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mermaidcamp

Keeping current in wellness, in and out of the water

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Conflict Resolution, Wampanoag Style

March 6, 2013

I will soon have the opportunity to learn about the history of my ancestors in the museum at Plymouth, MA. This young man named Philip eloquently describes the first world war, which he believes happened on his homeland. I agree with him. The culture that introduced war rather than ball games for conflict resolution not only wiped out the Wampanoag population, but disrespected all aspects of the sovereignty of the nations who lived here.  Forcing them from Eden is a pretty accurate way to describe what the Euro colonists did.  They had everything (except yellow fever) before the colonists landed.  Now a remnant of the culture is reenacted at Plymouth for tourists.  There is also a small museum at Mashpee which I plan to visit.  I am getting very excited about seeing it all in person.

Joseph Howland of Plymouth Colony

February 24, 2013 3 Comments

Howland Monument

Howland Monument

While my first cousin 12x removed, King Philip, was waging war against the Pilgrims, Joseph Howland, my 9th great grandfather, was guarding Wampanoag prisoners. The fact that I am related to so many people in the colonies is not all that strange because they only had a limited pool of religiously correct folks to marry.  The ones who went Baptist and went to Rhode Island, had even fewer. If my Pilgrim ancestor, Gabriel Wheldon, had not gone AWOL upon arrival in Plymouth and married a Wampanoag princess I would not be related to both sides of this bloody war. The conflict between the welfare of the Pilgrim people and the welfare of the native people is still in gear.  Guess who is winning.

Joseph lived and died in Plymouth, where he was always closely identified with the welfare of the people. He was commissioned a lieutenant of militia in 1679 which position he held many years. He was a large real estate owner, and he and his son Thomas, his grandson, Consider, and his great grandson, Thomas, successively held the land on which Pilgrim Hall, in Plymouth, now stands. Joseph d. 1st mo. n1704.
JOHN HOWLAND: A MAYFLOWER PILGRIMJoseph Howland was the second son of the Pilgrim, born about 1635 to 1640. A pioneer farmer as his father was, he too held various offices, among them that of surveyor, church delegate, selectman which at that time included the office of justice of the peace,and deputy to the General Court. He served on many town committees, once with the Governor, and was foreman of the jury.
Joseph was also a soldier. In 1667 he agreed to serve the town as a standing trooper for a period of five years. He later became lieutenant of the Plymouth Military Company. During King Philip’s War, in 1675, when the Indians reached the outskirts of Plymouth and were burning houses, he and another soldier guarded Indian prisoners.
By 1690 he had become Captain of the Plymouth Company. This was a considerable honor as this company was the oldest in the Colony and its first Captain was Myles Standish. A special law had been passed which permitted its former officers who had resigned to keep their military titles. Military titles in those days of Indian attack were very highly thought of.
Starting out originally with two acres Joseph eventually became a large landowner. He ingerited land not only from his father, but also through his wife from her father. Captain Thomas Southworth. Much of the latter was of considerable value as it was situated in the center of Plymouth, where Pilgrim Hall now stands.
In 1664 Joseph married Elizabeth . Joseph’s mother-in-law. Elizabeth Reynor Southworth was a close relation of the Reverend John Reynor, for many years the Plymouth misister. He, as many of the early Colonial New England clergy was a graduate of Magdalen College Cambridge University. The Reverend John referred to Joseph as “beloved kind man”, and Joseph eventually became trustee of his estate.
As at the present time, there was servant problems in those days. One sued Joseph for unpaid wages. However, Joseph won the suit.
In Joseph’s inventory, a horse, saddle, and pillion are mentioned. He and his wife Elizabeth must have ridden often together from Rocky Nook to Plymouth and beyond.
The Pilgrim John Howland had bought the property at Rocky Nook in 1633. He left this in his will to his wife Elizabeth stating that it was to be hers for the rest of her life, then it was to go to Joseph. In 1675, during King Philip’s War Indians attacked Rocky Nook and burned the main “dwelling house”, Elizabeth eventually went to live with her daughter Lydia Brown, the wife of James Brown, Swansea. Joseph Howland took over and built his house in 1676. When he died in 1736, he left the property to his son James ? who finally sold it in 1735. All told Howlands lived at Rocky Nook for almost one hundred years.From and address at Dedication at Rocky Nook, Kingston, Mass. by McClure M. Howland September 7, 1963.

Joseph Howland (1640 – 1703)

is my 9th great grandfather
Elizabeth Howland (1673 – 1724)
daughter of Joseph Howland
Eleazer Hamblin (1699 – 1771)
son of Elizabeth Howland
Sarah Hamblin (1721 – 1814)
daughter of Eleazer Hamblin
Mercy Hazen (1747 – 1819)
daughter of Sarah Hamblin
Martha Mead (1784 – 1860)
daughter of Mercy Hazen
Abner Morse (1808 – 1838)
son of Martha Mead
Daniel Rowland Morse (1838 – 1910)
son of Abner Morse
Jason A Morse (1862 – 1932)
son of Daniel Rowland Morse
Ernest Abner Morse (1890 – 1965)
son of Jason A Morse
Richard Arden Morse (1920 – 2004)
son of Ernest Abner Morse
Pamela Morse
I am the daughter of Richard Arden Morse
King Philip

King Philip

Pioneer Archetype

January 31, 2013 7 Comments

Mayflower document

Mayflower document

My family in history is LOADED with Pioneers, including my own parents. I find that almost all of my people left Europe in the early 1600’s to come to America. They had both the sense of adventure and the wherewithal to make it happen.  Before that they were running around Europe doing daring stuff, but the whole idea of sailing in a ship across the Atlantic to live in the New World was extremely bold. As soon as they arrived in Plymouth there was quibbling about religion, which lead to some banishment and some abandonment of the first settlements. Here we have at work both the light and the shadow aspects of the Pioneer.  A passion for innovation and creativity can have the shadow aspect of a compulsive need to keep moving with no anchor.

My 11th great-grandfather, John Tilley sailed on the Mayflower, signed the Mayflower Compact, then promptly dropped dead. He did his pioneer thing and died in Plymouth Colony.  Lucky for me, his daughter Elizabeth survived.

John Tilley (1589 – 1620)
is my 11th great grandfather
Elizabeth Tilley (1607 – 1687)
Daughter of John
Joseph Howland (1640 – 1704)
Son of Elizabeth
Elizabeth Howland (1673 – 1724)
Daughter of Joseph
Eleazer Hamblin (1699 – 1771)
Son of Elizabeth
Sarah Hamblin (1721 – 1814)
Daughter of Eleazer
Mercy Hazen (1747 – 1819)
Daughter of Sarah
Martha Mead (1784 – 1860)
Daughter of Mercy
Abner Morse (1808 – 1838)
Son of Martha
Daniel Rowland Morse (1838 – 1910)
Son of Abner
Jason A Morse (1862 – 1932)
Son of Daniel Rowland
Ernest Abner Morse (1890 – 1965)
Son of Jason A
Richard Arden Morse (1920 – 2004)
Son of Ernest Abner
Pamela Morse
I am the daughter of Richard Arden

John was a singer of the Mayflower compact which was done November 11, 1620.  Therefore, if the day and month aqre correct he must have died in 1621.

John Tilley (1571 – 1620 or 1621) was one of the settlers who traveled from England to North America on the Mayflower and signed the Mayflower Compact. Tilley died shortly after arrival in New England.

Overview

Tilley was christened in Henlow, Bedfordshire, England on 19 December 1571. He was the eldest child of Robert and Elizabeth Tilley. He had four sisters (Rose, Agnes, Elizabeth, and Alice) and three brothers (George, William, and Edward or Edmund). Research done by Robert Ward Leigh, using probate records, show that Tilley’s paternal grandparents were William and Agnes Tylle, his great-grandparents were Thomas and Margaret Tylle, and great-great-grandparents were Henry and Johann[a]? Tilly, all of Henlow.

On 20 September 1596 in Henlow, John married Joan Hurst Rogers, the daughter of William and Rose Hurst and the widow of Thomas Rogers of Henlow. Joan had had one daughter from her previous marriage. John and Joan had five children between 1597 and 1607. At least one child died young. Research by George Ernest Bowman shows that John was not the Jan Tellij that married Prijntgen Van den Velde in Leyden.

In September 1620, John and Joan embarked on the Mayflower along with their teenage daughter Elizabeth and John’s brother Edward Tilley and his wife Ann or Agnes (Cooper) Tilley. Edward and Ann brought along Ann’s relatives Henry Sampson and Humility Cooper. They left behind their older children, who were married by this time. They arrived at what would become Plymouth in November. John and brother Edward were amongst the men who signed the Mayflower Compact.

Unfortunately, the first winter after their arrival was extremely difficult and a number of the settlers died. Amongst these were John, wife Joan, brother Edward, and sister-in-law Ann. William Bradford reported, “…Edward Tillie, and his wife both dyed soon after their arrivall; and the girle Humility their cousen, was sent for unto Ento England, and dyed ther But the youth Henery Sampson, is still liveing, and is married, & hath .7. children. John Tilley and his wife both dyed, a litle after they came ashore…” This left daughter Elizabeth the only surviving member of the Tilley family in America. The orphan was taken in by John Carver but he and his wife both died that spring. Elizabeth later married John Howland, Carver’s former servant, and left many descendants. I am one.

Gabriel Whelden, Rebel in Plymouth Colony

January 3, 2013 5 Comments

There are many records of my 10th Great Grandfather who ran away as soon as he got to America:

Gabriel Wheldon and brothers deserted ship at Plymouth. To escape punishment and being sent back to England in chains, they went inland to Massasoit’s village at Po ko net, and took to wife a daughter of a brother of Massasoit, although he had a wife in England. After children were born through the good offices of Massasoit and the English at Plymouth not wishing to offend him, consented to try Gaberial and his brothers at the Plymouth court.He was sentenced to dwell at Mattachees on land that was ceded by HighYannough at the request of Massasoit in lieu of certain annual tribute paid Massasoit by the Cape Tribes. One of Gabriel’s brothers went back to England and Gaberial and the other brother stayed in the Colonies. It was many years before Gaberial was made a freeman, and he had to go outside the jurisdiction to become one.

Gabriel Whelden (1600 – 1655)
is my 10th great grandfather
Ruth Whelden (1625 – 1673)
Daughter of Gabriel
John TAYLOR (1651 – 1690)
Son of Ruth
Abigail Taylor (1663 – 1730)
Daughter of John
Martha Goodwin (1693 – 1769)
Daughter of Abigail
Grace Raiford (1725 – 1778)
Daughter of Martha
Sarah Hirons (1751 – 1817)
Daughter of Grace
John Nimrod Taylor (1770 – 1816)
Son of Sarah
John Samuel Taylor (1798 – 1873)
Son of John Nimrod
William Ellison Taylor (1839 – 1918)
Son of John Samuel
George Harvey Taylor (1884 – 1941)
Son of William Ellison
Ruby Lee Taylor (1922 – 2008)
Daughter of George Harvey
Pamela Morse
I am the daughter of Ruby Lee

The first known Whelden in the line in America was Gabriel Whelden of Plymouth. He is believed to have been born in England, but the date and place are not proven. It is commonly stated that Gabriel Whelden originated in Nottinghamshire, but no records have been found to substantiate it. The author Pope reports he found a record of a land sale in Middlesex county files where Gabriel in 1653 sold land he owned in Nottingham to William Cross. The head archivist of these records, Elizabeth Bouvier has been unable to find any such record.

The Wheeldon/Wheelton family, which has not yet been connected to Gabriel Wheldon, finds the earliest spelling located to-date is Whyldon (christenings of sons of William Whyldon at Astbury, Cheshire: Matthew, 14 Dec 1574; John 14 Mar 1584; per LDS IGI ). In “Homes of Family Names in Great Britain”, Baltimore, MD: Genealogical Publishing Company, 1968) H. B. Guppy noted that the surname Wheelton as “peculiar” or “confined mostly to this county [Cheshire].” He indicated it was more specifically associated with Macclesfield. The surname is concentrated in the ancient Parish of Prestbury, which originally included Macclesfield. Additionally, “pockets” of Wheeldon ~ Wheelton individuals settled in the Cheshire / Derbyshire / Staffordshire border area known as “The Potteries.”

Was Margaret (Oguina) a Wampanoag?

Gabriel married Margaret Diguina (or Oguina), who may have been Gabriel’s second wife. Some say that Margaret was a Wampanoag Indian, although it is hotly disputed by many genealogists. Accordig to the Wampanoag theory Oguina was a child of 6 years in 1608 when a British fishing vessel picked her up along with other Wampanoags along a beach on Cape Cod. She was taken to England where she baptized and given the English name Margaret. She eventually married Gabriel Whelden.

Oguina was a daughter of Quadequina who in turn was a son of WAasaneginN. These geenrations were of the Algonkian nation of Massachusoi and tribe of Wampanoag.

Oguina’s descent is as follows:

1- WASANEGIN, born by 1554 begot 2-QUADEQUINA, born 1576. This year is determined from the fact that he was born in the year when the “Great Light” went out. European astronomers noted in 1576 that there was a Solar Eclipse. He, QUADEQUINA begot 3-OGUINA, born 1602 @ Wampanoag village in what is today Rhode Island.

Gabriel Whelden and Margaret (Oguina) had the following children:

  1. Ruth Whelden, who married Richard Taylor, and who died December 1673 in Yarmouth, Barnstable County, Massachusetts.
  2. Henry Whelden, who died 28 October 1694
  3. Katherne Whelden
  4. John Whelden, who died 20 November 1711
  5. Ralph Whelden

Gabriel died January 1653/1654 in Malden, Massachusetts. Following is his Last Will and Testament:

In the name of God, and in obedience to his comand (according to my bounden duty) I, Gabriell Whelding, of the Towne and Church of Maulden, being weake and sicke in body, do make my last will. My body to be layd asleepe in the bed of the grave, in the Common buriing lace for the Inhabitants of this Towne. I give 10s as a Small testimony of my true Love to the Church of Maulden, to be payd into the hands of the Deacons within a month after my decease. i give all my estate in Maulden, consisting of house, Frame Lands, cattle, and corne, (together [with] what money is due unto me from William Croffts, of Linne, to Margaret Whelding, my wife, who I appoynt my sole executrix.

In the presence of: Nathaniell Vphame, James Larnard, Michaiah Mathews, with others.

The part that seems far fetched to me is that Margaret was taken to England as  kidnapped child.  However, a recent piece of good luck on this very blog has introduced me to a fellow descendant, Ron Turner, who has more information about the story.  The clues are many, and my interest could not be higher.

Richard Taylor, “Tailor” of Plymouth Colony

January 1, 2013

My 9th great grandfather Richard Taylor, the tailor, of Plymouth Colony was described by an unknown source:

Richard was born in Europe and was three times the age of his wife, Ruth Wheldon. Ruth was ½ blood Wampanoag Indian, born at Yarmouth, daughter of Gaberial Wheldon and his wife Margaret, a full blood Wampanoag Indian. Margaret was the daughter of a Wampanoag Sagamore, a younger brother of Massasoit.

Richard Taylor (1620 – 1673)
is my 9th great grandfather
John TAYLOR (1651 – 1690)
Son of Richard
Abigail Taylor (1663 – 1730)
Daughter of John
Martha Goodwin (1693 – 1769)
Daughter of Abigail
Grace Raiford (1725 – 1778)
Daughter of Martha
Sarah Hirons (1751 – 1817)
Daughter of Grace
John Nimrod Taylor (1770 – 1816)
Son of Sarah
John Samuel Taylor (1798 – 1873)
Son of John Nimrod
William Ellison Taylor (1839 – 1918)
Son of John Samuel
George Harvey Taylor (1884 – 1941)
Son of William Ellison
Ruby Lee Taylor (1922 – 2008)
Daughter of George Harvey
Pamela Morse
I am the daughter of Ruby Lee
Below we see why two Richard Taylors married to two women named Ruth make for a pretty confusing story:

Richard TAYLOR (abt. 1620-1673), “tailor”  Early settler of Yarmouth, Plymouth Colony. Not to be confused with his (possibly slightly younger) contemporary, also of Yarmouth: Richard Taylor (abt 1625-1703), farmer or husbandman of “The Rock”. Both were supposedly married to women by the name of Ruth. Vital statistics
Sex: Male
Born: about 1620 at England
Died: about 13 December 1673 at Yarmouth, Plymouth Colony, age at death unknown.
Interment: Probably at Yarmouth, Plymouth Colony
Richard Taylor’s origins and emigration are unknown. (But see below.)
Several histories and genealogies claim that Richard Taylor, tailor, married Ruth Whelden (abt 1625-1673), daughter of Gabriel Whelden, and that she was the “wife of Richard Taylor”, whose body was found in a boat, drowned, off Duxbury, MA about 3 December 1673. HOWEVER, the inquest records concerning the drowning do not provide her given name at all. They simply identify the body as “the wife of Richard Taylor, sometimes of Yarmouth.” This researcher (Jillaine 16:14, 28 July 2007 (UTC)) believes it’s just as likely that Ruth Whelden was married to Richard Taylor of the “Rock”– and that it is just as likely that the “Ruth, wife of Richard Taylor” who died in 1693 was the daughter of Gabriel Whelden. Older genealogies say that Richard “the Rock” Taylor was likely married to Ruth Burgess, but this has never been proven. So we have no proof of the name of Richard Taylor, tailor’s wife; but we do know that Richard Taylor, the “Rock” did have a wife Ruth who died in 1693.
Offspring
Ruth Taylor, b. July 29, 1647; buried in 1648.
Ann Taylor, b. Dec. 2, 1648; buried March 29, 1650, aged about 1-1/2 years.
Mary Taylor (1649-??), m. [Abijah Merchant (1651-?)]].
Martha (1650-1728), b. Dec. 18, 1650; m. Joseph Bearse of Barnstable Dec. 3, 1676; d. Jan. 27, 1727-8, aged 77, leaving issue.
John Taylor (1652-1721), m. 15 December 1674 Sarah Matthews, daughter of James Matthews.
Elizabeth Taylor (1655-1721), m. Dec. 20, 1680, Samuel Cobb (1651-?) of Barnstable; d. May 4, 1721, aged 66, leaving issue.
Hannah Taylor (1658-1743), m. as his 2d wife July 19, 1680, Deacon Job Crocker of Barnstable; d. May 14, 1743, in her 85th year, leaving issue.
Ann Taylor (1659-?), m. Josiah Davis, of Barnstable, June 25, 1679, and had issue.
Joseph Taylor (1660-?)
Sarah Taylor (?-1695); d. unmarried July 31, 1695. The inventory of Sarah Taylor of Barnstable was taken Aug. 16, 1695, and amount to £34 19s. Deacon Job Crocker and Samuel Cobb, brothers-in-law, were made administrators Sept. 23, 1695. The estate was, Sept. 13, 1695, ordered equally divided between the brothers and sisters of the deceased, given in the following order, to wit: John Taylor, Joseph Taylor, Mary Marchant, Martha Bearse, Elizbaeth Cobb, Hannah Crocker and Ann Davis. The inventory consisted of wearing apparel, five pounds of worsted yarn, a Bible, cattle, sheep and lambs, cash moneys due from Samuel Cobb and Joseph Bearse, &c.
Biography
The biographical information listed below could apply just as easily to Richard Taylor, the “Rock” with the exception of the 1674 will.
Early life and education Edit
There was a Richard Taylor, age 16, on the ship Truelove which departed Gravesend, England on 11 Jun 1635. Other Taylors on that ship were: James Taylor, 28; William Taylor, 17; Ann Taylor, 24.
Military service
1643 (August): He is first mentioned in the Colonial records as among those in Yarmouth between 16 and 60 years of age able to bear arms.
Career Edit
1648 (June 7): was a surveyor of highways for Yarmouth.
1651 (June 6): was sworn as a member of the grandjury.
1656 (May 30): with Edmond Hawes, Richard Taylor was witness to a deed of Samuel Mayo to John Phinney of Barnstable.
1656 (June 3): he was constable of Yarmouth.
1657 (June 3): he was one of the surveyors of highways there. That year he took the oath of fidelity.
Family life
1647 (Oct 28): Gabriel Whelden gave his assent for one Richard Taylor (many believe this one, but without documentation) to marry his daughter, Ruth Whelden.
1655 (May 28; July 27): Richard Taylor, tailor, among others suing widow Margaret Whelden, for a share of the estate left by Gabriel Whelden.
1673 (Dec 3): Richard’s wife, not named, was discovered drowned in a boat off Duxbury. Richard died within a couple of weeks.
Will of Richard Taylor Edit
(Source: James W. Hawes, “Richard Taylor, Tailor, and Some of His Descendants” in ‘Library of Cape Cod History & Genealogy’, No. 48, 1914.) (Transcribed with original spelling maintained.)
The Court (March) 4, 1673-4, made the following order:
“Mr. John Gorum and Mr. John Thacher are joyned with John Taylor ( for the disposing of the estate of Richard Tayler to his children, and for the paying and receiving of debts according to order of Court. Concerning the estate of Richard Tayler, late of Yarmouth, deceased, this Court doth order, first, that the eldest son of the said Tayler shall have his fathers housing, and two thirds of the land, both upland and marsh, and the rest of his portion out of what of the estate Mr. Gorum and Mr. John Thacher shall judge most suitable for him, hee being by order of Court to have a dubble portion. 2condly, it is ordered, that the hay, and what provisions was or is upon the invoice of the estate that is now spent, or shalbe judged convenient for the family to spend betweixt this and the first of the next August, shall not be accounted to the estate, as like-wise what woole and flaxe hath bing spon by the daughters sence theire parents death shalbe accompanted theirs that spon it. The rest of the estate to be devided betweixt the second son and the five daughters, everyone an equall proportion, to bee set out to them as maybe most suitable for them, by the discretion of their eldest brother, and Mr. John Gorum, and Mr. John Thacher. The second son to have the other third of his father’s land, besides his portion equall to his sisters. Lastly, that nothing that hat bin already given or betowed by the said Taylor on any of this children, shall not be considered in the devision, but everyone of to have an equall proportion, after the payment of debts due from the estate.”
His inventory taken Dec. 13, 1673, and submitted to the Court under oath March 6, 1673-4, amounted to L199 4s 11d. The debts of the estate were L18 1s. 2d. Included in the inventory were 12 acres of upland, nine of meadow and three of marsh, which together with houses and some grain sown amounted to L60. The children named are John, Joseph, Martha and Mary. The inventory shows that he possessed a considerable many cattle, shep and hogs, one horse, corn, wheat, flax, provisions, 21 yards of cloth, lumber and household articles. There were due to him 38.5 barrels of tar, and John Blake of Boston owed him money. Some things had been given to the children in his life time.

Contributors:
Jillaine
Sources:
Richard Taylor, Tailor and Some of His Descendants, by James W. Hawes; C.W. Swift, publisher, Yarmouthport, Mass.: 1914.
Barnstable Probate Records
Plymouth Colony Records, Volume 5; pp. 122-123
Plymouth Colony Wills
NEHGS Register, Volume 3, 1849, p. 189 citing CR, Volume II, p. 18
NEHGS Register, Volume 4, 1850, p. 258.
NEHGS Register, volume 14, 1860, p. 354
The history of Cape Cod : annals of thirteen towns of Barnstable County, p. 182; p. 193.
History of Barnstable County, Massachusetts, edited by Simeon L. Deyo. 1890. New York: H. W. Blake & Co.; CHAPTER XVII, pages 453-506. Town of Yarmouth, by Hon. Charles F. Swift.
James Savage, Vol. IV, p. 263
Torrey, Clarence Alman, New England Marriages, Genealogical Publishing Co., 1985; p. 730
Court Files of Middlesex County, Mass., 1649-1675 (through NEHGS web site)
Middlesex Court Files Folio 11; HLS #409 and 411.
History of Yarmouth, 1884, p. 88

My Tribe and History

December 31, 2012 5 Comments

Plymouth

Plymouth

It is enlightening to track my personality archetypes while I track my ancestors. There are similarities, highs and lows, temporary dead ends in both. You can’t change the ancestors and you can’t change your archetypes, in the same way that you can not rearrange the stars in the sky. When I was new in the genealogy game I went to Tulsa to meet a cousin based on only family legend and no facts to discover/confirm our Cherokee bloodline. We had a great time, but came up empty on the Native American theory. We both wanted it to be true, but my cousin’s husband was insanely convinced without any evidence. He really wanted a Cherokee wife. He was the worst detective I have ever seen.

While searching it is important to be open to discovering that for which what you were not looking. When I find a Plymouth Colony ancestor I am generally excited, fill in the blanks with some black britches and some assumptions. Richard Taylor was no regular Pilgrim. He fell in love and married a Wampanoag chief’s daughter. I have a tribe in Massachusetts. I never would have guessed this, but I am thrilled out of my mind. My 12th great-grandfather,Great Sachem, had been exposed to English fishermen, and had learned some language from them. He walked into the Pilgrim camp and said “Welcome Englishmen”, to the great surprise of the Englishmen.

Wasanequin Great Sachem Wampanoag tribe (1554 – 1617)
is my 12th great grandfather
Quadequina Wampanoag (1576 – 1623)
Son of Wasanequin Great Sachem
Margaret Diguina Weeks (1613 – 1651)
Daughter of Quadequina
Ruth Whelden (1625 – 1673)
Daughter of Margaret Diguina
John TAYLOR (1651 – 1690)
Son of Ruth
Abigail Taylor (1663 – 1730)
Daughter of John
Martha Goodwin (1693 – 1769)
Daughter of Abigail
Grace Raiford (1725 – 1778)
Daughter of Martha
Sarah Hirons (1751 – 1817)
Daughter of Grace
John Nimrod Taylor (1770 – 1816)
Son of Sarah
John Samuel Taylor (1798 – 1873)
Son of John Nimrod
William Ellison Taylor (1839 – 1918)
Son of John Samuel
George Harvey Taylor (1884 – 1941)
Son of William Ellison
Ruby Lee Taylor (1922 – 2008)
Daughter of George Harvey
Pamela Morse
I am the daughter of Ruby Lee

I am very interested in my tribe, and have already had contact from a fellow descendant who has some proof of our Nativeness. I am looking forward to his input and learnring more about my roots. Ironically these people helped the Pilgrims survive, but the tribe has no reservation today. This is an overview of my First Nation Family:

Pokanoket is a tribe of Native Americans who trace their their lineage back thousands of years beyond the colonial days of the United States of America. We trace our ancestry through the bloodlines and the written and oral history of our people. We are the people of Massasoit Ousamequin, Massasoit Wamsutta, and Massasoit Metacom. We are Philip’s people, the people of Metacom. We are the people who celebrated the First Thanksgiving with the Pilgrims in 1621. We are the people who have endured much and who have returned, after a long journey through history to the present day and continue to look forward to the future.

Pokanoket is also a Nation. The Nation of Tribes you may have heard of referred to as Wampanoag ( pronounced wahm – peh – noe – ahg ) was known to our ancestors as the Pokanoket Nation. The Pokanoket Nation, also known as the Pokanoket Confederacy or Pokanoket Country, was comprised of a multitude of Tribes.

Each Tribe was comprised of Bands and Villages and the Pokanoket Tribe was the Headship of the Pokanoket Nation.

Pokanoket is also our home. Prior to the time of the pilgrim’s arrival in Plymouth, which used to be Patuxet, the realm of the Pokanoket included portions of Rhode Island and much of southeastern Massachusetts, including the surrounding islands around Cape Cod and Martha’s Vineyard.

The Pokanoket social organization developed in a manner that differed from neighboring Native American Tribes, since Pokanoket was more socially structured and layered, as well as more politically complex.

Unique to the Pokanoket Tribe were the spirtual and military elite, know as the Pineese (Pineese Warrior), who protected and served the Massasoit (Great Leader). They are the spiritual guardians of Pokanoket Nation.

Pokanoket believed seven to be the perfect number of completeness, for we still believe in the Seven Spirits of the Creator.

Quadequina Wampanoag, 11th Great Grandfather

December 26, 2012 69 Comments

Natives of New England

Natives of New England

It is with great excitement that I have found an ancestor from my mother’s side in Plymouth Colony.  Most of her forefathers sailed to Virginia or below, but this particular Taylor branch had some distinctions. Margaret Diguina Weeks is said to be the Wampanoag daughter of Quadequina. There is  dispute about this, but I do hope I can confirm these facts. My 11th great-grandfather, Quadequina, introduced popcorn to the Pilgrims at the first Thanksgiving.

It becomes complicated because there were two Richard Taylors, both married to women named Ruth. I have not traced them back in England to know if they match up in the old country  with the other Taylors.  Ruth Wheldon’s father officially objected to her marriage to my Mr. Taylor, helping us narrow down some of the facts.  If Ruth Wheldon had a full-blooded Wampanoag mother,  Ruth was a kind of Pocahontas of the north.  I need to do some research on this to see what I can learn.  The story is amazing.

Quadequina Wampanoag (1576 – 1623)
is my 11th great-grandfather
Margaret Diguina Weeks (1613 – 1651)
Daughter of Quadequina
Ruth Whelden (1625 – 1673)
Daughter of Margaret Diguina
John TAYLOR (1651 – 1690)
Son of Ruth
Abigail Taylor (1663 – 1730)
Daughter of John
Martha Goodwin (1693 – 1769)
Daughter of Abigail
Grace Raiford (1725 – 1778)
Daughter of Martha
Sarah Hirons (1751 – 1817)
Daughter of Grace
John Nimrod Taylor (1770 – 1816)
Son of Sarah
John Samuel Taylor (1798 – 1873)
Son of John Nimrod
William Ellison Taylor (1839 – 1918)
Son of John Samuel
George Harvey Taylor (1884 – 1941)
Son of William Ellison
Ruby Lee Taylor (1922 – 2008)
Daughter of George Harvey
Pamela Morse
I am the daughter of Ruby Lee

Here is one account of the story of Margaret Diguina and her tribe:

“Gordon B. Hinckley, Shoulder for the Lord” by George M. McCune page 35- ” Two of the early immigrants to Plymouth colony were Gabriel Wheldon, of Arnold, Nottingham, England, and his brother (name unknown). Gabriel had been married in England before sailing to America but his first wife named Margaret evidently was deceased at the time of his migration.

Both brothers had a free spirit much like Stephen Hopkins and found their way to the camps of the Wampanoags. There they both fell in love with two of the daughters of Chief Quadequina, younger brother of the Great Chief. They each married and Gabriel gave his second wife the English name ‘Margaret’ after his first spouse. The two counseled with their father-in-law and his older brother Massasoit regarding what to do. The Plymouth Colony would probably punish them for their intermarriage. Massasoit advised them to return to the colony and all would be well.

The Plymouth Colony tribunals saved face by banishing the couples from Plymouth for life but did not send them back to England. Gabriel and Margaret established their home in Barnstable where the Hinckleys came in late 1630’s and here Gabriel and Margaret raised a large family of girls.

One of those girls was Ruth Wheldon.  This is a score!!

What Would My Ancestors Do?

December 23, 2012 1 Comment

Sears Cemetery

Sears Cemetery, Barnstable

You do not need to hold a seance to contact the spirits of the dead. You can use a few facts, or many facts if you have them, to query your ancestors. These are not fictional characters of history, but your DNA connection to the past. The novels you have read in your life can not possibly match the drama of the story of your particular historical survival.  Your ancestors handed down to you an ethical will.  Those who left no written document have nonetheless passed values to the future, with less precision. You are now actively creating the history and the ethics you want to survive in the world.

I started to study my ancestry to learn about the ethical will of my people, whoever they were.  My mother had never described her family in any racial terms.  I was taught that the Taylors were, in no uncertain terms, Confederate Rebels.  My mother, Ruby Taylor’s very large family all lived in Texas.  They were involved in religion to a much greater degree than our family living in Pittsburgh. The went to church at least three times a week, including Wednesday.  They did a bit of holy rolling and other practices foreign to me. Indeed, my great grandfather Taylor fought in the civil war and received a Confederate pension in Texas in his old age.  He was a farmer and preacher in the Church of Christ.  This story was the known history of the  Taylor tribe, and even this information was never retold to the Taylors of the 1960’s.

What nobody knew at the Taylor family reunion in Houston on the 4th of July each year in the 1960’s was that our Taylor forefather and his wife’s uncle had been burned at the stake as Protestant martyrs in England.  Now that is what I call a Rebel.  The roots of each family feed the ethical expression (also known as fruit) of the family spirit.  The tongue speaking, chicken frying Taylors of Humble/Houston all shared a particular extreme view of the Bible that freaked me out when I was young. The Pentecostal experience, when I was exposed to it, frightened me.   Now that I know about the stake burning it all makes perfect sense.

My forefathers and mothers in the grave yard pictured above lived in Holland, then sailed to Plymouth to build a shining city on a hill, creating a strong, complex ethical will.  They  had a lot to say about the way they thought all cosmology worked in harmony with government.  They had strong convictions by which they lived and died.  Now that I know more about the lives of these elders in my tribe I have a greater responsibility.  I can no longer look at Thanksgiving as a bunch of stuffing.  I need to discover the meaning of  the Puritan Ethic they created. The values they held are more significant than the physical goods they once owned in old Cape Cod.

On the surface they all seem to use the Bible as an excuse for their own human folly.  Just under the surface is the fact that humans have always indulged in folly to learn the folly of our ways.  What did they learn?  How can we acquire wisdom from their knowledge?

John Bourchier Sears, Holland to Plymouth

December 22, 2012 2 Comments

Sears COA

Sears COA

My 11th Great grandfather was so totally kicked out of England:

JOHN BOURCHIER, so named after his father, “he married MARIE L. daughter of PHlLIP VAN EGMONDE, of that city, and acquired with her a large fortune, principally in money. With this he was enabled to purchase property in Essex, adjoining the lands which he hoped soon to recover as his lawful patrimony. Amongst the estates thus bought were Bourchier and Little Fordham Manors, both of which had in former times belonged to his ancestors. But his return to England was resisted by those who were deeply interested in keeping at a distance so formidable a claimant to many of their broad acres. Strenuous and energetic were the efforts JOHN BOURCHIER SEARS made to remove the obstacles which intervened to keep him in exile; but all to no purpose. His opponents were inexorably hostile, and even threatened him with a prosecution, as a participator in the gunpowder plot, if he ventured to set foot in England. The attainder, it must be remembered, which hung over his grandfather, had never been removed, and still impended over the family at the time of his death in 1629.”
He left two sons and two daughter, RICHARD, JOHN, MARIE, and JANE, the three latter settled in Kent; the eldest son
“worn out by his parents’ want of success to recover their English possessions, determined at his father’s death to quit England for ever. He accordingly took passage, with a party of Puritans, for New England in America, and landed at Plymouth in Massachusetts on the 8th of May, 1630. Here he became the founder of a family which has attained wealth and honours in the New World, and died in 1676, leaving behind him three sons, KNYVET, PAUL, and SYLAS. “In the year 1851, a descendant of this family, the Honourable DAVID SEARS, of Boston, visited Colchester in company with a friend, Mr. H. G. SOMERBY, of London, and inspected with much interest the monuments in St. Peter’s Church. With a view to perpetuate the recollection of the ties that attached his family to the town of Colchester, Mr. SEARS caused a brass tablet to be engraved, and obtained the permission of the late Vicar (the Rev. S. CARR), for its erection on the North wall of the Church.”
This brass is divided into three columns, with the copies of the memorials on either side. The central column is headed by a coat of arms bearing the mottoes “EXALTAT HUMILES” and “HONOR ET FIDES”. Beneath is repeated the motto “Exaltat humiles” and the following:
Worth is better than wealth, Goodness better than nobility, Excellence better than distinction. To their Pilgrim Fathers, a grateful posterity. The outer columns transcribe the following memorials: Sacred to the Memory of Richard Sears, son of John Bouchier Sears and Marie L. Van Egmont in lineal descent from Richard Sears of Colchester and Ann Bouchier Knyvet, England. he landed at Plymouth in 1630, Married Dorothy Thacher and died in Yarmouth in 1676. Sacred to the Memory of Knyvet Sears eldest son of Richard Sears of Yarmouth, born in 1635, married Elizabeth Dymoke and died in England in 1686. Sacred to the Memory of Paul Sears, second son of Richard Sears born in 1637, married Deborah Willard and died in Yarmouth in 1707. Sacred to the Memory of Sylas Sears, third son of Richard Sears, born in 1639, married and died in Yarmouth in 1697. Sacred to the Memory of Daniel Sears, son of Knyvet Sears of Yarmouth born in 1682, married Sarah Hawes and died in Chatham in 1756. Sacred to the Memory of Daniel Sears II son of Daniel Sears of Chatham born in 1712, married Fear Freeman and died at Chatham in 1761. Sacred to the Memory of David Sears I son of Daniel Sears II of Chatham born in 1752, married Ann Winthrop and died in Boston in 1816. An explanation for this plate is given along the bottom edge: ON GRANITE MONUMENTS IN THE GRAVEYARDS OF YARMOUTH, AND CHATHAM, IN MASSACHUSETTS, NEW ENGLAND, IN NORTH AMERICA, ARE THE ABOVE INSCRIPTIONS TO THE MEMORY OF THE DESCENDANTS OF THE SAYERS OF ALDHAM, AND COLCHESTER. 1830.

John Bouchier Sears (1561 – 1629)
is your 11th great grandfather
Richard Sears (1590 – 1676)
Son of John Bouchier
Silas Sears (1638 – 1697)
Son of Richard
Silas Sears (1661 – 1732)
Son of Silas
Sarah Sears (1697 – 1785)
Daughter of Silas
Sarah Hamblin (1721 – 1814)
Daughter of Sarah
Mercy Hazen (1747 – 1819)
Daughter of Sarah
Martha Mead (1784 – 1860)
Daughter of Mercy
Abner Morse (1808 – 1838)
Son of Martha
Daniel Rowland Morse (1838 – 1910)
Son of Abner
Jason A Morse (1862 – 1932)
Son of Daniel Rowland
Ernest Abner Morse (1890 – 1965)
Son of Jason A
Richard Arden Morse (1920 – 2004)
Son of Ernest Abner
Pamela Morse
am the daughter of Richard Arden

Pilgrim Will

November 21, 2012

Plymouth Colony Seal

This is the will of my 10th great grandfather who arrived on the Mayflower. It is interesting to note how much they had and did not have. Bless the Plymouth colony for keeping good records:
The Plymouth Colony Archive Project[Go to Biographical Profiles • Wills • Probates • Search • Archive] James Bursell October 11, 1676Plymouth Colony Wills 3(2):61#P281The Inventory of James Bursell
An Inventory of the estate of James Bursell of yarmouth who departed this life on the third of October 1676, and this Inventory taken the 11th of October 1676
L s d
Item in Meate Chattle 25 08 00
Item a Cart & wheeles & yoakes & Chaines 01 09 00
Item in barrells & other wooden ware 02 02 00
Item in pailes and seiues 00 10 00
Item in pewter 01 13 00
Item in 1 morter and pestell 00 02 00
Item 1 pott of butter 00 04 00
Item in earthenware 00 02 00
Item in Iron kettles & 2 potts 01 04 00
Item in brasse kettles & other brasse 01 16 00
Item in one warming pan 00 08 00
Item in seuerall sorts of Iron tooles 01 16 00
Item in old brasse and one spitt 00 03 06
Item in tining ware 00 01 06
Item in Cheires tables and trenchers 00 10 00
Item in armes and amunition 01 00 00
Item in a paire of tonggs and old Iron 00 15 00
Item in Corne and meale sackes 01 00 00
Item 1 feather bed & furniture to it 06 06 00
Item in wheels and Cords 00 12 00
Item in flax and linnine yarne and a baskett 02 00 00
Item 1 feather bed and furniture to it 06 05 00
Item more 1 feather bed and furniture to it 05 15 00
Item in Table linnine 01 03 06
Item in pillow Coates 01 16 00
Item in a remnant of Cloth 01 04 00
Item 17 paire of sheets 18 12 00
Item more in bolster Cases and linnine 01 10 00
Item in Cours linnine Cloth 00 11 00
Item in a parsell of linnie Cloth 00 10 00
Item in wearing apparrell and linine 12 18 00
Item a bible 00 03 00
Item in sickells 00 05 00
Item in Cushens and penistone 2 yards 00 11 06
Item in Glasses and a lanthorne 00 02 06
Item 2 Chests & a Case with bottles 00 16 06
Item 1 bull 02 00 00
Item in Mony 09 04 00
Item in debs due to the estate 16 02 06
Item the estate is debtor about 10 00 00
Item in old lumber 00 06 00
Item in an house and land 25 00 00
Item due to estate for laying 02 10 00
[156 17 06]
Iohn Hiller
Ieremiah houes
This 15 of Nouember 1676 Emett Bursell the relict of Iamos Bursell late deceased made her appeerance and Gaue oath to the truth of this Inventory before Iohn Freeman Assistant

James Bursell (1600 – 1676)
is my 10th great grandfather
Daughter of James
Son of Anna
Daughter of Silas
Daughter of Sarah
Daughter of Sarah
Daughter of Mercy
Son of Martha
Son of Abner
Son of Daniel Rowland
Son of Jason A
Son of Ernest Abner
I am the daughter of Richard Arden
He is not a famous Pilgrim.  In fact, we do not know who his parents or his wife’s parents are…yet.  We do know, however, what he owned when he died in 1676.  17 pairs of sheets seems like the most extravagant thing they had.
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