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Humphrey Stafford, Duke of Buckingham, Eighteenth Great-Grandfather

September 8, 2018 2 Comments

Humphrey married Margaret Beaufort, daughter of Edmund Beaufort, 2nd Duke of Somerset and Eleanor Beauchamp. Her maternal grandparents were Richard de Beauchamp, 13th Earl of Warwick and his first wife, Elizabeth Beauchamp, 4th Baroness Lisle. She was also a first cousin to Anne Neville, 16th Countess of Warwick and through her cousin-by-marriage to Richard Neville, 16th Earl of Warwick, the so-called “Kingmaker” during the Wars of the Roses. Humphrey and Margaret had a single son Henry Stafford, 2nd Duke of Buckingham (4 September 1455 – 2 November 1483).

Humphrey fought under his father-in-law in support of the House of Lancaster during the First Battle of St Albans. He appears to have been badly wounded at this battle but actually survived for a least another 2–3 years. This may account for his disappearance from the contemporary records of the time. In 1458 he died from the plague.

The First Battle of St Albans, fought on 22 May 1455 at St Albans, 22 miles (35 km) north of London, traditionally marks the beginning of the Wars of the Roses. Richard, Duke of York and his ally, Richard Neville, Earl of Warwick, defeated the Lancastrians under Edmund, Duke of Somerset, who was killed. York also captured Henry VI, who appointed him Constable of England.

The Lancastrian army of 2,000 troops arrived at St Albans first, and proceeded to defend it by placing troops along the Tonman Ditch and at the bars in Sopwell Lane and Shropshire Lane. The 3,000-strong Yorkist army arrived and camped in Keyfield to the east. Lengthy negotiations ensued with heralds moving back and forth between the rival commanders. After several hours, Richard, despairing of a peaceful solution, decided to attack. The bulk of Henry’s forces were surprised by the speed of Richard’s attack; most of the army was expecting a peaceful resolution similar to the one at Blackheath in 1452. However, two frontal assaults down the narrow streets against the barricades made no headway and resulted in heavy casualties for the Yorkists.
Warwick took his reserve troops through an unguarded part of the town’s defences, through back lanes and gardens. Suddenly the Earl appeared in the Market Square where the main body of Henry’s troops were talking and resting. There is evidence they were not yet expecting to be involved in the fighting, as many were not even wearing their helmets. Warwick charged instantly with his force, routing the Lancastrians and killing the Duke of Somerset.
On the Earl’s orders, his archers then shot at the men around the King, killing several and injuring the King and the Duke of Buckingham. The Lancastrians manning the barricades realised the Yorkists had ouflanked them, and fearing an attack from behind abandoned their positions and fled the town.
The First Battle of St Albans was relatively minor in military terms, but politically was a complete victory for York and Warwick: York had captured the King and restored himself to complete power, while his rival Somerset and Warwick’s arch-enemies Henry Percy, 2nd Earl of Northumberland, and Lord de Clifford both fell during the rout.

 Humphrey actually died of the plague, not of wounds after The Battle of St. Albans. He was apprently badly wounded there, but survived.


Humphrey actually died of the plague, not of wounds after The Battle of St. Albans. He was apprently badly wounded there, but survived.

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His maternal grandparents were Ralph de Neville, 1st Earl of Westmorland and Joan Beaufort, Countess of Westmorland.  His maternal uncles included (among others) Richard Neville, 5th Earl of Salisbury (father ofWarwick, the Kingmaker), Robert Neville who was first Bishop of Salisbury and then Bishop of Durham, William Neville, 1st Earl of Kent and Edward Nevill, 3rd Baron Bergavenny. His most prominent maternal aunt was Cecily Neville, wife of Richard Plantagenet, 3rd Duke of York and mother to among others Edward IV of England, Edmund, Earl of Rutland, George Plantagenet, 1st Duke of Clarence and Richard III of England.

Lord Stafford fought under his father-in-law in support of the House of Lancaster during the First Battle of St Albans. He appears to have been badly wounded at this battle, but either eventually died of his wounds or from the plague, predeceasing his own father in 1458.

Stafford married Lady Margaret Beaufort, daughter of Edmund Beaufort, 2nd Duke of Somerset and Lady Eleanor Beauchamp. Her maternal grandparents were Richard de Beauchamp, 13th Earl of Warwick and his first wife Elizabeth Berkeley. By her father, she was a niece of Joan Beaufort, Queen of Scots and a cousin to Lady Margaret Beaufort (mother of King Henry VII). By her mother, Lady Margaret was a niece of Anne de Beauchamp, 16th Countess of Warwick and as such, a cousin to Isabel, Duchess of Clarence and queen consort Anne Neville.

Lord and Lady Stafford had a single son, Henry (4 September 1455 – 2 November 1483). Henry was styled Earl of Stafford on his father’s death, and succeeded his paternal grandfather as Duke of Buckingham in June 1473, following the latter’s death at the Battle of Northampton on 10 July 1460.

Nicholas Atwood, 11th Great-Grandfather

November 25, 2016 1 Comment

St. Martin-in-the-Fields Church

St. Martin-in-the-Fields Church

My eleventh great-grandfather was probably born in Sanderstead,Surrey, England in 1539.  He died in Surrey May 10, 1586. He married Olive Harman at St. Martins, London on 30 Jan 1569. (Olive Harman was born in 1548 in Sanderstand, Surrey, England,81 died in 1603 in Elstree Church, Herefordshire, England 81 and was buried in 1603 in Elstree Church, Herefordshire, England.)
Nicholas was baptized at All Saints’ Sanderstead.  His parents were John Hewson Attewood and Margaret Grenville.
Nicholas Atwood was assistant of the Queens Carriages. Due to the estate being left to Nicholas eldest son Harman, the younger brother John (Jonanem) sued Harman for the Estate but lost. (See Generation 10 for details of how the estate
passed to Harman)..

Here lyeth Nicholas Wood thirde sonne/ of John At wood of Sanderstead Corte who
served/ Queen Elizabeth sens the second year of her/ rayne & deceased the XIIIth
of May 1586 and left/ behind him a wife & children ix vii sonns HARMON/JOHN
NICHOLAS THOMS. JAMES JOHN RICHARD ALLIS & SUAN.

Olive Harman was born in 1548 in Sanderstead, Surrey, She was the daughter of James Harman. She also Married William Marleville and John Buck.

Nicholas Atwood (1539 – 1586)
11th great-grandfather
John Atwood (1582 – 1644)
son of Nicholas Atwood
John Thomas Wood (1614 – 1675)
son of John Atwood
Margaret Wood (1635 – 1693)
daughter of John Thomas Wood
Elizabeth Manchester (1667 – 1727)
daughter of Margaret Wood
Dr. James Sweet (1686 – 1751)
son of Elizabeth Manchester
Thomas Sweet (1732 – 1813)
son of Dr. James Sweet
Samuel Thomas Sweet (1765 – 1844)
son of Thomas Sweet
Valentine Sweet (1791 – 1858)
son of Samuel Thomas Sweet
Sarah LaVina Sweet (1840 – 1923)
daughter of Valentine Sweet
Jason A Morse (1862 – 1932)
son of Sarah LaVina Sweet
Ernest Abner Morse (1890 – 1965)
son of Jason A Morse
Richard Arden Morse (1920 – 2004)
son of Ernest Abner Morse
Pamela Morse
I am  the daughter of Richard Arden Morse

A Chancery suit includes a statement that the Court Roll in 1547 show Nicholas Atwood to have then been the heir of Sanderstead Manor. Nicholas Atwood, was born before 1539, most likely at Sanderstead Court. He served Queen Elizabeth after the second year of her reign, as Assistant Sergeant of the Queen’s Carriages with his cousin, John Ownstead as Sergeant.

At St. Martin’s, 30 Jan 1569, he married Olive Harman (1548-1603), daughter and heiress of James Harman. Most of their children were baptized at St. Martin’s. When in the country, they resided at Court farm and here one night, when roads were especially bad, the Queen returning from one of her trips, spent the night at Court Farm.

Nicholas died 10 May 1586, in Sanderstead and was buried in St. Martin’s, 14 May 1586. His wife, Olive married for a second and third time. Her monument in Elstree Church names her Atwood children.

~Ye Ole Atte Wode Annals, pp. 3, 5
• Background Information. 179
~History of the Atwood Family, in England and the United States: To which is Appended a Short Account of the Tenney Family, p. 4, Nycholas Wood, died 1586, was the third son of John Atwoode, who died in 1520, and the father of Harman Attwood, also written Attwoodd. Harman Attwood is called Harman Woode until the entry of the baptism of his third child in the Saunderstead register. The Atte Woodes or Atwoods had many different spelling for their name in the records that can be found.
• Epitath. 110
“Here lyeth Nycholas Wood, the third son of John At Wood of Sanderstead corte, who served Queene Elizabeth seus the second yeare of her rayne, and deceased the 14 of may, 1586, leaving behind him a wyfe and children, – 7 sons, Harman, John, Nicholas, Thomas, James, John, Richard, Allis, Susan.”

~History of the Atwood Family, in England and the United States: To which is Appended a Short Account of the Tenney Family, p. 6

Aubrey de Vere, 10th Earl of Oxford, 20th Great-Grandfather

September 20, 2016 1 Comment

St James the Less Churchyard

St James the Less Churchyard

Photo submitted by geoffrey gillon on findagrave.com

This is the final resting place of Sir Aubrey.  I would love to visit Haleigh someday to take in the sights and visit my dead ancestors, in romantic ruin.

Located on High Street in Hadleigh, Essex, England – Cemetery notes and/or description from findagrave.com: Hadleigh is a town in southeast Essex, England, on the A13 between Benfleet and Leigh-on-Sea. Although a historic settlement with its castle, it has become intertwined with Benfleet to the West and Leigh-on-Sea to the East. This has led to the Hadleigh in Suffolk becoming more well known. Hadleigh is probably best known for its castle, and the country park that surrounds it. The castle has been a romantic ruin for a few hundred years, but parts of two towers are still standing. John Constable painted Hadleigh Castle in 1829, and the painting now resides at the Yale Center for British Art in USA.. Set at the top of a hill overlooking the Thames Estuary, it is possible to see as far as the Canary Wharf development to the west. Since the Local Government Act 1972, Hadleigh, along with Canvey Island, South Benfleet, and Thundersley has formed the parliamentary constituency and local government district and borough of Castle Point. General Booth, founder of the Salvation Army, established the Farm Colony in 1891 in Hadleigh. Today the colony operates an employment training centre for people who have special training needs, and accepts referrals from Social Services and the Employment Service. A reminder of the Salvation Army’s work in the area is a special section at the east end of the churchyard for the graves of Colony officers and workers. St. James the Less Church, like the castle, is a Norman building, with a typical Norman round east end, but the church is still in use today. It is built of Kentish ragstone with 3 feet thick walls. It remains picturesque despite the fact that it effectively stands in the central reservation or island, of the A13.(text by Geoffrey Gillon)

Hedingham Castle in Essex, John de Vere's main residence

Hedingham Castle in Essex, John de Vere’s main residence

 

My 20th great-grandfather was tight with the Black Prince, who took good care of his people.  Sir Aubrey was knighted and accompanied the Black Prince to Aquitaine in battle.  His father, John de Vere, is both my 21st and my 20th great-grandfather.  This is because I descend from two of his children, Aubrey and Margaret.  I am pretty sure I also descend from the Edward Black Prince himself, but more about that later.  When sorting out various branches of a tree it is really important to look carefully for errors.

Sir Aubrey 10th Earl of Oxford DeVere (1338 – 1400)
20th great-grandfather
Sir Richard, 11th Earl of Oxford DeVere KG (1385 – 1417)
son of Sir Aubrey 10th Earl of Oxford DeVere
Sir John 12th Earl of Oxford DeVere (1408 – 1462)
son of Sir Richard, 11th Earl of Oxford DeVere KG
John DeVere (1447 – 1509)
son of Sir John 12th Earl of Oxford DeVere
John DeVere (1490 – 1540)
son of John DeVere
Frances DeVere (1517 – 1577)
daughter of John DeVere
Thomas Howard (1536 – 1572)
son of Frances DeVere
Margaret Howard (1561 – 1591)
daughter of Thomas Howard
Lady Ann Dorset (1552 – 1680)
daughter of Margaret Howard
Robert Lewis (1574 – 1656)
son of Lady Ann Dorset
Robert Lewis (1607 – 1644)
son of Robert Lewis
Ann Lewis (1631 – 1686)
daughter of Robert Lewis
Joshua Morse (1669 – 1753)
son of Ann Lewis
Joseph Morse (1692 – 1756)
son of Joshua Morse
Joseph Morse (1721 – 1776)
son of Joseph Morse
Joseph Morse III (1756 – 1835)
son of Joseph Morse
John Henry Morse (1775 – 1864)
son of Joseph Morse III
Abner Morse (1808 – 1838)
son of John Henry Morse
Daniel Rowland Morse (1838 – 1910)
son of Abner Morse
Jason A Morse (1862 – 1932)
son of Daniel Rowland Morse
Ernest Abner Morse (1890 – 1965)
son of Jason A Morse
Richard Arden Morse (1920 – 2004)
son of Ernest Abner Morse
Pamela Morse
I am the daughter of Richard Arden Morse

Aubrey de Vere, 10th Earl of Oxford (c. 1338 – 15 February 1400) was the second son of John de Vere, 7th Earl of Oxford and Maud de Badlesmere, daughter of Bartholomew de Badlesmere, 1st Lord Badlesmere.
In 1360 he was made steward of the royal forest of Havering in Essex. In 1367 was retained to ‘abide for life’ with the Black Prince, with a substantial allowance. He was knighted, made constable of Wallingford Castle in 1375 and also given the honours of Wallingford and St. Valery, though he gave up Wallingford in 1378 for Hadleigh Castle. Edward III used him as an ambassador in seeking peace with France. In 1381, de Vere became a Chamberlain of the Royal Household and member of the privy council. In 1388 his nephew, Robert de Vere, Duke of Ireland and 9th Earl of Oxford was deemed a traitor, causing Aubrey to lose his post of chamberlain. However, after Robert’s death in 1392, the king gave Aubrey the title of Earl of Oxford allowing him to take a seat in parliament. Aubrey’s son, Richard became the 11th Earl of Oxford on his death.

October Rituals

October 12, 2014 1 Comment

October brings ancient celebrations and rituals to life. Samhain, Halloween, Guy Fawkes Day,as well as Divali, fall at the end of October and beginning of November. They have in common ritual use of fire as part of the celebrations. As we enter the darkest part of the year in the northern hemisphere we honor the dead and invite them to partake in their former earthly pleasures. Day of the Dead is only one of the cultural holidays designed around remembering. The season is the right time to let go, to clean, clear, and remember. This is possible without any formal outward practice. You don’t have to dress up or build an altar to honor this change of season.

We all go through dark times in life. Lighting up the sky with fires and fireworks reminds us of energy shared, passed on, and finally no longer needed. You don’t need to be religious to understand the sacred nature of the inheritance of our human life. To be able to walk on the earth is not a small gift. Without the generations that survived before us we would not exist. We may notice a feeling of guidance from the ancestors, or simply a reverence for those who created our existence out of their own. I sometimes feel a deep sense of regret when I consider the lives of my ancestors. Who knows if that comes from me or from them. What can be known is that our connection to our ancestors is permanent. What we can learn from knowing about them and from imagining the way they lived gives us some insight into our own strengths and weaknesses. The ancestors know about those strengths and follies because they had them before we did, under different circumstances. I believe they would like for us to learn from their experiences.

Frances de Vere, Countess of Surrey

August 18, 2014 3 Comments

 

My 15th great-grandmother was  lady in waiting to Anne Boleyn when she was married at the age of 15. She managed to stay alive during the shaky royal shake downs that caused her husband to be beheaded. To be in court with Henry VIII was a treacherous position. She wrote poetry like her more well educated husband.

Frances de Vere was the daughter of John de Vere, 15th earl of Oxford (1490-March 21,1540) and Elizabeth Trussell (1496-c.1527). She had no fortune, but in April 1532, she married Henry Howard, earl of Surrey (1517-x.January 19,1547). They lived apart until 1535 because of their youth. Alison Weir in Henry VIII: The King and his Court, states that Anne Boleyn arranged the match over the objections of the duchess of Norfolk and that Frances was at court as one of Anne’s ladies from 1533. She was also at court when Catherine Howard was queen, but not, apparently, afterward. Catherine gave her a brooch set with tiny diamonds and rubies. According to one of her grandson’s biographers, Frances, in common with her more famous husband, wrote poetry. Her children were clever and well educated, although Frances did not have charge of their education. They were Jane (1537?-1593), Thomas (March 10, 1538-June 2,1572), Catherine (1539?-April 7,1596), Henry (February 1540-1614), and Margaret (January 1543-March 17,1592). Frances miscarried in 1547, the year her husband was executed for treason. She was ill for some time afterward. Alternatively, Robert Hutchinson in House of Treason states that Frances gave birth to daughter Jane three weeks after Surrey was executed and names Catherine as the eldest daughter. W. A. Sessions in Henry Howard The Poet Earl of Surrey gives the birth order as Thomas (March 12, 1536), Henry (February 25, 1538), Jane, Catherine, and Margaret (1547). By 1553, Frances had married Thomas Steyning of Woodbridge, Suffolk (d. October 20, 1575+), where she owned the manor of East Soham near Framlingham Castle. She was granted nine manors in all by the duke of Norfolk, her father-in-law, after his restoration in 1553. In July 1554, Frances represented Queen Mary at the christening of the French ambassador’s son and in December 1557 she was chief mourner at the funeral of her sister-in-law, Mary Howard. She was also chief mourner for her daughter-in-law, Margaret Audley, on January 17, 1563. Frances had two children by her second husband, Henry and Mary. She died at East Soham. Portrait: sketch by Hans Holbein, 1535.

source: http://www.kateemersonhistoricals.com

Frances DeVere (1517 – 1577)
is my 15th great grandmother
Thomas Howard (1536 – 1572)
son of Frances DeVere
Margaret Howard (1561 – 1591)
daughter of Thomas Howard
Lady Ann Dorset (1552 – 1680)
daughter of Margaret Howard
Robert Lewis (1574 – 1645)
son of Lady Ann Dorset
Robert Lewis (1607 – 1644)
son of Robert Lewis
Ann Lewis (1633 – 1686)
daughter of Robert Lewis
Joshua Morse (1669 – 1753)
son of Ann Lewis
Joseph Morse (1692 – 1759)
son of Joshua Morse
Joseph Morse (1721 – 1776)
son of Joseph Morse
Joseph Morse III (1752 – 1835)
son of Joseph Morse
John Henry Morse (1775 – 1864)
son of Joseph Morse III
Abner Morse (1808 – 1838)
son of John Henry Morse
Daniel Rowland Morse (1838 – 1910)
son of Abner Morse
Jason A Morse (1862 – 1932)
son of Daniel Rowland Morse
Ernest Abner Morse (1890 – 1965)
son of Jason A Morse
Richard Arden Morse (1920 – 2004)
son of Ernest Abner Morse
Pamela Morse
I am the daughter of Richard Arden Morse

Frances deVere was from a prestigious family, but one without great wealth. She was one of Anne Boleyn’s ladies-in-waiting and Anne probably arranged the match between Frances and Henry Howard, Earl of Surrey, whose mother would not have approved the choice of a bride with no dowry otherwise. Because of her young age (they married in 1532, when she was only 15), Frances continued her role as lady-in-waiting before joining her husband at his home – which is why she was at court to be sketched by Holbein in 1535. Frances shared her husband’s love of the arts, and also wrote poetry. She was traumatized by the 1547 execution of her husband, suffering a miscarriage and spending the next few years in delicate health.

Sir Edmund Bedingfield, 14th Great-Grandfather

November 13, 2013 12 Comments

Coat of Arms

Coat of Arms

My 14th great grandfather was knighted by the first Duke of Suffolk. He is one of several Knights of the Bath in my family.  He was involved with Henry VIII’s divorce, which is called his Great Matter:

Knighted by 1st Duke of Suffolk
Sir Edmund Bedingfield or Bedingfeld (1479/1480 – 1553), Knight of the Bath.
In 1523 Bedingfield was knighted by Charles Brandon, 1st Duke of Suffolk for demonstrating bravery in the French Wars. In 1539 he inherited from his brother Robert the great estate of Oxburgh Hall, King’s Lynn, Norfolk.
He married Grace Marney (d. in or after 1553), the daughter of Henry Marney, 1st Baron Marney.
Sir Edmund Bedingfield was entrusted with the care of Katherine of Aragon, at Kimbolton Castle, following the proceedings of 18 June 1529, concerning King Henry VIII’s Great Matter (divorce).
His first son Sir Henry Bedingfield (1510-1583), succeeded to his estate.

Edmund Bedingfield (1483 – 1552)

is my 14th great grandfather
Henry Bedingfield (1509 – 1583)
son of Edmund Bedingfield
Edmund Bedingfield (1534 – 1585)
son of Henry Bedingfield
Nazareth Bedingfeld (1561 – 1622)
daughter of Edmund Bedingfield
Elishua Miller Yelverton (1592 – 1688)
daughter of Nazareth Bedingfeld
Yelverton Crowell (1621 – 1683)
son of Elishua Miller Yelverton
Elishua Crowell (1643 – 1708)
daughter of Yelverton Crowell
Yelverton Gifford (1676 – 1772)
son of Elishua Crowell
Ann Gifford (1715 – 1795)
daughter of Yelverton Gifford
Frances Congdon (1738 – 1755)
daughter of Ann Gifford
Thomas Sweet (1759 – 1844)
son of Frances Congdon
Valentine Sweet (1791 – 1858)
son of Thomas Sweet
Sarah LaVina Sweet (1840 – 1923)
daughter of Valentine Sweet
Jason A Morse (1862 – 1932)
son of Sarah LaVina Sweet
Ernest Abner Morse (1890 – 1965)
son of Jason A Morse
Richard Arden Morse (1920 – 2004)
son of Ernest Abner Morse
Pamela Morse
I am the daughter of Richard Arden

We can tell from his probate papers that Sir Edmund had worldly wealth.

Will of Sir Edmund Bedingfield, 1552

In the name of God, Amen. The ninth day of August in the reign of our most dreadSovereign Lord Edward the Sixth by the grace of God of England, France and Ireland King, Defender of the Faith, and in earth of the Church of England and also of Ireland the Supreme Head, the fifth, I, Sir Edmund Bedingfield of Oxburgh in the county of Norfolk, knight, whole and perfect of mind and remembrance, thanked be God, fearing nevertheless the unstableness of this present world, do make my testament and last will in form as hereafter ensueth, that is to say:
I commend my soul to Almighty God, trusting by the merits of the passion of Christ, my Saviour and Redeemer, to have remission of my sins;
My body I will to be buried after the most laudable manner and custom of Christ’s church in such place and after such form as shall seem most convenient to mine executors;
And I give to the high altar of Oxburgh Church for my tithes negligently forgotten ten shillings;
Item, I bequeath to the reparation of the said church forty shillings;
And I bequeath to the like reparations of the churches of Redlingfield and Denham, to
each of them 20s;
Item, I bequeath unto my wife, Dame Grace Bedingfield, all such jewels as she hath beenused to wear upon her body, together with all my jewels and plate except a piece of silver parcel gilt engraven in the boton [sic] with ‘God’s blessing’ and the Bedingfields’ arms;
And also I give unto her all my right, interest and title which I have in and to the farm and lease of Skaleshoo in the parts of marshland in the county of Norfolk;
And I give also unto her all such sheep cattle as I shall have going there and depastured at the time of my death, and all my milch kine and other cattle being not above one year ofage the which at the same time of my death shall be remaining at Redlingfield & Denham in the county of Suffolk;
And I give and bequeath unto my son, Sir Henry Bedingfield, knight, all my harness, weapons and habiliments of war which shall remain at Oxburgh in the armoury there at the time of my said death, to th’ intent he may serve the King’s Majesty therewith at all times when he shall be commanded; And where by the last will and testament of Sir Henry Marney, knight, Lord Marney, it
was assigned, willed and bequeathed unto the said Sir Henry Bedingfield by the name of ‘Henry Bedingfield, son and heir apparent’ to me, the said Sir Edmund Bedingfield, one hundred pounds of plate then belonging to the said Lord Marney, to be delivered and disposed in such wise as in the same testament and last will is expressed & declared, considering now that I, the said Sir Edmund, before this time have divers and sundry ways issued and paid divers great and notable sums of money as well for th’ attaining of the inheritance of Sir Thomas Bedingfield, knight, mine eldest brother, lately departed, as also in obtaining of the King’s Majesty the manor of Bedlingfield [=Bedingfield] in the county of Suffolk, which both by the sufferance of Almighty God shall descend and come unto the said Sir Henry and his heirs, and also considering that at divers other times I have been beneficial unto him, as amongst other upon my departure from my late farm at Massingham the said Sir Henry had of my gift as well part of my plate and utensils of household as also divers cattle, as horses and kine, besides other necessaries and
implements of husbandry, I think myself by good reason and all conscience to bedischarged against the said Sir Henry and for the said sum of one hundred pounds;
Also I will that all such stuff of household remaining at Oxburgh which was agreed upon between Dame Alice Burgh, late wife of my said brother, Sir Thomas Bedingfield, knight, and me, the said Sir Edmund, by mediation of Sir John Spelman, Sir Roger
Townshend, knights, and Humphrey Carwell, esquire, shall be delivered by mineexecutors unto my said son, Sir Henry Bedingfield, knight, within one month nextensuing after my decease, that is to say:
First, in the chamber called the great chamber, a featherbed with a bolster; item, acovering of verdures with arms, and a tester of the same with curtains of green sarsenet; also a hanging of arras, two cushions with arms, a cupboard with a carpet thereon, a
coffer and a chair;
Item, in the chamber called the King’s chamber, a featherbed with a bolster, a mattress, a pair of fustians, a covering of red and green sarsenet twilted, a tester of tawny and black satin embroidered with unicorns and scallop shells, two cushions with arms, a cupboard with a green cloth thereon, two chairs, a carpet in the window, two cob-irons in the chimney;
I tem, in the chamber next the said King’s chamber, a featherbed with a bolster, a pair of blankets, a covering of tapestry, the hangings in the chamber of red and yellow canvas, and a form;
Item, in the inward chamber next unto the chamber called the Queen’s chamber, afeatherbed with a bolster, a blanket, a covering of russet cloth, a tester of stained cloth, and a form;
Item, in the said chamber called the Queen’s Chamber, a featherbed with a bolster, a pair of blankets, a covering of red say with arms and a tester of the same, the curtains of white linen cloth, a trundle-bed with a featherbed and a bolster, a blanket, a covering, a cupboard with the cloth thereupon, a cloth of red say in the window, a long chair with a cloth therein, another chair, and three cushions without arms;
Item, in the parlour, a hanging of red say stained, a cupboard, the long table, and a trussing bed in the chamber of the said parlour;
Item, in the chapel, a pair of chalice with the paten, the altar-cloths, the hangings of white sarsenet, and 4 cushions; item, a pall cloth of black velvet with a white cross; And I give unto the said Sir Henry one piece of silver parcel gilt where is engraven
‘God’s blessing’ and the Bedingfields’ arms, to remain to him as an heirloom in such wise as I received the same piece of my said brother, Sir Thomas Bedingfield;
And I bequeath unto the said Sir Henry my two stoned horses which be both ridden;
And over that, I do likewise assign, will and bequeath unto the said Sir Henry all and all manner of utensils belonging to my bakehouse at Oxburgh, together with other necessaries occupied and used for the purpose and intent of baking and brewing which at the time of my death shall remain at and within my said bakehouse there, and also all such utensils belonging to the kitchen there as was agreed upon by the said Dame Alice Burgh and me, the said Sir Edmund, by mediation of the said Sir John Spelman, Sir Roger Townshend, knights, and Humphrey Carvell, esquire;
And I give unto the said Sir Henry all mine eyries of swans called(?) swan-marks, except one couple of old eyries remaining at Redlingfield;
Item, I give and bequeath unto my said son, Sir Henry, all such coals, timber, boards and stone or other thing appertaining to reparations of the house of Oxburgh that shall remain at Oxburgh at the time of my death, all which said bequests and legacies I will shall enure and remain unto the said Sir Henry only upon condition that the same Sir Henry nor his executors shall not at any time hereafter claim of mine executors or th’ executors of them any parcel of the said sum of one hundred pounds before assigned, willed and bequeathed unto him by the testament and last will of the said Henry, Lord Marney;
And I give and bequeath unto my grandchild, Frances Sulyard, daughter of John Sulyard, Esquire, one hundred marks of good and lawful English money, to be paid to her at the day of her marriage or else at th’ age of 21 years, foreseen always that if the said Frances do die before marriage had and before she shall attain unto the age of 21 years, that then the said hundred marks to be divided by even portions between my youngest sons then living;
An d I give and bequeath unto my said wife, Dame Grace, all and all manner myhousehold stuff and other necessary implements together with my utensils of husbandry now remaining as well at Oxburgh as at Redlingfield not before assigned, willed or bequeathed to my said son, Sir Henry Bedingfield, to do therewith her will and pleasure;
And I heartily desire and require my said wife to give unto my servant, John Turner, forty shillings by year during his life, and if it shall happen my said wife to die, the said John then living, then I will mine executors shall from thenceforth yearly content and pay unto the said John Turner forty shillings during his natural life;
Also I will and bequeath to the children of my said son, Sir Henry Bedingfield, nowliving, one hundred pounds of good and lawful English money, to be equally divided amongst them, and to be paid to them at their several ages of 21 years or else at such days
as they and every of them shall happen to be married;
And I give to the children of my son, Francis Bedingfield, fourscore pounds of good and lawful English money, to be equally divided among them and to be paid to them in such sort and at such times as in the article last before-mentioned is declared and specified;
Also, I give and bequeath to the children of my son, Anthony Bedingfield, threescore pounds of good and lawful English money equally to be divided among them, and to be paid to them in like manner and time;
Provided always and my will is that if it shall happen any of the children of my said sons, Sir Henry, Francis and Anthony, to die before marriage had and before their several ages of 21 years, then I will that the portion and portions of such and as many of their said children as shall so happen to die shall be equally divided and given unto my children Anthony, Humphrey and Edmund, if they then do live, or else to as many of them as then shall be living, to their further advancement and relief;
And further I give and bequeath unto my said wife, Dame Grace, all my pullery and swine, together with all my corn and hay remaining as well at Redlingfield as at Oxburgh at the time of my death, and also all mine interest and term of years which I have in the parsonage and tithe corn of Hoxne in the said county of Suffolk;
Also I give unto my sons, Anthony, Humphrey & Edmund, to each of them forty pounds of good and lawful English money (my debts being first paid), provided always that if the said Anthony, Humphrey or Edmund do die within six years next after my decease, then I will that the portion or portions of such of them so dying shall be equally divided between my said younger sons then living;
And I give and bequeath to Margaret, the wife of Thomas Parke, otherwise calledThomas Tailor, my servant, to be delivered unto her within six weeks after my death, twenty ewe sheep going in Westhall flock in Cley;
And I give unto Adam Roberts, my servant, £6 13s 4d besides his quarter’s wages and livery;
An d I give and bequeath unto Edmund Grymston, William Shuldham, John Brooke, William Dey, Robert Nollothe, Robert Cooke, John Hewar, Thomas Spicer, Simon Bedall, Robert Clarke and Robert Barwicke, to every of them besides their quarter’s
wages and liveries forty shillings of good and lawful English money;
And in like manner I give and bequeath unto Edmund Grene, Robert Jerves, Thomas Caton, Thomas Parke, John Turnor, Henry Raydon, Thomas Stocke, Henry Jubye, Edmu{n}d Roberd{es}, Daniel Elstigoode(?), Thomas Laycocke, John Eyslingh{a}m,
William Skoldinge, Edward Hosteler, Robert Turnepenny, Humphrey Shulderham, Henry Spencer, John Cooke and Thomas Hewar, my servants, to every of them besides their quarter’s wages and their liveries, twenty shillings;
Item, I give to every one of mine other servants besides their quarter’s wages and their liveries, ten shillings;
And I give to Margaret Popper, forty shillings;
And I give unto the right worshipful and right so mine assured good brother and friend, Sir Roger Townshend, knight, (blank);
The residue of my goods, chattels and debts not before assigned, willed or bequeathed, I freely give them and every of them to mine executors, whom I ordain, constitute and make my well-beloved wife, Dame Grace Bedingfield, my son, Anthony Bedingfield, and Thomas Caton, my servant, to every of which I give, for their pains to be taken in and about th’ execution and performance of this my testament, ten pounds and their reasonable costs;
And furthermore I, the said Sir Edmund Bedingfield, do revoke, annul and annihilate all other wills and testaments by me made, devised or ordained before the day of the date of this my present last will and testament, these witnesses. Per Edmund Bedingfield.

Eleanor of Aquitane

October 16, 2013 3 Comments

Eleanor of Aquitane

Eleanor of Aquitane

My 25th great-grandmother was extremely powerful.  She married the king of France, and then the king of England.  She ruled for her son, Richard the Lionhearted, while he was off crusading.

Eleanor of Aquitane (1130 – 1204)
is my 25th great grandmother
Eleanor Spain Plantagenet (1162 – 1214)
daughter of Eleanor of Aquitane
Berenguela CASTILE LEON (1181 – 1244)
daughter of Eleanor Spain Plantagenet
Saint Ferdinand Castile amp Leon (1199 – 1252)
son of Berenguela CASTILE LEON
Alfonso X Wise Castile Leon amp Galicia (1221 – 1284)
son of Saint Ferdinand Castile amp Leon
Sancho Brave Castile Leon (1258 – 1295)
son of Alfonso X Wise Castile Leon amp Galicia
Beatrice Sanchez Infanta Castile (1293 – 1359)
daughter of Sancho Brave Castile Leon
Peter I Portugal Cruel Algarve (1320 – 1367)
son of Beatrice Sanchez Infanta Castile
John I DePinto (1358 – 1433)
son of Peter I Portugal Cruel Algarve
Beatrix DePinto (1403 – 1447)
daughter of John I DePinto
John Fettiplace (1427 – 1464)
son of Beatrix DePinto
Richard Fettiplace (1460 – 1511)
son of John Fettiplace
Anne Fettiplace (1496 – 1567)
daughter of Richard Fettiplace
Mary Purefoy (1533 – 1579)
daughter of Anne Fettiplace
Susanna Thorne (1559 – 1586)
daughter of Mary Purefoy
Gov Thomas Dudley (1576 – 1653)
son of Susanna Thorne
Anne Dudley (1612 – 1672)
daughter of Gov Thomas Dudley
John Bradstreet (1652 – 1718)
son of Anne Dudley
Mercy Bradstreet (1689 – 1725)
daughter of John Bradstreet
Caleb Hazen (1720 – 1777)
son of Mercy Bradstreet
Mercy Hazen (1747 – 1819)
daughter of Caleb Hazen
Martha Mead (1784 – 1860)
daughter of Mercy Hazen
Abner Morse (1808 – 1838)
son of Martha Mead
Daniel Rowland Morse (1838 – 1910)
son of Abner Morse
Jason A Morse (1862 – 1932)
son of Daniel Rowland Morse
Ernest Abner Morse (1890 – 1965)
son of Jason A Morse
Richard Arden Morse (1920 – 2004)
son of Ernest Abner Morse
Pamela Morse
I am the daughter of Richard Arden Morse

Eleanor of Aquitaine

(in French: Aliénor d’Aquitaine, Éléonore de Guyenne) (1122 or 1124 – 1 April 1204) was one of the wealthiest and most powerful women in Western Europe during the High Middle Ages. As well as being Duchess of Aquitaine in her own right, she was queen consort of France (1137-1152) and of England (1154-1189). Eleanor of Aquitaine is the only woman to have been queen of both France and England, with the exception of Margaret of Anjou whose status as Queen of France is disputed. She was the patroness of such literary figures as Wace, Benoît de Sainte-More, and Chrétien de Troyes.

Eleanor succeeded her father as suo jure Duchess of Aquitaine and Countess of Poitiers at the age of fifteen, and thus became the most eligible bride in Europe. Three months after her accession she married Louis VII, son and junior co-ruler of her guardian, King Louis VI of France. As Queen of France, she participated in the unsuccessful Second Crusade. Soon after the Crusade was over, Louis VII and Eleanor agreed to dissolve their marriage, because of Eleanor’s own desire for divorce and also because the only children they had were two daughters – Marie and Alix. The royal marriage was annulled on 11 March 1152, on the grounds of consanguinity within the fourth degree. Their daughters were declared legitimate and custody of them awarded to Louis, while Eleanor’s lands were restored to her.

As soon as she arrived in Poitiers, Eleanor became engaged to Henry II, Duke of the Normans, her cousin within the third degree, who was nine years younger. On 18 May 1152, eight weeks after the annulment of her first marriage, Eleanor married the Duke of the Normans. On 25 October 1154 her husband ascended the throne of the Kingdom of England, making Eleanor Queen of the English. Over the next thirteen years, she bore Henry eight children: five sons, three of whom would become king, and three daughters. However, Henry and Eleanor eventually became estranged. She was imprisoned between 1173 and 1189 for supporting her son Henry’s revolt against her husband, King Henry II.

Eleanor was widowed on 6 July 1189. Her husband was succeeded by their son, Richard the Lionheart, who immediately moved to release his mother. Now queen dowager, Eleanor acted as a regent for her son while he went off on the Third Crusade. Eleanor survived her son Richard and lived well into the reign of her youngest son King John. By the time of her death she had outlived all of her children except for King John and Eleanor, Queen of Castile.

John Talbot, Earl of Shrewsbury

September 10, 2013 2 Comments

Battle of Castellon

Battle of Castellon

My 17th great grandfather was a general in the 100 Years’ War.  He died in battle.

SIR J0HN13 TALBOT, K. G., first Earl of Shrewsbury born about 1385, married in 1406, Maud Nevill, eldest daugh- ter and co-heir of Thomas Nevill, Lord Furnivall, by whom heacquired vast estates in Hallamshire (including the Castle of Sheffield), in consequence of which he was summoned to Parlia- ment from 1409 to 1420 as John Talbot, Lord Furnival. On the death in childhood of his niece, Ankaret Talbot, in 1421, he succeeded also to the ancient Talbot estates in Linton and to the Baronies of Talbot and Strange of Blackmere. From 1412 to 1420 he served as Lord Lieutenant of Ireland; but in 1422 he entered into military pursuits and became one of the most renowned warriors of the martial age in which he lived. He gloriously sustained the cause of King Henry VL throughout his French realm in battle after battle, until the very name of Talbot became a terror to his foes. Once his forces were defeated by the army of the Maid of Orleans at the Battle of Patay in 1429, and he himself was taken prisoner; but four years later he was exchanged, and soon again in com- mand of an English army. For his brilliant achievements he was created in 1442 Earl of Shrewsbury and in 1446 Earl of Waterford. Later he was commander of the Castle of Falaise in Normandy (the birthplace of William the Conqueror), to which he added a massive keep, still known as the Talbot Tower. In 1453 he was again in command of an English army in France and was killed by a cannon shot at the Battle of Chastillon, 17 July 1453. He had been victorious in forty battles, and his death proved fatal to English dominion on the Continent. From this great Earl, the present Earl of Shrews- bury, the Premier Earl of England, is directly descended, (See Burke’s “Peerage” for 1904, pp. 1411-12; and G. E. Cock- ayne’s “Complete Peerage”, vol. 7, pp. 359-61, and 136-7.)

General John Talbot  (1384 – 1453)

is my 17th great grandfather
son of General John Talbot *
daughter of John Talbot
son of Isabel Talbot
son of Sir Richard Ashton
daughter of Sir Christopher Ashton
son of Lady Elizabeth Ashton
son of Capt Roger Dudley
daughter of Gov Thomas Dudley
son of Anne Dudley
daughter of John Bradstreet
son of Mercy Bradstreet
daughter of Caleb Hazen
daughter of Mercy Hazen
son of Martha Mead
son of Abner Morse
son of Daniel Rowland Morse
son of Jason A Morse
son of Ernest Abner Morse
I am the daughter of Richard Arden Morse

The Earl of Shrewsbury

The Death of Shrewsbury at the Battle of Castillon. Born1384 or 1387 Died July 17, 1453 Castillon-la-BattaileGascony Title Earl of Shrewsbury The Earl of Shrewsbury Earl ShrewsburyNationalityKingdom of EnglandWars and battlesHundred Years’ WarSiege of Orleans Battle of PatayBattle of Castillon  PredecessorNoneSuccessor John Talbot, 2nd Earl of ShrewsburySpouse(s)Maud Nevill Margaret Beauchamp Issue Parents Richard, 4th Baron Talbot and Ankaret, heiress of Richard John Talbot, 1st Earl of Shrewsbury, 1st Earl of Waterford, 10th Baron Strange of Blackmere, 7th Baron Talbot, 6th Baron Furnivall (1384/1387 – 17 July 1453) , known as “Old Talbot” was an important English military commander during the Hundred Years’ War, as well as the only Lancastrian Constable of France.

Contents[hide]
  • 1 Family
  • 2 First marriage
  • 3 Second marriage
  • 4 Early career
  • 5 Service in France
  • 6 The English Achilles
  • 7 Cultural influence
  • 8 See also
  • 9 References

[edit] FamilyHe was second son of Richard, 4th Baron Talbot, by Ankaret, heiress of Richard, Baron Lestrange of Blackmere.

[edit] First marriageTalbot was married before 12 March 1407 to Maud Nevill, daughter and heiress of  Thomas Nevill, 5th Baron Furnivall, the son of John Neville, 3rd Baron Neville de Raby. He was summoned to Parliament in her right from 1409.

The couple had four children:

  • Lady Joan Talbot
  • John Talbot, 2nd Earl of Shrewsbury (c. 1413 – 11 July 1460)
  • Sir Christopher Talbot (1419-1443),
  • Hon. Thomas Talbot (died before his father in Bordeaux)

In 1421 by the death of his niece he acquired the Baronies of Talbot and Strange. His first wife died on 31 May 1422

[edit] Second marriageOn 6 September 1425, he married Lady Margaret Beauchamp, daughter of Richard de Beauchamp, 13th Earl of Warwick and Elizabeth de Berkeley. They had six children:

  • John Talbot, 1st Viscount Lisle (c. 1426 – 17 July 1453)
  • Sir Humphrey Talbot (before 1453 – c. 1492)
  • Lady Joan Talbot
  • Lady Elizabeth Talbot (before 1453). She married John de Mowbray, 4th Duke of Norfolk.
  • Sir Lewis Talbot
  • Lady Eleanor Talbot (d. 1468) married to Sir Thomas Butler and mistress to King Edward IV.

Early career From 1404 to 1413 he served with his elder brother Gilbert in the Welsh war or the rebellion of Owain Glyndŵr. Then for five years from February 1414 he was Lord Lieutenant of Ireland, where he held the honour of Wexford. He did some fighting, and had a sharp quarrel with the Earl of Ormonde. Complaints were made against him both for harsh government in Ireland and for violence in Herefordshire. From 1420 to 1424 he served inFrance. In 1425, he was lieutenant again for a short time in Ireland.

Service in France So far his career was that of a turbulent Marcher Lord, employed in posts where a rough hand was useful. In 1427 he went again to France, where he fought with distinction in Maine and at the Siege of Orléans. He fought at the Battle of Patay where he was captured and held prisoner for four years.

He was released in exchange for the French leader Jean Poton de Xaintrailles. Talbot was a daring and aggressive soldier, perhaps the most audacious Captain of the Age. He and his forces acted as a kind of fire brigade ever ready to retake a town and to meet a French advance. His trademark was rapid aggressive attacks. In January 1436, he led a small force including Kyriell and routed La Hire and Xaintrailles at Ry near Rouen. The following year at Crotoy, after a daring passage of the Somme, he put a numerous Burgundian force to flight. In December 1439, following a surprise flank attack on their camp, he dispersed the 6000 strong army of the Constable Richemont, and the following year he retookHarfleur. In 1441, he pursued the French army four times over the Seine and Oise rivers in an unavailing attempt to bring it to battle.

[edit] The English AchillesHe was appointed in 1445 by Henry VI (as king of France) as Constable of France. Taken hostage at Rouen in 1449 he promised never to wear armour against the French King again, and he was true to his word. He was defeated and killed in 1453 at the Battle of Castillonnear Bordeaux, which effectively ended English rule in the duchy of Gascony, a principal cause of the Hundred Years’ War. His heart was buried in the doorway of St Alkmund’s Church, WhitchurchShropshire.[1]

The victorious French generals raised a monument to Talbot on the field called Notre Dame de Talbot. And the French Chroniclers paid him handsome tribute:

“Such was the end of this famous and renowned English leader who for so long had been one of the most formidable thorns in the side of the French, who regarded him with terror and dismay” – Matthew d’Escourcy

Although Talbot is generally remembered as a great soldier, some have raised doubts as to his generalship. In particular, charges of rashness have been raised against him. Speed and aggression were key elements in granting success in medieval war, and Talbot’s numerical inferiority necessitated surprise. Furthermore, he was often in the position of trying to force battle on unwilling opponents. At his defeat at Patay in 1429 he was advised not to fight there by Sir John Fastolf, who was subsequently blamed for the debacle, but the French, inspired by Joan of Arc, showed unprecedented fighting spirit – usually they approached an English position with great circumspection. The charge of rashness is perhaps more justifiable at Castillon where Talbot, misled by false reports of a French retreat, attacked their entrenched camp frontally – facing wheel to wheel artillery and a 6 to 1 inferiority in numbers.

He is portrayed heroically in William Shakespeare‘s Henry VI, Part I: “Valiant Lord Talbot, Earl of Shrewsbury, Created, for his rare success in arms”.

[edit] Cultural influenceJohn Talbot is shown as a featured character in Koei‘s video game known as ‘Bladestorm: The Hundred Years’ War‘, appearing as the left-arm of Edward, the Black Prince, in which he assists the former and the respective flag of England throughout his many portrayals.

Talbot appears as one of the primary antagonists in the PSP game Jeanne d’Arc.

See also

  • Talbot (dog)

References

  •  This article incorporates text from a publication now in the public domain: Chisholm, Hugh, ed (1911). Encyclopædia Britannica (Eleventh ed.). Cambridge University Press.
  1. ^ “Whitchurch”. Shropshire Tourism. http://www.shropshiretourism.co.uk/whitchurch/. Retrieved 2008-03-13.

Political officesNew officeLord High Steward of Ireland1446–1453Succeeded by The 2nd Earl of ShrewsburyPeerage of EnglandNew creationEarl of Shrewsbury1442–1453Succeeded by John TalbotPreceded byAnkare t TalbotBaron Strange of Blackmere1421–1453Baron Talbot1421–1453Baron Furnivall1421–1453Peerage of IrelandNew creationEarl of Waterford1446–1453Succeeded by John Talbot

Categories14th-century births 1453 deaths Earls in the Peerage of England Earls in the Peerage of Ireland English military personnel killed in action English soldiers Knights of the Garter Talbot family

Elizabeth Bessiles, 14th Great-Grandmother

March 21, 2013 6 Comments

Elizabeth Bessiles

Elizabeth Bessiles

She was the only child and heiress of William Bessiles, whose family had been settled at Besils Leigh, Berks as Leland says in his quaint language, ‘syns the time of Edward the first’. The Bessells cam out of Provence in France and were ‘men of activitye in feates of arms as it appearith in monuments at Legh; how he faught in listes with a straunge knyghte that challengyd hym, at the whitche deade the kynge and quene at that time of England were present’.  (source – http://www.tudorplace.com.ar)

She married Sir Richard Fettiplace.

Elizabeth Bessiles (1465 – 1511)
is my 14th great grandmother
Anne Fettiplace (1496 – 1567)
daughter of Elizabeth Bessiles
Mary Purefoy (1533 – 1579)
daughter of Anne Fettiplace
Susanna Thorne (1559 – 1586)
daughter of Mary Purefoy
Gov Thomas Dudley (1576 – 1653)
son of Susanna Thorne
Anne Dudley (1612 – 1672)
daughter of Gov Thomas Dudley
John Bradstreet (1652 – 1718)
son of Anne Dudley
Mercy Bradstreet (1689 – 1725)
daughter of John Bradstreet
Caleb Hazen (1720 – 1777)
son of Mercy Bradstreet
Mercy Hazen (1747 – 1819)
daughter of Caleb Hazen
Martha Mead (1784 – 1860)
daughter of Mercy Hazen
Abner Morse (1808 – 1838)
son of Martha Mead
Daniel Rowland Morse (1838 – 1910)
son of Abner Morse
Jason A Morse (1862 – 1932)
son of Daniel Rowland Morse
Ernest Abner Morse (1890 – 1965)
son of Jason A Morse
Richard Arden Morse (1920 – 2004)
son of Ernest Abner Morse
Pamela Morse
I am the daughter of Richard Arden Morse

Berkshire flag

Berkshire flag

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