mermaidcamp

mermaidcamp

Keeping current in wellness, in and out of the water

You can scroll the shelf using and keys

Rudolf II Count der Gutige Old graf Der Schweigsame Von Habsburg

September 15, 2014

My 22nd great-grandfather was born and died in present day Aargau,Switzerland.  He married in Germany in about 1200. The Habsburg family was known for making very strategic marriages.  His grandson Rudolf moved the family power base to Austria and became Holy Roman Emperor.  They did very well for themselves.

Father: ALBRECHT 111 the rich VON GRAF HABSBURG b: ABT 1132 in Habsburg,Aargau,Switzerland
Mother: Ita Von PFULLENDORF b: ABT 1141 in Pfullendorf,Konstanz,Baden

Marriage 1 AGNES VON STAUFEN b: BEF 1178 in of A.D.H. Blankenberg Am Rhein,Brunswick,Germany
Married: ABT 1200
Children
ALBRECHT 1V VON GRAF HABSBURG b: ABT 1188 in Schloss Limburg A.D. Rhein,Freidberg,Baden,
Gertrud Von HABSBURG b: 1191 in Schloss Limburg A.D. Rhein,Freidberg,Baden,
Heilwig HABSBURG Countess b: 1195 in Schloss Limburg A.D. Rhein,Freidberg,Baden,
Rudolf 1 Habsburg LAUFENBURG count b: ABT 1198 in Schloss Limburg A.D. Rhein,Freidberg,Baden,
Rudolf II Count der Gutige Old graf Der Schweigsame Von Habsburg (1158 – 1232)
is my 22nd great grandfather
Albert IV “The Wise” Count of Habsburg (1188 – 1240)
son of Rudolf II Count der Gutige Old graf Der Schweigsame Von Habsburg
Rudolf IV King of Germans, Holy Roman Emperor Habsburg (1218 – 1291)
son of Albert IV “The Wise” Count of Habsburg
Albert I King of Germany Habsburg (1248 – 1308)
son of Rudolf IV King of Germans, Holy Roman Emperor Habsburg
Albrecht Albert II ‘The Wise’ Duke of Austria Habsburg (1298 – 1358)
son of Albert I King of Germany Habsburg
Leopold III “Duke of Austria” Habsburg (1351 – 1386)
son of Albrecht Albert II ‘The Wise’ Duke of Austria Habsburg
Ernst I “Ironside” Archduke of Austria Habsburg (1377 – 1424)
son of Leopold III “Duke of Austria” Habsburg
Katharina Archduchess Austria Von Habsburg (1420 – 1493)
daughter of Ernst I “Ironside” Archduke of Austria Habsburg
Christof I VanBaden (1453 – 1527)
son of Katharina Archduchess Austria Von Habsburg
Beatrix Zahringen (1492 – 1535)
daughter of Christof I VanBaden
Sabine Grafin VonSimmern (1528 – 1578)
daughter of Beatrix Zahringen
Marie L Egmond (1564 – 1584)
daughter of Sabine Grafin VonSimmern
Richard Sears (1590 – 1676)
son of Marie L Egmond
Silas Sears (1638 – 1697)
son of Richard Sears
Silas Sears (1661 – 1732)
son of Silas Sears
Sarah Sears (1697 – 1785)
daughter of Silas Sears
Sarah Hamblin (1721 – 1814)
daughter of Sarah Sears
Mercy Hazen (1747 – 1819)
daughter of Sarah Hamblin
Martha Mead (1784 – 1860)
daughter of Mercy Hazen
Abner Morse (1808 – 1838)
son of Martha Mead
Daniel Rowland Morse (1838 – 1910)
son of Abner Morse
Jason A Morse (1862 – 1932)
son of Daniel Rowland Morse
Ernest Abner Morse (1890 – 1965)
son of Jason A Morse
Richard Arden Morse (1920 – 2004)
son of Ernest Abner Morse
Pamela Morse
I am the daughter of Richard Arden Morse

House of Habsburg CountryAustria, Kingdom of Germany, Holy Roman Empire, Sicily, Naples, Spain, Hungary-Croatia, Bohemia, and Portugal

Titles
Holy Roman Emperor
Emperor of Austria
Emperor of Mexico
President of the German Confederation
King of the Romans
King of Germany
King of Spain
King of Aragon
King of Sicily
King of Naples
King of Castile
King of Hungary
King of Bohemia
King of Croatia
King of Portugal
King of Dalmatia
King of Galicia and Lodomeria
King of England
Grand Prince of Transylvania
Archduke of Austria
Grand Duke of Tuscany
Duke of Burgundy
Duke of Parma
Count of Habsburg

Founding11th century: Radbot, Count of Habsburg

Dissolution1780

The House of Habsburg (pron.: /ˈhæbs.bɜrɡ/; German pronunciation: [ˈhaːbs.bʊʁk]), also spelled Hapsburg[1] and also known as House of Austria, is one of the most important royal houses of Europe, The Habsburgs are best known for being Holy Roman Emperors for most of the time between 1438 and 1806, as well as rulers of the Austrian Empire and Spanish Empire and several other countries.

The House takes its name from Habsburg Castle, a fortress built around 1020–1030 in present day Switzerland by Count Radbot of Klettgau, who chose to name his fortress Habsburg. His grandson, Otto II, was the first to take the fortress name as his own, adding “Count of Habsburg” to his title. The House of Habsburg gathered dynastic momentum through the 11th, 12th and 13th centuries.

By 1276, Count Radbot’s seventh generation descendant, Rudolph of Habsburg, had moved the family’s power base from Habsburg Castle to the Duchy of Austria. Rudolph had become Roman-German King in 1273, and the dynasty of the House of Habsburg was truly entrenched in 1276 when Rudolph became ruler of Austria, which the Habsburgs ruled until 1918.

A series of dynastic marriages enabled the family to vastly expand its domains, to include Burgundy, Spain, Bohemia, Hungary, and other territories into the inheritance. In the 16th century, the family separated into the senior Habsburg Spain and the junior Habsburg Monarchy branches, who settled their mutual claims in the Oñate treaty.

The House of Habsburg became extinct in the male line in the 18th century. The Spanish branch ended upon the death of Charles II in 1700 and was replaced by the Anjou branch of the House of Bourbon in the person of his great-nephew Philip V. The Austrian branch went extinct in the male person in 1740 with the death of Charles VI and in the female person in 1780 with the death of his daughter Maria Theresa and was succeeded by the Vaudemont branch of the House of Lorraine in the person of her son Joseph II. The new successor house styled itself formally as House of Habsburg-Lorraine (German: Habsburg-Lothringen), although it was often referred to as simply the House of Habsburg.

Principal roles

Their principal roles were as:

King of the Romans
Holy Roman Emperors
King of Germany
Rulers of Austria (as Dukes, Archdukes after 1453)
King of Bohemia (1306–1307, 1437–1439, 1453–1457, 1526–1918),
Kings of Hungary and Croatia (1526–1918),
Kings of Spain (1516–1700),
King of Portugal (1580–1640),
King of Galicia and Lodomeria (1772–1918), and
Grand Prince of Transylvania (1690–1867).

Numerous other titles were attached to the crowns listed above.

History Counts of Habsburg

The Habsburg dominions around 1200 in the area of modern day Switzerland are shown as Habsburg, among the houses of Savoy, Zähringer and Kyburg

The progenitor of the House of Habsburg may have been Guntram the Rich, a count in Breisgau who lived in the 10th century. His grandson Radbot, Count of Habsburg founded the Habsburg Castle, after which the Habsburgs are named. The origins of the castle’s name, located in what is now the Swiss canton of Aargau, are uncertain. Most people assume the name to be derived from the High German Habichtsburg (Hawk Castle), but some historians and linguists are convinced that the name comes from the Middle High German word “hab/hap” meaning ford, as there is a river with a ford nearby. The first documented use of the name by the dynasty itself has been traced to the year 1108.[3][4][5] The Habsburg Castle was the family seat in the 11th, 12th and 13th centuries.

The Habsburgs expanded their influence through arranged marriages and by gaining political privileges, especially countship rights in Zürichgau, Aargau and Thurgau. In the 13th century, the house aimed its marriage policy at families in Upper Alsace and Swabia. They were also able to gain high positions in the church hierarchy for their members. Territorially, they often profited from the extinction of other noble families such as the House of Kyburg.

Kings of the Romans
By the second half of 13th century, count Rudolph IV (1218–1291) had become one of the most influential territorial lords in the area between Vosges mountains and Lake Constance. Due to these impressive preconditions, on 1 October 1273 Rudolph was chosen as the King of the Romans and received the name Rudolph I of Germany.[6]

In 1282, the Habsburgs gained the rulership of the Duchy of Austria, which they then held for over 600 years, until 1918. Through the forged Privilegium Maius document (1358/59), a special bond was created between the House and Austria. The document, forged at the behest of Rudolf IV, Duke of Austria (1339–1365), also attempted to introduce rules to preserve the unity of the family’s Austrian lands. In the long term, this indeed succeeded, but Rudolph’s descendants ignored the rule, leading to the separation of the Albertian and Leopoldian family lines in 1379.

By marrying Elisabeth of Luxembourg, the daughter of Holy Roman Emperor Sigismund in 1437, Duke Albert V (1397–1439) became the ruler of Bohemia and Hungary, expanding the family’s political horizons. The next year, Albert V was crowned as the King of the Romans as Albert II. After his early death in war with the Turks in 1439, and after the death of his son Ladislaus Postumus in 1457, the Habsburgs lost Bohemia and Hungary again. National kingdoms were established in these areas, and the Habsburgs were not able to restore their influence there for decades.

What do you think?

Please keep your comments polite and on-topic.

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

comments

There are still quite some castles that belonged to the Habsburger and can be visited. 🙂

Liked by 1 person

Brigitte Kobi

September 15, 2014

I did not know they started in Switzerland…I have always been fond of Baden..

Like

mermaidcamp

September 16, 2014

LOL you have such an amazing family tree!

Liked by 1 person

Fiona Maclean

September 16, 2014

They are a fancy bunch..and pretty crazy too

Like

mermaidcamp

September 16, 2014

Another Hapsburg.. that’s pretty darn cool! Holy Roman Emperor is a great “job title” too…… what an awesome person./family to have in your family tree!

Like

Stevie Wilson (@LAStory)

September 18, 2014

%d bloggers like this: