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Elizabeth Mure of Rowallan

January 30, 2014 2 Comments

Rowallan Castle

Rowallan Castle

Rowallan Castle is an ancient castle located near Kilmaurs, at NS 4347 4242, about 5 kilometres (3.1 mi) north of Kilmarnock, East Ayrshire, Scotland. The castle stands on the banks of the Carmel Water, which may at one time have run much closer to the low eminence upon which the original castle stood. The castle and barony has been owned or held by the medieval Mure family, the (Boyle) Earls of Glasgow, the (Campbell) Earls of Loudoun, the (Corbett) Barons Rowallan, and by Historic Scotland. It is said that the earliest piece of Lute music was written at Rowallan. It is said to have been visited by the unfortunate King James I of Scotland when on his way from Edinburgh to England. The first Mure holder, Sir J. Gilchrist Mure was buried in the Mure Aisle at Kilmarnock The original castle is thought to date back into the 13th century. Rowallan was said to be the birth place of Elizabeth Mure(Muir), first wife of Robert, the High Steward, later Robert II of Scotland.[6] She was mother to the Duke of Albany, and the Earls of Carrick, Fife and Buchanan. In 1513 the Rowallan Estate took its present day form. In about 1690 the estate was home to the Campbells of Loudoun, who held it into the 19th century

Row Allan, row!

A tale is told of one Allan of Stewarton
who was rowing a Scottish
chief off the Ayrshire coast.
The weather made a turn for
the worse and the chief became
anxious. The chief in his fear of
the ocean said to Allan, Row, Allan row! Bear me to safety and you will have the
rich lands of Carmelside,
wuth silver to build yourself
a castle. Hill and valley and
rivers of fish will be yours …. but just row, Allan, row!
Allan won his prize and named
the estate ‘Rowallan’ after his
adventure. The same story is
told in the form of a poem written
by the Rev. George Paxton from
Kilmaurs, pastor of a Secession Church from 1789 – 1807

…David de More, of the house of Polkelly, Renfrewshire, appears as a witness to a charter of Alexander II. Willielmi de Mora and Laurentii de Mora also occur in two charters granted by Robert the Bruce.The first on record of the family is stated to have been the above-named David de More. His successor is supposed to have been Sir Gilchrist More, the first of the name mentioned in the family ‘Historie.’

In the beginning of the reign of Alexander III., Sir Walter Cumyn took forcible possession of the house and living of Rowallan, “the owner thereof, Gilchrist More, being redacted for his safety to keep close in his castle of Pokellie.”The latter distinguished himself at the battle of Largs in 1263, and for his bravery was knighted. “At which time,” says the ‘Historie,’ “Sir Gilchrist was reponed to his whole inheritance, and gifted with the lands belonging to Sir Walter Cuming before mentioned, a man not of the meanest of that powerful tribe, which for might and number have scarcelie to this day been equaled in this land.”

He married Isobel, daughter and heiress of the said Sir Walter Cumyn, and in the death of his father-in-law, he found himself secured not only in the title and full possession of his old inheritance, but also in the border lands wherein he succeeded to Sir Walter Cuming, within the sheriffdom of Roxburgh. Sir Gilchrist “disponed to his kinsman Ranald More, who had come purposlie from Ireland for his assistance: in the time of his troubles, and also at the battle of Largs, the lands of Polkellie, which appear to have been the original inheritance of the family.

He died “about the year 1280, near the 80 year of his age,” and was buried “with his forfathers in his own buriell place in the Mures Isle at Kilmarnock.”

He had a son, Archibald, and two daughters, Elizabeth, the wife of Sir Godfrey Ross, and Anicia, married to Richard Boyle of Kelburne, ancestor of the earls of Glasgow.In the Ragman Roll, among those barons who swore fealty to Edward I. in 1296, we find the names of Gilchrist More of Craig and Reginald More de Craig, that is, the Craig of Rowallan. The former is stated to have been the ancestor of the Mures of Polkellie, who, Nisbet thinks, were “the stem of the Mures, and an ancienter family than the Rowallan.” The latter was in 1329 chamberlain of Scotland.

William More, the son and successor of Archibald, married a daughter of the house of Craigie, then Lindsay, and with two daughters, had a son, Adam, who succeeded him. Of William honourable mention is made in an indenture of truce with England in the nonage of King David, wherein he is designated Sir William.

He died about the time when King David was taken prisoner at the battle of Durham, fought 17th October 1346. There is supposed to have been an older son than Adam, named Reynold. The editor of the ‘Historie,’ on the authority of Crawford’s Officers of State, (vol. i. p. 290), says in a note: Reynold, son and heir of Sir William More, was one of the hostages left in England at David’s redemption.

This is certainly the same Sir William mentioned above, but whether of Rowallan seems still doubtful; If so, he must have lived long after 1348. There is a William More, Miles, mentioned in M’Farlane’s MS., as living in 1363. Supposing this Sir William More to have been of Rowallan, Reynold probably never returned from England, and thus the estate may have fallen to Sir Adam, a younger son. During the long protracted payment of the king’s ransom, many of the hostages died in confinement.

Sir Adam More, who, “in his father’s auld age,” had the management of all his affairs, both private and public, considerably enlarged and improved the estate. He married, in his younger years, Janet Mure, heiress of Polkellie, granddaughter of Ranald More, and thus restored that estate to the family. By this marriage he had two sons, Sir Adam, his successor, and Andrew, and a daughter, Elizabeth, married in 1348, to Robert, the high steward, afterwards King Robert II.

She was a lady of great beauty and rare virtues, and attracted the high steward’s regard in his younger years when living in concealment about Dundonald castle during Edward Baliol’s usurpation.

There was long considerable doubt as to this marriage, and Buchanan and earlier historians were of opinion that none had ever taken place. The fact of her marriage, however, is now set beyond all question, and the author of the ‘Historie’ says, “Mr. John Learmonth, chaplain to Alexander, archbishop of St. Andrews, hath left upon record, in a deduction of the descent of the house of Rowallan, collected by him at command of the said archbishop, that Robert, great steward of Scotland, having taken away the said Elizabeth, drew to Sir Adam her father ane instrument that he should take her to his lawful wife, which myself have seen, saith the collector, as also ane testimonie, written in Latin by Roger M’Adam, priest of our Ladie Marie’s chapel, (‘Our Lady’s Kirk of Kyle,’ in the parish of Monktown,) that the said Roger married Robert and Elizabeth foresaids.”

The editor of the ‘Historie’ remarks in a note: “Mr. Lewis Innes, principal of the Scots college at Paris, first completely proved the fallacy of Buchanan’s account of King Robert’s marriages, by publishing in 1694, a charter granted by him in 1364, which charter showed that Elizabeth More was the first wife of Robert, and made reference to a dispensation granted by the pope for the marriage. That dispensation was long sought for in vain, but was at length discovered in 1789, at which time a dispensation for the marriage with Euphemia Ross was also found. These discoveries have decided the question. The dispensation for the marriage with Elizabeth More is dated in December, in the sixth year of the pontificate of Clement VI. He was elected pope in 1342; this dispensation must therefore have been granted in December 1347. The dispensation for the marriage with Euphemia Ross is dated in the third year of the pontificate of Innocent VI. He was elected pope in 1352; this dispensation must therefore have been given in 1355.”

Sir Adam, the eldest son, had on his own resignation, a new charger from Robert III., of the barony of Rowallan and whole lands holden of the crown, as also of the barony of Polkellie, &c., with very ample privileg4es, the designation given him by the king being ‘consanguineus.’

He married Joan, daughter of Danielston of that ilk, and by her had three sons. “Caried away,” says the ‘Historie,’ “as appears with emptie surmises and hopes founded on court favors, he made unawares a new rent in his estate and provided his second son, Alexander, to the barronie of Pokellie, together with the lands of Limflare and Lowdonehill, wherein his lady was infeft in liferent, and wer given out by him, now the second time, to the great damage and prejudice of his house and posteritie. However, at that time the court seemed to smile upon him, his proper estate considerable, his friendship strong, and of the greatest of these times. He gave a quartered coat of the arms of Mure and cumin.

The hoarseness and asperitie of the Irish pronunciation of his title and lands is forgot, and Rigallane is now Rowallane, Pothkellath is now Pokellie, &c., and More is now Mure by the court dialect.

Elizabeth Mure

Elizabeth Mure

Elizabeth Mure (1320 – 1355)

is my 19th great grandmother
Robert Scotland Stewart (1337 – 1406)
son of Elizabeth Mure
James I Scotland Stewart (1394 – 1434)
son of Robert Scotland Stewart
Joan Stewart (1428 – 1486)
daughter of James I Scotland Stewart
John Gordon (1450 – 1517)
son of Joan Stewart
Robert Lord Gordon (1475 – 1525)
son of John Gordon
Catherine Gordon (1497 – 1537)
daughter of Robert Lord Gordon
Lady Elizabeth Ashton (1524 – 1588)
daughter of Catherine Gordon
Capt Roger Dudley (1535 – 1585)
son of Lady Elizabeth Ashton
Gov Thomas Dudley (1576 – 1653)
son of Capt Roger Dudley
Anne Dudley (1612 – 1672)
daughter of Gov Thomas Dudley
John Bradstreet (1652 – 1718)
son of Anne Dudley
Mercy Bradstreet (1689 – 1725)
daughter of John Bradstreet
Caleb Hazen (1720 – 1777)
son of Mercy Bradstreet
Mercy Hazen (1747 – 1819)
daughter of Caleb Hazen
Martha Mead (1784 – 1860)
daughter of Mercy Hazen
Abner Morse (1808 – 1838)
son of Martha Mead
Daniel Rowland Morse (1838 – 1910)
son of Abner Morse
Jason A Morse (1862 – 1932)
son of Daniel Rowland Morse
Ernest Abner Morse (1890 – 1965)
son of Jason A Morse
Richard Arden Morse (1920 – 2004)
son of Ernest Abner Morse
Pamela Morse
I am the daughter of Richard Arden Morse

Elizabeth Mure (died before May 1355) was mistress and then wife of Robert, High Steward of Scotland, and Guardian of Scotland (1338 – 1341 and from October 1346), who later became King Robert II of Scotland.
History

Elizabeth Mure (Muir) was said to be born at Rowallan Castle. Her parents were Sir Adam Mure of Rowallan and Joan Cunningham.

She initially became the Steward’s mistress. He married her in 1336 but the marriage was criticised as uncanonical, so he remarried her in 1349 following a papal dispensation dated at Avignon 22 November 1347.

She died before her husband inherited the crown at the rather advanced age of 54, and he married again (Papal Dispensation dated 2 May 1355), so she was never queen of Scotland.

On 27 March 1371, “–The Lord John (who later took the title of King Robert III, changing his name because of what he saw as John de Baliol’s unpatriotic desecration of the name John), Earl of Carrick and Steward of Scotland, first-born son of King Robert II–” was declared heir to the Crown by Parliament in Scone Abbey.

They had at least ten children – some accounts say thirteen. Doubts about the validity of her marriage led to family disputes over her children’s right to the crown.

* Robert III, born John Stewart, Earl of Carrick
* Walter Stewart, Lord of Fife
* Robert Stewart, Duke of Albany
* Andrew Stewart, Earl of Buchan
* Margaret Stewart, married John of Islay, Lord of the Isles
* Marjorie Stewart, married (1), John Dunbar, 5th Earl of Moray, and (2), Alexander Keith
* Johanna Stewart, married (1), Sir John Keith, (2), Sir John Lyon, and (3) in 1384, Sir James Sandilands.
* Isabella Stewart, married (1), James Douglas, 2nd Earl of Douglas, and (2), David Edmonstone
* Katherine Stewart, married Sir Robert Logan of Grugar and Restalrig, Lord High Admiral of Scotland
* Elizabeth Stewart, married Sir Thomas Hay, Lord High Constable of Scotland

Alexander Stewart, 4th High Steward of Scotland

January 30, 2014 5 Comments

Alexander Stewart

Alexander Stewart

tartan

tartan

The Stewart Stewards of Scotland were powerful.  Alexander took over as Steward from his father.  Although there is some question about the parentage of his wife, there is no doubt about his children:

ALEXANDER Stewart, son of WALTER FitzAlan High Steward of Scotland & his wife — (-1283). The Liber Pluscardensisnames “dominus Alexander Stevart de Dundonald, pronepos primi Walteri Stewart”[1101]. The Visitation of Cambridge 1575 names “Alexander Stuart secundo genitus Gualt, Senescalli Scotie”[1102]. He succeeded his father as High Steward of Scotland. “Alexander filius Walteri Scotie senescallus” donated flour from “firma mea de Inchynnan” to Paisley monastery by charter dated Jan 1286 (presumably misdated)[1103]. The seal of “Alexandri filii Walterii senescalli regis Scotie” is appended to a charter under which “Alexander Stuart” donated lands at Machline and Carentabel to Melrose by charter dated to [1226] (presumably misdated)[1104]. John of Fordun´s Scotichronicon (Continuator) records the death in 1281 of “Alexander senescallus Scotiæ, avus…Walteri generi domini Roberti Bruce regis”[1105].

m JEAN, daughter of —. Balfour Paul names Jean of Bute heiress of the Isles of Bute and Arran, daughter of James Lord of Bute and Arran & his wife —, and records her marriage to Alexander Stewart, but does not cite the corresponding primary source[1106]. Andrew McEwen suggests that there is no evidence to indicate that the wife of Alexander Stewart was the daughter of James Lord of Bute[1107]. He adds that what evidence there is “suggests a double marriage alliance…about 1240 between Sir Walter fitz Alan II and Richard Comyn by which the Steward´s son and heir Alexander married Comyn´s daughter Joanna, while Comyn´s son and heir John married Sir Walter´s daughter Eva”, but he does not cite the nature of the evidence in question[1108].

Alexander Stewart & his wife had [six] children:

1. [JAMES Stewart (-young). The Visitation of Cambridge 1575 names “Jacobus Styward” as eldest son of “Alexander Stuart secundo genitus Gualt, Senescalli Scotie”, adding that he died young[1109].

2. JAMES Stewart ([1243]-16 Jul 1309). The Visitation of Cambridge 1575 names “Johannes Steward” as second son of “Alexander Stuart secundo genitus Gualt, Senescalli Scotie”, adding that he was killed in battle “ad variu´ Sacella”[1110]. He succeeded his father as High Steward of Scotland. He was appointed one of the six guardians of the kingdom on the death of King Alexander III in 1286[1111]. King Edward I confirmed the grant of “castro de Roo” made by “Ricardus de Burgo comes Ultoniæ et dominus Connactensis” to “Jacobo Senescallo Scotiæ et Egidiæ sorori ipsius comitis” by charter dated 10 Oct 1296[1112]. John of Fordun´s Scotichronicon (Continuator) records the death “XVII Kal Aug” in 1309 of “dominus Jacobus senescallus Scotie, pater…Walteri, generi regis Roberti Bruce”[1113]. [m firstly CECILIA de Dunbar, daughter of PATRICK Earl of Dunbar & his wife Cecilia —. Symson records that James Stewart married “Cecilia daughter to Patrick Earl of Dunbar…the first of that family who quitted that title and assumed that of March”, adding that Cecilia was the mother of James´s children. without citing the corresponding primary source[1114]. Andrew McEwen indicates that “no documentary evidence has been found” to support this statement, but adds that “though hardly free from error, Symson´s work is always deserving of respect”, and highlights that “it is highly unlikely that Muriel of Strathearn, whom he married in 1278, was James´s first wife”[1115].] [m secondly (before Jan 1279, [divorced before 1291]) as her second husband, MURIEL of Strathearn, widow of WILLIAM Earl of Mar, daughter of MALISE Earl of Strathearn & his first wife Marjory de Muschamp of Wooler ([1244]-[16 May/12 Nov] 1291). The evidence for this possible second marriage is indicated by an assize roll dated “7 Edw I” [Nov 1278/Nov 1279] which records a claim relating to the barony of Muschamp brought by “Jacobus filius Alexandri et Muriella uxor eius” and “Maria uxor Nicholai de Grame”, both represented by “Stephanum de Muschaump vel Thomam de Hagarston”, against “Thomam de Rok”[1116]. Pleas taken at Newcastle 20 Jan 1279 (N.S.) include a jury finding that “the heirs of Muschampe hold their barony by service of four knights, and making suit to the county of Newcastle”[1117]. Andrew MacEwen indicates that “Muriella…Maria” were the two daughters of Malise Earl of Strathearn by his first wife Marjory de Muschamp, and identifies “Jacobus filius Alexandri”, the husband of Muriel, as James Stewart the future High Steward of Scotland, although he cites no primary source which confirms that the latter identification is correct[1118]. The absence of any reference to Muriel´s husband “James” in the document dated 16 May 1291, which records the homage sworn to King Edward by “Muriellæ quæ fuit uxor Willelmi quondam comitis de Mar, filiæ et heredis Margeriæ filiæ Roberti de Muschaumps defunctæ” for the lands of “Margeria mater sua”[1119], suggests that her second marriage to “James” must have terminated before that date by divorce or annulment.] m [thirdly] EGIDIA de Burgh, daughter of WALTER de Burgh Earl of Ulster & his wife Aveline FitzJohn ([1260/70]-). King Edward I confirmed the grant of “castro de Roo” made by “Ricardus de Burgo comes Ultoniæ et dominus Connactensis” to “Jacobo Senescallo Scotiæ et Egidiæ sorori ipsius comitis” by charter dated 10 Oct 1296[1120]. The Visitation of Cambridge 1575 records that “Johannes Steward”, second son of “Alexander Stuart secundo genitus Gualt, Senescalli Scotie”, married “heredem de Bouthill”[1121]. According to Burke, James Stewart married “Cecilia, daughter of Patrick de Dunbar 7th Earl of Dunbar & March” by whom he fathered Walter Stewart[1122]. James Stewart & his [third] wife had [five] children:

a) ANDREW Stewart ([after 1290]-after 25 Aug 1306). The fact that Andrew was his father´s oldest [surviving] son is confirmed by a notarial confirmation dated 9 Aug 1306 which attested the verity of various documents, including one indicating that William Bishop of St Andrews had delivered “Andrew son and heir of Sir James the Steward of Scotland” to Robert de Brus[1123]. Malise Earl of Strathearn and John de Inchmartyn were ordered to produce “Andrew son of the Steward of Scotland and John son of John Earl of Athol” by charter dated 25 Aug 1306[1124]. These two documents presumably indicate that Andrew was still a minor in 1306, which confirms that he must have been from his father´s marriage to Egidia de Burgh.

b) WALTER Stewart ([1292]-9 Apr [1326/29]). The Liber Pluscardensis names “dominus Alexander Stevart de Dundonald, pronepos primi Walteri Stewart” as “proavus…nobilis Walteri Stevart qui filiam Roberti de Broys desponsavit”[1125]. He succeeded his father as High Steward of Scotland.

c) EGIDIA Stewart . Her parentage and marriage are confirmed by the charter under which “Alexandro de Meyners militi et Egidie Senescalli sponse sue” renounced “totam baroniam de Dorsidere” {Durrisdeir} in favour of her brother James, dated to [1315/21][1126]. m ALEXANDER de Meyners, son of —.

d) [JOHN Stewart (-killed in battle Dundalk 1318). “…Johe Senescallo…” witnessed a charter dated 9 Jul 1316 under which “Thomas Ranulphi comes Morauie et dns Mannie” confirmed a donation to Newbattle abbey[1127]. Andrew McEwen states that “if there was such a son [John], he must have been illegitimate”, but he does not explain his reasoning for this statement[1128].]

e) JAMES Stewart of Durisdeer (-after Nov 1330). “…Domino Malcolmo Flemyng, domino Jacobo senescallo fratre quondam domini Walteri quondam senescalli Scotie, domino Alano Senescallo…” subscribed the charter dated Nov 1330 under which “Malcolmus comes de Levenax” donated “ecclesiam de Kylpatrick” to Paisley monastery[1129].

3. ELIZABETH Stewart . The primary source which confirms her parentage and marriage has not yet been identified. Balfour Paul records her parentage and marriage without citing a precise source[1130]. The marriage is suggested by Barbour´s The Brus which records that “Walter Steward” and “Douglas” were “cosynis in ner degre”[1131]. m as his first wife, Sir WILLIAM Douglas “the Hardy” of that Ilk, son of Sir WILLIAM Douglas of Douglas & his wife — (-London in prison 1298).

4. [ANDREW Stewart (-after 1350). m — Beith, daughter of JAMES Beith & his wife —. The Visitation of Cambridge 1575 records the marriage of “Andreas Stuard iunior filius” (of Alexander Stuart secundo genitus Gualt, Senescalli Scotie) and “filiam Jacobi Bethe”, adding that he was decorated with a military swordbelt by “Johanne Francor´ Rege” and naming “Alexander Styward unicus filius Andree” who was awarded military honours by “Carolus rex Francor” (together with eight generations of Alexander´s alleged descendants in East Anglia)[1132]. The chronology of this entry is extremely shaky and it is unlikely that Andrew was the son of Alexander.]

5. Sir JOHN Stewart of Bonkyl (-killed in battle Falkirk 1298). A charter dated 15 May 1296 records the submission of “Johan le Seneschal frere Mons James Seneschal d Escoce” to Edward I King of England[1133]. m as her first husband, MARGARET Bonkyl, daughter and heiress of Sir ALEXANDER Bonkyl of that Ilk & his wife —. She married secondly as his first wife, David de Brechin. Sir John & his wife had six children:

a) Sir ALEXANDER Stewart of Bonkyl (-1317). m —. The name of Sir Alexander’s wife is not known. Sir Alexander & his wife had one child:

i) JOHN Stewart (-9 Dec 1331). He succeeded his father in 1319 at Bonkyl, co. Berwick. He was created Earl of Angus before 15 Jun 1329, when he is styled as such in a charter[1134].

Alexander 4th High Steward Stewart (1214 – 1298)

is my 22nd great grandfather
James 5th high steward Stewart (1243 – 1309)
son of Alexander 4th High Steward Stewart
Walter the High Steward Stewart (1293 – 1326)
son of James 5th high steward Stewart
Robert II, King of Scotland, Stewart (1316 – 1390)
son of Walter the High Steward Stewart
Robert Scotland Stewart (1337 – 1406)
son of Robert II, King of Scotland, Stewart
James I Scotland Stewart (1394 – 1434)
son of Robert Scotland Stewart
Joan Stewart (1428 – 1486)
daughter of James I Scotland Stewart
John Gordon (1450 – 1517)
son of Joan Stewart
Robert Lord Gordon (1475 – 1525)
son of John Gordon
Catherine Gordon (1497 – 1537)
daughter of Robert Lord Gordon
Lady Elizabeth Ashton (1524 – 1588)
daughter of Catherine Gordon
Capt Roger Dudley (1535 – 1585)
son of Lady Elizabeth Ashton
Gov Thomas Dudley (1576 – 1653)
son of Capt Roger Dudley
Anne Dudley (1612 – 1672)
daughter of Gov Thomas Dudley
John Bradstreet (1652 – 1718)
son of Anne Dudley
Mercy Bradstreet (1689 – 1725)
daughter of John Bradstreet
Caleb Hazen (1720 – 1777)
son of Mercy Bradstreet
Mercy Hazen (1747 – 1819)
daughter of Caleb Hazen
Martha Mead (1784 – 1860)
daughter of Mercy Hazen
Abner Morse (1808 – 1838)
son of Martha Mead
Daniel Rowland Morse (1838 – 1910)
son of Abner Morse
Jason A Morse (1862 – 1932)
son of Daniel Rowland Morse
Ernest Abner Morse (1890 – 1965)
son of Jason A Morse
Richard Arden Morse (1920 – 2004)
son of Ernest Abner Morse
Pamela Morse
I am the daughter of Richard Arden Morse

Alexander Stewart (c.1214-c.1283) was the hereditary High Steward of Scotland from c.1241 until his death. He was a member of the House of Stewart (later known as Stuart). Alexander was a son of Walter Stewart, 3rd High Steward of Scotland and his wife Bethóc of Angus. Bethóc was daughter of Gille Críst, Earl of Angus.
Alexander Stewart was instrumental in the Battle of Largs on October 2, 1263.
Marriage and Issue
The Stewart married Jean, daughter of James, Lord of Bute. They were parents to at least three children:
James Stewart, 5th High Steward of Scotland (c. 1243 – 1309).
Sir John Stewart, Lord of Bonkyl (before 1269 – 1298). Killed while fighting in the Battle of Falkirk.
Elizabeth Stewart.(d. before 1288) Married Sir William Douglas the Hardy, mother of the Good Sir James Douglas
Through their eldest son James, Alexander and Jean were the great-grandparents of King Robert II, the first Stewart to be King of Scots, and thus an ancestor of all subsequent Scottish monarchs and the later and current monarchs of Great Britain.
Alexander and Jean were also the direct male-line ancestors, through their second son, of Henry Stuart, Lord Darnley.

James, 5th High Steward, Stewart

December 20, 2013 5 Comments

James Stewart

James Stewart

James Stewart (d 1309), high steward of Scotland, was the son of Alexander, high steward, by Jean, daughter and heiress of James, son of Angus Macrory or Roderick, lord of Bute. He succeeded his father in 1283, and the same year was present in the assembly which acknowledged the maid of Norway as heir to the throne. After the death of Alexander III on 9 March 1286, he was on 11 April chose one of the six guardians of the kingdom under Queen Margaret. The same year he signed the band of Robert Bruce and other nobles for mutual defence. In the war which followed between Balliol and Bruce he took part on the side of Bruce. He attended in 1290 the parliament at Brigham at which a marriage was arranged between Prince Edward of England and the Maid of Norway; but her death in Orkney in October of the same year completely altered the political outlook. Being continued one of the guardians of the kingdom after her death, he agreed with the other guardians to submit the rival claimes of the competitors for the Scottish throne to the arbitration of Edward I of England; but he afterwards joined with the party who resolved at all hazards to break with Edward, and his seal as a baron is appended to the ratification of the treaty with France in 1295. On 7 July 1297 he, however, came to terms with Edward, and, having on 9 July confessd his rebellion and placed himself at Edward’s disposal, he became a guarantor for the loyalty of the Earl of Carrick, until he delivered up his daughter Marjory as hostage. The service he had rendered Edward, in inducing many barons to submit, caused Edward to place considerable confidence in his loyalty; but this confidence was soon belied. On the outbreak shortly afterwards of the rebelion under Wallace, he pretended to side with the English, and before the battle of Stirling was, along with the Earl Of Lennox, sent by Surrey, the English commander, to treat with Wallace; but probably his main purpose was rather to supply Wallace with information than induce him to make submission. At any rate the negotiations failed, and as soon as the tide of battle turned in favour of the Scots he joined in the pursuit. Consequently, on 31 Aug 1298, he was deprived of his lands, which were granted by Edward to Alexander De Lindsay. In 1302 he was, with six other commissioners, sent to Paris to endeavour to secure that the interests of Scotland would be respected in the proposed treaty between England and France, but the mission was unsuccessful. On 17 Feb 1303-4 he had a safe-conduct to go to England to treat of peace; and having submitted himself absolutely to the king’s will in November 1305, he on 23 Oct 1306 subscribed an oath of submission and fealty. Nevertheless he was one of the Scots barons who on 16 March 1309 wrote to Philip, king of France, recognising Bruce’s right to the Scottish throne. He died on 16 July 1309, and was buried at Paisley.

Source:  Dictionary of National Biography (XVIII:1181-1182).

James 5th high steward Stewart (1243 – 1309)
is my 21st great grandfather
Walter the High Steward Stewart (1293 – 1326)
son of James 5th high steward Stewart
Robert II, King of Scotland, Stewart (1316 – 1390)
son of Walter the High Steward Stewart
Robert Scotland Stewart (1337 – 1406)
son of Robert II, King of Scotland, Stewart
James I Scotland Stewart (1394 – 1434)
son of Robert Scotland Stewart
Joan Stewart (1428 – 1486)
daughter of James I Scotland Stewart
John Gordon (1450 – 1517)
son of Joan Stewart
Robert Lord Gordon (1475 – 1525)
son of John Gordon
Catherine Gordon (1497 – 1537)
daughter of Robert Lord Gordon
Lady Elizabeth Ashton (1524 – 1588)
daughter of Catherine Gordon
Capt Roger Dudley (1535 – 1585)
son of Lady Elizabeth Ashton
Gov Thomas Dudley (1576 – 1653)
son of Capt Roger Dudley
Anne Dudley (1612 – 1672)
daughter of Gov Thomas Dudley
John Bradstreet (1652 – 1718)
son of Anne Dudley
Mercy Bradstreet (1689 – 1725)
daughter of John Bradstreet
Caleb Hazen (1720 – 1777)
son of Mercy Bradstreet
Mercy Hazen (1747 – 1819)
daughter of Caleb Hazen
Martha Mead (1784 – 1860)
daughter of Mercy Hazen
Abner Morse (1808 – 1838)
son of Martha Mead
Daniel Rowland Morse (1838 – 1910)
son of Abner Morse
Jason A Morse (1862 – 1932)
son of Daniel Rowland Morse
Ernest Abner Morse (1890 – 1965)
son of Jason A Morse
Richard Arden Morse (1920 – 2004)
son of Ernest Abner Morse
Pamela Morse
I am the daughter of Richard Arden Morse

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