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John Howard, Duke of Norfolk

January 14, 2014 , , ,

John Howard

John Howard

My 16th great-grandfather died in battle in the War of the Roses:

John Howard, 1st Duke of Norfolk, 12th Baron Segrave, 11th Baron Mowbray, Earl Marshal (1421 – 22 August 1485) was an English nobleman, soldier, and the first Howard duke of Norfolk. He was a close friend and loyal supporter of King Richard III of England, with whom he died in combat at the Battle of Bosworth.

The Battle of Bosworth Field was the penultimate battle of the Wars of the Roses, the civil war between the House of Lancaster and the House of York that raged across England in the latter half of the 15th century. Fought on 22 August 1485, the battle was won by the Lancastrians. Their leader Henry Tudor, Earl of Richmond, became the first English monarch of the Tudor dynasty by his victory and subsequent marriage to a Yorkist princess. His opponent Richard III, the last king of the House of York, was killed in the battle. Historians consider Bosworth Field to mark the end of the Plantagenet dynasty, making it one of the defining moments of English history.http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Bosworth_Field

Retrieved on 7 May 2010 from:http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Bosworth_Field,http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Howard, _1st_Duke_of_Norfolk

Battle of Bosworth Field

Battle of Bosworth Field

John Howard (1421 – 1485)
is my 16th great grandfather
Lord Thomas HOWARD (1443 – 1524)
son of John Howard
Lady Katherine Howard Duchess Bridgewater (1495 – 1554)
daughter of Lord Thomas HOWARD
William ApRhys (1522 – 1588)
son of Lady Katherine Howard Duchess Bridgewater
Henry Rice (1555 – 1621)
son of William ApRhys
Edmund Rice (1594 – 1663)
son of Henry Rice
Edward Rice (1622 – 1712)
son of Edmund Rice
Lydia Rice (1649 – 1723)
daughter of Edward Rice
Lydia Woods (1672 – 1738)
daughter of Lydia Rice
Lydia Eager (1696 – 1735)
daughter of Lydia Woods
Mary Thomas (1729 – 1801)
daughter of Lydia Eager
Joseph Morse III (1752 – 1835)
son of Mary Thomas
John Henry Morse (1775 – 1864)
son of Joseph Morse III
Abner Morse (1808 – 1838)
son of John Henry Morse
Daniel Rowland Morse (1838 – 1910)
son of Abner Morse
Jason A Morse (1862 – 1932)
son of Daniel Rowland Morse
Ernest Abner Morse (1890 – 1965)
son of Jason A Morse
Richard Arden Morse (1920 – 2004)
son of Ernest Abner Morse
Pamela Morse
I am the daughter of Richard Arden Morse

Born around 1420, John Howard was the son and heir of Sir Robert Howard andMargaret, daughter of Thomas Mowbray, Duke of Norfolk. Through his mother and her female line, he was descended from Edward I, thus making him the premier Duke and heir to the title of Earl Marshall. Nothing is known of his childhood.

His first recorded service was in 1451, when he followed Lord L’Isle to Guienne. He was also present at the Battle of Chatillon in Jul two years later. It was at this time that he entered the service of John Mowbray, Duke of Norfolk.

On the first accession of Edward IVHoward was knighted and appointed Constable of Colchester Castle, Sheriff of Norfolk and Suffolk. He was also one of the King’s Carvers.

Howard took an active part in John Mowbray’s quarrel with John Paston. In Aug 1461, he was involved in a violent brawl with Paston and used his influence withEdward IV against Paston. In Nov of the same year, Howard was imprisoned after giving offence at the election of Paston, causing many complaints against him.

The following year, he was appointed Constable of Norwich Castle and received grants of several manors forfeited by the Earl of Wiltshire. He was joined byWilliam Neville, Baron Fauconberg and Lord Clinton to “keep the seas“, taking Croquet and the Isle of Rhe. Later in the year, he was sent to help the Richard Neville, Earl of Warwick at Warkworth.

In the Spring of 1464, Howard helped Norfolk secure Wales for Edward IV. He bought the reversion of Bamburgh Castle in Jun of the same year and was withEdward IV and his court at Reading by the year’s end.

Howard was appointed Vice Admiral for Norfolk and Suffolk in 1466, and was charged with conveying envoys from England to France and the Duke of Burgundy. He remained in Calais from 15 May to 27 Sep.

He was elected Knight of the Shire for Suffolk in Apr 1467, having been elected Knight of the Shire for Norfolk in 1455. Nov 1467 saw him as an appointed Envoy to France as well as Treasurer to the Household, a post which he held until 1474. The following Jun (1468) he attended Margaret of York to Flanders for her marriage to Charles, Duke of Burgundy.

On the restoration of Henry VI, he was created Baron de Howard (15 Oct 1470). However, when Edward IV landed back in England in Mar 1471, after living in exile in Bruges, Howard proclaimed Edward to be King.

The following Jun, he was appointed Deputy Governor of Calais. When Edward IVinvaded France in Jul 1474, he was accompanied by John Howard, who was one of the commissioners who made a truce at Amiens. Howard received a pension from Louis XI and remained in France, briefly, as a hostage after Edward’s departure. On Howard’s return to England, he was granted manors in Suffolk and Oxfordshire forfeited by John de Vere, Earl of Oxford.

John Howard was also sent by Edward to treat with France on several occasions – Jul 1477, Mar 1478, and Jan 1479. Also, in 1479, he was put in charge of the fleet which was sent to Scotland.

At Edward IV’s funeral in Apr 1483, he carried Edward’s Banner. He then attached himself to Richard III. On 13 May 1483, he was appointed High Steward of the Duchy of Lancaster and was made a Privy Councillor. A month later, John Howard was created Duke of Norfolk and Earl Marshall.

He persuaded Elizabeth Woodville to let the young Duke of York join his brother Edward V in the Tower. He was possibly involved in the murder of the two princes in the Tower of London. At Richard III’s coronation, Howard performed many functions – he acted as High Steward, bore the crown, and, as Earl Marshall, was the King’s Champion. Shortly afterwards, he was created Admiral of England, Ireland, and Aquitaine, and was appointed Chief of Commissioners to negotiate with James III of Scotland on 12 Sep 1484 at Nottingham.

In Aug 1485, he summoned his retainers to Bury St. Edmunds and commanded the vanguard at the Battle of Bosworth, where he was killed. Howard was attainted at Henry VII’s first Parliament. Warned in the following distich: “Jockey of Norfolk be not too bold,/ For Dickon thy master is bought and sold“. He was buried in the conventual church at Thetford, Norfolk.

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comments

I thank God often for our ability in America to learn from our mistakes England, and do things differently. We had to give up a lot but it seems to have been worth it.

John Howard, 1st Duke of Norfolk, K.G. (1420 – 1485)

is your 15th great grandfather

Thomas Howard, 2nd Duke of Norfolk (1444 – 1524)

son of John Howard, 1st Duke of Norfolk, K.G.

William Howard (1510 – 1572)

son of Thomas Howard, 2nd Duke of Norfolk

Margaret Howard * (see attached pedigree) (1550 – 1610)

daughter of William Howard

William Hynson (1570 – 1630)

son of Margaret Howard * (see attached pedigree)

James (Tobias?) Hinson (1590 – 1650)

son of William Hynson

Robert Hinson * (see pedigree attached) (1615 – 1675)

son of James (Tobias?) Hinson

Alexander Hinson (1657 – 1727)

son of Robert Hinson * (see pedigree attached)

John Hinson * (see pedigree) (1680 – 1745)

son of Alexander Hinson

Phillip Hinson (1723 – 1777)

son of John Hinson * (see pedigree)

Benjamin Hinson * (see pedigree to Margaret Howard b. 1550 further up the Hinson line) (1736 – 1816)

son of Phillip Hinson

Lydia Hinson * (see pedigree) (1773 – 1851)

daughter of Benjamin Hinson * (see pedigree to Margaret Howard b. 1550 further up the Hinson line)

Cynthia Mourning Diggs (1790 – 1874)

daughter of Lydia Hinson * (see pedigree)

Benjamin Albert Evans (1811 – 1886)

son of Cynthia Mourning Diggs

Burwell Christmas Evans (1844 – 1889)

son of Benjamin Albert Evans

Ethel Evans (1887 – 1981)

daughter of Burwell Christmas Evans

Ethel Bennett (1917 – 2013)

daughter of Ethel Evans

Frederick Edward Rehfeldt

You are the son of Ethel Bennett –

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frederick (rick) rehfeldt

January 14, 2014

Ms Andrea Wilson may be one of your “cousins”Rick. She has inquired about the Evans family…

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mermaidcamp

August 17, 2014

I watched a movie about the war of the roses– or it was in the movie.. and not just about that. It was quite interesting.. quite the dynamic personal history Pam!

Liked by 1 person

Stevie Wilson

January 20, 2014

Totally Brit, and now more clear to me than before I did my tree…that and the Magna Carta are great big British deals…I had ancestors on both sides..

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mermaidcamp

August 17, 2014

Could you please tell me the source(s) that were used to document the lineage from John Howard, 1st Duke of Norfok to the Diggs,Hinsons and Evans Families?

Thank You,

Andrea M. Wilson

Liked by 1 person

Andrea M Wilson

August 17, 2014

All info came from Ancestry.com

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mermaidcamp

August 17, 2014

But, my cousin Rick is from the Evans family..we are cousins about 5 hundred years ago..and then we part company in history…

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mermaidcamp

August 17, 2014

Margaret Howard b. circa 1550 married Richard Allen Hinson b. circa 1550. From there the Howard – Hinson line descends to the Diggs and the Evans. Ancestry confirms this descent but some sources do not cover Margaret. But lots of people think this, however. I need to recheck my line here. I am always open to revision. No warranties express or implied. Do you have any specific critical questions? I always yield to the truth. Rick

Liked by 1 person

Frederick Rehfeldt

August 17, 2014

No, it is not I who is questioning the data…I have had more than one long branch I had to cut when I discovered..or had other people point out to me, some errors that had been made. It is funny because I become attached to them..and then learn they are not mine..so I start again. I am sure there are more errors in my tree, but I have not the funds to go verify each item.

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mermaidcamp

August 18, 2014

Sorry, Cousin Pamela but my comments were not meant to be directed to you but to the inquirer Andrea M Wilson, as I recall her name. I should have made that clear in my repIy. I hope you will forgive me. Cousin Rick

Liked by 1 person

Frederick Edward rehfeldt

August 18, 2014

There is nothing to forgive, my dear and most polite cousin.

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mermaidcamp

August 18, 2014

Speaking of the Evans here is something I wrote the other day. Any thoughts? I am not looking for flattery.

Nancy Brady Lucy (nee Horton) (1785-1868)-

Nancy Brady Horton was the maternal grandmother of Burwell Christmas Evans (1844-1889). Nancy married William Burwell Lucy (1779-1823) the maternal grandfather of Burwell Christmas Evans.

Up until recently I had largely ignored Nancy because the Evans and Lucy line consumed so much of my time. When I did look I was startled by the depth and breadth of her pedigree.

I have Nancy as born and dying in South Carolina. I have her father William Horton (1750-1834) born in Virginia, and dying in South Carolina. The Horton line came from Leicestershire, England to New York before 1640. They came to Virginia after 1692.

The Hortons are first found in Yorkshire, England where they held a family seat from very ancient times, some say well before the Norman Conquest and the Battle of Hastings in 1066 A.D.

The one thing I find the most interesting about the Hortons is the fact that it is often stated that they were aware of the value of buying and re-selling real estate long before landed property became a part of modern life. Perhaps this suggests something about my theory about family backing for Burwell Christmas Evans, his propitious arrival in Fort Worth around 1872, and his acquisition, and rumored acquisition, of vast amounts of ranch land and urban real estate?

Nancy’s mother was Elizabeth Brewer (1750-1835). Her pedigree is too much to cover here but I did bring her into my 3rd Observation noted below. I am not sure I will ever fully work out Nancy’s pedigree.

Here are some observations on parts of Nancy’s pedigree working up the Horton line.

1st Observation is a showing of how the Horton line connected with the Hastings circa 1210 bringing in descent from the English Kings:

William I “The Conqueror” King of England, 7th Duke of Normandy (1024 – 1087)
25th great grandfather

Adela of England (1062 – 1138)
daughter of William I “The Conqueror” King of England, 7th Duke of Normandy
Guillaume de Blois, Comte de Chartres, Seigneur de Sully-sur-Loire (1087 – 1150)
son of Adela of England
Margaret of Champagne (1095 – 1145)
daughter of Guillaume de Blois, Comte de Chartres, Seigneur de Sully-sur-Loire
Jean, Lord Hastings, 5th Comte d’Eu (1120 – 1170)
son of Margaret of Champagne
Ida of Eu (1138 – 1170)
daughter of Jean, Lord Hastings, 5th Comte d’Eu
Sir Thomas Hastings (1138-1170)
son of Ida of Eu
Nicholas Hastings (1170 – 1268)
son of Sir Thomas Hastings
Emma Hastings (1190 – 1250)
daughter of Nicholas Hastings
Henry de Horton (1220 – 1270)
son of Emma Hastings
Hugh de Horton (1256 – 1332)
son of Henry de Horton
John Horton (1279 – 1345)
son of Hugh de Horton
Thomas Horton (1300 – 1381)
son of John Horton
William Horton (1324 – 1381)
son of Thomas Horton
William de Horton (1338 – 1373)
son of William Horton
William de Horton (1370 – 1413)
son of William de Horton
Richard Horton (1410 – 1453)
son of William de Horton
Richard de Horton (1450 – 1515)
son of Richard Horton
Thomas de Horton (1480 – 1540)
son of Richard de Horton
Richard de Horton (1500 – )
son of Thomas de Horton
Robert Horton (1525 – 1570)
son of Richard de Horton
William Horton (1550 – 1640)
son of Robert Horton
Joseph Horton (1578 – 1640)
son of William Horton
Barnabas Horton (1600 – 1680)
son of Joseph Horton
Joseph Horton (1625 – 1696)
son of Barnabas Horton
David Horton (1654 – 1737)
son of Joseph Horton
Daniel Horton (1692 – 1777)
son of David Horton
Amos Horton (1710 – 1791)
son of Daniel Horton
William Horton (1750 – 1834)
son of Amos Horton
Nancy Brady Horton
daughter of William Horton
Sarah Ann Lucy (1811 – 1866)
daughter of Nancy Brady Horton
Burwell Christmas Evans (1844 – 1889)
son of Sarah Ann Lucy
Ethel Evans (1887 – 1981)
daughter of Burwell Christmas Evans
Ethel Bennett (1917 – 2013)
daughter of Ethel Evans
Frederick Edward Rehfeldt
son of Ethel Bennett

2nd Observation is a showing of how the Horton line connected with the Holland and Dutton bring in more royal descent for the Horton line.

Henry II, King of England, 11th Count of Anjou, Duke of Normandy, Count of Maine & Aquitaine (1133 – 1189)
21st great grandfather

John Lackland, King of England, Duke of Normandy & Aquitaine Comte d’Anjou, Lord of Ireland (1166 – 1216)
son of Henry II, King of England, 11th Count of Anjou, Duke of Normandy, Count of Maine & Aquitaine
Joan, Princess of England (1180 – 1237)
Daughter of John Lackland, King of England, Duke of Normandy & Aquitaine Comte d’Anjou, Lord of Ireland
Helen fil Llewelyn of Wales (1215 – 1253)
daughter of Joan, Princess of England
Elene de Quincy (1222 – 1296)
daughter of Helen fil Llewelyn of Wales
Sir Roger Zouche, 5th Lord Zouche (1240 – 1285)
son of Elene de Quincy
Sir Alan le Zouche, 6th Lord Zouche of Ashby, Constable of Rockingham Castle (1267 – 1314)
son of Sir Roger Zouche, 5th Lord Zouche
Maud la Zouche (1290 – 1349)
daughter of Sir Alan le Zouche, 6th Lord Zouche of Ashby, Constable of Rockingham Castle
Joan de Holland (1287 – )
daughter of Maud la Zouche
Sir Thomas Dutton (1314 – 1381)
son of Joan de Holland
Edmund de Dutton (1342 – 1392)
son of Sir Thomas Dutton
Joan Dutton (1381 – 1440)
daughter of Edmund de Dutton
Richard Horton (1410 – 1453)
son of Joan Dutton
Richard de Horton (1450 – 1515)
son of Richard Horton
Thomas de Horton (1480 – 1540)
son of Richard de Horton
Richard de Horton (1500 – )
son of Thomas de Horton
Robert Horton (1525 – 1570)
son of Richard de Horton
William Horton (1550 – 1640)
son of Robert Horton
Joseph Horton (1578 – 1640)
son of William Horton
Barnabas Horton (1600 – 1680)
son of Joseph Horton
Joseph Horton (1625 – 1696)
son of Barnabas Horton
David Horton (1654 – 1737)
son of Joseph Horton
Daniel Horton (1692 – 1777)
son of David Horton
Amos Horton (1710 – 1791)
son of Daniel Horton
William Horton (1750 – 1834)
son of Amos Horton
Nancy Brady Horton (1785 – 1868)
daughter of William Horton
Sarah Ann Lucy (1811 – 1866)
daughter of Nancy Brady Horton
Burwell Christmas Evans (1844 – 1889)
son of Sarah Ann Lucy
Ethel Evans (1887 – 1981)
daughter of Burwell Christmas Evans
Ethel Bennett (1917 – 2013)
daughter of Ethel Evans
Frederick Edward Rehfeldt
son of Ethel Bennett

3rd Observation is a showing of how the Horton line connected with Sancha de Ayala (1356 – 1418) bringing in almost everything.
(By way of introduction, and explanation, around 1770 Nancy’s mother, Elizabeth Brewer, married William Horton, Nancy’s father. It is Nancy Brady Horton’s maternal Brewer line, going back through marriages and name changes, that finally intersects with the Ayala. Sancha was descended from the Kings of Spain, and most of Europe as well as some of the most illustrious of the Castilian families. Sancha’s older brother, Don Pedro Suåarez was the progenitor of much of Europe’s nobility. He married Doña Juana de Orozco, Lady of Pinto and had Inés de Guzmán or de Toledo. By her second husband, Don Diego Fernández de Córdoba, Marshal of Castile, she had a daughter, Doña María Fernández. Maria married Don Fadrique Enriquez and had Doña Juana Enríquez. Juana, married (1447) as his second wife, John II, King of Aragon and had Ferdinand II of Aragon, better known as Ferdinand V, the Catholic, King of Castile, who married the celebrated Queen Isabella of Castile. Ferdinand I, was the progenitor of the Habsburg Holy Roman Emperors and Emperors of Austria, all of the present European sovereigns (including Queen Elizabeth II of Great Britain), most of the dethroned dynasties of Europe, and Catherine of Aragon who married first the Tudor Prince, Arthur and second, his brother, King Henry VIII of England. There is a great deal more to be said about Sancha, and her husband, Sir Walter Blount but I must remember brevity.)

Tiberius Claudius, Emperor of Rome
63rd great grandfather

Venissa Julia of Rome
daughter of Tiberius Claudius, Emperor of Rome
Marius (Meric) ( – 125)
son of Venissa Julia of Rome
Coelus, King of Britain ( – 170)
son of Marius (Meric)
Athildis of Britain
daughter of Coelus, King of Britain
Clodomir IV, King of the Franks ( – 166)
son of Athildis of Britain
Farabert, King of the Franks ( – 186)
son of Clodomir IV, King of the Franks
Sunno (Hunno), King of the Franks ( – 213)
son of Farabert, King of the Franks
Hilderic, King of the Franks ( – 253)
son of Sunno (Hunno), King of the Franks
Bartherus, King of the ( – 272)
son of Hilderic, King of the Franks
Clodius III, King of the ( – 298)
son of Bartherus, King of the
Walter, King of the ( – 306)
son of Clodius III, King of the
Dagobert I ( – 317)
son of Walter, King of the
Genebald I, Duke of the Franks ( – 358)
son of Dagobert I
Dagobert II, Duke of the Franks ( – 379)
son of Genebald I, Duke of the Franks
Clodius I, Duke of the East Franks ( – 389)
son of Dagobert II, Duke of the Franks
Marcomir I ( – 404)
son of Clodius I, Duke of the East Franks
Pharamond, King of all the Franks ( – 430)
son of Marcomir I
Clodius/Chlodion “the Long Hair”, King of the Salian Franks (390 – 447)
son of Pharamond, King of all the Franks
Merovaeous I “the Young”, King of the Salic Franks (Defeated Attila the Hun in 451) (411 – 458)
son of Clodius/Chlodion “the Long Hair”, King of the Salian Franks
Childeric I, King of Salian Franks (436 – 481)
son of Merovaeous I “the Young”, King of the Salic Franks (Defeated Attila the Hun in 451)
Clovis I “the Great”, King of Franks (466 – 511)
son of Childeric I, King of Salian Franks
Clothary/Clothaire I, King of Soissons, Austrasia, Neustria, King of the Franks (497 – 561)
son of Clovis I “the Great”, King of Franks
Sigibert I, King of Austrasia (525 – 575)
son of Clothary/Clothaire I, King of Soissons, Austrasia, Neustria, King of the Franks
Ingunda of France
daughter of Sigibert I, King of Austrasia
Athanagildo of Spain
son of Ingunda of France
Ardebasto of Spain
son of Athanagildo of Spain
Ervigio of Spain ( – 687)
son of Ardebasto of Spain
Pedro, Duke of Cantabria (Visagoth leader descended from the Visagothian kings of Toledo, Leovingildo and Ricaredo)
son of Ervigio of Spain
Fruela, Duke of Bardulia & Cantabria ( – 765)
son of Pedro, Duke of Cantabria (Visagoth leader descended from the Visagothian kings of Toledo, Leovingildo and Ricaredo)
Bermudo I, King of Asturias (750 – 797)
son of Fruela, Duke of Bardulia & Cantabria
Ramiro I, King of Asturias (790 – 850)
son of Bermudo I, King of Asturias
Roderick I, Count of Castile ( – 873)
son of Ramiro I, King of Asturias
Diego Rodriguez Porcelos, Count of Castile ( – 885)
son of Roderick I, Count of Castile
Mayor Diaz
daughter of Diego Rodriguez Porcelos, Count of Castile
Aragonta Suarez de Novelas
daughter of Mayor Diaz
Gomez Echigas de Sousa
son of Aragonta Suarez de Novelas
Egas Gomez de Sousa ( – 1090)
son of Gomez Echigas de Sousa
Mendo Venegas de Sousa ( – 1130)
son of Egas Gomez de Sousa
Chamoa (Flamulla) Mendes de Sousa
daughter of Mendo Venegas de Sousa
Egas Gomes Barroso Guedeao
son of Chamoa (Flamulla) Mendes de Sousa
Gomes Viegas “de Basto” Barroso (1180 – )
son of Egas Gomes Barroso Guedeao
Pedro Gomez de Barroso (1226 – )
son of Gomes Viegas “de Basto” Barroso
Fernan Perez de Barroso, Senor de Calabazos (1252 – )
son of Pedro Gomez de Barroso
Sancha Fernandez Barroso (1282 – )
daughter of Fernan Perez de Barroso, Senor de Calabazos
Fernan Perez de Ayala, 13th Lord Ayala (1305 – 1385)
son of Sancha Fernandez Barroso
Inez Fernandez de Ayala (1337 – 1395)
daughter of Fernan Perez de Ayala, 13th Lord Ayala
Sancha de Ayala (1356 – 1418)
daughter of Inez Fernandez de Ayala
Joelean Walthers (1372 – 1427)
daughter of Sancha de Ayala
Joan Binn (1390 – 1421)
daughter of Joelean Walthers
William Smythe (1412 – 1467)
son of Joan Binn
Richard William Smythe, Sr. (1450 – 1527)
son of William Smythe
Sir John Smythe, High Sheriff of Essex (1495 – 1560)
son of Richard William Smythe, Sr.
Sir Thomas “Customer” Smythe, English Secretary of State (1530 – 1591)
son of Sir John Smythe, High Sheriff of Essex
Alice Smythe (1559 – 1615)
daughter of Sir Thomas “Customer” Smythe, English Secretary of State
Sarah Anne Harris (1600 – 1679)
daughter of Alice Smythe
Mary Hunt (1625 – )
daughter of Sarah Anne Harris
Judith Edwards (1650 – 1713)
daughter of Mary Hunt
Henry Wyche (1689 – 1735)
son of Judith Edwards
Abigale Wyche (1718 – 1760)
daughter of Henry Wyche
Elizabeth Brewer (1750 – 1835)
daughter of Abigale Wyche
Nancy Brady Horton (1785 – 1868)
daughter of Elizabeth Brewer
Sarah Ann Lucy (1811 – 1866)
daughter of Nancy Brady Horton
Burwell Christmas Evans (1844 – 1889)
son of Sarah Ann Lucy
Ethel Evans (1887 – 1981)
daughter of Burwell Christmas Evans
Ethel Bennett (1917 – 2013)
daughter of Ethel Evans
Frederick Edward Rehfeldt
son of Ethel Bennett

Our Royal, Titled, Noble, and Commoner Ancestors & Cousins (hereinafter referred to as “the Family History”) is from what I have seen the best and most reliable source for the genealogy of the titled people of England and Europe.

As noted above, I traced the line for Sancha de Ayala (1356 – 1418) back using the Family History through an endless line of European Kings to the early English Kings, and then to Tiberius Claudius, Emperor of Rome (1 Aug 10 B.C. to 13 Oct 54 A.D.). Claudius is shown as the father of Venissa Julia of Rome, and Venissa Julia is shown as the wife of Arviragus, King of Britain (d. 74).

The Family History shows the Roman line of Sancha de Ayala ending with Tiberius Claudius. The father of Arviragus, namely, Kimbeline (Cunobelin), King of Britain, is shown but the British Kings end there.

Other (less reliable? More reliable?) sources go back further showing at least 2 more British Kings, and then Bell Mawr “the Blessed”, King of Britain (b. bef 162 A.D.) who is shown as married to Anna of Arimathaea who in turn is shown as the daughter of Joseph of Arimathaea (b. circa 47 B.C.). Joseph of Arimathaea the great uncle? Of Jesus?

Is this the ascent from Joseph of Arimathaea a “fictitious” genealogy? I cannot answer yes or no but perhaps “where there is smoke there is fire”? A lot of people seem to think it’s something like that. So, I answered my question with a question.

There are several comments made by the genealogical community concerning Rome, early Britain and Israel that I found interesting. These comments are set out here only for the fact that they were made. I am not passing on their validity. Some sound so novel that I found myself leaning toward suspicion. But I am not a Biblical scholar or historian. Yet, I must admit there seems to be a ring of truth throughout. I am comfortable with some of the comments but not all.

Here they are:

1) After the resurrection of Christ the persecution of Christians by the Jews (and Romans) forced Joseph of Arimathaea, and a small band of followers to sail to Marseilles, France. Joseph had been a tin merchant, and had traveled to Britain many times as such so he led the band to the English Channel, and from there on to Glastonbury. Jesus had warned of the storm to come to Jerusalem in 70 A.D. Joseph seemed to be heeding his warnings, and “getting out of Dodge.”
2) Jesus said concerning the Temple in Jerusalem: “Truly I tell you, not one stone here will be left on another; every one will be thrown down.” (Matthew 24:2)
3) Jesus said: “I was sent only to the lost sheep of Israel.” (Matthew 15:24)
4) Jesus to the 12 Apostles: “Do not go into the way of the Gentiles, and do not enter a city of the Samaritans. But go rather to the lost sheep of the house of Israel.”
5) Jesus said concerning those in Jerusalem and Judea: “let those who are in Judea flee to the mountains. Let no one on the housetop go down to take anything out of the house. Let no one in the field go back to get their cloak.” (Matthew 24:16)
6) Jesus to the scribes and Pharisees: “Woe to you Scribes and Pharisees, impostors, who build the tombs of The Prophets and adorn the tombs of the righteous! And you say, ‘If we had been in the days of our forefathers, we would not have been partakers with them in the blood of The Prophets.’ Therefore you testify against yourselves that you are the children of those who murdered The Prophets. So fulfill the standard of your forefathers. Snakes! Offspring of vipers! How will you escape from the judgment of Gehenna?” (Matthew 23:29-33)

7) “Gehenna” is a better word choice here than Hell. It is a place, namely, the Valley of the Hinnon, a garbage dump outside of Jerusalem where trash and human bodies were always burning. Jesus was telling the scribes and Pharisees that they would likely end up there (when Rome came in 70 A.D.).

8) Joseph had become a friend of King Arviragus of Britain from prior visits. King Arviragus granted each member of the band 160 acres of land upon which to live and work. And work they did.
9) Joseph built a church on the spot where Jesus had erected a structure for His earlier stay at Glastonbury. Glastonbury was to become the focus of Christian pilgrimage. Disciples poured in to be sent out as missionaries to Ireland and Europe. Seminaries were established to train the missionaries.
10) In 42 A.D. an edict by the Emperor Claudius made being a Christian a capital crime. He also took up again the war against Britain started by Julius Caesar in 53 B.C. While Caradoc; being made military commander of the British, was making fools of all Rome’s best legions and generals, strange things were happening in the upper echelons of both sides. Contact between the two ruling factions had begun year’s earlier when then king Caswallon of Britain sent his two sons Cynvelin and Llyr (Lear) to Rome for their education. This was accomplished by none other than the Emperor Augustus himself. This was during a time of truce between the two countries. But that was to end with Claudius’ edict.
11) As the war heated up and the Roman forces were taking a severe beating, there was called a short truce, during which Claudius offered Arviragus, the British King, his daughter Venus. They were married A.D. 45, but that didn’t accomplish the peace that Claudius hoped for, and the war was on again. But not before another liaison could be formed and consummated. The Roman Commander in Chief Aulus Plautius met and married the sister of the Pendragon Caradoc, King of Britain!
12) Through betrayal, Caradoc was captured, and the war abated. Not only was the Pendragon taken captive, but his whole family for 4 generations. Llyr, the grandfather, Bran, the father, former Arch druid and King, Caradoc, and his children. These were all transported to Rome. Rome liked to gloat over it’s conquered enemy champions; before putting them to horrible deaths for the amusement of the populace. But this was not to be the case. Almost unique in Rome’s history, none of the family was executed. This was due to a short but moving speech made by Caradoc to the Roman Senate, in which he minded them that their greatness would go down in history if they spared him and his family. So they did. And routinely this speech is taught in the classrooms of England today.
13) But the story doesn’t end there. Claudius goes on to adopt Gladys, the daughter of Caradoc, and changes her name to Claudia. She shortly after marries Rufus Pudens, the son of Aquila Pudentius a Roman Senator. They were married at the Palatium Britannicum, the Royal residence in Rome. This also served as the gentile Christian church, where Paul ordained Caradoc’s fourth child Linus, the First Bishop of Rome in 58 AD. This gentile church was later to join with the Jewish Christian church at Rome headed by Priscilla and Aquila (Pudentius). These two are mentioned by Paul in the last chapter of Romans. Priscilla was Paul’s mother, Aquila his stepfather. And maybe you’ve noticed that through Rufus’ marriage to Claudia (Gladys), that Paul became an in-law of the Emperor Claudius!
14) While Claudia and Rufus are establishing the church at Rome, Caradoc’s second child Cylinus went home to take up the throne for his Dad. He will rule throughout the seven year “house arrest” of Caradoc. Cylinus’ grandson Coel married a great granddaughter of Arviragus, and their granddaughter is Strada the Fair who married “Old King Coel”, that we’ve heard of. In 245 A.D. Strada and Coel’s daughter, Helen of the Cross, married a Christian Roman living in Britain named Constantius. Constantius, after putting down the 10th and worst Christian persecution begun by the Emperor Diocletian, begun in 300 A.D., moves up from Emperor of Britain, Spain and Gaul, to Emperor of the whole Roman Empire. Four years later Constantius died leaving his throne to his English-born son Constantine. Constantine beat the last Roman general, Maximian and received a hero’s welcome in Rome. Acting on a vision that “by this (the symbol of the Cross) will you conquer,” one of Constantine’s first acts was to Christianized the Roman Empire. He was a bit of a copy cat, however. Britain was already officially a Christian nation, by decree of Lucius in 157 A.D.
15) God’s is in control. We compare the Bible and history and it’s like some James Michener super-novel that weaves threads of history through some 3800 years of time. It’s no coincidence that England and the U.S. are the bastions of world Christianity. Or that those 2 countries are mainly responsible for Christianity’s worldwide dissemination. Israel, not the Jews, but the other eleven tribes, were God’s choice to tell the rest of humanity about His reality and Redemption. That one fact will point to the identity of those people. The people that proclaim God are the Israelites. We and Britain are Israelites.

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frederick edward rehfeldt

August 18, 2014

This is fabulous. I like the inherited real estate skill, and think it is about right. The Romans are very exciting. As soon as I hit John of Gaunt people on Ancestry sent me messages about how they could hook me up all they way to the Roman Senate, but I decided to do it myself. I love that it goes, Brit, Frank, Spanish..I scoured that line for any common name but it is not to be found….It is truly fascinating.

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mermaidcamp

August 21, 2014

Your are connected. One of these must be at least a progenitor to one of your lines. Also, my descents leave out one name each generation? I think?

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Frederick Edward rehfeldt

August 21, 2014

Hi, could I ask the source for the family data someone posted that states “around 1770 Nancy’s mother, Elizabeth Brewer, married William Horton.” I have been trying to verify for a long time that Elizabeth (daughter of George Brewer and Abigail Wyche) was married to William Horton
of Lancaster, SC but can’t locate any definitive sources. Hope to hear back from you.
Thank you.

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Mel

August 18, 2017

I wish I could verify this for you, but cannot. I have many unsolved mysteries in my tree, so I fully understand. Hope you find the evidence you need. Thanks for visiting.

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Pamela Morse

August 19, 2017

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