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Edmund Lockwood, Eleventh Great-Grandfather

March 21, 2017 1 Comment

The Arabella

The Arabella

My eleventh great-grandfather was an early settler in Cambridge, Massachusetts.  The records of the Massachusetts Bay Colony are extensive, so we know quite a bit about his life in America.

MIGRATION: 1630
FIRST RESIDENCE: Cambridge
FREEMAN: Requested 19 October 1630 (as “Mr. Edmond Lockwood”) and admitted 18 May 1631 (as “Mr. Edmond Lockewood”) [MBCR 1:79, 366].
OFFICES: Trial jury in case of Walter Palmer (as “Mr. Edmond Lockwood”), 9 November 1630 [MBCR 1:81]; “Mr. Lockwood” deputy to General Court for Cambridge, 9 May 1632 [MBCR 1:95]; “Mr. Edmond Lockwood” constable for Cambridge, 9 May 1632
ESTATE: 3 March 1634/5: “It is ordered, that Ruth Lockwood, widow, shall bring all the writings that her husband left in her hands to John Haynes, Esq., & Simon Bradstreete, on the third day of the next week, who shall detain the same in their hands till the next Court, when they shall be disposed of to those to whom they belong”
7 April 1635: “It is referred to the church of Waterton, with the consent of Rob[er]te Lockwood, executor of Edmond Lockwood, deceased, to dispose of the children & estate of the said Edmond Lockwood, given to them, to such persons as they think meet, which if they perform not within fourteen days, it shall be lawful for the Governor, John Hayne, Esq., & Simon Bradstreete, to dispose of the said children & estates as in their discretion, they shall think meet, as also to take an account of the said Rob[er]te Lockwood, & give him a full discharge”
2 June 1635: “In the cause of the children & widow of Edward Lockwood, (the elders & other of the church of Waterton being present,) and upon consideration of the order of Court in April last made in the case, which was found not to have been observed, because the estate was not computed & apportioned, it is now ordered, with consent of all parties, viz:, the church of Waterton, the widow of the said Edmond living, & the executor having consented to the former order, that the present Governor & the Secretary shall have power to call parties & witnesses for finding out the true estate, having consideration of the uncertainty of the will, & the debts, & other circumstances, to apportion the remainder of the estate to the wife & children, according to their best discretion; & then the church of Waterton is to dispose of the elder children & their portions as shall be best for their Christian education & the preservation of their estate” [MBCR 1:151].
BIRTH: By about 1600 based on estimated date of marriage (but see COMMENTS below).
DEATH: Cambridge between 9 May 1632 [MBCR 1:95, 96] and 3 March 1634/5 [MBCR1:134] (and probably closer to the earlier date, since Edmund Lockwood does not appear in any of the recorded Cambridge land grants beginning in August 1633).
MARRIAGE: (1) By about 1625 _____ _____; she may have died in England before 1630.
(2) By 1632 Elizabeth Masters, daughter of JOHN MASTERS; she married (2) Cary Latham of Cambridge.
CHILDREN:
With first wife

i EDMUND, b. England say 1625; m. Stamford 7 January 1655[/6] Hannah Scott, daughter of Thomas Scott [FOOF 1:381].

ii Child (one or more additional children by first wife implied by court order to the Watertown church “to dispose of the elder children” [MBCR 1:151]); no further record.

With second wife
iii JOHN, b. Cambridge November 1632 (“son of Edward Lockwood & Elisabeth his wife”) [NEHGR 4:181]; d. at New London in 1683, unmarried [Lockwood Gen 10].

ASSOCIATIONS: Although no record states the relationship explicitly, Edmund and Robert Lockwood were almost certainly brothers.
COMMENTS: The oft-stated origin of the Lockwood brothers in Combs, Suffolk, seems to be based on nothing more than finding the right names at about the right time. Further research is needed before this origin can be accepted.
In a discussion of financial transactions, John Winthrop wrote to his son John in Groton 23 July 1630 saying “If money be brought to you or your Uncle Downinge for Goodman Lockwood, let Mr. Peirce be paid his bill of provisions for him, and bring the rest with you” [WP 2:306].
“Mr. Edmond Lockwood” was the third in the list of eight “Newtowne Inhabitants” which is found at the beginning of the Cambridge town records, and probably dates from 1632 [CaTR2].
After NICHOLAS KNAPP was fined for quackery on 1 March 1630/1, “Mr. Will[ia]m Pelham and Mr. Edmond Lockewood hath promised to pay to the Court the sum of £5” [MBCR 1:83].
BIBLIOGRAPHIC NOTE: The 1889 Lockwood genealogy (Frederic A. Holden and E. Dunbar Lockwood, Descendants of Robert Lockwood, History of the Lockwood Family in America[Philadelphia 1889]) was deservedly described by Jacobus as “a genealogical atrocity” [TAG31:222]. By lumping all the descendants of the first Edmund under his brother Robert, the posterity of this family through eldest son Edmund was misplaced.
Donald Lines Jacobus began to sort the family out properly in 1930, with further contributions made in 1955 [FOOF 1:380-81; TAG 31:222-24]. In 1978 Harriet Woodbury Hodge published detailed arguments for a rearrangement of the Lockwood families that would restore to Edmund Lockwood his children [Some Descendants of Edmund Lockwood (1594-1635) of Cambridge, Massachusetts, and his son Edmund Lockwood (c. 1625-1693) of Stamford, Connecticut (New York 1978), cited above as Lockwood Gen].
Edmund Lockwood (1574 – 1634)
11th great-grandfather
Eliner Lockwood (1592 – 1658)
daughter of Edmund Lockwood
Caleb Knapp (1637 – 1684)
son of Eliner Lockwood
Sarah Knapp (1669 – 1750)
daughter of Caleb Knapp
Ebenezer Mead (1692 – 1775)
son of Sarah Knapp
Deacon Silas Meade (1730 – 1807)
son of Ebenezer Mead
Abner Mead (1749 – 1810)
son of Deacon Silas Meade
Martha Mead (1784 – 1860)
daughter of Abner Mead
Abner Morse (1808 – 1838)
son of Martha Mead
Daniel Rowland Morse (1838 – 1910)
son of Abner Morse
Jason A Morse (1862 – 1932)
son of Daniel Rowland Morse
Ernest Abner Morse (1890 – 1965)
son of Jason A Morse
Richard Arden Morse (1920 – 2004)
son of Ernest Abner Morse
Pamela Morse
I am the daughter of Richard Arden Morse

Lawrence Washington, 11th Great-Grandfather

January 31, 2017 1 Comment

When Lawrence Washington and his twin brother Robert were born in 1568 in Sulgrave, Northamptonshire, England, their father, Robert, was 24, and their mother, Elizabeth, was 21. He married Lady Margaret Butler on August 3, 1588. Lady Margaret was heiress to a wool fortune.  Her father helped Lawrence prosper in the wool trade and become a prominent citizen.  He was mayor of Northhampton from 1532-1545, and acquired a manor house known as Sulgrave.   Lawrence and Margaret has 17 children, 8 sons and 9 daughters.  They married well and created an illustrious lineage, that includes George Washington, the first US president….and me. Lawrence died on December 13, 1616, at the age of 48.  He is buried at St Mary the Virgin with St John Churchyard, Great Brington, Daventry District, Northamptonshire, England  His plot: Grave is below a stone slab in the chancel of the church.

Lawrence Washington (1568 – 1616)
11th great-grandfather
Richard Washington (1592 – 1642)
son of Lawrence Washington
John Washington (1632 – 1677)
son of Richard Washington
Richard Washington (1660 – 1725)
son of John Washington
Elizabeth Washington (1689 – 1773)
daughter of Richard Washington
Elizabeth Lanier (1719 – 1795)
daughter of Elizabeth Washington
Martha Burch (1743 – 1803)
daughter of Elizabeth Lanier
David Darden (1770 – 1820)
son of Martha Burch
Minerva Truly Darden (1806 – 1837)
daughter of David Darden
Sarah E Hughes (1829 – 1911)
daughter of Minerva Truly Darden
Lucinda Jane Armer (1847 – 1939)
daughter of Sarah E Hughes
George Harvey Taylor (1884 – 1941)
son of Lucinda Jane Armer
Ruby Lee Taylor (1922 – 2008)
daughter of George Harvey Taylor
Pamela Morse
I am the daughter of Ruby Lee Taylor

Sulgrave Manor

Sulgrave Manor

DNA Breakthrough

October 3, 2016 1 Comment

Andrew Armour's fort

Andrew Armour’s fort

I recently started to study the matches that Ancestry.com has found for me. I took the test long ago and had paid little attention to that section of the website. I was asked to help a living person who is trying to find his birth father. He contacted me through the message system in Ancestry because he saw I was related to a DNA match he has. This man has done more research and has a much broader understanding of the various kinds of DNA testing available, and how to apply them to answer mystery ancestry questions. I have taken some time to look through the surnames he and I share with no luck in finding a connection.   We are waiting for a y chromosome test from my brother to be processed at Ancestry to see if that reveals more.  The match may come from as far back as 10 generations, so the whole thing is pretty complicated.  I hope we find the answer my distant adopted cousin is seeking.  In the process I am learning more about DNA testing and how helpful it can be.

I have had an excellent breakthrough on my maternal side by searching through all the matches and reading the trees.  Some of the folks with whom I am matched have no tree.  I am not sure what there are doing there.  They are not much use until they get some data to go with the genetics.  By following my matches in the Armer line I have found very early colonists from Plymouth and more new connections yet to be researched in Massachusetts.  I have found Andrew Armour, 5th great-grandfather, born in Scotland 1740, died in Georgia, 1801.  This line is also rich with history and original documents galore.   The map above is of Andrew’s fort.  I also have his will and testament in his own beautiful hand. I always love seeing the ancestors’ handwriting.

In the never ending research to learn more about my ancestors I appreciate any and all breakthroughs that help me verify my family members.  The time spent studying my matches has given me a major breakthrough that will yield much  more data as I dig into it.  I will soon write more bios of this new/old branch of Scotsmen.  If you have access to the Ancestry DNA database I believe you will learn something significant from taking the test.  If you are already studying genealogy I recommend paying attention to the DNA section for possible happy consequences.

Aubrey de Vere, 10th Earl of Oxford, 20th Great-Grandfather

September 20, 2016 1 Comment

St James the Less Churchyard

St James the Less Churchyard

Photo submitted by geoffrey gillon on findagrave.com

This is the final resting place of Sir Aubrey.  I would love to visit Haleigh someday to take in the sights and visit my dead ancestors, in romantic ruin.

Located on High Street in Hadleigh, Essex, England – Cemetery notes and/or description from findagrave.com: Hadleigh is a town in southeast Essex, England, on the A13 between Benfleet and Leigh-on-Sea. Although a historic settlement with its castle, it has become intertwined with Benfleet to the West and Leigh-on-Sea to the East. This has led to the Hadleigh in Suffolk becoming more well known. Hadleigh is probably best known for its castle, and the country park that surrounds it. The castle has been a romantic ruin for a few hundred years, but parts of two towers are still standing. John Constable painted Hadleigh Castle in 1829, and the painting now resides at the Yale Center for British Art in USA.. Set at the top of a hill overlooking the Thames Estuary, it is possible to see as far as the Canary Wharf development to the west. Since the Local Government Act 1972, Hadleigh, along with Canvey Island, South Benfleet, and Thundersley has formed the parliamentary constituency and local government district and borough of Castle Point. General Booth, founder of the Salvation Army, established the Farm Colony in 1891 in Hadleigh. Today the colony operates an employment training centre for people who have special training needs, and accepts referrals from Social Services and the Employment Service. A reminder of the Salvation Army’s work in the area is a special section at the east end of the churchyard for the graves of Colony officers and workers. St. James the Less Church, like the castle, is a Norman building, with a typical Norman round east end, but the church is still in use today. It is built of Kentish ragstone with 3 feet thick walls. It remains picturesque despite the fact that it effectively stands in the central reservation or island, of the A13.(text by Geoffrey Gillon)

Hedingham Castle in Essex, John de Vere's main residence

Hedingham Castle in Essex, John de Vere’s main residence

 

My 20th great-grandfather was tight with the Black Prince, who took good care of his people.  Sir Aubrey was knighted and accompanied the Black Prince to Aquitaine in battle.  His father, John de Vere, is both my 21st and my 20th great-grandfather.  This is because I descend from two of his children, Aubrey and Margaret.  I am pretty sure I also descend from the Edward Black Prince himself, but more about that later.  When sorting out various branches of a tree it is really important to look carefully for errors.

Sir Aubrey 10th Earl of Oxford DeVere (1338 – 1400)
20th great-grandfather
Sir Richard, 11th Earl of Oxford DeVere KG (1385 – 1417)
son of Sir Aubrey 10th Earl of Oxford DeVere
Sir John 12th Earl of Oxford DeVere (1408 – 1462)
son of Sir Richard, 11th Earl of Oxford DeVere KG
John DeVere (1447 – 1509)
son of Sir John 12th Earl of Oxford DeVere
John DeVere (1490 – 1540)
son of John DeVere
Frances DeVere (1517 – 1577)
daughter of John DeVere
Thomas Howard (1536 – 1572)
son of Frances DeVere
Margaret Howard (1561 – 1591)
daughter of Thomas Howard
Lady Ann Dorset (1552 – 1680)
daughter of Margaret Howard
Robert Lewis (1574 – 1656)
son of Lady Ann Dorset
Robert Lewis (1607 – 1644)
son of Robert Lewis
Ann Lewis (1631 – 1686)
daughter of Robert Lewis
Joshua Morse (1669 – 1753)
son of Ann Lewis
Joseph Morse (1692 – 1756)
son of Joshua Morse
Joseph Morse (1721 – 1776)
son of Joseph Morse
Joseph Morse III (1756 – 1835)
son of Joseph Morse
John Henry Morse (1775 – 1864)
son of Joseph Morse III
Abner Morse (1808 – 1838)
son of John Henry Morse
Daniel Rowland Morse (1838 – 1910)
son of Abner Morse
Jason A Morse (1862 – 1932)
son of Daniel Rowland Morse
Ernest Abner Morse (1890 – 1965)
son of Jason A Morse
Richard Arden Morse (1920 – 2004)
son of Ernest Abner Morse
Pamela Morse
I am the daughter of Richard Arden Morse

Aubrey de Vere, 10th Earl of Oxford (c. 1338 – 15 February 1400) was the second son of John de Vere, 7th Earl of Oxford and Maud de Badlesmere, daughter of Bartholomew de Badlesmere, 1st Lord Badlesmere.
In 1360 he was made steward of the royal forest of Havering in Essex. In 1367 was retained to ‘abide for life’ with the Black Prince, with a substantial allowance. He was knighted, made constable of Wallingford Castle in 1375 and also given the honours of Wallingford and St. Valery, though he gave up Wallingford in 1378 for Hadleigh Castle. Edward III used him as an ambassador in seeking peace with France. In 1381, de Vere became a Chamberlain of the Royal Household and member of the privy council. In 1388 his nephew, Robert de Vere, Duke of Ireland and 9th Earl of Oxford was deemed a traitor, causing Aubrey to lose his post of chamberlain. However, after Robert’s death in 1392, the king gave Aubrey the title of Earl of Oxford allowing him to take a seat in parliament. Aubrey’s son, Richard became the 11th Earl of Oxford on his death.

John De Vere, Earl of Oxford, 20th Great-Grandfather

September 19, 2016 4 Comments

Siege of Rheims

Siege of Rheims

My 20th great-grandfather was the 7th Earl of Oxford, hereditary Chamberlain of England.  He was son and heir to Sir Alphonese de Vere and Joan Foliot, grandson of Sir Robert de Vere and Alice de Sanford, Sir Jordan Foliot and Margery Newmarch.  He was husband of Maud de Badlesmere, daughter of Bartholomew Badlesmere and Margaret de Clare, widow of Robert FitzPayne. They were married before 27 March 1336 and had four sons and three daughters.  John was a captain in King Edward III’s army, and as such participated in the Battle of Crécy and the Battle of Poitiers.

John de Vere, 7th Earl of Oxford (c. 12 March 1312 – 24 January 1360) was the nephew and heir of Robert de Vere, 6th Earl of Oxford. He succeeded as Earl of Oxford in 1331, after his uncle died without issue. John de Vere was a trusted captain of Edward III in the king’s wars in Scotland and France, and took part in both the Battle of Crécy and the Battle of Poitiers. He died campaigning in France in 1360. Throughout his career he was closely associated with William de Bohun, 1st Earl of Northampton, who was his brother-in-law.

Hedingham Castle in Essex, John de Vere's main residence

Hedingham Castle in Essex, John de Vere’s main residence

 

John de Vere was the only son of Alfonso de Vere, and Jane, daughter of Sir Richard Foliot. Alfonso was a younger son of Robert de Vere, 5th Earl of Oxford, and brother of Robert de Vere, 6th Earl of Oxford. When the younger Earl Robert’s son died without issue in 1329, the earl obtained licence from the king to entail his estates on his nephew, John.  It was in this way that John de Vere, when his uncle died 17 April 1331, became Earl of Oxford. He had made homage and received livery by 17 May.

In 1336 he married Maud, who was the second of the four daughters of Bartholomew de Badlesmere, 1st Baron Badlesmere, of Badlesmere in Kent and Margaret de Clare. Maud was a co-heiress of her brother Giles de Badlesmere, 2nd Baron Badlesmere. When Giles died in 1338, this brought a significant part of the Badlesmere inheritance into de Vere’s hands. The marriage also forged a strong bond with William Bohun, Earl of Northampton, who had married Badlesmere’s third daughter, Elizabeth de Badlesmere and thus became Oxford’s brother-in-law.The two campaigned together, sat on the same commissions and died the same year.

De Vere’s military career began with service on Edward III’s Scottish campaigns, in the 1330s Second War of Scottish Independence. He took part in the Roxburgh campaign of 1334–5, and in the summer campaign of 1335.   Later in the decade, England’s military efforts turned towards France, with the beginning of the Hundred Years’ War. In March 1340, de Vere served in Flanders, and was therefore out of the country during Edward’s disputes with Archbishop John de Stratford. Oxford was not forced to take sides in the conflict, and has been described as a “political neutral”.

After a period in England, de Vere returned to the Continent in 1342, where he served with Northampton, who had been made lieutenant of Brittany. They both took part in the Battle of Morlaix that year. The next year the two earls were sent to Scotland to relieve Lochmaben Castle, and in 1345 they were again campaigning in Brittany. Tradition has it that, returning to England, their ships were forced ashore by bad weather, and the party was robbed of their possessions by the locals.  In the summer of 1346 de Vere was campaigning with the king in Normandy, and took part in the Battle of Crécy. According to the chronicler Froissart, de Vere was fighting with the Black Prince, and was among the captains who sent a request to Edward III for reinforcements when the king famously answered ‘Let the boy win his spurs’.  Oxford was also at the Siege of Calais, but reportedly fell ill in 1348, and did not take part in any major campaigning until 1355.

In 1355 he was again in the company of the Black Prince, and took part in the prince’s great raid in Languedoc. 19 September 1356, at the Battle of Poitiers, Oxford was in command of the vanguard together with the earl of Warwick. de Vere’s attack on the flank of the French cavalry, with a group of archers, did much to secure the English victory.  His last campaign was Edward III’s Rheims campaign in 1359–60. Here he died, probably during the raid into Burgundy, on 23 or 24 January 1360.  He was buried in the de Vere family’s burial place Colne Priory in Essex.

Maud de Vere died in 1366. The couple had four sons and two daughters. The eldest son, John, married the daughter of Hugh Courtenay, Earl of Devon, but died before his father, in 1350. Also another son, Robert, died in his father’s lifetime. The oldest remaining son was then Thomas, born around 1336–7, who succeeded his father in 1360. Thomas’s son Robert succeeded at his father’s death, but with Robert’s forfeiture in 1392, the earldom was given to Robert’s uncle Aubrey – the seventh earl’s fourth son. The eldest daughter, Margaret, married three times, while of the second, Matilda, little is known.

John de Vere, in the family tradition of the “fighting de Veres”, was active in almost all major military engagements in the years from 1340 to 1360.  On the Roxburgh campaign he brought a retinue of twenty-eight men-at-arms and twelve mounted archers. In Brittany in 1342, the retinue had grown to forty men-at-arms, one banneret, nine knights, twenty-nine esquires, and thirty mounted archers.  His retinue was of a diverse composition, and also included foreign mercenaries.[10] At one point, in the Battle of Poitiers, John Hawkwood, who was later to make his fortune as a condottiero in Italy, also served with de Vere.   Yet in spite of this, de Vere never distinguished himself particularly as a military commander. Neither did he receive a great amount of royal patronage, and was never made a member of the Order of the Garter. This was largely a consequence of the de Vere family’s relatively modest resources among the English peerage. As an example can be mentioned that in the late 1340, £349 were owed to Oxford in arrears for his services, yet at the same time the king owed Northampton two debts of £782 and £1237.  This obstacle of resources and status John de Vere was unable to overcome either by marriage or warfare.

from John de Vere, 7th Earl of Oxford
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

 

John de Vere (1311 – 1359)
20th great-grandfather
Margaret De Vere (1340 – 1398)
daughter of John de Vere
Margaret De Lovaine (1372 – 1408)
daughter of Margaret De Vere
Thomas St Clair (1394 – 1434)
son of Margaret De Lovaine
Edith StClair (1425 – 1472)
daughter of Thomas St Clair
Alice Harcourt (1450 – 1526)
daughter of Edith StClair
Elizabeth Bessiles (1465 – 1511)
daughter of Alice Harcourt
Anne Fettiplace (1496 – 1567)
daughter of Elizabeth Bessiles
Mary Purefoy (1533 – 1579)
daughter of Anne Fettiplace
Susanna Thorne (1559 – 1586)
daughter of Mary Purefoy
Gov Thomas Dudley (1576 – 1653)
son of Susanna Thorne
Anne Dudley (1612 – 1672)
daughter of Gov Thomas Dudley
John Bradstreet (1652 – 1718)
son of Anne Dudley
Mercy Bradstreet (1689 – 1725)
daughter of John Bradstreet
Caleb Hazen (1720 – 1777)
son of Mercy Bradstreet
Mercy Hazen (1747 – 1819)
daughter of Caleb Hazen
Martha Mead (1784 – 1860)
daughter of Mercy Hazen
Abner Morse (1808 – 1838)
son of Martha Mead
Daniel Rowland Morse (1838 – 1910)
son of Abner Morse
Jason A Morse (1862 – 1932)
son of Daniel Rowland Morse
Ernest Abner Morse (1890 – 1965)
son of Jason A Morse
Richard Arden Morse (1920 – 2004)
son of Ernest Abner Morse
Pamela Morse
You are the daughter of Richard Arden Morse

  • EO7 – John de Vere, 7th Earl of Oxford (1313 – 1360)

John de Vere, 7th Earl of Oxford and 8th Great Chamberlain, born in 1313, became one of the most famous “Fighting Earls of Oxford,” renowned for bravery, gallantry, and chivalry as one of Edward III’s greatest generals, serving in Scotland, France, Flanders, Brittany and Gascony.

John was the son and heir of Sir Alfonso de Vere (d. 1328) [younger brother of Robert de Vere, EO6] by his wife Jane, daughter of Sir Richard Foliot. John succeeded his uncle, who left no issue, in April 1331. John EO7 actively participated in the wars of King Edward III’s, fighting in the Scottish campaigns of 1333 and 1335, in support of Edward Baliol. When war broke out with France in 1339, EO7 accompanied King Edward III to Flanders, and, in 1342 joined the first Breton campaign of William de Bohun, earl of Northampton. EO7 had, in his war party, 40 men-at-arms, one banneret, nine knights, 29 esquires, and 30 mounted archers, with an allowance of 56 sacks of wool as wages. On one occasion, when EO7 was returning from fighting on the continent, his ship was driven off course and wrecked on the shores of Connaught where some ‘barbarous people’ robbed the party of all of their possessions. [A similar encounter with pirates happened 200+ years later to the 17th Earl of Oxford upon his return from Italy and France in 1576). John de Vere, EO7, was a commander at the battles of Crecy, where he fought with a contingent of 160 men, including three bannerets and 27 knights. In October 1355, EO7 returned to France, joining the Black Prince in his famous raid into the Languedoc. EO7 shared the command of the first division at Poitiers with the Earl of Warwick, where he organized a crucial maneuver that saved the English archers from being downtrodden by the enemy’s cavalry.
“Yet all courage had been thrown away to no purpose, had it not been seconded by the extraordinary Gallantry of the English Archers, under the earl of Oxford, who behaved themselves that day with wonderful Constancy, Alacrity and Resolution ”
John de Vere, EO7, was killed during the siege of Rheims on January 24, 1360, during the British invasion of Burgundy. His corpse was brought back to England and interred in the family crypts at Colne Priory.

John’s will, dated November 1, 1359, contained bequests to Colne church and to the chapel (called the New Abbey) at Hedingham. EO7 also left instructions to his executors to pay out 400 marks sterling that had been accumulated by his ancestors in aid of the Holy Land.
John EO7 had married, in 1336, Maud Badlesmere [b. 1310, widow of Robert Fitzpayne], second sister and coheir of Giles, lord Badlesmere (d. 1338) of Badlesmere in Kent. The couple had had four sons and one daughter, Margaret or Maud. The sons were Thomas (1337-1371), the 8th Earl of Oxford, Aubrey, who became 10th EO in 1393, and John and Robert, who predeceased their father.
By EO7’s marriage, the title of Lord Badlesmere was added to the honorific employed by all later Earls of Oxford. His son Thomas succeeded him.

By Robert Brazil © copyright 2003

Elizabeth Trussel, 16th Great-Grandmother

July 18, 2016 8 Comments

Church of St Nicholas, burial place of Elizabeth de Vere, Countess of Oxford Spouse(s)John de Vere, 15th Earl of Oxford

Church of St Nicholas, burial place of Elizabeth de Vere, Countess of Oxford
Spouse John de Vere, 15th Earl of Oxford

My 16th great-grandmother was a lady-in-waiting to Ann Boleyn.  She was the second wife of John de Vere, 15th Earl of Oxford.

Elizabeth de Vere (née Trussel), Countess of Oxford (1496 – before July 1527) was an English noblewoman. Through her daughter Frances, she was the mother-in-law of celebrated poet Henry Howard, Earl of Surrey.
Elizabeth was born in Kibblestone, Staffordshire, England on an unknown date in 1496 to Sir Edward Trussel and Margaret Dun. On 10 April 1509 at the age of about thirteen, she became the second wife of John de Vere, 15th Earl of Oxford. His first wife, Christian Foderingey had died about ten years earlier without having produced children. Together John and Elizabeth had seven children.
Children
1. Elizabeth de Vere (born about 1512)
2. John de Vere, 16th Earl of Oxford (1516 – 3 August 1562 married (1) Dorothy Neville (2) Margery Golding
3. Lady Frances de Vere (c. 1517 – 30 June 1577 married Henry Howard, Earl of Surrey
4. Aubrey de Vere (born about 1519) married (1) Margaret Spring (2) Bridget Gibbon
5. Robert de Vere (born about 1520)
6. Anne de Vere (c. 1522 – February, 1571/72) married Edmund Sheffield, 1st Baron Sheffield of Butterwick
7. Jeffrey de Vere (born about 1526) married Elizabeth Hardkyn daughter of Sir John Hardkyn of Colchester
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Elizabeth de Vere, Countess of Oxford
Church of St Nicholas, burial place of Elizabeth de Vere, Countess of Oxford
Spouse(s)John de Vere, 15th Earl of Oxford
Issue
John de Vere, 16th Earl of Oxford
Aubrey Vere
Robert Vere
Geoffrey Vere
Elizabeth Vere

Anne Vere
Frances VereNoble familyDe Vere (by marriage)FatherEdward TrussellMotherMargaret DonneBorn1496DiedBefore July 1527BuriedChurch of St Nicholas, Castle Hedingham, Essex
Elizabeth de Vere (née Trussell), Countess of Oxford (1496 – before July 1527) was an English noblewoman. As a young child she became a royal ward. She married John de Vere, 15th Earl of Oxford, and by him was mother of the 16th Earl and grandmother ofSir Francis and Sir Horace Vere, the ‘fighting Veres’.

Family
Elizabeth Trussell, born in 1496,was the daughter of Edward Trussell (c.1478 – 16 June 1499) of Elmesthorpe, Leicestershire, only son of Sir William Trussell (d. before 24 June 1480) of Elmesthorpe, Knight of the Body for King Edward IV, by Margaret Kene. The Trussells were a ‘very ancient Warwickshire family’; Elizabeth’s ancestor, Sir Warin Trussell, was of Billesley, Warwickshire.
Elizabeth Trussell’s mother was Margaret Donne, the daughter of Sir John Donne (1450–1503) of Kidwelly, Carmarthenshire, and Elizabeth Hastings (c.1450 – 1508), daughter of Sir Leonard Hastings and Alice Camoys, and sister of William Hastings, 1st Baron Hastings.  Sir John Donne’s mother, Joan Scudamore, was the granddaughter of the Welsh rebel, Owain Glyndŵr.
Elizabeth had a brother, John Trussell (d.1499), to whom she was heir.
Through her father’s family, Elizabeth was a descendant of King Henry II by his mistress, Ida de Tony.

Elizabeth Trussell’s grandfather, Sir John Donne, from the Don triptych by Hans Memling.
Elizabeth’s father, Edward Trussell, had been a ward of William Hastings, 1st Baron Hastings, and at Hastings’ death in 1483 was still a minor. In his will, Hastings expressed the wish that Trussell’s wardship be purchased by Hastings’ brother-in-law, Sir John Donne:
Also I will that mine executors give to my sister Dame Elizabeth Don 100 marks . . . Also where I have the ward and marriage of Edward Trussell, I will that it be sold and the money employed to the performing of this my will and for the weal of my soul; and if my brother Sir John Don will buy the said ward, I will that he be preferred therein before any other by £10.[9]
After her father’s death on 16 June 1499 and the death of her brother, John, in the same year,[10] Elizabeth Trussell became a royal ward. Her wardship and marriage were initially purchased from King Henry VII by George Grey, 2nd Earl of Kent (d. 21 December 1503), who intended her as a bride for Sir Henry Grey (d. 24 September 1562), the 2nd Earl’s son by his second marriage to Katherine Herbert, daughter of William Herbert, 1st Earl of Pembroke, by Anne Devereux, the daughter of Sir Walter Devereux. However after the 2nd Earl’s death, Richard Grey, 3rd Earl of Kent, the 2nd Earl’s eldest son and heir by his first marriage to Anne Woodville, abducted Elizabeth Trussell, a crime for which the King levied a heavy fine against him:
Aged at least twenty-five when he succeeded his father in 1503, [the 3rd Earl] wasted his family’s fortunes — possibly, as Dugdalesays, he was a gambler. In a striking series of alienations he gave away or sold most of the lands, principally in Bedfordshire, that he had inherited . . . The earl also fell quickly into debt to the king: he failed to pay livery for his father’s lands, and he was fined 2500 marks for abducting Elizabeth Trussell, whose wardship the second earl had left to Richard’s half-brother Henry; he then failed to keep up the instalments laid down for the payment of the fine.
As a result of these events Elizabeth Trussell’s wardship and marriage again came into the hands of the King, who sold it on 29 April 1507[12] to John de Vere, 13th Earl of Oxford, and his cousin John de Vere, later 15th Earl of Oxford, for an initial payment of 1000 marks and an additional £387 18s to be paid yearly, less £20 a year for Elizabeth’s maintenance. The annual value of Elizabeth’s lands had been estimated in the inquisition post mortem taken after her brother John’s death at £271 12s 8d a year.
Marriage and issue
Between 29 April 1507 and 4 July 1509 Elizabeth became the second wife of John de Vere, 15th Earl of Oxford, whose first wife was Christian Foderingey (born c. 1481, died before 4 November 1498), the daughter and co-heiress of Thomas Foderingey (c. 1446 – 1491) ofBrockley, Suffolk, by Elizabeth Doreward (c. 1473 – 1491), daughter of William Doreward of Bocking, Essex, by whom the 15th Earl had no issue.
By her marriage to the 15th Earl of Oxford, Elizabeth had four sons and three daughters:
John de Vere, 16th Earl of Oxford (1516 – 3 August 1562), who married firstly, Dorothy Neville (died c. 6 January 1548),[16] second daughter of Ralph Neville, 4th Earl of Westmorland, by whom he had a daughter, Katherine de Vere, who married Edward Windsor, 3rd Baron Windsor. The Earl married secondly, Margery Golding (d. 2 December 1568), by whom he had a son, Edward de Vere, 17th Earl of Oxford, and a daughter, Mary de Vere.
Aubrey de Vere (d. 1580), who married firstly Margaret Spring, the daughter of John Spring of Lavenham, by whom he had a daughter, Jane, who married Henry Hunt of Gosfield,Essex, and a son, Hugh Vere,[18] who married Eleanor Walsh, the daughter of William Walsh. Hugh Vere and Eleanor Walsh had a son, Robert, who inherited the title as 19th Earl of Oxford. Aubrey de Vere married secondly, Bridget Gibbon, the daughter of Sir Anthony Gibbon of Lynn, Norfolk.
Robert de Vere (died c. 1598), who married firstly, Barbara Berners, by whom he had a son, John Vere, and a daughter, Mary Vere, and secondly, Joan Hubberd, sister of Edward Hubberd (d. 1602), by whom he had no issue.
Geoffrey Vere (d. 1572), who in 1556 married Elizabeth Hardekyn (d. December 1615), daughter of Richard Hardekyn (d. 1558) of Wotton House near Castle Hedingham, by whom he had four sons, John Vere (c. 1558 – 1624) of Kirby Hall near Castle Hedingham, Sir Francis Vere (born c. 1560), Robert Vere (b. 1562), and Sir Horatio Vere (b. 1565), and a daughter, Frances Vere (born 1567), who married, as his second wife, the colonial adventurer and author, Sir Robert Harcourt (1574/5–1631), of Nuneham on 20 March 1598.
Elizabeth de Vere (born c. 1512), who married, as his second wife, Thomas Darcy, 1st Baron Darcy of Chiche (d. 28 June 1558), by whom she had three sons, John Darcy, 2nd Baron Darcy of Chiche (d. 3 March 1581), Aubrey (d. 1558–68) and Robert (died c. 1568), and two daughters, Thomasine and Constance, of whom the latter married Edmund Pyrton (died c. 1609).
Anne de Vere, (born c. 1522, died c. 14 February 1572), who married firstly, Edmund Sheffield, 1st Baron Sheffield of Butterwick, Lincolnshire, second but eldest surviving son of Sir Robert Sheffield by Margaret Zouche, by whom she had a son and three daughters. Edmund Sheffield was slain 31 July 1549 during the suppression of Kett’s rebellion. Anne de Vere married secondly, John Brock, esquire, of Colchester, Essex, son and heir of John Brock of Little Leighs, Essex, by Agnes Wiseman, by whom she had no issue.[23]
Frances de Vere (c. 1517 – 30 June 1577), who married firstly, Henry Howard, Earl of Surrey, by whom she was the mother of Jane Howard, Thomas Howard, 4th Duke of Norfolk, Margaret Howard, Henry Howard, 1st Earl of Northampton, and Katherine Howard. Frances de Vere married secondly, Thomas Steynings, by whom she had no issue.
Elizabeth died before July 1527, and was buried in the Church of St Nicholas, Castle Hedingham, Essex, where her effigy can be seen on the black marble tomb erected for Elizabeth and her husband, the 15th Earl.
Footnotes
She is usually said to have been born at the Trussell manor of Cubleston or Kibblestone near Barlaston and Stone, Staffordshire.

Elizabeth DeVere, Countess of Oxford

Elizabeth DeVere, Countess of Oxford

 

Elizabeth Trussel (1494 – 1527)
16th great-grandmother
Frances DeVere (1517 – 1577)
daughter of Elizabeth Trussel
Thomas Howard (1536 – 1572)
son of Frances DeVere
Margaret Howard (1561 – 1591)
daughter of Thomas Howard
Lady Ann Dorset (1552 – 1680)
daughter of Margaret Howard
Robert Lewis (1574 – 1656)
son of Lady Ann Dorset
Robert Lewis (1607 – 1644)
son of Robert Lewis
Ann Lewis (1631 – 1686)
daughter of Robert Lewis
Joshua Morse (1669 – 1753)
son of Ann Lewis
Joseph Morse (1692 – 1759)
son of Joshua Morse
Joseph Morse (1721 – 1776)
son of Joseph Morse
Joseph Morse III (1756 – 1835)
son of Joseph Morse
John Henry Morse (1775 – 1864)
son of Joseph Morse III
Abner Morse (1808 – 1838)
son of John Henry Morse
Daniel Rowland Morse (1838 – 1910)
son of Abner Morse
Jason A Morse (1862 – 1932)
son of Daniel Rowland Morse
Ernest Abner Morse (1890 – 1965)
son of Jason A Morse
Richard Arden Morse (1920 – 2004)
son of Ernest Abner Morse
Pamela Morse
I am the daughter of Richard Arden Morse

Humphrey VIII Earl Hereford, 20th Great-Grandfather

June 5, 2016 1 Comment

effigy and grave

effigy and grave

My 20th great grandfather was born  c. 1276, at Pleshey Castle, Essex, England
He died on Mar. 16, 1322, in the battle of Boroughbridge, in Yorkshire, England.  He is buried at Friars Preachers Church, York, Yorkshire, England.

4th Earl of Hereford. Born the son of Humphrey de Bohun, 3rd Earl of Hereford and Maud de Fiennes at Pleshy Castle in Essex. In November 1302 he married King Edward I’s daughter, Elizabeth Plantagenet, with whom he had at least eleven children. He held the office of Lord High Constable. He took part in the king’s Scottish campaigns in the early 1300s. After the flight of Robert Bruce, de Bohun received many of Bruce’s confiscated properties. At the battle of Bannockburn in 1314, he charged the Bruce, and his nephew Henry de Bohun was killed, but he was taken and held for ransom. He was eventually exchanged for Bruce’s wife and daughter. He numbered among the peers who opposed Edward II’s excesses and banished the royal favorite, Piers Gaveston. In 1316 he successfully led the suppression of the revolt of Llywelyn Bren. By 1322, however, he fell in with Lancaster’s rebellion against Edward II, and as the rebels approached Boroughbridge in Yorkshire, de Bohun led an attempt to storm the bridge held by royal pike men. The Earl, however, was run through by pike men secreted beneath the bridge and died in the field, his gruesome death breaking the advance, and spelling failure for the rebels. (bio by: Iola)

Humphrey VIII Earl Hereford amp DeBohun (1276 – 1322)
20th great-grandfather
William Earl of Northampton De Bohun (1312 – 1360)
son of Humphrey VIII Earl Hereford amp DeBohun
Lady Elizabeth Countess Arundel Countess DeBohun (1350 – 1385)
daughter of William Earl of Northampton De Bohun
Elizabeth Duchess Norfolk Fitzalan (1366 – 1425)
daughter of Lady Elizabeth Countess Arundel Countess DeBohun
Lady Joan De Goushill Baroness Stanley (1402 – 1459)
daughter of Elizabeth Duchess Norfolk Fitzalan
Countess Elizabeth Sefton Stanley (1429 – 1459)
daughter of Lady Joan De Goushill Baroness Stanley
Thomas Sir 8th Earl of Sefton Molyneux (1445 – 1483)
son of Countess Elizabeth Sefton Stanley
Lawrence Castellan of Liverpool Mollenaux (1490 – 1550)
son of Thomas Sir 8th Earl of Sefton Molyneux
John Mollenax (1542 – 1583)
son of Lawrence Castellan of Liverpool Mollenaux
Mary Mollenax (1559 – 1598)
daughter of John Mollenax
Gabriell Francis Holland (1596 – 1660)
son of Mary Mollenax
John Holland (1628 – 1710)
son of Gabriell Francis Holland
Mary Elizabeth Holland (1620 – 1681)
daughter of John Holland
Richard Dearden (1645 – 1747)
son of Mary Elizabeth Holland
George Dearden (1705 – 1749)
son of Richard Dearden
George Darden (1734 – 1807)
son of George Dearden
David Darden (1770 – 1820)
son of George Darden
Minerva Truly Darden (1806 – 1837)
daughter of David Darden
Sarah E Hughes (1829 – 1911)
daughter of Minerva Truly Darden
Lucinda Jane Armer (1847 – 1939)
daughter of Sarah E Hughes
George Harvey Taylor (1884 – 1941)
son of Lucinda Jane Armer
Ruby Lee Taylor (1922 – 2008)
daughter of George Harvey Taylor
Pamela Morse

Name: HUMPHREY VIII de Bohn
Given Name: HUMPHREY VIII de
Surname: Bohn
Suffix: Earl Of Hereford & Essex

Birth: 1275-1276 in Pleshey Castle, Essex, England
Death: 16 Mar 1321-1322 in Boroughbridge, Yorkshire, Eng
Burial: Aft 16 Mar 1321-1322 Friars Preachers Church, York, Yorkshire, England 1 1
Event: Alt. Birth 1275 Pleshey Castle, Essex, England
Event: Alt. Death 16 Mar 1321-1322 Boroughbridge, Yorkshire, England
Event: Killed Try To Force Boroughbridge, Yorkshire Death

Humphrey de Bohun VIII, born c1276, slain at Boroughbridge 16 Mar 1321/2,Earl of Hereford and Essex, Lord High Constable of England; married 14Nov 1302, Elizabeth Plantagenet, born Aug 1282, died 5 May 1316, daughterof King Edward I of England and Eleanor of Castile. [Magna Charta Sureties]

Humphrey de Bohun,Earl of Hereford, Earl of Essex, and Lord HighConstable. In the 30th Edward I[1302-3], this nobleman gave and granted unto the king, by a formal conversance, the inheritances of al his landsand lordships, as also of his earldoms of Hereford and Essex, and the constableship of England, which, upon his marriage with Elizabeth Plantagenet, widow of John, Earl of Holland, and dau. of the king, were regranted to him and entailed upon his issue lawfully begotten by thatlady; in default thereof, and from and after the death of himself and wife, then the lordship of Plessets and certain other lordships in Essexand elsewhere, together with the constableship, should remain wholly tothe king and his heirs forever.

In the 34th of the same reign he had a grant similarly entailed of the whole territory of Annandale, in Scotland. After this his lordship was in the wars of Scotland and was taken prisoner in the 7th Edward II(1313-14), at the disastrous battle (to the English) of Stryvelin. But he was exchanged for the wife of Robert Bruce, who had long been captive in England. From this period we find him constantly engaged in the service of the crown until the14th year of the king’s reign [1321-22], when Edward learning that the earl was raising forces in the marches of Wales against Hugh de Spencer the younger, sent him a peremptory command to forbear, which his lordship not only refused obeying but forthwith joined Thomas,Earl of Lancaster, in the great insurrection then incited by that nobleman for the redress of certain grievances and the banishment of the Spencers.In his proceeding, however, he eventually lost his life, being run through the body by a soldier at the battle of Boroughbridge, in Yorkshire, where his party received so signal a defeat on 16 March, 1321.
The earl had issue five surviving sons and two surviving daus., viz.,John, Humphrey, Edward, William, Humphrey, Alianore, and Margaret. The earl was s. by his eldest son, Sir John de Bohun, K.B. [Sir Bernard Burke, Dormant and Extinct Peerages, Burke’s Peerage, London, 1883, p.57, Bohun, Earls of Hereford, Earls of Essex, Earls of Northampton, and High Constables of England]

21st century The moat, all that remains of Pleshey Castle

21st century
The moat, all that remains of Pleshey Castle

James Oscar Byrne and the Luck of the Irish

March 17, 2016 1 Comment

James Oscar Byrne (1840 – 1879)
2nd great-grandfather
Sarah Helena Byrne (1878 – 1962)
daughter of James Oscar Byrne
Olga Fern Scott (1897 – 1968)
daughter of Sarah Helena Byrne
Richard Arden Morse (1920 – 2004)
son of Olga Fern Scott
Pamela Morse
I am the daughter of Richard Arden Morse

My second great-grandfather was born in County Meathe, Ireland and immigrated to the United States during the potato famine with his family.  He arrived in New York at the age of 7 in 1848.  His family took up residence in Wilna, Jefferson County, in upstate New York.  I know from notes left to me by his daughter, my great-grandmother, that he and his brother Luke operated a saw mill in Michigan before they moved to Kansas.  She wrote that they sent all the wood to build homes in Kansas from that mill.  On the Kansas census of 1875 he says he moved to Kansas from Wyoming, which was pretty wild at the time.  He was married to Hattie Peterson, age 19, and her parents lived next door to them in that census.  James owned a large piece of property, much larger than Hattie’s family, and his profession was listed as farmer.

James and Hattie had 2 daughters born in Ladore, Kansas, where James is buried.  After all the adventures he endured crossing the ocean (a voyage during which two of his siblings died), lumber speculating in Michigan, making it to Wyoming, and settling on the frontier in Kansas he died in 1879 at the age of 38, when my great-grandmother Sarah Helena was less than a year old.  I don’t know the cause of death.  He was probably the only Catholic in his wife’s family, and maybe the only Catholic in my entire ancestry.  I was Catholic for a year when I went to boarding school because I didn’t like to go to long Moravian church services and being Catholic was the only way to get out of it.  My parents did not object.  I wonder if that was some kind of calling from clan O’Byrne that lead me to do that.  I will never know but on St. Patrick’s Day I feel proud of James Oscar and his adventurous spirit.

Erin Go Bragh!

Irish Love

Irish Love

Jonathan Aaron Taylor, 3rd Great-Grandfather

February 11, 2016 1 Comment

revolutionary pension

revolutionary pension

My third great-grandfather served in the Revolutionary War. On his pension his rank is listed as Dragoon, which is a name for cavalry soldier.  After the war all of the cavalry units were disbanded.  His wife Joanna received $50 twice a year from 1836-1850 to compensate for his service. He married at the age of 26 and died in South Carolina at the age of 60.

Jonathan Aaron Taylor (1760 – 1820)
3rd great-grandfather
John Samuel Taylor (1798 – 1873)
son of Jonathan Aaron Taylor
William Ellison Taylor (1839 – 1918)
son of John Samuel Taylor
George Harvey Taylor (1884 – 1941)
son of William Ellison Taylor
Ruby Lee Taylor (1922 – 2008)
daughter of George Harvey Taylor
Pamela Morse
I am the daughter of Ruby Lee Taylor

Jonathan Taylor enlisted in service in Cumberland County, Virginia. He was discharged at Cambridge in South Carolina on June 9, 1781. He was wounded at the Battle of Herrington, N. J., and also was in the Battles of Brandywine and Monmouth in New Jersey. He served under Col. Bailee and Col. William Washington.

revolutionary pension

revolutionary pension

Rev. Henry Nichols, Missionary to Pennsylvania

November 23, 2015 8 Comments

St. David's Church, Radnor, Pa.

St. David’s Church, Radnor, Pa.

My 8th great grandfather was born in Wales and died in Maryland.  He came to Pennsylvania on a mission for the Anglican church.  He wrote his own epitaph in Latin which is telling about his beliefs.  He was harsh on himself.

Rev. Henry Nicholls, B.A., 1703 & M.A., 1715, Jesus College, Oxford, Wales. He was sent to Pennsylvania, 1702-1708, during the reign of King James II. He ministered at Chester, Pennsylvania.   The Chester Church is described as of good brick fabric, one of the neatest on the continent, furnished with handsome furniture and pews.  He also served St. David’s Church, Radnor, Pa. and at Concord and Montgomery, Pa. Later, he was transferred to St. Michael’s Parish, Talbot Co., Maryland where he served, 1708-1749, (41 years).

From William King and Virginia Watkins – Their Ancestors and Descendents compiled by Maellen King Ford

Henry Nichols was the first residential missionary to Pennsylvania for the “Society for Propagation of the Gospel in Foreign Parts“, arriving in 1703. His churches were located in Chester, Concord, Radnor, and Montgomery. The members were regular and constant in divine worship, and they contributed 60 pounds a year toward their pastor’s support. The Radnor Church is still in excellent preservation, known as St. David’s Church and has been in use since 1708. Rev Nichols requested a transfer in 1708 and became rector at St. Michael’s Parish Church. Talbot Co., MD – a post he occupied until his death. For years, all records of his life were lost. The early church books had disappeared! Until June 1878 when workmen, employed to demolish the old church building, found his tomb under the Chancel in good preservation.

The following is a translation of the Latin inscription found on the slab over his tomb: “Here lies the remains of Henry Nicols, M. A., formerly a Fellow of Jesus College, Oxford, England, and a pastor of this church for 41 years – most unworthy. Born April 1st, 1678; died Feb. 12, 1748. Save his soul, O Christ for Thy own merits. Tread upon salt without savor.” (Henry has ordered these works to be inscribed before his death.) A number of his descendents still worship at St. Michael’s Church. They placed a tablet there to his memory where he ministered for so long. (From the Historical Magazine of the Protestant Episcopal Church, 1943, by Mary Clement, M. A., Principal of the Girls County School Board, Bridgend, Glamorganshire, Wales.)

Rev. Henry Nichols (1678 – 1748)
is my 8th great grandfather
William Nicholls (1709 – 1776)
son of Rev. Henry Nichols
Amos Nicholls (1740 – )
son of William Nicholls
Amos Nicholls (1780 – )
son of Amos Nicholls
Amos Nicholls (1808 – 1868)
son of Amos Nicholls
Emiline P Nicholls (1837 – )
daughter of Amos Nicholls
Harriet Peterson (1856 – 1933)
daughter of Emiline P Nicholls
Sarah Helena Byrne (1878 – 1962)
daughter of Harriet Peterson
Olga Fern Scott (1897 – 1968)
daughter of Sarah Helena Byrne
Richard Arden Morse (1920 – 2004)
son of Olga Fern Scott
Pamela Morse
I am the daughter of Richard Arden Morse

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