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On The Rock

November 22, 2017 1 Comment

Mayflower

Mayflower

The ship was grounded on the shoals
The Pilgrims had not yet achieved their goals
The crowd was hungry, tired, depressed and sick
There was no welcoming party with a magic trick
To heal the suffering and recover moral fortitude
All the tribe had to offer was comfort and food
With great trepidation they approached the invaders
Dressed in high hats and collars of religious crusaders

Visit To Plymouth Plantation

November 23, 2016 6 Comments

cannons above church Plymouth

cannons above church Plymouth

Pilgrims

Pilgrims

Pilgrim

Pilgrim

miller's take

miller’s take

mill pond

mill pond

When I visited Plymouth Plantation to see how my ancestors had lived the Mayflower was out of town being repaired. That did not bother me. I filled my day visiting at the museums of the living culture, including the grain mill extension in town.  The details are fabulous and the actors doing the recreation are very knowledgeable and professional at their work.  My personal ancestors were not on hand the day I went, but I did see the recreations of their homes.  I also spent time in the cemetery and the church.  The whole town is kind of preserved, with a definite Mayflower Pilgrim theme.

I was most interested in the Wampanoag section of the display. I thought for years I was a descendant of Quadequina, a member of the first Thanksgiving party.  I was thrilled to be a Wamp, but later my first cousin discovered an error in my research.  I had to cut that branch from the tree and begin again in the 1700s in South Carolina.  I was super distressed at this news, which at first I was unwilling to accept.  I was furious at my cousin, but had to face the reality that I had based my conclusions on specious data.  I had mistaken one John Taylor in South Carolina for another, and that was all it took to lead me astray.  It was a bummer.  I was just a wanna be Wampanoag after all.  It was a sad day when I had to admit that.

I stayed on Cape Cod where many of my ancestors moved after they had had it with the Plymouth bureaucracy and religious police.  The whole area is filled with history.  Even though my dreams of being a Wampanoag were dashed I enjoyed learning about the tribe and their struggle today.  My relationship to them is purely intellectual, but I still love the People of The First Light.  I love them more than I love the Pilgrims, who turned out to be pretty religious crazy.  That whole story about religious freedom and Plymouth has been stilted quite a bit.  They had no use for religious freedom other than their own specific brand of religious practice.  They forced everyone to go to their church and obey their church’s rules. That is why many of my ancestors left for Cape Cod and later for Rhode Island.  Those oppressive Pilgrims were just too intrusive to have as neighbors.

I hope to go back to Plymouth some day.  I now have done more research and more people to find in the vicinity.  I also hope I will revisit Williamsburg, VA because many of my ancestors were living down there in the 1600’s too.  If you have a chance to go see the exhibits at Plimouth Plantation Thanksgiving will never be the same for you.  You will see a clearer picture of what really happened in history.

Richard Warren, Mayflower Passenger, Ancestor

October 5, 2016 7 Comments

Pilgrims

The original painting hangs at the Pilgrim Hall Museum in Plymouth, Massachusetts.  Mayflower Compact, Image from painting by Edward Percy Moran (1862-1935), showing Myles Standish, William Bradford, William Brewster and John Carver signing the Mayflower Compact in a cabin aboard the Mayflower while other Pilgrims look on, ca. 1900.

My eleventh great-grandfather sailed on the Mayflower as a paying customer, not part of the Leiden religious Pilgrims.  He was a merchant who sailed from England without his wife and daughters, sending for them to join him after he was established in Plymouth.  As we travel in time toward Thanksgiving I like to deconstruct some of the misconceptions we have about these Mayflower pioneers. They were not all religious and they did not all survive very well in the new world. Things were not as rose as they were presented to us back in elementary school.  It was not all turkey and dressing.  The Plymouth story is a complicated tale of cultural clashes that continue to this day.

Richard Warren (1580 – 1628)
11th great-grandfather
Anna Warren (1612 – 1675)
daughter of Richard Warren
William Little (1640 – 1731)
son of Anna Warren
William Little (1660 – 1740)
son of William Little
William Little Jr (1685 – 1756)
son of William Little
Jeanette Little (1713 – 1764)
daughter of William Little Jr
Andrew Armour (1740 – 1801)
son of Jeanette Little
William Armor (1775 – 1852)
son of Andrew Armour
William Armer (1790 – 1837)
son of William Armor
Thomas Armer (1825 – 1900)
son of William Armer
Lucinda Jane Armer (1847 – 1939)
daughter of Thomas Armer
George Harvey Taylor (1884 – 1941)
son of Lucinda Jane Armer
Ruby Lee Taylor (1922 – 2008)
daughter of George Harvey Taylor
Pamela Morse
I am the daughter of Ruby Lee Taylor

Richard Warren (c.1580 1628) a passenger on the Mayflower, old “May Floure,” in 1620, settled in Plymouth Colony and was among 10 passengers of the Mayflower landing party with Myles Standish at Cape Cod on November 11, 1620. Richard Warren co-signed the Mayflower Compact and was one of 19 among 41 signers who survived the first winter. His wife Elizabeth, nee Walker, baptised 1583 in Baldock, Hertfordshire, England, died October 2, 1673. She and his first five children, all daughters, came to America in the ship “Anne” in 1623. Once in America, they then had two sons before Richard’s untimely death in 1628. Clearly a man of rank, Richard Warren was accorded by Governor William Bradford the prefix “Mr.”, pronounced Master, used in those times to distinguish someone because of birth or achievement. From his widow’s subsequent land transactions, we can assume that he was among the wealthier of the original Plymouth Settlers.” In Mourt’s Relation, published in 1622, we learn that Warren was chosen, when the Mayflower stopped at Cape Cod before reaching Plymouth, to be a member of the exploring party among 10 passengers, and 8 crew, and he was described as being “of London” among 3 men. Charles Edward Banks, in Ancestry and Homes of the Pilgrim Fathers writes: “Richard Warren came from London and was called a merchand of that city, by Mourt.” He was not of the Leyden, Holland, Pilgrims, but joined them in Southampton, England to sail on the Mayflower. Richard Warren received his acres in the Division of Land in 1623. In the 1627 Division of Lands and Cattle, in May of 1627, “RICHARD WARREN of the Mayflower” was given “one of the black heifers, 2 she-goats, and a grant of 400 acres of land” at the Eel River in Plymouth, Massachusetts. The Warren house built in that year, 1627, stood at the same location as the present house; it was re-built about 1700, at the head of Clifford Road, with its back to the sea, and later owned by Charles Strickland, in 1976. However, Richard Warren died a year after the division, in 1628, the only record of his death being found as a brief note in Nathaniel Morton’s 1669 book New England’s Memorial, in which Morton writes: “This year [1628] died Mr. Richard Warren, who hath been mentioned before in this book, and was an useful instrument ; and during his life bore a deep share in the difficulties and troubles of the first settlement of the plantation of New Plimouth.” -Nathaniel Morton, New England’s Memorial (Boston : John Usher, 1669) Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Richard_Warren The Mayflower Compact was the first governing document of Plymouth Colony. It was drafted by the “Pilgrims” who crossed the Atlantic aboard the Mayflower, seeking religious freedom. It was signed on November 11, 1620 in what is now Provincetown Harbor near Cape Cod. The Pilgrims used the Julian Calendar which, at that time, was ten days behind the Gregorian Calendar, signing the covenant “ye .11. of November.” Having landed at Plymouth, so named by Captain John Smith earlier, many of the Pilgrims aboard realized that they were in land uncharted by the London Company. For this reason the Mayflower Compact was written and adopted, based simultaneously upon a majoritarian model and the settlers’ allegiance to the king. Many of the passengers knew that earlier settlements in the New World had failed due to a lack of government, and the Mayflower Compact was in essence a social contract in which the settlers consented to follow the rules and regulations of the government for the sake of survival. The government, in return, would derive its power from the consent of the governed. The compact is often referred to as the foundation of the Constitution of the United States, in a figurative, not literal, way. The list of 41 male passengers who signed was supplied by Bradford’s nephew Nathaniel Morton in his 1669 New England’s Memorial include: Richard Warren Source: Mayflower Compact, Image from painting by Edward Percy Moran (1862-1935), showing Myles Standish, William Bradford, William Brewster and John Carver signing the Mayflower Compact in a cabin aboard the Mayflower while other Pilgrims look on, ca. 1900.  Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mayflower_Compact

My 11th great-grandfather was probably born in Hertford, England.  He married Elizabeth Walker, 14 April 1610, Great Amwell, Hertford, England, daughter of Augustine Walker. He died in  1628, in Plymouth. Children: Mary, Ann, Sarah, Elizabeth, Abigail, Nathaniel, and Joseph.
Richard Warren’s English origins and ancestry have been the subject of much speculation, and countless different ancestries have been published for him, without a shred of evidence to support them. Luckily in December 2002, Edward Davies discovered the missing piece of the puzzle. Researchers had long known of the marriage of Richard Warren to Elizabeth Walker on 14 April 1610 at Great Amwell, Hertford. Since we know the Mayflower passenger had a wife named Elizabeth, and a first child born about 1610, this was a promising record. But no children were found for this couple in the parish registers, and no further evidence beyond the names and timing, until the will of Augustine Walker was discovered. In the will of Augustine Walker, dated April 1613, he mentions “my daughter Elizabeth Warren wife of Richard Warren”, and “her three children Mary, Ann and Sarah.” We know that the Mayflower passenger’s first three children were named Mary, Ann, and Sarah (in that birth order).
Very little is known about Richard Warren’s life in America. He came alone on the Mayflower in 1620, leaving behind his wife and five daughters. They came to him on the ship Anne in 1623, and Richard and Elizabeth subsequently had sons Nathaniel and Joseph at Plymouth. He received his acres in the Division of Land in 1623, and his family shared in the 1627 Division of Cattle. But he died a year later in 1628, the only record of his death being found in Nathaniel Morton’s 1669 book New England’s Memorial, in which he writes: “This year [1628] died Mr. Richard Warren, who was an useful instrument and during his life bare a deep share in the difficulties and troubles of the first settlement of the Plantation of New Plymouth.”
All of Richard Warren’s children survived to adulthood, married, and had large families: making Richard Warren one of the most common Mayflower passengers to be descended from. Richard Warren’s descendants include such notables as Civil War general Ulysses S. Grant, President Franklin D. Roosevelt, and Alan B. Shepard, Jr. the first American in space and the fifth person to walk on the moon.

6 September 1620 Richard was one of the 102 passengers that embarked on the Mayflower, leaving Plymouth, England on this day. Many people are aware that the passengers of the Mayflower were fleeing religious persecution. What most people don’t realize is that over half the passengers were “strangers” picked up from London, whose passage to America on the Mayflower helped the religious separatists pay the excessive expenses involved with sending a ship to the New World. Those in the Leyden contingent are the “religious separatists” and those of the London contingent are the “strangers”.
9 November 1620 The passengers and crew aboard the Mayflower sighted land.
11 November 1620 The passengers and crew of the Mayflower made landfall in America. The group of 102 passengers who crowded aboard the Mayflower for the crossing was not homogenous. Many of the passengers were members of the Leiden congregation, but they were joined by a number of English families or individuals who were hoping to better their life situations, or were seeking financial gain. These two general groups have sometimes been referred to as the “saints” and “strangers.” Although the Leiden congregation had sent its strongest members with various skills for establishing the new colony, nearly half of the passengers died the first winter of the “great sickness.” Anyone who arrived in Plymouth on Mayflower and survived the initial hardships is now considered a Pilgrim with no distinction being made on the basis of their original purposes for making the voyage.

Goodith Gilman, Pilgrim Mother

November 21, 2013 9 Comments

marriage record

marriage record

coat of arms (with leg)

coat of arms (with leg)

Goodith's grave

Goodith’s grave

My 12th great-grandmother arrived in Massachusetts Colony before 1632, and joined the church in Charlestown with her well respected husband.  Her unusual first name is often misspelled in records, but it is an old English name.

Note: From “The Great Migration Begins…”: :’Goodith’ was a distinct given name, not to be confused with ‘Judith’, and not to be interpreted as ‘Goodwife,’ as has been done. “The Winthrop Society shows Goodith’s birth as circa 1585 and death as before 1632.
Judith Gillman was also known as Goodith Gillman. She was born in 1594 at Bermondsey, London, England. On 22 April 1606 at St. Olive, Southwork, Surrey, England, Judith married William Learned. Judith Gillman and William Learned were admitted to the church on 6 December 1632 at Woburn, Middlesex County, Massachusetts. Judith Gillman died on Friday, 24 June 1661 at Malden, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, at age 67 years.
[S466] Ancestral File. Family History Library, Salt Lake City, Salt Lake County, Utah, 1994. [S14] Wyman, Thomas Bellows. The Genealogies and Estates of Charlestown, Massachusetts 1629-1818. 1879. Reprint Somersworth, New Hampshire: New England History Press, 1982.

WILLIAM LEARNED d. Woburn, MA 1 Mar 1646, m. GOODITH GILMAN, d. 24 Jan 1661.

William Learned came from Bermondsey, Surrey, England and settled at Charlestown in the Massachusetts Bay in or before 1632, possibly in 1630 with the Winthrop fleet. He and his wife Judith were admitted to the First Church of Charlestown on Dec. 6, 1632, their names being the first two on the list of members. “1632, 10 mo., day 6, William Learned and Goodeth, his wife, were admitted”, being the first admissions after the separation from the Boston Church. He became a freeman on May 14, 1634 and a Selectman on Feb. 13, 1635-6. On March 2, 1637 he was chosen one of four to divide, for stinting, the common land, and on Feb. 12, 1637-8 he and Mr. Greene were appointed to settle the wages of the school-master.[2] On April 26, 1638 William Learned and five others were on a committee “to consider of some things tending toward a body of laws”

William was a subscriber to the town orders for Woburn, drawn up at Charlestown Dec. 18, 1640. In 1641 William moved to Woburn where he was one of the seven original members of the church on August 14, 1642. He was chosen constable April 13, 1643 and Selectman of Woburn in 1643 and 1645. These offices were only given to trusted and respected men.

Goodith Gillman (1592 – 1661)
is my 12th great grandmother
Sarah Learned (1604 – 1652)
daughter of Goodith Gillman
Mary Ewer (1637 – 1693)
daughter of Sarah Learned
Mehitable Jenkins (1655 – 1684)
daughter of Mary Ewer
Isaac Hamblin (1676 – 1710)
son of Mehitable Jenkins
Eleazer Hamblin (1699 – 1771)
son of Isaac Hamblin
Sarah Hamblin (1721 – 1814)
daughter of Eleazer Hamblin
Mercy Hazen (1747 – 1819)
daughter of Sarah Hamblin
Martha Mead (1784 – 1860)
daughter of Mercy Hazen
Abner Morse (1808 – 1838)
son of Martha Mead
Daniel Rowland Morse (1838 – 1910)
son of Abner Morse
Jason A Morse (1862 – 1932)
son of Daniel Rowland Morse
Ernest Abner Morse (1890 – 1965)
son of Jason A Morse
Richard Arden Morse (1920 – 2004)
son of Ernest Abner Morse
Pamela Morse
I am the daughter of Richard Arden Morse

William Walker, 13th Great Grandfather

October 26, 2013 5 Comments

burial place

burial place

coat of arms

coat of arms

William Walker received a grant of land in 1639 in Hingham, Massachusetts and was among the first settlers there. He was with Richard, James, and Sarah Walker when they came to New England in the “Elizabeth” in April 1635. He later removed to Eastham where he was admitted to freedom June 3, 1656.

William Walker (1620 – 1703)
is my 13th great grandfather
daughter of William Walker
daughter of Sarah Walker
daughter of Sarah Warren
son of Elizabeth Blackwell
daughter of Thomas Baynard
daughter of Deborah Baynard
daughter of Mary Horney
son of Esther Harris
daughter of John H Wright
daughter of Mary Wright
daughter of Emiline P Nicholls
daughter of Harriet Peterson
daughter of Sarah Helena Byrne
son of Olga Fern Scott
I am the daughter of Richard Arden Morse

William Walker was born in 1620 at England. He immigrated in 1635. He immigrated in 1643 to Plymouth, MA. He married Sarah Snow, daughter of Nicholas Snow and Constance Hopkins, on 25 February 1654 at Eastham, MA (25 Jan 1655 per #494). William Walker’s name is on the list of those able to bear arms in 1643 and he was admitted as a freeman 8 June 1656 at Eastham, Barnstable, MA. He was in COURT/CIVIL on 3 March 1663 at Plymouth Colony: Ralph Smith of Eastham, fined 3s, 4p for breaking the peace in striking William Walker. He was in COURT/CIVIL on 5 June 1671 at Plymouth: William Walker was charged with stealing cloth from Thomas Clark, “of Boston” and was sentenced to pay double for the cloth and for telling a lie about it, was fined 10 Pounds. He died in 1703.

Nathaniel Warren of Plymouth Colony

October 25, 2013 2 Comments

Richard landing with Pilgrims

Richard landing with Pilgrims

Nathaniel Warren was born in 1624 in Plymouth Colony.  His father, Richard, came alone on the Mayflower to America, then sent later for his family:
We know that the Mayflower passenger’s first three children were named Mary, Ann, and Sarah (in that birth order).Very little is known about Richard Warren’s life in America.  He came alone on the Mayflower in 1620, leaving behind his wife and five daughters.  They came to him on the ship Anne in 1623, and Richard and Elizabeth subsequently had sons Nathaniel and Joseph at Plymouth.
Nathaniel Warren (1624 – 1667)
is my 12th great grandfather
daughter of Nathaniel Warren
daughter of Sarah Warren
son of Elizabeth Blackwell
daughter of Thomas Baynard
daughter of Deborah Baynard
daughter of Mary Horney
son of Esther Harris
daughter of John H Wright
daughter of Mary Wright
daughter of Emiline P Nicholls
daughter of Harriet Peterson
daughter of Sarah Helena Byrne
son of Olga Fern Scott
I am  the daughter of Richard Arden Morse
When he was 41 years old he was given the responsibility of negotiating with my 11th great uncle Metacom to purchase land from the Wampanoag tribe.
Plymouth Colony Land Purchase:

  • Oct. 1665, John Cooke and his Brother-In-Law Nathaniel Warren, were appointed by Plymouth Colony to “treat with Philip the Sagamore about the sale of such lands as are to be sold by him, and to purchase them in the behalf of the country.” Philip the Sagamore, sometimes called Metacom, was the son or grandson of Massasoit, and leader of the Wampanoag Indians. He would later be dubbed “King Philip” during the Wampanoag’s war he led against the English in 1676.

    His prepared his will in 1661 to resolve disputes over his father’s estate.

From the book “Mayflower Families Through Five Generations” Richard Warren, Volume Eighteen Part 1 – Third Edition by the General Society of Mayflower Descendants 2004
On June 11 1653 Jane Collyare (Collier) on behalf of her grandchild Sara, the wife of Nathaniel Warren. Elizabeth Warren and Nathaniel Warren agreed to let the court resolve their differences over certain lands of Mr. richard Warren deceased.
Nathaniel Warren became a Freeman 3 June 1657. On 1 June 1658 he was a Deputy from Plymouth, a position he frequently held.
On 15 oct 1661 Nathaniell Warren “aged thirty seaven yeares or thereabouts” made a deposition. NOTE: spelling in the ( )’s are exactly the way it was written back in 1661.
The will of Nathaniel Warren Sr. of Plymouth, dated 29 June 1667, codicil dated 16 July 1667, names wife Sarah; dau. Hope who is lame; other children (not named); the codicil mentions mother Elizabeth Warren; brother Joseph Warren; sisters Mary Bartlett, Sr., Ann Little, Sarah Cooke, Elizabeth Church and Abigail Snow. The inventory was taken 21 Oct 1667, sworn by widow Sarah Warren who was granted administration 30 Oct 1667.
On 9 Jan. 1689/90, Sarah Warren sold land in Plymouth to her son James Warren. On 9 Jan. 1689/90, the other heirs of Nathaniel Warren consented to the sale, they were: Richard Warren; Nathaniel Warren; Jabiz Warren; Elizabeth Green; Sarah Blackwell; Thomas Gibbs and wife Alice; Jonathan Delano and wife Mercy Delano.
On 19 Sept. 1694 Jabiz Warren of Plymouth, yeoman, sold to John Gibbs land in Middleboro which was bought by his father Nathaniel Warren.

Mistress Bradstreet, Puritan Poet

October 20, 2013 6 Comments

My 9th great grandmother was the first woman poet to be published in America:

Anne Bradstreet (1612-1672) is one of the most important figures in the history of American Literature. She is considered by many to be the first American poet, and her first collection of poems, “The Tenth Muse Lately Sprung Up in America, By a Gentlewoman of Those Parts”, doesn’t contain any of her best known poems, it was the first book written by a woman to be published in the United States. Mrs. Bradstreet’s work also serves as a document of the struggles of a Puritan wife against the hardships of New England colonial life, and in some way is a testament to plight of the women of the age. Anne’s life was a constant struggle, from her difficult adaptation to the rigors of the new land, to her constant battle with illness.
It is clear to see that Anne’s faith was exemplary, and so was her love for children and her husband, Governor Simon Bradstreet. Anne’s poems were written mainly during the long periods of loneliness while Simon was away on political errands. Anne, who was a well educated woman, also spent much time with her children, reading to them and teaching them as her father had taught her when she was young. While it is rather easy for us to view Puritan ideology in a bad light because of it’s attitude towards women and strict moral code, her indifference to material wealth, her humility and her spirituality, regardless of religion, made her into a positive, inspirational role model for any of us.
Another one of Anne’s most important qualities was her strong intuition, although only subtly hinted at in her work, probably for fear of reprisal from the deeply religious Puritan community, one cannot help but feel her constant fascination with the human mind, and spirit, and inner guidance.
Her style is deceptively simple, yet speaks of a woman of high intelligence and ideals who was very much in love, and had unconditional faith. While it was difficult for women to air their views in the 17th Century, Anne Bradstreet did so with ease, as her rich vocabulary and polyvalent knowledge brought a lyrical, yet logical quality to her work which made it pleasant for anyone to read.

Anne Dudley Bradstreet was protected by her father and husband at a time when women were not supposed to think, let alone write poetry.  She wrote history as she lived it as an Englishwoman in New England.  I visited the University of Arizona Poetry Center this week to see the word shrine for the dead.  I was very happy to also find a big blue book by Anne Bradstreet on the shelves.  I enjoyed the wonderful space and visited with my ancestor by reading her works for about an hour.  I had seen some of the work before, but since I was thinking of ancestry I really enjoyed the note she wrote to her son Simon (brother of my own ancestor).  There is a copy preserved in her own hand, which I love to see.  It gives me some intuition into her soul’s journey.  Being a Pilgrim was not easy, but if your father and husband were governors you had some obvious advantages.

It is a wonderment of synchronicity to find my ancestor’s work preserved at the Poetry Center very near my home where I can go visit and read her any time.

Wasanequin, Sachem of the Pokanoket Nation

February 25, 2013 2 Comments

Wampanoag dwelling

Wampanoag dwelling

I am proud to be a descendant, even though there are 10 generations between my tribe and me. Massasoit,  my 11th great uncle, was the Sachem who made a treaty with the Pilgrims in 1621.  His father, Wasanequin, is the last link I have found, but I hope when I go to Cape Cod my tribe will know more.

The Wampanoag/Pilgrim Treaty

  • About an hour after noon on a fair, warm day on March 22/April 1, 1621, Samoset and Squanto appeared in the village of Plymouth with some skins and newly caught and dried herrings to trade. They told the colonists that the great Sachem Massasoit was nearby with his brother Quadequina and all their men. About an hour later Massasoit came to the top of the hill with some sixty of his men. However, the Pilgrims were not willing to send their governor to meet them, and the Indians were unwilling to come to them. Squanto went again to Massasoit and brought back word that Massasoit wished to have trade and peace with them, asking the Pilgrims to send someone to parley with him.

    Edward Winslow agreed to serve as diplomatic ambassador and went to Massasoit. The scene was described by Winslow in his Journal as follows:

    “We sent to the King a payre of Knives, and a Copper Chayne, with a jewell at it. To Quadequina we sent likewise a Knife and a Jewell to hang in his eare, and withall a Pot of strong water, a good quantity of Bisket, and some butter, which were all accepted: our Messenger [Winslow] made a speech unto him, that King James saluted him with words of love and Peace, and did accept him as his Friend and Alie, and that our Governour desired to see him and to trucke with him, and to confirme a Peace with him, and his next neighbour: he liked well of the speech and heard it attentively, though the Interpreters did not well expresse it; after he had eaten and drunke himselfe, and given the rest to his company, he looked upon his messengers sword and armour which he had on, with intimation of his desire to buy it, but on the other side, our messenger shewed his unwillingness to part with it: In the end he left him in the custodie of Quadequina his brother, and came over the brooke, and some twentie men following him, leaving all their Bowes and Arrowes behind them. We kept six or seaven as hostages for our messenger.”

    Captain Standish and William Brewster met the king at the brook with half a dozen musketeers, where they saluted him and he them. With Standish on one side of Massasoit and Brewster on the other, they escorted Massasoit to a house which was just being built. On the floor, the Pilgrims had placed a green rug and three or four cushions.

    Winslow described Massasoit and his men as “…a very lustie [strong] man, in his best yeares, an able body, grave of countenance, and spare of speech: In his Attyre little or nothing differing from the rest of his followers, only a great Chaine of white bone Beades about his neck, and at it behind his necke, hangs a little bagg of Tobacco, which he dranke and gave us to drinke; his face was paynted with a sad [dark] red like murray, and oyled both head and face, that he looked greasily: All his followers were likewise, were in their faces, in part or in whole painted, some blacke, some red, some yellow, and some white, some with crosses and other Antick [antique] workes, some had skins on them, and some naked, all strong, tall, all men in appearance…”

    Immediately, Governor Carver came to the house with drum and trumpet after him and a few musketeers. Governor Carver kissed the hand of Massasoit and Massasoit kissed Carver before they sat down.

    Governor Carver called for some strong water, and made a toast to Massasoit. Massasoit drank deeply of the liquor which made him sweat. Then, Carver called for fresh meat, which Massasoit ate and shared with his followers. Later in the text, Winslow remembered additional details:“…one thing I forgot, the King had in his bosome hanging in a string, a great long knife, hee marvelled much at out Trumpet, and some of his men would sound it as well as they could…”

    TERMS OF THE TREATY

    Following the introductory ceremonies, Carver and Massaoit agreed upon the terms of a peace treaty between the Pilgrims and the Wampanoags. The treaty of mutual support they negotiated said in part:

    1. That he nor any of his should do hurt to any of their people.

    2. That if any of his did hurt any of theirs, he should send the offender, that they might punish him.

    3. That if anything were taken away from any of theirs, he should cause it to be restored; and they should do the like to his.

    4. If any did unjustly war against him, they would aid him; if any did war against them, he should aid them.

    5. He should send to his neighbors confederates to certify them of this, that they might not wrong them, but might be likewise compromised in the conditions of peace.

    6. That when their men came to them, they should leave their bows and arrows behind them.

    7. That King James would esteem Massasoit as his friend and ally.

    Winslow concluded his account of the treaty signing as follow: “Wee cannot yet conceive, but that he is willing to have peace with us, for they have seene our people sometimes alone two or three in the woods at worke and fowling, when as they offered them no harme as they might easily have done, and especially because hee hath a potent Adversary the Narowhiganseis [Narragansetts], that are at warre with him, against whom hee thinkes wee may be some strength to him…”

Wasanequin “Great Sachem” (Wampanoag tribe) (1554 – 1617)

is my 12th great grandfather
son of Wasanequin Great Sachem Wampanoag tribe
daughter of Quadequina Wampanoag
daughter of Margaret Diguina Oguina Weeks WAMPANOAG Whelden **
son of Ruth Whelden
daughter of John TAYLOR
daughter of Abigail Taylor
daughter of Martha Goodwin
daughter of Grace Raiford
son of Sarah Hirons
son of John Nimrod Taylor
son of John Samuel Taylor
son of William Ellison Taylor
daughter of George Harvey Taylor
I am the daughter of Ruby Lee Taylor

Pokanoket is a tribe of Native Americans who trace their their lineage back thousands of years beyond the colonial days of the United States of America. We trace our ancestry through the bloodlines and the written and oral history of our people. We are the people of Massasoit Ousamequin, Massasoit Wamsutta, and Massasoit Metacom. We are Philip’s people, the people of Metacom. We are the people who celebrated the First Thanksgiving with the Pilgrims in 1621. We are the people who have endured much and who have returned, after a long journey through history to the present day and continue to look forward to the future.
Pokanoket is also a Nation. The Nation of Tribes you may have heard of referred to as Wampanoag ( pronounced wahm – peh – noe – ahg ) was known to our ancestors as the Pokanoket Nation. The Pokanoket Nation, also known as the Pokanoket Confederacy or Pokanoket Country, was comprised of a multitude of Tribes.

Each Tribe was comprised of Bands and Villages and the Pokanoket Tribe was the Headship of the Pokanoket Nation.
Pokanoket is also our home. Prior to the time of the pilgrim’s arrival in Plymouth, which used to be Patuxet, the realm of the Pokanoket included portions of Rhode Island and much of southeastern Massachusetts, including the surrounding islands around Cape Cod and Martha’s Vineyard.
The Pokanoket social organization developed in a manner that differed from neighboring Native American Tribes, since Pokanoket was more socially structured and layered, as well as more politically complex.
Unique to the Pokanoket Tribe were the spirtual and military elite, know as the Pineese (Pineese Warrior), who protected and served the Massasoit (Great Leader). They are the spiritual guardians of Pokanoket Nation.
Pokanoket believed seven to be the perfect number of completeness, for we still believe in the Seven Spirits of the Creator.

My Tribe and History

December 31, 2012 5 Comments

Plymouth

Plymouth

It is enlightening to track my personality archetypes while I track my ancestors. There are similarities, highs and lows, temporary dead ends in both. You can’t change the ancestors and you can’t change your archetypes, in the same way that you can not rearrange the stars in the sky. When I was new in the genealogy game I went to Tulsa to meet a cousin based on only family legend and no facts to discover/confirm our Cherokee bloodline. We had a great time, but came up empty on the Native American theory. We both wanted it to be true, but my cousin’s husband was insanely convinced without any evidence. He really wanted a Cherokee wife. He was the worst detective I have ever seen.

While searching it is important to be open to discovering that for which what you were not looking. When I find a Plymouth Colony ancestor I am generally excited, fill in the blanks with some black britches and some assumptions. Richard Taylor was no regular Pilgrim. He fell in love and married a Wampanoag chief’s daughter. I have a tribe in Massachusetts. I never would have guessed this, but I am thrilled out of my mind. My 12th great-grandfather,Great Sachem, had been exposed to English fishermen, and had learned some language from them. He walked into the Pilgrim camp and said “Welcome Englishmen”, to the great surprise of the Englishmen.

Wasanequin Great Sachem Wampanoag tribe (1554 – 1617)
is my 12th great grandfather
Quadequina Wampanoag (1576 – 1623)
Son of Wasanequin Great Sachem
Margaret Diguina Weeks (1613 – 1651)
Daughter of Quadequina
Ruth Whelden (1625 – 1673)
Daughter of Margaret Diguina
John TAYLOR (1651 – 1690)
Son of Ruth
Abigail Taylor (1663 – 1730)
Daughter of John
Martha Goodwin (1693 – 1769)
Daughter of Abigail
Grace Raiford (1725 – 1778)
Daughter of Martha
Sarah Hirons (1751 – 1817)
Daughter of Grace
John Nimrod Taylor (1770 – 1816)
Son of Sarah
John Samuel Taylor (1798 – 1873)
Son of John Nimrod
William Ellison Taylor (1839 – 1918)
Son of John Samuel
George Harvey Taylor (1884 – 1941)
Son of William Ellison
Ruby Lee Taylor (1922 – 2008)
Daughter of George Harvey
Pamela Morse
I am the daughter of Ruby Lee

I am very interested in my tribe, and have already had contact from a fellow descendant who has some proof of our Nativeness. I am looking forward to his input and learnring more about my roots. Ironically these people helped the Pilgrims survive, but the tribe has no reservation today. This is an overview of my First Nation Family:

Pokanoket is a tribe of Native Americans who trace their their lineage back thousands of years beyond the colonial days of the United States of America. We trace our ancestry through the bloodlines and the written and oral history of our people. We are the people of Massasoit Ousamequin, Massasoit Wamsutta, and Massasoit Metacom. We are Philip’s people, the people of Metacom. We are the people who celebrated the First Thanksgiving with the Pilgrims in 1621. We are the people who have endured much and who have returned, after a long journey through history to the present day and continue to look forward to the future.

Pokanoket is also a Nation. The Nation of Tribes you may have heard of referred to as Wampanoag ( pronounced wahm – peh – noe – ahg ) was known to our ancestors as the Pokanoket Nation. The Pokanoket Nation, also known as the Pokanoket Confederacy or Pokanoket Country, was comprised of a multitude of Tribes.

Each Tribe was comprised of Bands and Villages and the Pokanoket Tribe was the Headship of the Pokanoket Nation.

Pokanoket is also our home. Prior to the time of the pilgrim’s arrival in Plymouth, which used to be Patuxet, the realm of the Pokanoket included portions of Rhode Island and much of southeastern Massachusetts, including the surrounding islands around Cape Cod and Martha’s Vineyard.

The Pokanoket social organization developed in a manner that differed from neighboring Native American Tribes, since Pokanoket was more socially structured and layered, as well as more politically complex.

Unique to the Pokanoket Tribe were the spirtual and military elite, know as the Pineese (Pineese Warrior), who protected and served the Massasoit (Great Leader). They are the spiritual guardians of Pokanoket Nation.

Pokanoket believed seven to be the perfect number of completeness, for we still believe in the Seven Spirits of the Creator.

Quadequina Wampanoag, 11th Great Grandfather

December 26, 2012 69 Comments

Natives of New England

Natives of New England

It is with great excitement that I have found an ancestor from my mother’s side in Plymouth Colony.  Most of her forefathers sailed to Virginia or below, but this particular Taylor branch had some distinctions. Margaret Diguina Weeks is said to be the Wampanoag daughter of Quadequina. There is  dispute about this, but I do hope I can confirm these facts. My 11th great-grandfather, Quadequina, introduced popcorn to the Pilgrims at the first Thanksgiving.

It becomes complicated because there were two Richard Taylors, both married to women named Ruth. I have not traced them back in England to know if they match up in the old country  with the other Taylors.  Ruth Wheldon’s father officially objected to her marriage to my Mr. Taylor, helping us narrow down some of the facts.  If Ruth Wheldon had a full-blooded Wampanoag mother,  Ruth was a kind of Pocahontas of the north.  I need to do some research on this to see what I can learn.  The story is amazing.

Quadequina Wampanoag (1576 – 1623)
is my 11th great-grandfather
Margaret Diguina Weeks (1613 – 1651)
Daughter of Quadequina
Ruth Whelden (1625 – 1673)
Daughter of Margaret Diguina
John TAYLOR (1651 – 1690)
Son of Ruth
Abigail Taylor (1663 – 1730)
Daughter of John
Martha Goodwin (1693 – 1769)
Daughter of Abigail
Grace Raiford (1725 – 1778)
Daughter of Martha
Sarah Hirons (1751 – 1817)
Daughter of Grace
John Nimrod Taylor (1770 – 1816)
Son of Sarah
John Samuel Taylor (1798 – 1873)
Son of John Nimrod
William Ellison Taylor (1839 – 1918)
Son of John Samuel
George Harvey Taylor (1884 – 1941)
Son of William Ellison
Ruby Lee Taylor (1922 – 2008)
Daughter of George Harvey
Pamela Morse
I am the daughter of Ruby Lee

Here is one account of the story of Margaret Diguina and her tribe:

“Gordon B. Hinckley, Shoulder for the Lord” by George M. McCune page 35- ” Two of the early immigrants to Plymouth colony were Gabriel Wheldon, of Arnold, Nottingham, England, and his brother (name unknown). Gabriel had been married in England before sailing to America but his first wife named Margaret evidently was deceased at the time of his migration.

Both brothers had a free spirit much like Stephen Hopkins and found their way to the camps of the Wampanoags. There they both fell in love with two of the daughters of Chief Quadequina, younger brother of the Great Chief. They each married and Gabriel gave his second wife the English name ‘Margaret’ after his first spouse. The two counseled with their father-in-law and his older brother Massasoit regarding what to do. The Plymouth Colony would probably punish them for their intermarriage. Massasoit advised them to return to the colony and all would be well.

The Plymouth Colony tribunals saved face by banishing the couples from Plymouth for life but did not send them back to England. Gabriel and Margaret established their home in Barnstable where the Hinckleys came in late 1630’s and here Gabriel and Margaret raised a large family of girls.

One of those girls was Ruth Wheldon.  This is a score!!

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