesett over against Road Iland … Mistris Elizabeth Warren.”
Records of the Town of Plymouth, Vol. 1, p. 36

1652 : “petition was prefered by Robert Bartlet unto the Court holden att Plymouth the 7th of October, 1652, therin requesting that wheras sundry speeches have pased from som who pretend themselves to bee the sole and right heires unto the lands on which the said Robert Barlet now liveth, at the Eelriver, in the townshipp of Plymouth, which hee, the said Robert, had bestowed on him by his mother in law, Mis Elizabeth Warren, in marriage with her daughter … doe therby find that Mis Elizabeth Warren, who gave the said lands unto the said Robert and others in like condicion, had power soe to doe, as being by an order of Court bearing date March the 7th, 1637, and other actes of Court before, envested into the state and condicon of a purchaser, as in the said order is expressed ; the said Court doth by these presents, therefore, further ratify and confeirme the aforesaid actes of Court wherby the said Elizabeth Warren is declared to have right to despose of the aforsaid lands, approveing and allowing of the abovesaid gift of land unto the said Robert Barlet and others in like condicon with him, to bee called …”
Plymouth Colony Records, Vol. 3, p. 19.

1653 : “An Obligation appointed to bee recorded ;
“Wheras there hath been a Difference Depending betwixt Mis Elizabeth warren and her sonn Nathaniell Warren about certaine lands which the said Nathaniell conceiveth hee hath right unto as heire unto the lands of Mr Richard Warren Deceased ; These are therfore to Declare and certify unto the court by Mis Jane Collyare in the behalfe of her grandchild Sara the wife of the said Nathaniell Warren and an other petition formerly prefered to the court by Robert Bartlett sonn inlaw of the said Elizabeth wArren by each petitions the prties requesting Justice in the prmises ; the said Mis Elizabeth Warren and Mis Jane Collyare and Nathaniell Warren haveing agreed to refer the said Difference unto such of the bench as they have chosen ; viz Mis Elizabeth Warren hath chosen Mr William Bradford and captaine Willett and Mis Jane Collyare and Nathaniell Warren haveing Chosen Mr Thomas Prence and capt : Myles Standish and they the said Elizabeth Jane and Nathaniell Doe bind them selves heerby videlecett Elizabeth Warren in the summe of an hundred pounds and the said Jane Collyare and Nathaniell Warren in the summe of an hundred pounds to stand to whatsoever they shall Doe and finally Determine in the prmises or the Maior prte of them ; and incase they can not agree they are to chose a fift to bee Umpire in the case In Witnesse wherof they have heerunto sett theire hands The eleventh of June 1653.”
Mayflower Descendant, Vol. 2, p. 64.

1653 : “These are to signifye that upon a claime made by Nathaniell Warren as heire to the lands of Richard Warren late of Plymouth and by Reason alsoe of a petition prefered to the court held att Plymoth the seaventh of June 1653 by mis Jane Collyare in behalfe of her grandchild the wife of the said Nathaniell Warren conserning sundry passages and Discourses between her and mis Elizabeth Warren ye mother of the said Nathaniell Warren about the time of theire contract ; by which the said mis Collyare Did conceive her grandchild should by promise have been Invested and entersed in more lands then the said mis Warren Doth now acknowlidge By Reason wherof many great and sad Differences were like to arise between the prties abovsaid and the said mis Warren and her other children to whom shee had Desposed som prte of her lands to theire great Discontent if not undoeing ; The case was Refered by both prties ; videlecett the said Nathaniell Warren and mis Jane Collyare on the one prtie and mis Elizabeth Warren on the other prtie To Mr Willam Bradford Mr Thomas Prence captaine Myles Standish and captaine Thomas Willett as arbetrators chosen Indiffrently by them to end Deside Issue and finnally Determine all contraversies Differences and claimes about this matter that hath arisen or may for ever arise heerafter for which end the prties abovesaid were all and every of them bound in an assumsett of an hundred pounds apeece to stand to theire award which is as followeth
“first That the said Nathaniell Warren shall enjoy to him and his heires for ever all that land which hee is now possess of ; and moreover shall have two thirds of those lands called purchase lands as yett unlayed out ;
“2’condly And mis Warren shall enjoy that three acres of land bee it more or lesse lying neare to the lotts of Nathaniell Warren ; Dureing his life ; but after her Decease it shall come to Nathaniell Warren
“3’dly shee and her children (viz mis Warren aforsaid) shall quietly enjoy all the Rest of her lands and all of them to whom shee hath alreddy att any time heer(to)fore Desposed any prte therof by gift sale or otherwise or shall heerafter Doe the same To them and theire heires for ever without any trouble or molestacon ;
“4’ly Lastly the said Nathaniell Warren shall for ever cease all other or further claimes suites questions or any molestations or Disturbance att any time heerafter conserning the pr’mises ; but that his said mother and all her children or any other to whom shee hath any way Desposed any lands or shall heerafter Doe the same ; But that they may quietly and peacably posesse and enjoy the same they and theire heires for ever without any molestation from him and his att any time heerafter ; This Determination and award wee have signed under our hands The eleventh of June 1653.
Willam Bradford, Thomas Prence, Myles Standish, Thomas Willett.”
Mayflower Descendant, Vol. 3, p. 141-142.

1660 re the Purchasers of Dartmouth : “Att a generall meeting of the Purchasers att Plymouth the seaventh of march 1652 It was ordered and fully agreed unto and Concluded by the whole that all that Tract and tracts of lands lying from the Purchassers bounds on the west side of Acoughcusse to a river called Accusshaneck and three miles to the Eastwards of the same ; with all Ilands meddows woods waters rivers Creekes and all appurtenances therunto belonging Should bee given to those whose names are heerunder written Containing thirty four shares and was then given alloted Assigned and sett over to them by the whole to have and to hold to them and their heires and Assignes for ever ; to Devide and Dispose of the same as they should see good ; and they are to Satisfy the Indians for the Purchase therof and to beare all other Due Charges that shall any way arise about the same According to their severall proportions… mistris Warren, [et al.]…Wheras these Purchasers whoe by agreement of the whole had theire proportions of Purchase land falling unto them in the places above mencioned whoe by agreement had theire severall names entered into a list (together with some other old Comers) under the hand of the honored Gov’r : late Deceased they Did Desire that the list of theire Names might bee recorded ; but the above written originall list of Names and the agreement Could not bee found in some yeares ; soe that it was Judged lost These purchasers notwithstanding still Desiring that what was theire right might bee recorded ; wherupon order was given by the aforsaid Gov’r that it might bee Done …
“The names of those whoe by order of the Purchasers mett att Plymouth the seaventh Day of march 1652 whoe by Joyne consent and agreement of the said purchasers are to have theire prtes shares or proportions att the place or places commonly called and knowne by the names of Acushena alias acquessent which entereth in att the western end of Neckatay and to Coaksett alisa acoakius and places adjacent ; the bounds of which Tract fully to extend… The said Tract or tract[s] of Land soe bounded as abovesaid which is purchased of the Indians which were the right propriators therof ; as appeers by a Deed under theire hands with all the mershes meddows rivers waters woods Timbers ; and all other profitts privilidges emunities comodities and appurtenances belonging to the said Tract or Tracts above expressed or any prte or prcell therof to belonge unto the prties whose names are underwritten (whoe are in number thirty four whole prtes or shares and noe more) to them and their heires and assignes for ever …Mis Warren one whole share, [et al.]”
Mayflower Descendant, Vol. 4, p. 185-188.

1673 : “Mistris Elizabeth Warren, an aged widdow, aged above 90 yeares, deceased on the second of October, 1673, whoe, haveing lived a godly life, came to her grave as a shocke of corn fully ripe. Shee was honorably buried on the 24th of October aforsaid.” Plymouth Colony Records, Vol. 8, p. 35.

James Hamblin, London to Barnstable

May 11, 2015 4 Comments

My 10th great-grandfather made the trip from England to America in 1639, establishing himself before sending for his wife and children.  He was one of the first settlers in Barnstable, MA, where he and his wife are buried.

James Hamlin (Hamblen) was living in London, England, in 1623. He came to New England and settled in Barnstable, Massachusetts, where he was a proprietor. He was admitted a freeman March 1, 1641-1642 and was on the list of those able to bear arms in 1643. He was a town officer.

James arrived at Barnstable in 1639. (Source: Virkus, “Abridged Compendium”). HAMBLEN, or HAMLIN, came from London. He first came to America without his family, in 1639, and they came later. It is believed that he was obliged to flee England due to religious persecution. He was a Puritan, and member of Rev. Lothrop’s church in Barnstable. He became a Freeman 1 MAR 1641-42. He was appointed constable soon after. He and his wife were members of the church in Barnstable at the settlement of Mr. Jonathon Russell in 1683.

James Hamblen (1606 – 1690)
is my 10th great grandfather
Eleazer Hamblen (1648 – 1698)
son of James Hamblen
Isaac Hamblin (1676 – 1710)
son of Eleazer Hamblen
Eleazer Hamblin (1699 – 1771)
son of Isaac Hamblin
Sarah Hamblin (1721 – 1814)
daughter of Eleazer Hamblin
Mercy Hazen (1747 – 1819)
daughter of Sarah Hamblin
Martha Mead (1784 – 1860)
daughter of Mercy Hazen
Abner Morse (1808 – 1838)
son of Martha Mead
Daniel Rowland Morse (1838 – 1910)
son of Abner Morse
Jason A Morse (1862 – 1932)
son of Daniel Rowland Morse
Ernest Abner Morse (1890 – 1965)
son of Jason A Morse
Richard Arden Morse (1920 – 2004)
son of Ernest Abner Morse
Pamela Morse
I am the daughter of Richard Arden Morse

James Hamblen, so far as has been ascertained, was the first of the name who settled in America. He came from London and settled in Barnstable, Massachusetts, in the Spring of 1639. Of his earlier life very little has been learned; records exist, however, from which some traces of him are supposed to have been discovered. The name of Hamblen appears frequently in th records of Plymouth Colony. The first mention is “March 1, 1741-2. James Hamblen was propounded for Freeman.”March 15, 1657, James Hamblen served on inquest on the body of a child, Simeon Davis.June 3, 1657, James Hamblen was sick and could not serve on the Grand Enquest.The name of James Hamblen appears in the list of Freemen of Barnstable in 1658.June 7, 1670, James Hamblen served on Grand Enquest; same day he was member of a trial jury.May 29, 1670, James Hamblen, Juni, and James Hamblen Seni, in list of Freeman.March 6, 1671, James Hamblen served on a jury.June 3, 1679, James Hamblen served on a jury in the case betgween Capt. John Williams and Edward Jenkins.July 7, 1681, James Hamblen served on juries.July 6, 1682, James Hamblen summoned to serve on a jury, and served.In the list of Freemen of Barnstable for 1689, among others appear the names of James Hamblen, James Hamblen, Jr., John Hamblen, Eleazar Hamblen. From Genealogy of James Hamblen and His Descendents and The Hamlin Family

As nearly all the first settlers of Barnstable came from London and the County of Kent, it is probable that James Hamblen,the ancestor, came from that city, as stated by Mr. David Hamblenin the New England Historic and Genealogical Journal. Ofhis early history, little is known. He appears to have been anearly member of Mr. Lothrop’s Church,’ though the date, is notfound on tie record. His son Bartholemew was baptized April24, 1642, but the baptism of his older children, James and Hannah,do not appear on the record. It is probable that they wereborn in England, and that neither they nor their mother cameover so early as the father. This was a common occurrence inearly times. The father came over, and when he had provided ahome sent for his family.He was one of the earliest settlers, and was in Barnstable inthe spring of 1639. His houselot, containing eight acres, was at Coggin’s Pond, and was one of those that I presume were laid outunder the authority of Mr. Collicut. It was bounded northerlyby the lot of Gov. Hinckley, easterly by the Commons, (now the ancient graveyard) southerly by the Commons, and westerly by the highway, which at that time after crossing the hill on the westturned to the north on the borders of the pond to Gov. Hinckley’sold house, which stood near the pond, and thence turnedeasterly, joining the present road at the head of Calve’s PastureLane. In 1686 the present road was laid out through Hamblen’s lot, and leaving a triangular shaped portion of it on the north ofthe road. Afterwards, in 1693, the location of the road havingbeen changed, the Hamblens were allowed to enclose that part of the old road situate between their land and the pond, and adjoining to Gov. Hinckley’s. The westerly portion of the roadwhich was discontinued, opposite the south end of the pond, wasreserved as a public watering-place, and is so occupied to thisday.His other lands were six shares and six acres of upland in$he Calves Pasture, twenty acres of upland, and the meadow onthe north, bounded easterly by the land of Henry Bourne, andwesterly by the land of Dea. John Cooper. His great lot of fifty acres was bounded south-westerly by the great Indian Pond, southerly by the lot of Thomas Lothrop, and northerly by theCommons. It was the most northerly of the Indian Pond lots,and his son John built a house thereon. The Hamblens were among the first settlers in that part of the town, and that region of country is now known as Hamblen’s Plain.In 1686 James Hamblen, Senior’s, house is described as standingon his twenty acre lot, on the north side of the highway, between the houses of Mr. Russell (known in modern times as Brick John Hinckley’s) and Dea. John Cooper’s, now owned by Mr.William Hinckley and others. In the year 1653 this land is calledon the records Mr. Groom’s land, but in the following year, 1654,Goodman Hamblen’s.James Hamblen, Sen’r, died in 1690. In his will dated Jan.23, 1683-4, he names his wile Anne and all his children. To Jame she gave £10, to Bartholemew, £5, and to his daughter Hannah,”according to ye desire of my mother,” £5. All the rest of his esta-te he gave to his wife during her natural life, and after her deathto be divided equally among his children He had a large real estate.His personal estate was appraised at £19,17.3.Goodman Hamblen was not much in public life. He was anhonest man, a, good neighbor, and a sincere christian. He was industriousand prudent in his habits, and, brought up his children to walk in his footsteps. His descendants have, with few exceptions,inherited the good qualities pf their ancestor. The Hon. HannibalHamlin, Vice President of the United States, is the only one amongthem who has been eminent in public life. To give a full genealogyof the family would require a volume. I cannot use all the materialI have collected without transcending the limits of a newspaper article.Several of this name came over early. Capt. Giles Hamlin, ofMiddletown, was a shipmaster, an,d a man of note in his time.There was a Clement Hamlin of Boston, in 1776,. James, of Barnstable,is supposed to have been a brother of Giles, but I have seen no evidence that renders it probable. Capt. Giles wrote his name Hamblin; James Hamblin. This is not conclusive evidence ; but if they were brothers the probability is they would have written their names in the same manner. On the Colony Records, except in two instances, his name is written, Hamlen. The exceptions are aninstrument to which he affixed his own signature, and, an exemptipnin 1657 from serving on the grand jury in consequence of sickness.His sons wrote their name Hamblen, Rev. Mr. Lothrop wrote the name uniformly, Hamling; Rev. Mr. Russell Hamblin. In 1642 James Hamlin ws admitted a freeman of the Colony, and in 1643 was constable of the town of Barnstable. The usual spelling is Hamblin, but the descendants of James are not uniform. Eleazer,the great-grandfather of Vice President Hamlin, dropped the b as a useless letter, and his descendants have continued to do so.

Family of James Hamblen.

His son James and daughter Hannah were probably born in England, his other children in Barnstable.I. JamesII, HannahIII. Bartholemew, 11th April, 1642, bap. April 24IV. John, 26th June, 1644, bap. June 30V. Sarah, 7th Nov. 1647, bap. same dayVI. Eleazer, 17th March, 1649-50, bap. same dayVII. Israel, 25th June, 1652, bap. same day This record shows that Goodman Hamblen was very exact in the performance of what he believed to be a religious duty, that none of his children should die unbaptised.

sources:

U.S., New England Marriages Prior to 1700

The Hamlin family : a genealogy of James Hamlin of Barnstable, Massachusetts, eldest son of James Hamlin, the immigrant

Geneological and Personal History of the Allegheny Valley, Pennsylvania. By John Woolf Jordan. Lewis Historical Pub. Co., 1913 – 1162 pages.

Daniel Pratt of Plymouth Colony

April 9, 2014 5 Comments

My 11th great-grandfather was born in Plymouth Colony in 1640. His father was a joiner who was well known in the colony. We know little about his life. He died in Providence, Rhode Island the same year his second child, a daughter,was born. It was common for people to move to Rhode Island from Plymouth for religious reasons. Later some members of the family are Quakers, and this may have been Daniel’s persuasion also.

Daniel Pratt (1640 – 1680)
is my 11th great grandfather
Henry Pratt (1658 – 1745)
son of Daniel Pratt
Esther Pratt (1680 – 1740)
daughter of Henry Pratt
Deborah Baynard (1720 – 1791)
daughter of Esther Pratt
Mary Horney (1741 – 1775)
daughter of Deborah Baynard
Esther Harris (1764 – 1838)
daughter of Mary Horney
John H Wright (1803 – 1850)
son of Esther Harris
Mary Wright (1816 – 1873)
daughter of John H Wright
Emiline P Nicholls (1837 – )
daughter of Mary Wright
Harriet Peterson (1856 – 1933)
daughter of Emiline P Nicholls
Sarah Helena Byrne (1878 – 1962)
daughter of Harriet Peterson
Olga Fern Scott (1897 – 1968)
daughter of Sarah Helena Byrne
Richard Arden Morse (1920 – 2004)
son of Olga Fern Scott
Pamela Morse
I am the daughter of Richard Arden Morse

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