mermaidcamp

mermaidcamp

Keeping current in wellness, in and out of the water

You can scroll the shelf using and keys

Samuel Wilbore, Pioneer Wheeler Dealer

May 30, 2016 13 Comments

Central Burial Grounds Boston

Central Burial Grounds Boston

My 10th great-grandfather was banished from the colony of Massachusetts, and signed the Portsmouth Compact.  He did not stay in Rhode Island for very long, but returned to live in Boston, where he was one of the citizens who purchased the Boston Common and donated it to the town.  I am not sure how he became un-banished, but his case is not the only un-banishment in our family.  He kept his property in Rhode Island and had extensive holdings in Boston as well.  He was in the wool business.

Portsmith Compact

Portsmith Compact

Samuel Wilbore and wife Ann, came to America before 1 December, 1633 and lived in Boston. May have come 4 September, 1633 on ship “Griffin” He was a merchant, had a ship, probably sold cloth and lumber and was in the wool business.
He and 6 men under him guarded the gate at Roxbury. He sold his home on what is now Washington St. to Samuel Sherman. In 1634, he and William Blackstene bought “Boston Commons” and gave it to the town. Made “Freeman” 4 March 1633/4 and with John Porter and Philly Sherman bought Aquidneck Island, (Rhode Island). He was banished from Boston 30 August 1637, and disarmed 20 November 1637 and went to Portsmouth, R.I. because of his association with a religious group lead by Anne Hutchinson, Mr. Wheelwright and possibly Roger Williams. Anne Hutchinson was the unauthorized Puritan preacher of a dissident church discussion group.
Rhode Island had become a haven for persecuted religious sects. These people, called Antinomians, believed that the moral laws as taught by the Church of England were of no value and that the only law that should be followed was that of the Gospel. Quakers, who eventually merged with the Antinomians, established a meeting house on Aquidneck in 1657.
11 January 1638/9 he was constable at Portsmouth. He owned land at Nt. Wolliston (now Quincy). With Ralph Earle he built a planing mill at Portsmouth,1640. By 1645 was back in Boston, though he kept his Portsmouth and Taunton land, and lived on Mill Street. He was wealthy and gave to the 1st free school in America. The early spelling was “Welleboro”, a Norman name. In 1626 he was a “juror” in Sible Hedington, Essex, England.

Samuel Wilbore (1595 – 1656)
10th great-grandfather
Dorothy Wilbore (1617 – 1696)
daughter of Samuel Wilbore
Elizabeth Albro (1646 – 1720)
daughter of Dorothy Wilbore
Benjamin Congdon (1676 – 1756)
son of Elizabeth Albro
William Congdon (1711 – 1755)
son of Benjamin Congdon
Frances Congdon (1738 – 1755)
daughter of William Congdon
Thomas Sweet (1765 – 1844)
son of Frances Congdon
Valentine Sweet (1791 – 1858)
son of Thomas Sweet
Sarah LaVina Sweet (1840 – 1923)
daughter of Valentine Sweet
Jason A Morse (1862 – 1932)
son of Sarah LaVina Sweet
Ernest Abner Morse (1890 – 1965)
son of Jason A Morse
Richard Arden Morse (1920 – 2004)
son of Ernest Abner Morse
Pamela Morse

Samuel Wilbore was born in Jan 1595 in Sible Hedingham, Essex, England. He died on 29 Sep 1656 in Boston, Suffolk, Massachusetts. Samuel married Ann Smith on 13 Jan 1619/1620 in Sible, Hedingham, Essex, England.

Samuel Wildbore, said to have been born in 1585, came to Boston not later than 1633, and was admitted to the First Church of Boston on December 1/1633. His house was on the neck of land between the island and the mainland, now called Washington St. and later Milk Street. In 1634 Samuel and others bought the Boston Common for the town, from William Blackstone whose ownership was acknowledged by an entry in the Town Records as early as 1633 by which it was agreed that William Blackstone shall have 50 acres set off to him near his house in Boston. The Town Records have the following statement in reference to Samuel Wildbore’s share in the purchase of the Common. “The 10th day of the 9th month 1654: Item, Edmund Quinsey, Samuel Wildbore, William Baulston, Edward Hutchinson the elder, and William heesborough, constable, shall make and assess all the rates, viz, a rate of œ30 to William Blackstone”. Blackstone sold the whole parcel of land except 6 acres immediately adjoining his house. On August 6/1635, Samuel gave œ10 towards a free school, the first in America. Governor Winthrop gave a like amount, and none other gifts exceeded this amount. Samuel also had a piece of land on Essex St., near where the Touraine Hotel now stands. Samuel married in 1620, at Sibley Hedringham, England, Ann Smith. Most genealogies wrongly give her name as Ann Bradford. Samuel was made freeman on March 4/1634. He bought much property in Taunton and likewise possessed considerable holdings in Boston, evidently dividing his place of residence between the two places. While in Taunton, he with others, embraced the “dangerous doctrines” as they were then called, of Cotton and Wheelwright, for which in 1637 he was banished from the Massachusetts Colony. Acting upon the advice of Roger Williams, he and seventeen others fled to Providence, R.I., where they purchased the island of Aquidnec, (now Rhode Island) from the Naragansett Indians, and early in 1638 moved his family there and formed a colony on March 7/1638. Full details of the purchase and history of this action is contained in the Genealogies quoted, but too long to insert here. He did not remain in Rhode Island for long, and returned to Boston in 1645 and built the first iron furnace in New England at Taunton, now Raynham, on the main road from Tilicut to Taunton. He was clerk of the town board in 1638, Constable in 1639, Sergeant in 1644. He married, 2nd, before November 29/1645, Elizabeth Lechford, widow of Thomas Lechford. Date of his second marriage and date of death of his first wife Ann are not known. Samuel died July 24/1656. After his death Elizabeth married, 2nd, on December 20/1656, Henry Bishop who died in 1664: Elizabeth died in 1665. Samuel was a man of wealth and he was of very respectable standing in society, exerting a wide influence in each of the places he dwelt. His will was dated April 30/1656.

Ann SMITH-8832 was born on 13 Jan 1598 in Sible, Hedingham, Essex, England. She died on 24 Sep 1636 in Taunton, Bristol, Massachusetts. Ann married Samuel WILDBORE-8833 on 13 Jan 1619/1620 in Sible, Hedingham, Essex, England.
They had the following children.
MiSamuel WILBORE-8830 was born on 10 Apr 1622. He died in 1697. MiiWilliam WILBORE-8838 was born on 21 May 1630. He died on 15 Apr 1710.

William Hammond

June 25, 2014 1 Comment

 

Hammond Coat of Arms

Hammond Coat of Arms

My 10th great-grandfather was born and went bankrupt in England.  His family sailed to America at different times, William himself probably arriving in 1631 on the ship Lyon.  He lived in Watertown, MA. raising animals.  We have a record of his will.

William Hammond (1575 – 1662)
is my 10th great grandfather
Elizabeth Hammond (1620 – 1703)
daughter of William Hammond
Elishua Crowell (1643 – 1708)
daughter of Elizabeth Hammond
Yelverton Gifford (1676 – 1772)
son of Elishua Crowell
Ann Gifford (1715 – 1795)
daughter of Yelverton Gifford
Frances Congdon (1738 – 1755)
daughter of Ann Gifford
Thomas Sweet (1759 – 1844)
son of Frances Congdon
Valentine Sweet (1791 – 1858)
son of Thomas Sweet
Sarah LaVina Sweet (1840 – 1923)
daughter of Valentine Sweet
Jason A Morse (1862 – 1932)
son of Sarah LaVina Sweet
Ernest Abner Morse (1890 – 1965)
son of Jason A Morse
Richard Arden Morse (1920 – 2004)
son of Ernest Abner Morse
Pamela Morse
I am the daughter of Richard Arden Morse
William HammondBirth: 1575, Lavenham, Suffolk, England.
Baptized: 30 Oct 1575, Lavenham, Suffolk, England.
Death: 8 Oct 1662, Watertown, Massachusetts. “Aged about ninety-four [sic].

Father: Thomas Hammond, born and died in England.
Mother: Rose Trippe, born and died in Lavenham, Suffolk, England.

1629: On 26 Feb 1629/30, William Hammond was declared bankrupt in England.

1629: On “the 20th of November after that date, he departe[d] the land and fleeth into New England. Information from a 1656 law suit against William Hammond, citing this occurance. This would place him on the “Lyon” which sailed from Bristol on 1 Dec 1630/1631, and arriving in New England the following February.

Emigration: 1631. See above.
The Hammond family came to New England in at least three stages. In late 1630 or early 1631, John Winthrop Jr. noted receipt of £7 5s. from “Goody Hammond to send her husband.” This supports the conclusion that William Hammond was a passenger on the “Lyon” when it sailed from Bristol in late 1631.

On 26 Sept 1633, Governor John Winthrop, wrote to Sir Simonds D’Ewes, informing him that “Yours by young Hamond I received,” indicating that William Hammond Jr. probably sailed for New England in one of the ships that arrived in the fall of 1633. His sister Anne and brother Thomas may also have come at this time, because they are not included, a year later, in the passenger list of the “Francis”, which sailed from Ipswich, in the spring of 1634, with Elizabeth Hammond, (aged 47); Elizabeth Hammond, (aged 15); Sarah Hammond, (aged 10); and John Hammond, (aged 7) on board.

First Residence: William’s first residence was Watertown, Massachusetts.

Occupation: Husbandman.

Religion: Admitted to Watertown Church prior to 25 May 1636, (implied by freemanship.)

1636: Admitted as a Freeman, 25 May 1636.

1636: In his record of admissions to Scituate Church, Rev. John Lathrop, entered on 14 Apr 1636, “Elizabeth Hammon, my sister, having a dismission from the church at Watertown.”

1636: On 25 Jul 1636, William Hammond was granted forty acres in the Great Dividend.

1637: Granted eight acres in the Remote Meadows, 26 Jun 1637.

1641: Granted a farm of one hundred fifty-five acres, 10 May 1642.

1645: In the “year 1645 Rose his mother dyeth … but now in the year 1647 his son Thomas come from New England to be admitted to the land.”

1647: On 22 Nov 1647, “W[illia]m Hamond granted a letter of attorney unto Thomas Hamond, his son, to ask demand of the lord of the manor the possession of certain lands in Lavenham, in Suffolk which were the possession of Rose Steward, his mother.”

1647: William was a Watertown Selectman, 8 Nov 1647.

1656: Along with Isaac Stearns, William was an arbiter in a dispute between John Wincoll and Benjamin Crisp.

1656: “Old Goodman Hammond” was appointed to a committee to assign seats in the meeting house, 17 Nov 1656.

1660: On 6 Non 1660, Watertown Selectmen sent the constables to “Old Hamond to let him know, that contrary to order of town, he had entertained into his family such a person as is likely to prove chargeable, do therefore desire him to rid the town of such an encumbrance or otherwise to bear the burden thereof himself.”


In William’s will, dated 1 Jul 1662 and proved 16 Dec 1662:

“William Hammond of Watertowne … now about ninety years of age” bequeathed to “my loving dear wife Elizabeth Hammond my whole estate” for life;
and after her death, to “my son John Hammond all my houses, lands;”
to “Thomas Hammond son of my son Thomas Hammond, deceased,” £40 when twenty-one, but if he dies before that then “the £40 to be equally divided between the children of my daughter House, daughter Barnes, [i.e., Barron’s], children”; to “daughter Barnes” £30;
to “the four children of my daughter Elizabeth House deceased” £5 apiece; to “Adam Smith son of my daughter Sarah … one mare colt”
and to “my daughter Sarah Smith” £5.

The inventory of the estate of William Hammond totalled £467 16s. 9d., including £318 in real estate:
one dwelling house, an orchard £24;
23 acres of pasture land, £69;
11 acres of broken-up land, £48;
15 acres of meadow, £90;
8 acres of meadow remote, £15;
18 acres of land in lieu of township, £6;
1 Great Dividend, 40 acres, £40;
1 farm, 160 acres, £20; and
a part of a barn, £6.

His inventory also included “one great Bible and 3 other books” valued at 13s.


Married: Elizabeth Paine, baptized in Lavenham 22 Sep 1586. She was the daughter of William and Agnes Neves Paine. Elizabeth arrived in New England in 1634 on the “Francis” with her three youngest children. Elizabeth died 27 Sep 1670, in Watertown, Massachusetts, “aged about ninety years [sic].”
Marriage: 9 Jun 1605, in Lavenham, Suffolk, England.

Children of William Hammond and Elizabeth Paine Hammond:

  1. William Hammond, baptized 20 Sep 1607, in Lavenham, Suffolk, England. He was killed by Indians in June 1636. Not believed to have married.
  2. Anne Hammond, baptized 19 Nov 1609, in Lavenham, Suffolk, England. She died there 7 Jun 1615.
  3. John Hammond, baptized 5 Dec 1611, in Lavenham, Suffolk, England. He died there 16 Aug 1620.
  4. Anne Hammond, baptized 14 Jul 1616, in Lavenham, Suffolk, England. Married 1: Timothy Hawkins. Married 2: 14 Dec 1653, Ellis Barron.
  5. Thomas Hammond, baptized 17 Sep 1618, in Lavenham, Suffolk, England. He returned to England in 1647/1648, to reclaim his grandmother’s lands. Thomas married Hannah Cross in 1655. Their only child, Thomas, was born at Watertown, Massachusetts on 11 July 1656. Thomas Hammond, the father, had died on 10 Dec 1655, and Hannah, the mother, died on 24 Mar 1656.
  6. Elizabeth Hammond, born about 1619. Married: Samuel House of Scituate, Massachusetts, about Apr 1636. 7. Sarah Hammond, baptized 21 Oct 1623, in Lavenham, Suffolk, England. Married Richard Smith of Long Island, by 1646

Rev Thomas Crosby, 9th Great Grandfather

May 23, 2013 2 Comments

Crosby Coat of Arms

Crosby Coat of Arms

My 9th great-grandfather made it across the Atlantic Ocean to arrive in the new world at the age of 8 months, in 1635.  He was born in England and his grave can be found today, located in Boston.  He graduated from Harvard College and became a minister.  There are conflicting reports about his formal ordination, but no doubt that he was employed to teach religion.  He also got to trade ammo and alcohol. He made his money selling liquor, powder, and shot. This paints a funny picture if you ask me, but I am prejudiced against much of the founding fathers’ behavior.  Thomas was well respected in his time as a preaching ammo and alcohol dealer.  I appreciate that he survived so I can be here today. It would have been very easy to die on the voyage from England as an infant, but he had a different destiny.

Thomas Crosby (1635 – 1702)

is my 9th great grandfather
Sarah Crosby (1667 – 1706)
daughter of Thomas Crosby
Sarah Sears (1697 – 1785)
daughter of Sarah Crosby
Sarah Hamblin (1721 – 1814)
daughter of Sarah Sears
Mercy Hazen (1747 – 1819)
daughter of Sarah Hamblin
Martha Mead (1784 – 1860)
daughter of Mercy Hazen
Abner Morse (1808 – 1838)
son of Martha Mead
Daniel Rowland Morse (1838 – 1910)
son of Abner Morse
Jason A Morse (1862 – 1932)
son of Daniel Rowland Morse
Ernest Abner Morse (1890 – 1965)
son of Jason A Morse
Richard Arden Morse (1920 – 2004)
son of Ernest Abner Morse
Pamela Morse
You are the daughter of Richard Arden Morse
Reverend Thomas Crosby was baptized at Holme on February 26, 1635, named after his grandfather. He was brought to New England by his parents on 2 October 1635 (8 months old).

He graduated from Harvard College in 1653. Although never ordained, he was hired in 1655 to preach in the church at Eastham, MA and continued as minister succeeding Reverend John Mayo there until 1670 at a salary of 50 pounds per annum. Reverend Crosby was also engaged in trade and in 1664 was among those who kept for sale “liquor, powder and shot”.

Later, he became a merchant at Harwich, Mass., and while on a business trip to Boston was found dead in bed there, 13 June 1702, aged sixty-seven years. His inventory totalled £1091-16-0 with debts of £717-16-0, leaving a net estate of £374-0-0. His heirs divided his property by agreement, 8 Aug. 1705.Marriage 2 Sarah FITCH b: in Mass.1662Children Thomas CROSBY, Jr. b: 7 APR 1663 Sarah CROSBY b: 24 MAR 1666/67 Joseph CROSBY b: 27 JAN 1668/69 John CROSBY b: 4 DEC 1670 in Eastham, Massachusetts William CROSBY b: 16 MAR 1672/73 Ebenezer CROSBY b: 28 MAR 1675 Anne CROSBY b: 14 APR 1678 Mercy CROSBY b: 14 APR 1678Increase CROSBY b: 14 APR 1678 Eleazer CROSBY b: 31 MAR 1680When Thomas was eleven years of age and his brother Joseph was seven, they removed with their Mother to Braintree, a Village on the south side of Boston, Mass. now Quincy, after her marriage to the Rev. William Tompson.After attending District School, with the assistance of Doctor Tompson, entered Harvard College, graduating in 1653, and was ordained a clergyman. He was minister at Eastham, Mass. from 1655 to 1670. He seems to have been engaged as a religious teacher to carry on the Sabbath Service at a salary of 50 pounds.While at Eastham, he was engaged in a trade. He resided near the burying ground, a place he bought of Jonathan Sparrow in 1665. He removed to Harwich, about 1670, here he was also engaged in a trade. His widow, Sarah, the mother of his 12 children, m. Apr. 28, 1703, John Miller, of Yarmouth. He died in 1702 and has many descendants living in the vicinity of Cape Cod, Mass. He had a half-sister Anna, born in 1648.

In about 1662 he married Sarah Fitch. Their children born in Eastham, MA were: 1. Thomas born April 7, 1663, died May 21, 1731. 2. Simon born July 5, 1665, died 1718 3. Sarah born March 24, 1666-7, married Silas Sears 4. Joseph born January 27,1668-9, died May 30, 1725. 5-6. JOHN (3) born December 4, 1670 and died May 25, 1717 and twin who died February 11, 1670/1 7. William born March 1672-3 8. Ebenezer born March 28, 1675 9-11. Anne, Mercy and Increase born April 14, 1678 (Anne married William (2) Luce, (Henry 1) on July 5,1704) 12. Eleazer born March 31, 1680Later he became a merchant at Harwich, MA and was one of the founders of the church in that town. On a business trip to Bostonhe was found dead in bed there on the 13th or 27th of June 1702, age 67 years. He is buried in the Old Granary Cemetery in Boston, MA. After his death, his widow Sarah married John (2) Miller of Yarmouth on April 8, 1703, son of Reverend John and Lydia Miller.

Thomas Howlett, 10th Great Grandfather

May 21, 2013

Howlett Coat of Arms

Howlett Coat of Arms

Thomas Howlett arrived in America on the ship Hopewell in 1630 to live in Boston. He was a carpenter, and had skills as a surveyor.  He was active in church and military matters.

Thomas Howlett (1605 – 1678)
is my 10th great grandfather
Thomas Howlett (1638 – 1667)
son of Thomas Howlett
Mary HOWLETT (1664 – 1727)
daughter of Thomas Howlett
John Hazen (1687 – 1772)
son of Mary HOWLETT
Caleb Hazen (1720 – 1777)
son of John Hazen
Mercy Hazen (1747 – 1819)
daughter of Caleb Hazen
Martha Mead (1784 – 1860)
daughter of Mercy Hazen
Abner Morse (1808 – 1838)
son of Martha Mead
Daniel Rowland Morse (1838 – 1910)
son of Abner Morse
Jason A Morse (1862 – 1932)
son of Daniel Rowland Morse
Ernest Abner Morse (1890 – 1965)
son of Jason A Morse
Richard Arden Morse (1920 – 2004)
son of Ernest Abner Morse
Pamela Morse
I am the daughter of Richard Arden Morse

Name Thomas HOWLETT Sergeant, Ensign
Birth 1605, Assington, Suffolk, England
Death 24 Sep 1677, Topsfield, Essex, Massachusetts
Occupation Carpenter
Father William HOWLETT (1579-)

Misc. NotesFrom co. Suffolk, England. Removed Ipswich 1633. Deposed 1658, aged 52. Church member 1630.29One of the first settlers in Agawam (Ipswich) 1632/33. Deputy from Ipswich 1635 and Topsfield 1665 and often employed in running lines and locating towns and farms.Ipswich, Massachusetts Deputy in 1635. Ensign of Ipswich Company under Captain Daniel Dennison, 3rd Regiment, Colonel John Endicott 1636.102Thomas Howlett was twenty-five years old when he came to New England in 1630 aboard the ship “Hopewell” as part of Governor Winthrop’s Fleet. He was a carpenter by trade, with origins in South Elmham Parish of Suffolk County, East Anglia in England. He first settled in Boston, as did a majority of Winthrop colonists, and became a member of the First Church on August 27, 1630. In the spring of 1633 he married Alice French, daughter of Thomas and Susan (Riddlesdale) French, who apparently had emigrated to New England prior to her parents. She was a member of the First Church and was eventually dismissed on September 10, 1643 to the church in Ipswich as “Our sister Alice French ye wife of Thomas Howlet of Ipswich.”Although Howlett later settled in Topsfield where he spent the latter years of his life, he was one of the nine originals of John Winthrop Jr’s 1633 party settling the Indian village Agawam, which the next year became the town of Ipswich. He was sworn a freeman at Ipswich on March 4, 1633.In 1634 Ipswich granted Howlett, in partnership with John Manning and others, on the neck of land on which the town stood, two acres of meadow and two and a half acres of marsh between the town riger and the lands of William Sergient (probably Sargent) and John Newman. Added to this in 1635 was a house lot in the town, thirty acres of upland and ten of meadow at the head of Chebacco Creek and ten acres north of the town toward the Reedy marsh. In 1637 he purchased forty acres from John Perkins, Sr. His later acquired Topsfield holdings are described in his will.Thomas Howlett’s highest political office came to him as a young man, when, in 1635, he represented Ipswich in the General Court. he served on the Essex County Jury of Trials in 1654, 1657, and 1665 and on the Grand Jury in 1650, 1659, 1666, and 1667 and served as Selectman of Topsfield in 1661.In 1640 he was sergeant of the Ipswich military defense company and later became its ensign. In 1643 he, as Sergeant, and ten other militiamen were voted compensation by the town for their three days acting in defense of the Agawam Indians against their tribal enemies. In 1672 he became a Deacon of the Topsfield Church and his contribution of five pounds to the salary of Rev. Jeremiah Hubbard was the largest of those made.There were eight children of Howlett’s marriage with Alice — Sarah (1633/34-1700), John (1633/34-1674/75), alice (1636-1696), Thomas, Jr. (1637/34-1667), Mary (1641/42-1718), Nathaniel (1646-1658), William (1649/50-1718), and Samuel (1654/55-1719/20). On June 6, 1666, after the death of Alice he married Rebecca Smith, widow of Thomas Smith if Ipswich and Newbury, with his step-son, Thomas Smith, in 1671, choosing him as his guardian.Thomas Howlett died in Topsfield, Essex County on September 24, 1677.Military Was in Pequot War32, No. 74, pg. 120, 1920Spouses

1 Alice FRENCH
Birth 9 Oct 1609
Death 26 Jun 1666, Topsfield, Essex, Massachusetts
Christen 9 Apr 1610, Assington (St. Edmund’s), Suffolk, England
Father Thomas FRENCH (<1584-<1639)
Mother Susan RIDDLESDALE (<1584-1658)

Misc. NotesProbably emigrated to America with her brother Thomas. Alice was dismissed from the Boston Church to Ipswich 16 Jun 1644.

Marriage 1 Jan 1633/34, Ipswich, Essex, Massachusetts
Children Sarah (1633-1700)
Alice (ca1636-<1696)
Thomas (1637-1667)
Mary (1641-1718)
John (1643-1675)
Samuel (1645-1719)
Nathaniel (ca1646-1658)
William (1649-1718)
2 Rebecca SMITH
Death before 1 Jan 1634/35
Father Thomas SMITH
Mother Alice

Simon Crosby, 10th Great Grandfather

March 25, 2013 1 Comment

Simon Crosby signature on indenture of land

Simon Crosby signature on indenture

Simon Crosby, perhaps a brother of Thomas of Cambridge and Rowley, embarked from England in the ship “Susan and Ellen,” April 13, 1635, being then twenty-six years old, with his wife Ann, aged twenty-five, and infant son Thomas, eight weeks old. He settled in Cambridge, Mass., where he was a husbandman and was a proprietor as early as February 8, 1636. He was admitted a freeman in that year, and served as selectman in 1636 and 1638. He had several grants of land, and his estate, later known as the “Brattle place,” passed into the hands of Rev. William Brattle, his residence being at what is now the corner of Brattle street and Brattle square. He died in September, 1639, at the early age of thirty-one years, leaving sons Thomas, born in England; Simon, born in 1637, in Cambridge; and Joseph, 1639, at the same place. The widow married, in 1646, Rev. William Thompson, minister at Braintree, and became the second time a widow at his death, Dec. 10, 1666. She died Oct 8, 1676.

Simon Crosby (1608 – 1639)
is my 10th great-grandfather
Thomas Crosby (1635 – 1702)
son of Simon Crosby
Sarah Crosby (1667 – 1706)
daughter of Thomas Crosby
Sarah Sears (1697 – 1785)
daughter of Sarah Crosby
Sarah Hamblin (1721 – 1814)
daughter of Sarah Sears
Mercy Hazen (1747 – 1819)
daughter of Sarah Hamblin
Martha Mead (1784 – 1860)
daughter of Mercy Hazen
Abner Morse (1808 – 1838)
son of Martha Mead
Daniel Rowland Morse (1838 – 1910)
son of Abner Morse
Jason A Morse (1862 – 1932)
son of Daniel Rowland Morse
Ernest Abner Morse (1890 – 1965)
son of Jason A Morse
Richard Arden Morse (1920 – 2004)
son of Ernest Abner Morse
Pamela Morse
I am the daughter of Richard Arden Morse

Ernest Howard Crosby,  In the portion of the family history taken from the October New York Genealogical and Biograpical Record, Surmises that Simon Crosby  ‘may have come to America as one of the company of the Rev. Thomas Shepard,  who crossed the ocean in that year (1635) and settled at Newtown, now Cambridge, Massachusetts.  This Mr. Shepard was preceeded or accompanied by a large number of his freinds and acquaintances.  He had taken orders in the Church of England, and had held livings in Yorkshire and Northumberland,  but he enertained conscientious scruples regarding the ceremonies of his church,  and was consequently so harassed by those in authority that he left England,  and became one of the most eminent clergymen in New England.  The Chief reason for establishing Harvard College at Cambridge is that he lived there.’

This record goes on to state that before the end of 1635 we find Simon Crosby living at Newtown (Cambridge).  He was admitted as a freeman on March 3, 1636 and chosen as a selectman in the fall of that year. In September of 1637 he was elected surveyor of highways; was selectman again in 1638, and in October of that year was elected constable.

On Dec. 5, 1636 land was granted to him and six others for pasture.  He died in Cambridge in September 1639,  at only 31 years of age. The cause of his death is not known, but we can surmise that his death may have been fairly sudden,  since he died intestate.  An addendum to Ernest Howard Crosby’s record quoted above says that the original inventory of the estate of Simon Crosby,  signed by his widow Anne, is on file in the archives of Massachusetts.

Gov Simon Bradstreet, 9th Great Grandfather

February 28, 2013 5 Comments

Gov Simon Bradstreet

Gov Simon Bradstreet

Bradstreet was chosen to fill several important positions in colonial affairs, and he served as an assistant in the lower house of the General Court for most of his life. During his first twenty years in the colony, he was heavily involved in business pursuits, as well as the founding of new towns. In 1661, he was chosen as an envoy to the court of Charles II, that monarch having recently been restored to power. In 1679 Bradstreet was chosen governor of the colony. He would turn out to be the last governor under the original charter. In 1686, the colony was denied its right to self-rule, and Sir Edmund Andros was installed as governor. Bradstreet served briefly as governor again after Andros was overthrown, but England replaced him with Sir William Phips in 1692. Bradstreet continued to serve in government until his death in 1697, in Salem, Massachusetts.

Simon Bradstreet built his first home in America at the present location of Harvard Square at Brattle Street and John F. Kennedy Street, Cambridge Massachusetts

Governor Simon Bradstreet (1604 – 1697)
is my 9th great grandfather
John Bradstreet (1652 – 1718)
son of Governor Simon Bradstreet
Mercy Bradstreet (1689 – 1725)
daughter of John Bradstreet
Caleb Hazen (1720 – 1777)
son of Mercy Bradstreet
Mercy Hazen (1747 – 1819)
daughter of Caleb Hazen
Martha Mead (1784 – 1860)
daughter of Mercy Hazen
Abner Morse (1808 – 1838)
son of Martha Mead
Daniel Rowland Morse (1838 – 1910)
son of Abner Morse
Jason A Morse (1862 – 1932)
son of Daniel Rowland Morse
Ernest Abner Morse (1890 – 1965)
son of Jason A Morse
Richard Arden Morse (1920 – 2004)
son of Ernest Abner Morse
Pamela Morse
I am the daughter of Richard Arden Morse

SIMON BRADSTREET

 

ORIGIN: Horbling, Lincolnshire

MIGRATION: 1630

FIRS T RESIDENCE: Boston

RE MOVES: Cambridge 1634, Ipswich 1636, Salem 1646, Andover 1652, Salem 1676, Boston by 1689, Salem 1692

RETU RN TRIPS: To England and return in 1662 on colony business

OCCUPATION: Magistrate.

CHURCH MEMBERSHIP: “Simon Brandstreete” admitted to Boston church as member #7, which would be in the fall of 1630 [BChR 13].

FREE MAN: 25 May 1636 [MBCR 1:372]. (He was one of seven men admitted on that day who had been involved with the Massachusetts Bay Company for many years, and had held high offices; their admission to freemanship on this date was merely a formality that recognized a status that had existed for some time.)

ED UCATION: Morison argues that the Simon Bradstreet who received degrees at Emmanuel College, Cambridge, was not the immigrant, although the immigrant did reside at that college about 1628-9 and was a very well-educated man [Morison 367-68; see Venn 1:203 for the record of the “other” Simon Bradstreet].

OFFICES: Assistant, Massachusetts Bay Colony, 1630 to 1678; Secretary, 1630 to 1636; Governor, 1679 to 1686 and 1689 to 1692; Commissioner of the United Colonies, 1644, 1663 to 1667 [MA Civil List 17-18, 21-26, 28]. (Savage credits Bradstreet with service as Deputy Governor from 1673 to 1678, but Samuel Symonds held this office in those years, as Savage also notes.) Bradstreet held many other offices at the county and local level, such as Cambridge selectman and Essex magistrate.

ESTATE: With other leading men of Essex county, “Mr. Symon Bradstreete” petitioned to be allowed a “free company of adventurers” to pursue trade in Massachusetts Bay, 1 October 1645 [MBCR2:138].

The General Court granted “Mr. Symon Bradstreete” eight hundred acres to be located near the farms of Capt. Keane and others, 23 May 1650 [MBCR 3:193, 413]. Bradstreet and Thomas Wiggen, gent., were granted one thousand acres near Dover, with the privilege of timber for their sawmill, 14 October 1651 [MBCR 3:247, 306, 364]. Mr. Bradstreet and Mr. Symonds were granted five hundred acres “in reference to service done at York and Kittery,” 14 September 1653 [MBCR 3:339] to be laid out eight miles from the Haverhill meeting house [MBCR 4:2:327]. He was granted another five hundred acres, August 1653, near the Connecticut River next to his two hundred acres, 6 May 1657 [MBCR 3:430], but was encouraged to locate it elsewhere, 28 May 1659 [MBCR 4:1:380]. As a result, he was granted an additional three hundred acres, to be six miles or more from the Northampton meeting house, 31 May 1660 [MBCR 4:1:420]. His five hundred acres near Hadley was in controversy 18 May 1664 [MBCR 4:2:106].

In his will, dated 23 December 1689 (with codicil of 27 January 1692/3) and proved 2 April 1697, “Simon Bradstreet of Boston … being at present in competent health and strength” set his house in order and “for my outward estate which God in his rich mercy hath blessed me withal in this Wilderness (having given all my eight children such portions as I thought meet and equal & divided my plate and household stuff amongst them)” the remainder was bequeathed to “my dear and loving wife Mrs. Ann Bradstreet all that estate real and personal whatsoever that I had of hers or with her in marriage … (according to agreement made with her before marriage) in lieu of her thirds,” also £10 per year during her life out of my farm at Lynn “whereon Cornet John Lewis now liveth,” also £10 more during her widowhood, one half from my house and land at Andover and the other half from my farm at Topsfield, also “my negro woman Hannah and her daughter Bilhah now living with me, not to be sold to any except in way of marriage, but if she finds meet to dispose of them or either of them before or at her death, then to some of my children whom she pleaseth,” also “use of that little household stuff I bought since I came to Boston during her pleasure and then to some of my children as she shall see meet,” also provisions at the house in Boston with one quarter rent of the house wherein I lived at my death “entreating her to accept of these small bequests as a testimony of my unfeigned love … in regard of that love, care and tenderness she hath always showed to me and mine”; whereas “by a former will I had given to my eldest son Samuel Bradstreet my farm at Lynn” but at his death by his will given to Mary Bradstreet “his eldest daughter by his first wife whom I have been forced to educate and maintain … since September 1670 … and have now three of my said son’s children sent me from Jamaica” make some alteration to this gift by granting my wife £10 a year from the farm and “to the said Mercy Bradstreet the daughter of my son Samuel” the farm in Lynn occupied by Cornet John Lewis, to her and her heirs or in want of such heirs of her body, to the children of her father Samuel Bradstreet equally she paying the aforementioned £10 to “her grandmother Ann Bradstreet”; to “the said Mercy her father’s picture and household goods”; to “John and Simon Bradstreet two of my son Samuel’s children now with me my house and land in Lynn” purchased of Major Samuel Appleton and his son Samuel, said land and house equally divided betwixt them, also to the said John Bradstreet my twenty acres of meadow and part of a little island in Topsfield; to “Anne Bradstreet another child of my son Samuel Bradstreet” a house and land in Lynn of forty-three acres lately purchased of Mr. Ezekiel Needham; “my dear and loving wife Mrs. Ann Bradstreet” executrix as regards the three children of my son Samuel viz. John Simon and Anne; to the three children of my son Simon Bradstreet viz. Simon John and Lucy, a half of all my houses and lands in Andover, also £10; to Simon Bradstreet the eldest of the three children before mentioned ten acres in Lynn near my farm; to “my son Dudley Bradstreet” the other half of my houses and lands in Andover, also to each of his children living at my decease £10 each; to “my son John Bradstreet and to the heirs of his body lawfully begotten my house and farm at Topsfield wherein he now liveth,” also the lots of wood belonging to the farm, also the parcel of meadow purchased of Robert Muzzey together with all the swamp and ten or twelve acres of upland, also £60 and to each of his children living at my decease £10 apiece, his heirs to receive the farm as follows, one half to his eldest son and the other half equally divided amongst the rest of his sons and daughters; to “my grandchild Mr. John Cotton of Hampton” £20 and to his sisters “the daughters of my daughter Dorothy” or so many of them living at my decease £10 each “only as to Ann’s legacy I leave it to my executor and overseers to do therein as they shall see cause and as she may deserve” by her carriage and behavior; to “my son-in-law Mr. Andrew Wiggin” all that debt which he owes me £50″ and to every of his children by “my daughter Hannah” living at my decease £10 each; to “my daughter Mrs. Sarah Ward and to her husband Capt. Samuel Ward” all that debt which her former husband Mr. Richard Hubbard owed me being more than £100, and to every of her children living at my decease £10; to “my daughter Mrs. Mercy Wade and to her husband Mr. Nathaniel Wade” my farm at Topsfield whereon John Hunkins now lives, with twenty six acres of upland, part of an island, also the lot of upland of forty acres, she or her husband paying yearly the sum of £5 to “my wife Mrs. Ann Bradstreet during her widowhood,” also to every one of her children living at my death £10 each; to “the three children of my son Simon” one farm of five hundred acres granted me for service to the colony and not laid out yet; to “my son Dudley Bradstreet” the other farm of five hundred acres granted me; to “the three children of my son Samuel (viz) John Simon and Anna now with me” £100 each for their education and make void a former bequest to them of my two houses and lands in Lynn mentioned in the former part of my will, “having already disposed of one of them”; to Mr. Samuel Willard “the Reverend Pastor of the South Church in Boston” £5; residue distributed by my executors to some of my grandchildren, especially to those of “my son Simon and Daughter Cotton whose parents had the least portions”; son Dudley Bradstreet sole executor except in duties committed to “my dear wife”; “my much honored friends Capt. Wait Winthrop Esqr. and Mr. Peter Sedgwick” overseers to accept 40s. each to buy a ring.

In a codicil dated 27 January 1692/3 Bradstreet altered the bequest of his two negros Hannah and Bilhah so they were completely at the dispose of wife Ann Bradstreet and she to pay to said negros 20s. each; to my wife my spectacles set in gold; again entrusted the education of his son Simon’s three children to wife Ann Bradstreet; to my grandson John [Bradstreet] my set of gold shirt buttons; to Simon a silver trencher salt; to Anna a silver porringer; to “my granddaughter Mrs. Mary Oliver her father’s picture”; to “my three grandchildren John, Simon and Anne, all the arrears of what is due to me for salary as late Governor of the Colony of the Massachusetts Bay”; to “my grandson Simon the son of my late son Mr. Simon Bradstreet” ten acres of land in Lynn “he standing in great need of my help”; authorized his executor to sell the farm at Topsfield if the price of £250 can be gotten, £100 to his three grandchildren, John, Simon and Anne the children of my son Samuel, and the rest to my daughter Wade; Mr. Isaac Addington overseer [SPR 11:276-82]. BIRTH: Baptized Horbling, Lincolnshire, 18 March 1603/4, son of Rev. Simon Bradstreet [NEHGR 48:168-71].

DEATH: Salem 27 March 1697 [Sewall 371].

MAR RIAGE: (1) Before 1630 Anne Dudley, daughter of THOMAS DUDLEY. (At the birth of her first child she wrote “It pleased God to keep me a long time without child …” [EIHC 64:303]. She was admitted to Boston church as member #13, shortly after her husband [BChR 13]. She died at Andover 16 September 1672. (Simon Bradstreet’s first wife, Anne (Dudley) Bradstreet, was, of course, the renowned poetess. Two recent studies of Anne Bradstreet and her poetry are Elizabeth Wade White, Anne Bradstreet: The Tenth Muse [New York 1971], and Ann Stanford, Anne Bradstreet: The Worldly Poet [New York 1974].) Of her children she wrote

I had eight birds hatcht in one nest,
Four cocks there were, and hens the rest;
I nurst them up with pain and care,
Nor cost, nor labour did I spare,
Till at the last they felt their wing,
Mounted the trees, and learn’d to sing
[EIHC 64:303].

(2) 6 June 1676 Ann (Downing) Gardner, baptized St. Brides Fleet Street, London, 12 April 1633, daughter of Emanuel Downing (by his second wife, Lucy Winthrop), and widow of Captain Joseph Gardner of Salem (son of THOMAS GARDNER) [Hale, House 518]; she d. 19 April 1713 [Sewall 710].

CHILDREN:

    With first wife
    i   SAMUEL, b. say 1632; Harvard College 1653 [Sibley 1:360-61]; m. (1) “in” 1662 Mercy Tyng [TAG 32:18]; m. (2) by 1682 Margery or Martha _____.
    ii   DOROTHY, b. say 1634; m. Andover 14 June 1654 Rev. Seaborn Cotton [Sibley 1:292], son of Rev. JOHN COTTON.
    iii   SARAH, b. say 1636; m. (1) by about 1658 Rev. Richard Hubbard [Sibley 1:342-43] (brother of William Hubbard the historian); m. (2) after 1681 Samuel Ward.
    iv   HANNAH, b. say 1638; m. Andover 3 June 1659 Andrew Wiggin, son of THOMAS WIGGIN [GDMNH 751].
    v   SIMON, b. 28 September 1640; Harvard College 1660 [Sibley 2:54-57]; m. Newbury 2 October 1667 Lucy Woodbridge.
    vi   MERCY, b. about 1647 (d. Medford 5 October 1714 “in her 68th year”); m. Andover 31 October 1672 Nathaniel Wade.
    vii   DUDLEY, b. say 1649; m. Andover 12 November 1673 Ann (Wood) Price, daughter of Richard and Ann (Priddeth) Wood and widow of Theodore Price [NEHGR 139:139-42].
    viii   JOHN, b. Andover 22 July 1652; m. Topsfield 11 June 1677 Sarah Perkins.

 

ASSOCIATIONS: As argued under JOHN BOSWORTH, Simon Bradstreet may have brought with him as servants ANTHONY COLBYJOHN BOSWORTHGARRETT HADDON and JOSEPH REDDING.

While still in England Bradstreet had married the daughter of THOMAS DUDLEY.COMMENTS:Bradstreet was partners with George Carr and Richard Saltonstall in a vessel captained by Elias Parkman, who plied up and down the coast from the Bay to Connecticut. Parkman’s debt was the subject of a letter by Saltonstall to Winthrop in October, 1638 [WP 4:64].

Stephen Bachiler invited the help of “our Christian Friend Mr. Brodstreet” the first working day when he began the settlement of Hampton [WP 4:70].

On 23 April 1646 Emmanuel Downing reported to John Winthrop that “Mr. Broadstreet is about to settle his habitation with us, at Salem; and to imploy his stock in trading here” [WP 5:78].

At the General Court on 27 November 1661, “the honored Mr. Bradstreete is called, on the service of the country, to leave his family’s occasions, & go for England…” [MBCR 4:2:36]. “1661 February 10th Mr. Bradstreet & Mr. Norton with Mr. Davis & Mr. Hull took ship & set sail the next morning” [RChR 199]. Eliot welcomes him home 3 September 1662: “Mr. Bradstreet & Mr. Norton returned from England, bringing with them a gracious letter from his Majesty confirming our Charter & liberties” [RChR 200]. In parallel with other New England colonies, Massachusetts Bay saw the need to send representatives to England at the time of the Restoration to see to their “liberties.”

John Eliot recorded on 10 July 1666 that

There happened a dreadful burning at Andover. Mr. Bradstreet’s house & the greatest part of his goods were burnt. The occasion of which burning was the carelessness of the maid, who put hot ashes into an hogshead over the porch: the tub fired about 2 o’clock in the morning & set the chamber & house on fire [RChR 204].

Unlike several of his contemporaries, Simon Bradstreet managed his estate with a firm hand and dealt with reliable people. There was no necessity for him to clog the courts with debt cases, and aside from the occasional dead cow [EQC 1:116], “worried hog” [EQC 1:248] or missing beaver skins [EQC 1:90], Bradstreet generally tended to stay on the bench and not before it. Certainly in comparison to others of similar broad trading interests, Bradstreet’s business career was quite peaceful. His choice of servants was generally good as well, although he did have a little trouble with Thomas “Shareman” [EQC 1:205].

BIBLIOGRAPHIC NOTE: Unlike many of his equally illustrious contemporaries, Bradstreet has not been the subject of a lengthy biography (having been eclipsed by his more famous wife in this regard). William Andrews Pew did summarize his life in 1928 [EIHC 64:301-28].

 

 

The Great Migration BeginsSketchesPRESERVED PURITAN

John Jenkins, London to Boston

December 10, 2012

Jenkins COA

Jenkins COA

My 10th great grandfather, John Jenkins sailed at age 26 on the “Defence” of London, from London the last of July 1635 and arrived at Boston October 8, 1635 with about 100 other passengers, according to Edward Bostock, master. That is a seriously long voyage.

John Jenkins (1609 – 1684)

is my 10th great grandfather
Daughter of John
Son of Mehitable
Son of Isaac
Daughter of Eleazer
Daughter of Sarah
Daughter of Mercy
Son of Martha
Son of Abner
Son of Daniel Rowland
Son of Jason A
Son of Ernest Abner
I am the daughter of Richard Arden

What is normally found in the search for family history is probate records, documents, bibles, and census records.  Every once in a while you come across a written piece about your ancestor. This one is not designated to a specific publication.  It is unusual because it gives you a picture of his physical presence as well as his philosophy.  I love the Longfellow at the end.

John was a man of about 5 ft. 10 in. in height, slim build and weighing about 155 lbs. His face was widest at the eyebrows and became narrower at the chin.  His forehead was moderately high. He had a long, slender neck. Mentally, he was a conservative. One who took time to think over a plan or proposition before coming to a decision. He had a great, retentive memory and was a Liberal in religion. He was a Liberal when it took raw courage to proclaim it. His voice was pitched higher than the average person and did not carry far.
He was a student in the very limited area of his time and what he read, he understood. This conclusion must be sound because of the very large number of his descendants who have made outstanding records as students and as teachers. And the many who became competant in the legal and medical professions. He must have been very capable and worth while pioneer: one of that class of persons whom Longfellow had in mind when he wrote, “And departing, leave behind us,…Footprints on the sand of time.”

%d bloggers like this: