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Rue

July 11, 2014 , , ,

 

When the Pope sprinkles holy water he dips it in a branch of rue. Ruta graveolens is used medicinally as well as ceremonially.  In ancient Rome there were celebratory foods prepared with rue.  It is poisonous in large amounts and should not be consumed by pregnant women at all.  There is a homeopathic remedy that is very popular made with this plant.  Mexican folk medicine prescribes leaves of the plant stuck directly into the ear to cure an earache.  In gardening it is prized for its ability to repel insects from the area where it grows, making it a very good companion.  I grow it at the back of my garden by the gate because it is a protector plant.  It repels any unwanted attention, human, insect, or otherworldly.

The prophet Mohammed blessed this herb and none other.  Early Christians used it to  exorcise evil spirits.  During the Middle Ages it was hung in the doorway to repel evil, the plague, and witches.  Italians had a custom of adorning a silver amulet shaped like the top of  rue plant, a cimaruta, with symbols of fertility.  This magical charm was used to protect the user against the evil eye.  Medicinal uses as well as magical ones have been recorded for centuries, but the way I like to use it is in the bath.  Make a sachet of rue and create a strong tea in the bathtub by brewing in very hot water for 10 minutes or so before adding water to hit the bath temperature you desire.  To add an extra helping of magic to this bath I spread honey on my face and leave it on while I soak in the tub.  After rinsing the face feels very soft and the entire body, as well as the aura, is clean and clear.  These baths are great before a meditation session or a creative project.  Clearing and protecting are positive ways to influence your moods, your focus, and your ability to rest and relax.  If you need protection from evil, or just from too much stress, try a rue bath.

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comments

CP- U must see Ironclad 2011 Purefoy. Even better Templer portrayal. Very good flick I thought. I must check its version of history. CR

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Frederick Rehfeldt

July 11, 2014

Cool, I am into the Templar history and know very little. Thanks you for the tip, CR

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mermaidcamp

July 12, 2014

Thanks Pamela, I learn a lot from you. I like plants a lot and learn about their use. Moreover, I am often forced to check the dictionary for the name of plants. Good for my English, too.

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Brigitte Kobi

July 12, 2014

Latin always works for plants..the Germans used this herb a lot and planted it in their gardens.

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mermaidcamp

July 12, 2014

This one tells what King John did after he signed the Magna Carta. I really did not know before the film. A dark portrait of John. The protagonist was a Templar Knight named of all things “Thomas Marshal”! Wow! History generally seems to support film’s message but there probably was some poetic license. A flattering portrait of the Templar Knight. I know the Templars were not perfect but it would be hard for anyone to be worse than John I.

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Frederick Edward rehfeldt

July 12, 2014

The kings are all a blur except for a couple of them..I could start to get some detail with John I..very pivotal time in history. Thanks Rick.

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mermaidcamp

July 12, 2014

hard for me to believe they are a blur to you….

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Frederick Rehfeldt

July 13, 2014

It does repel aphids, and leafhoppers 🙂

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Caroline Gerardo

July 12, 2014

and the plague..thanks for visiting.

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mermaidcamp

July 12, 2014

Rue always makes me think of Ophelia in Hamlet – such a sad poem

There’s rosemary, that’s for remembrance; pray,love, remember: and there is pansies. that’s for thoughts. There’s fennel for you, and columbines: there’s rue for you; and here’s some for me: we may call itherb-grace o’ Sundays: O you must wear your rue with a difference. There’s a daisy: I would give you some violets, but they withered all when my father died: they say he made a good end,-

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London-Unattached.com

July 13, 2014

wow, good one Fiona..very symbolic

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mermaidcamp

July 13, 2014

That’s a pretty cool plant to have around. I love how you set up a recipe to clear one’s aura!

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Stevie Wilson (@LAStory)

July 13, 2014

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