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Ermengarde Blanche D Anjou Countess Gastinois

October 4, 2015 2 Comments

 

 Ermengarde Blanche D Anjou Countess Gastinois

Ermengarde Blanche D Anjou Countess Gastinois

My 29th great-grandmother, Ermengarde of Anjou (c. 1018 – 18 March 1076), daughter of Count Fulk III of Anjou and Hildegarde of Sundgau, was born in Angers and was murdered at the Church of Fleurey-sur-Ouche, Côte-d’Or.

Ermengarde-Blanche of Anjou was a French noblewoman who was first Countess of Chateau-Landon and secondly Duchess of Burgundy. She is also called Hermangarde in some sources. Ermengarde-Blanch was the heiress of the countship of Anjou and is an ancestress of the House of Plantagenet.

Ermengarde-Blanc he was the daughter of Count Fulk III of Anjou and Hildegarde.  She was involved in two marriage alliances that greatly benefited her father and brother as counts of Anjou. She was first contracted to marry Geoffrey II, Count of Gâtinais, called Ferréol , who was also lord of Château-Landon.  It was important marriage to return Château-Landon to the counts of Anjou.  It took between twelve and eighteen months to arrange the marriage. Meanwhile Fulk paid a great deal of attention to Château-Landon. He and his wife, Hildegarde, founded the abbey of Le Ronceray.  Originally a church dedicated to St. Mary, Hildegard was very active in its rebuilding into an abbey. They gave the abbey many gifts including the forest of Lattay. They gave more gifts to this abbey than any other church or religious house. Her two sons of this marriage, Geoffrey III and Fulk both became counts of Anjou after her brother Geoffrey II Martel. Among her descendants are the Plantagenet (or Angevin) kings of England.

After her husband Geoffrey died Ermengarde-Blanche married Robert I Capet, Duke of Burgundy.  Robert was the son of King Robert II of France. Because both Ermengarde and her second husband Robert Capet were both descendants of Ingelger, they were related by blood.  This was found in charts prepared at the monastery of Saint-Aubin at Angers between 1048 and 1052. The ancestral charts show how closely the Angevin and Capet families were related. The charts were probably created over concerns of who Ermengarde and Robert’s daughter Hildegarde could or could not marry. Ermengarde-Blanche died at Fleury-sur-Ouche on 18 March 1076. Robert died three days later at the same place on 21 March 1076.

Ermengarde Blanche D Anjou Countess Gastinois (1018 – 1076)
is my 29th great grandmother
Fulk Le Rechin Rude Anjou (1043 – 1109)
son of Ermengarde Blanche D Anjou Countess Gastinois
FULK V The Younger King of Jerusalem ANJOU * (1092 – 1143)
son of Fulk Le Rechin Rude Anjou
Sibilla Anjou (1105 – 1165)
daughter of FULK V The Younger King of Jerusalem ANJOU *
Marguerite De LORRAINE (1135 – 1194)
daughter of Sibilla Anjou
Isabelle De Hainault (1170 – 1190)
daughter of Marguerite De LORRAINE
Louis VIII France (1187 – 1226)
son of Isabelle De Hainault
Charles I King of Jerusalem and Naples (1227 – 1285)
son of Louis VIII France
Charles NAPLES (1254 – 1309)
son of Charles I King of Jerusalem and Naples
Marguerite Sicily Naples (1273 – 1299)
daughter of Charles NAPLES
Jeanne DeVALOIS (1294 – 1342)
daughter of Marguerite Sicily Naples
Philippa deHainault (1311 – 1369)
daughter of Jeanne DeVALOIS
John of Gaunt – Duke of Lancaster – Plantagenet (1340 – 1399)
son of Philippa deHainault
Elizabeth Plantagenet (1363 – 1425)
daughter of John of Gaunt – Duke of Lancaster – Plantagenet
John Holland (1395 – 1447)
son of Elizabeth Plantagenet
Henry Holland (1430 – 1475)
son of John Holland
Henry Holland (1485 – 1561)
son of Henry Holland
Henry Holland (1527 – 1561)
son of Henry Holland
John Holland (1556 – 1628)
son of Henry Holland
Gabriell Francis Holland (1596 – 1660)
son of John Holland
John Holland (1628 – 1710)
son of Gabriell Francis Holland
Mary Elizabeth Holland (1620 – 1681)
daughter of John Holland
Richard Dearden (1645 – 1747)
son of Mary Elizabeth Holland
George Dearden (1705 – 1749)
son of Richard Dearden
George Darden (1734 – 1807)
son of George Dearden
David Darden (1770 – 1820)
son of George Darden
Minerva Truly Darden (1806 – 1837)
daughter of David Darden
Sarah E Hughes (1829 – 1911)
daughter of Minerva Truly Darden
Lucinda Jane Armer (1847 – 1939)
daughter of Sarah E Hughes
George Harvey Taylor (1884 – 1941)
son of Lucinda Jane Armer
Ruby Lee Taylor (1922 – 2008)
daughter of George Harvey Taylor
Pamela Morse
I am the daughter of Ruby Lee Taylor

Anjou Coat of Arms

Anjou Coat of Arms

Fulk V The Younger King of Jerusalem Anjou

January 25, 2015 6 Comments

My 27th great-grandfather is buried in a very famous church.  I have been inside this church, but was completely unaware that there were graves of other people at the Church of the Holy Sepulchre in Jerusalem.  Orthodox religions say that Jesus of Nazareth was buried here, and arose from the dead in this location.  Protestant churches have another site for their resurrection, which is outside of the city.  My ancestor was there in the capacity of King of Jerusalem.  Since he was knight from France the idea seems preposterous, but the history of the Crusades and the people who created them is a wild and crazy story.  After Fulk’s wife died he hit the road for the Holy Land because it was totally the thing to do for rich Euros at the time.  He found fame and fortune through his wife, whom he did not defy.  She ruled and he did her bidding, as it was reported.  He died in a hunting accident on holiday, which does sound normal for a Euro monarch.

Count of Anjou
Fulk was born in Angers between 1089 and 1092, the son of Count Fulk IV of Anjou and Bertrade de Montfort. In 1092, Bertrade deserted her husband and bigamously married King Philip I of France.
He became count of Anjou upon his father’s death in 1109. In the next year, he married Erembourg of Maine, cementing Angevin control over the County of Maine.
He was originally an opponent of King Henry I of England and a supporter of King Louis VI of France, but in 1118 or 1119 he had allied with Henry when Henry arranged for his son and heir William Adelin to marry Fulk’s daughter Matilda. Fulk went on crusade in 1119 or 1120, and became attached to the Knights Templar. (Orderic Vitalis) He returned, late in 1121, after which he began to subsidize the Templars, maintaining two knights in the Holy Land for a year. Much later, Henry arranged for his daughter Matilda to marry Fulk’s son Geoffrey of Anjou, which she did in 1127 or 1128.
Crusader and King
By 1127 Fulk was preparing to return to Anjou when he received an embassy from King Baldwin II of Jerusalem. Baldwin II had no male heirs but had already designated his daughter Melisende to succeed him. Baldwin II wanted to safeguard his daughter’s inheritance by marrying her to a powerful lord. Fulk was a wealthy crusader and experienced military commander, and a widower. His experience in the field would prove invaluable in a frontier state always in the grip of war.
However, Fulk held out for better terms than mere consort of the Queen; he wanted to be king alongside Melisende. Baldwin II, reflecting on Fulk’s fortune and military exploits, acquiesced. Fulk abdicated his county seat of Anjou to his son Geoffrey and left for Jerusalem, where he married Melisende on 2 June 1129. Later Baldwin II bolstered Melisende’s position in the kingdom by making her sole guardian of her son by Fulk, Baldwin III, born in 1130.
Fulk and Melisende became joint rulers of Jerusalem in 1131 with Baldwin II’s death. From the start Fulk assumed sole control of the government, excluding Melisende altogether. He favored fellow countrymen from Anjou to the native nobility. The other crusader states to the north feared that Fulk would attempt to impose the suzerainty of Jerusalem over them, as Baldwin II had done; but as Fulk was far less powerful than his deceased father-in-law, the northern states rejected his authority. Melisende’s sister Alice of Antioch, exiled from the Principality by Baldwin II, took control of Antioch once more after the death of her father. She allied with Pons of Tripoli and Joscelin II of Edessa to prevent Fulk from marching north in 1132; Fulk and Pons fought a brief battle before peace was made and Alice was exiled again.
In Jerusalem as well, Fulk was resented by the second generation of Jerusalem Christians who had grown up there since the First Crusade. These “natives” focused on Melisende’s cousin, the popular Hugh II of Le Puiset, count of Jaffa, who was devotedly loyal to the Queen. Fulk saw Hugh as a rival, and it did not help matters when Hugh’s own stepson accused him of disloyalty. In 1134, in order to expose Hugh, Fulk accused him of infidelity with Melisende. Hugh rebelled in protest. Hugh secured himself to Jaffa, and allied himself with the Muslims of Ascalon. He was able to defeat the army set against him by Fulk, but this situation could not hold. The Patriarch interceded in the conflict, perhaps at the behest of Melisende. Fulk agreed to peace and Hugh was exiled from the kingdom for three years, a lenient sentence.
However, an assassination attempt was made against Hugh. Fulk, or his supporters, were commonly believed responsible, though direct proof never surfaced. The scandal was all that was needed for the queen’s party to take over the government in what amounted to a palace coup. Author and historian Bernard Hamilton wrote that the Fulk’s supporters “went in terror of their lives” in the palace. Contemporary author and historian William of Tyre wrote of Fulk “he never attempted to take the initiative, even in trivial matters, without (Melisende’s) consent”. The result was that Melisende held direct and unquestioned control over the government from 1136 onwards. Sometime before 1136 Fulk reconciled with his wife, and a second son, Amalric was born.
Securing the borders
Jerusalem’s northern border was of great concern. Fulk had been appointed regent of the Principality of Antioch by Baldwin II. As regent he had Raymund of Poitou marry the infant Constance of Antioch, daughter of Bohemund II and Alice of Antioch, and niece to Melisende. However, the greatest concern during Fulk’s reign was the rise of Atabeg Zengi of Mosul.
In 1137 Fulk was defeated in battle near Barin but allied with Mu’in ad-Din Unur, the vizier of Damascus. Damascus was also threatened by Zengi. Fulk captured the fort of Banias, to the north of Lake Tiberias and thus secured the northern frontier.
Fulk also strengthened the kingdom’s southern border. His butler Paganus built the fortress of Kerak to the south of the Dead Sea, and to help give the kingdom access to the Red Sea, Fulk had Blanche Garde, Ibelin, and other forts built in the south-west to overpower the Egyptian fortress at Ascalon. This city was a base from which the Egyptian Fatimids launched frequent raids on the Kingdom of Jerusalem and Fulk sought to neutralise this threat.
In 1137 and 1142, Byzantine emperor John II Comnenus arrived in Syria attempting to impose Byzantine control over the crusader states. John’s arrival was ignored by Fulk, who declined an invitation to meet the emperor in Jerusalem.

Death
In 1143, while the king and queen were on holiday in Acre, Fulk was killed in a hunting accident. His horse stumbled, fell, and Fulk’s skull was crushed by the saddle, “and his brains gushed forth from both ears and nostrils”, as William of Tyre describes. He was carried back to Acre, where he lay unconscious for three days before he died. He was buried in the Church of the Holy Sepulchre in Jerusalem. Though their marriage started in conflict, Melisende mourned for him privately as well as publicly. Fulk was survived by his son Geoffrey of Anjou by his first wife, and Baldwin III and Amalric I by Melisende.
Depictions
According to William, Fulk was “a ruddy man, like David… faithful and gentle, affable and kind… an experienced warrior full of patience and wisdom in military affairs.” His chief fault was an inability to remember names and faces.
William of Tyre described Fulk as a capable soldier and able politician, but observed that Fulk did not adequately attend to the defense of the crusader states to the north. Ibn al-Qalanisi (who calls him al-Kund Anjur, an Arabic rendering of “Count of Anjou”) says that “he was not sound in his judgment nor was he successful in his administration.” The Zengids continued their march on the crusader states, culminating in the fall of the County of Edessa in 1144, which led to the Second Crusade (see Siege of Edessa).
Family
In 1110, Fulk married Ermengarde of Maine (died 1126), the daughter of Elias I of Maine. Their four children were:
Geoffrey V of Anjou (1113–1151, father of Henry II of England.
Sibylla of Anjou (1112–1165, Bethlehem), married in 1123 William Clito (div. 1124), married in 1134 Thierry, Count of Flanders.
Alice (or Isabella) (1111–1154, Fontevrault), married William Adelin; after his death in the White Ship she became a nun and later Abbess of Fontevrault.
Elias II of Maine (died 1151)
His second wife was Melisende, Queen of Jerusalem
Baldwin III of Jerusalem
Amalric I of Jerusalem

Fulk V The Younger King of Jerusalem Anjou * (1092 – 1143)
is my 27th great grandfather
Sibilla Anjou (1105 – 1165)
daughter of FULK V The Younger King of Jerusalem ANJOU *
Marguerite De LORRAINE (1135 – 1194)
daughter of Sibilla Anjou
Isabelle De Hainault (1170 – 1190)
daughter of Marguerite De LORRAINE
Louis VIII France (1187 – 1226)
son of Isabelle De Hainault
Charles I King of Jerusalem and Naples (1227 – 1285)
son of Louis VIII France
Charles NAPLES (1254 – 1309)
son of Charles I King of Jerusalem and Naples
Marguerite Sicily Naples (1273 – 1299)
daughter of Charles NAPLES
Jeanne DeVALOIS (1294 – 1342)
daughter of Marguerite Sicily Naples
Philippa deHainault (1311 – 1369)
daughter of Jeanne DeVALOIS
John of Gaunt – Duke of Lancaster – Plantagenet (1340 – 1399)
son of Philippa deHainault
Elizabeth Plantagenet (1363 – 1425)
daughter of John of Gaunt – Duke of Lancaster – Plantagenet
John Holland (1395 – 1447)
son of Elizabeth Plantagenet
Henry Holland (1430 – 1475)
son of John Holland
Henry Holland (1485 – 1561)
son of Henry Holland
Henry Holland (1527 – 1561)
son of Henry Holland
John Holland (1556 – 1628)
son of Henry Holland
Gabriell Francis Holland (1596 – 1660)
son of John Holland
John Holland (1628 – 1710)
son of Gabriell Francis Holland
Mary Elizabeth Holland (1620 – 1681)
daughter of John Holland
Richard Dearden (1645 – 1747)
son of Mary Elizabeth Holland
George Dearden (1705 – 1749)
son of Richard Dearden
George Darden (1734 – 1807)
son of George Dearden
David Darden (1770 – 1820)
son of George Darden
Minerva Truly Darden (1806 – 1837)
daughter of David Darden
Sarah E Hughes (1829 – 1911)
daughter of Minerva Truly Darden
Lucinda Jane Armer (1847 – 1939)
daughter of Sarah E Hughes
George Harvey Taylor (1884 – 1941)
son of Lucinda Jane Armer
Ruby Lee Taylor (1922 – 2008)
daughter of George Harvey Taylor
Pamela Morse
I am the daughter of Ruby Lee Taylor

marries Queen of Jerusalem

marries Queen of Jerusalem

Albert IV, “The Wise” Count of Habsburg

August 10, 2014 3 Comments

Albert IV Habsburg married an heiress from Zurich.  He died on a crusade in a place near Tel Aviv.  How wise was it for him to be on a crusade?  This guy Theobald from Navarre that was leading the Crusade sounds like one of my ancestors too.  How crazy for them to trot off to the Holy Land as if they had some business there.  This is what it took to be called wise at the time.

Albrecht IV Count Of HABSBURG was born about 1188 in Of Schloss Limburg, A.d. Rh., Freiburg, Baden. He died on 22 Nov 1240. He married Hedwige Countess Of KYBURG.

Hedwige Countess Of KYBURG was born about 1192 in Of, Kyburg, Zurich, Switzerland. She died on 30 Apr 1260. She married Albrecht IV Count Of HABSBURG.

They had the following children: F i Kunigunde Von HABSBURG was born about 1208 in Of Schloss Limburg, A.d. Rh., Freiburg, Baden. She died in 1228 in Kl. Adelhausen, Freiburg, , Baden.
M ii Hartmann Von HABSBURG was born about 1222 in Of Schloss Limburg, A.d. Rh., Freiburg, Baden. He died in 1252.
M iii Albrecht V Count Of HABSBURG was born about 1220 in Of Schloss Limburg, A.d. Rh., Freiburg, Baden. He died on 1 Jan 1256.
F iv Kunigunde Countess Of HABSBURG was born about 1226 in Of Schloss Limburg, A.d. Rh., Freiburg, Baden.
M v Rudolf I King Of The GERMANS was born on 1 May 1218. He died on 15 Jul 1291.

Albert IV “The Wise” Count of Habsburg (1188 – 1240)
is my 21st great grandfather
Rudolf IV King of Germans, Holy Roman Emperor Habsburg (1218 – 1291)
son of Albert IV “The Wise” Count of Habsburg
Albert I King of Germany Habsburg (1248 – 1308)
son of Rudolf IV King of Germans, Holy Roman Emperor Habsburg
Albrecht Albert II ‘The Wise’ Duke of Austria Habsburg (1298 – 1358)
son of Albert I King of Germany Habsburg
Leopold III “Duke of Austria” Habsburg (1351 – 1386)
son of Albrecht Albert II ‘The Wise’ Duke of Austria Habsburg
Ernst I “Ironside” Archduke of Austria Habsburg (1377 – 1424)
son of Leopold III “Duke of Austria” Habsburg
Katharina Archduchess Austria Von Habsburg (1420 – 1493)
daughter of Ernst I “Ironside” Archduke of Austria Habsburg
Christof I VanBaden (1453 – 1527)
son of Katharina Archduchess Austria Von Habsburg
Beatrix Zahringen (1492 – 1535)
daughter of Christof I VanBaden
Sabine Grafin VonSimmern (1528 – 1578)
daughter of Beatrix Zahringen
Marie L Egmond (1564 – 1584)
daughter of Sabine Grafin VonSimmern
Richard Sears (1590 – 1676)
son of Marie L Egmond
Silas Sears (1638 – 1697)
son of Richard Sears
Silas Sears (1661 – 1732)
son of Silas Sears
Sarah Sears (1697 – 1785)
daughter of Silas Sears
Sarah Hamblin (1721 – 1814)
daughter of Sarah Sears
Mercy Hazen (1747 – 1819)
daughter of Sarah Hamblin
Martha Mead (1784 – 1860)
daughter of Mercy Hazen
Abner Morse (1808 – 1838)
son of Martha Mead
Daniel Rowland Morse (1838 – 1910)
son of Abner Morse
Jason A Morse (1862 – 1932)
son of Daniel Rowland Morse
Ernest Abner Morse (1890 – 1965)
son of Jason A Morse
Richard Arden Morse (1920 – 2004)
son of Ernest Abner Morse
Pamela Morse
I am the daughter of Richard Arden Morse

Albert IV (or Albert the Wise) (ca. 1188 – December 13, 1239) was Count of Habsburg in the Aargau and a progenitor of the royal House of Habsburg.

He was the son of Count Rudolph II of Habsburg and Agnes of Staufen. About 1217 Albert married Hedwig (Heilwig), daughter of Count Ulrich of Kyburg (died 1237) and Anna of Zähringen. Upon the death of his father in 1232 he divided his family’s estates with his brother Rudolph III, whereby he retained the ancestral seat at Habsburg Castle. A follower of Emperor Frederick II of Hohenstaufen, he died on the 1239 crusade of King Theobald I of Navarre near Ashkelon.

Albert was the father of King Rudolph I of Germany, and a mutual ancestor of Archduke Franz Ferdinand of Austria and of his wife Sophie, Duchess of Hohenberg. He is also an ancestor of Queen Elizabeth II of the United Kingdom.

Notes
^ Ferdinand was descended from Rudolph I and Sophie was descended from Rudolph’s sister Elisabeth.

Albert IV, Count of Habsburg

Spouse
Hedwig of Kyburg

Father
Rudolph II, Count of Habsburg

Mother
Agnes of Staufen

Born
c. 1188

Died
13 December 1239
Ashkelon

Jaime I Mallorc, 23rd Great-Grandfather

June 7, 2014 5 Comments

Jaime I Mallorc is my ancestor two times.  Two of his children became my ancestors, Isabella and Peter, both leading to Ann Dudley, Pilgrim poet.  She has the most royal of pedigrees. This is just one of them. She wrote about God and religion, but her DNA contained the royal history of Europe, crusades and all.  Jaime was one of those royals who had his first marriage annulled when he wanted to marry another woman.

Jaime I Mallorc (1207 – 1276)
is my 23rd great grandfather
Isabella DeAragon (1247 – 1271)
daughter of Jaime I Mallorc
Charles DeValois (1270 – 1325)
son of Isabella DeAragon
Jeanne DeVALOIS (1294 – 1342)
daughter of Charles DeValois
Philippa deHainault (1311 – 1369)
daughter of Jeanne DeVALOIS
John of Gaunt – Duke of Lancaster – Plantagenet (1340 – 1399)
son of Philippa deHainault
Philippa Plantagenet (1370 – 1415)
daughter of John of Gaunt – Duke of Lancaster – Plantagenet
Beatrix DePinto (1403 – 1447)
daughter of Philippa Plantagenet
John Fettiplace (1427 – 1464)
son of Beatrix DePinto
Richard Fettiplace (1460 – 1511)
son of John Fettiplace
Anne Fettiplace (1496 – 1567)
daughter of Richard Fettiplace
Mary Purefoy (1533 – 1579)
daughter of Anne Fettiplace
Susanna Thorne (1559 – 1586)
daughter of Mary Purefoy
Gov Thomas Dudley (1576 – 1653)
son of Susanna Thorne
Anne Dudley (1612 – 1672)
daughter of Gov Thomas Dudley
John Bradstreet (1652 – 1718)
son of Anne Dudley
Mercy Bradstreet (1689 – 1725)
daughter of John Bradstreet
Caleb Hazen (1720 – 1777)
son of Mercy Bradstreet
Mercy Hazen (1747 – 1819)
daughter of Caleb Hazen
Martha Mead (1784 – 1860)
daughter of Mercy Hazen
Abner Morse (1808 – 1838)
son of Martha Mead
Daniel Rowland Morse (1838 – 1910)
son of Abner Morse
Jason A Morse (1862 – 1932)
son of Daniel Rowland Morse
Ernest Abner Morse (1890 – 1965)
son of Jason A Morse
Richard Arden Morse (1920 – 2004)
son of Ernest Abner Morse
Pamela Morse
You are the daughter of Richard Arden Morse

James I of Aragon (Spanish: Jaime I, Catalan: Jaume I) (Montpellier February 2, 1208 � July 27, 1276), surnamed the Conqueror, was the king of Aragon, count of Barcelona and Lord of Montpellier from 1213 to 1276.
He was the only child of Peter II of Aragon and Marie of Montpellier. As a child he was a pawn of power politics in Provence, where his father was engaged in struggles in the wars between the Cathars of Albi and Simon de Montfort. Peter endeavoured to placate the northern crusaders by arranging a marriage between his son James and Simon’s daughter, entrusting the boy to be educated in Montfort’s care in 1211, but Peter was soon forced to take up arms against them, and he was slain at the Battle of Muret September 12, 1213. Montfort would willingly have used James as a means of extending his own power. The Aragonese and Catalans, however, appealed to the pope, who forced Montfort to surrender him in May or June 1214.

James was now entrusted to the care of Guillen de Monredon, the head of the Knights Templar in Spain and Provence. The kingdom was given over to confusion till in 1216 the Templars and some of the more loyal nobles brought the young king to Saragossa.

He first married, in 1221, Leonor, daughter of Alfonso VIII of Castile, and then after having the marriage annulled (though a son was declared legitimate), in 1235, Yolande of Hungary, daughter of Andrew II of Hungary. His children were:

Alfonso (1229-1260), married Constanza de Moncada, Countess of Bigorre
Violante of Aragon (1236-1301), married Alfonso X of Castile
Peter III of Aragon
Constanza of Aragon (1239-1269), married Juan Manuel of Castile, son of Ferdinand III of Castile
James II of Majorca
Isabella of Aragon, married Philip III of France
Sancho, Archbishop of Toledo (1250-1279)

After a false start at uniting Aragon with Navarre through a scheme of mutual adoption, James turned to the south and the Mediterranean, conquered the Balearic Islands (from 1228 over the following four years) and Valencia (the city capitulated September 28, 1238).

With the French, James endeavoured to form a state straddling the Pyrenees, to counterbalance the power of France north of the Loire. As with the earlier Visigothic attempt, this policy was victim of physical, cultural and political obstacles. As in the case of Navarra, he was too wise to launch into perilous adventures. By the Treaty of Corbeil, with Louis IX, signed May, 1258, he frankly withdrew from conflict with the French king, and was content with the recognition of his position, and the surrender of antiquated and illusory French claims to the overlordship of Catalonia.

During his remaining two decades, James warred with the Moors in Murcia, on behalf of his son-in-law Alphonso the Wise of Castile. As a legislator and organizer he occupies a high place among the Spanish kings. The favor he showed his bastards led to protest from the nobles, and to conflicts between his sons legitimate and illegitimate. When one of the latter, Fernan Sanchez, who had behaved with gross ingratitude and treason to his father, was slain by the legitimate son Peter, the old king recorded his grim satisfaction.

At the close of his life King James divided his states between his sons by Yolande of Hungary, Peter receiving the Hispanic possessions on the mainland and James, the Kingdom of Majorca (the Balearic Islands and the counties of Roussillon and Cerdagne) and the Lordship of Montpellier, a division which inevitably produced fratricidal conflicts. The king fell very ill at Alcira, and resigned his crown, intending to retire to the monastery of Poblet, but died at Valencia July 7, 1276.
King James wrote or dictated at various stages a chronicle of his own life, “Llibre Dels Fets” in Catalan, which is the first self-chronicle of a Christian king. As well as a fine example of autobiography the “Book of Deeds” expresses concepts of the power and purpose of monarchy, examples of loyalty and treachery in the feudal order, the growth of national sentiment based on homeland, language and culture, and medieval military tactics.

Sibilla Anjou, 25th Great-Grandmother

March 14, 2014 3 Comments

Sibilla Anjou

Sibilla Anjou

My 25th great grandmother was from the House of Anjou (like the pear) .  Her father, Fulk, was a crusader who is buried at the Church of the Holy Sepulchre in Jerusalem, as King of Jerusalem, which is a very big deal, and pretty creepy. I have been there but did not think to look for my ancestors at the time.  The Anjous are Plantagenets in that way that royal Euros had lots of different names and houses.  The crusade thing is equally confusing.  This is how the Anjous took over the English throne:

The Plantagenets are also called Angevins, because their immediate paternal progenitors were Counts of Anjou, an autonomous county in northern France. They descend in the male line from from the Counts of Gatinais, one of whom had married an heiress to the county, her Anjou ancestors deriving from an obscure 9th century nobleman named Ingelger.  It is due to this lineage that the Plantagenets are sometimes referred to as the First House of Anjou. One of the more notable Counts was Fulk, a crusader who became King of Jerusalem. It was his son, Geoffrey, nicknamed Plantagenet, who gave his name to the dynasty, and Fulk’s grandson, Henry, was the first of the family to rule England.
Henry’ s claim to the English throne came through his mother, the Empress Matilda, who had claimed the crown as the daughter of Henry I of England. Empress Matilda’s brother William Adelin had died in the wreck of the White Ship, leaving Matilda her father’s only surviving legitimate child.  However, on Henry’s death in 1135, Matilda’s cousin Stephen of Blois was supported by much of the Anglo-Norman nobility, and was able to have himself crowned instead.  A tightly fought civil war known as The Anarchy ensued, with Matilda gaining support from her illegitimate half-brother, Robert, 1st Earl of Gloucester.  The balance swayed both ways during the war, Matilda gained control at one point and carried the title “Lady of the English” before Stephen forced her out to Anjou. Unrest and instability continued throughout Stephen’s reign, while on the continent, Geoffrey managed to take control of the Duchy of Normandy for the Angevins in 1141 but seemingly showed no interest in campaigning across the Channel.

Sibilla went to Jerusalem where her father married the queen. Later she became a nun, like lots of my royal female ancestors:

Sibylla of Anjou (c. 1112-1165) was a daughter of Fulk V of Anjou and Ermengarde of Maine, and wife of William Clito and Thierry, Count of Flanders.

In 1123 Sibylla married to William Clito, son of the Norman Robert Curthose and future Count of Flanders. Sibylla brought the County of Maine to this marriage, which was annulled in 1124 on grounds of consanguinity. The annulment was made by Pope Honorius II upon request from Henry I of England, William’s uncle; Fulk opposed it and did not consent until Honorius excommunicated him and placed an interdict over Anjou. Sibylla then accompanied her widower father to the crusader Kingdom of Jerusalem, where he married Melisende, the heiress of the kingdom, and became king himself in 1131. In 1139 she married Thierry, Count of Flanders, who had arrived on his first pilgrimage to the Holy Land.

She returned to Flanders with her new husband, and during his absence on the Second Crusade the pregnant Sibylla acted as regent of the county. Baldwin IV, Count of Hainaut took the opportunity to attack Flanders, but Sibylla led a counter-attack and pillaged Hainaut. In response Baldwin ravaged Artois. The archbishop of Reims intervened and a truce was signed, but Thierry took vengeance on Baldwin when he returned in 1149.

In 1157 she travelled with Thierry on his third pilgrimage, but after arriving in Jerusalem she separated from her husband and refused to return home with him. She became a nun at the convent of St. Lazarus in Bethany, where her step-aunt, Ioveta of Bethany, was abbess. Ioveta and Sibylla supported Queen Melisende and held some influence over the church, and supported the election of Amalric of Nesle as Latin Patriarch of Jerusalem over a number of other candidates. Sibylla died in Bethany in 1165.

With Thierry she had six children:

  • Philip, Count of Flanders
  • Matthew, Count of Boulogne, married Marie of Boulogne
  • Margaret, Countess of Flanders and Hainaut, married Baldwin V, Count of Hainaut
  • Gertrude
  • Matilda
  • Peter
Sibilla Anjou (1105 – 1165)
is my 25th great grandmother
daughter of Sibilla Anjou
daughter of Marguerite De LORRAINE
son of Isabelle De Hainault
son of Louis VIII France
son of Charles I King of Jerusalem and Naples
daughter of Charles NAPLES
daughter of Marguerite Sicily Naples
daughter of Jeanne DeVALOIS
son of Philippa deHainault
daughter of John of Gaunt – Duke of Lancaster – Plantagenet
daughter of Joan DeBeaufort
son of Duchess of York Lady Cecily DeNeville
son of Henry Holland
son of Henry Holland
son of John Holland
son of Francis Gabriell Holland
daughter of John Holland
son of Mary Elizabeth Holland
son of Richard Dearden
son of George Dearden
son of George Darden
daughter of David Darden
daughter of Minerva Truly Darden
daughter of Sarah E Hughes
son of Lucinda Jane Armer
daughter of George Harvey Taylor
I am the daughter of Ruby Lee Taylor

Sibilla d’Anjou born about 1105 Anjou, France died 1165/67

father: *Foulques V “le Jeune” Count of Anjou & King of Jerusalemborn 1092 Anjou, France
died 10 November 1143 Jerusalem, Holy Landburied Church Of Holy Sepulchre, Jerusalem, Holy Land

mother: *Ermengarde (Ermentrude) du Maineborn about 1096 Maine, France
died 1126 Maine, Francemarried 11 July 1110 France

siblings:
*Geoffrey V “le Bon” Plantagenet born 24 August 1113 Anjou, France; died 7 September 1151 Chateau, France
Mathilde d’Anjou born about 1104 Angers, Maine-et-Loire, France; died 1154 Fontevrault Abbey, Fontevrault, Maine-et-Loire, France
Elias d’Anjou born about 1111 Anjou, France; died 15 January 1151 St Serge Abbey, Angers, Anjou, France buried L’Abbey des Sergela, Angers, France

spouse: *Dietrich (Thierry) d’ Alsaceborn about 1099 Alsace, France
died 17 January 1168married 1134

children:
*Marguerite de Lorraine born about 1135 Alsace, France died 15 November 1194
*Matthieu d’ Alsace born about 1137 Flanders, Belgium died 1214 buried St. Judoc, Ponthieu, France

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