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Richard Warren of the Mayflower, 13th Great-grandfather

November 26, 2014 7 Comments

Mayflower Compact

Mayflower Compact

Richard Warren, among 10 passengers in the landing party, when the Mayflower arrived at Cape Cod, November 11, 1620
On November 21, 1620, Richard Warren cosigned the Mayflower Compact, covenant of equal laws for the Colony
Richard Warren (c. 1580 – 1628) a passenger on the Mayflower (old “May Floure”) in 1620, settled in Plymouth Colony and was among ten passengers of the Mayflower landing party with Myles Standish at Cape Cod on November 11, 1620. Warren co-signed the Mayflower Compact and was one of nineteen (among forty-one) signers who survived the first winter.
Although most sources agree that his wife’s name was Elizabeth, there is some dispute as to what her maiden surname was. One reference indicates her maiden name was Elizabeth Walker, and that she was baptised 1583 in Baldock, Hertfordshire, England, died October 2, 1673. She and his first five children, all daughters, came to America in the ship Anne in 1623. Once in America, they then had two sons before Richard’s untimely death in 1628.
Although the details are limited, Richard Warren and wife, Elizabeth, and children were mentioned in official records or books of the time period. All seven of their children survived and had families, with thousands of descendants, including: President Ulysses S. Grant, President Franklin D. Roosevelt, astronaut Alan Shepard, author Laura Ingalls Wilder (Little House on the Prairie series), actor Richard Gere, and the Wright brothers

His life
Warren is among the less documented of the Mayflower pioneers. Clearly a man of rank, Warren was accorded by Governor William Bradford the prefix “Mr.”, pronounced Master, used in those times to distinguish someone because of birth or achievement. From his widow’s subsequent land transactions, we can assume that he was among the wealthier of the original Plymouth Settlers.” And yet, Bradford did not mention him in his History of the Plimouth Plantation except in the List of Passengers.
In Mourt’s Relation, published in 1622, we learn that Warren was chosen, when the Mayflower stopped at Cape Cod before reaching Plymouth, to be a member of the exploring party among 10 passengers (and 8 crew), and he was described as being “of London” among 3 men. Charles Edward Banks, in Ancestry and Homes of the Pilgrim Fathers writes: “Richard Warren came from London and was called a merchand of that city (by Mourt) Extensive research in every available source of information — registers, chancery, and probate, in the London courts, proved fruitless in an attempt to identify him.”
He was not of the Leiden, Holland, Pilgrims, but joined them in Southampton, England to sail on the Mayflower.
Richard Warren received his acres in the Division of Land in 1623. In the 1627 Division of Lands and Cattle, in May of 1627, “RICHARD WARREN of the Mayflower” was given “one of the black heifers, 2 she-goats, and a grant of 400 acres (1.6 km2) of land” at the Eel River (Plymouth, Massachusetts). The Warren house built in that year (1627) stood at the same location as the present house; it was re-built about 1700, at the head of Clifford Road, with its back to the sea, and later owned by Charles Strickland (in 1976).
Warren died a year after the division, in 1628, the only record of his death being found as a brief note in Nathaniel Morton’s 1669 book New England’s Memorial, in which Morton writes:
“This year [1628] died Mr. Richard Warren, who hath been mentioned before in this book, and was a useful instrument; and during his life bore a deep share in the difficulties and troubles of the first settlement of the plantation of New Plimouth.” -Nathaniel Morton, New England’s Memorial (Boston : John Usher, 1669)
Research into the life of Richard Warren is still ongoing.
Descendants
Elizabeth and Richard Warren’s seven children, with their spouses, were:
Mary (c1610- 27 March 1683) married Robert Bartlett;
Anna (c1612- aft 19 February 1676) married Thomas Little;
Sarah (c1613- 15 July 1696) married John Cooke, who, along with his father, Francis Cooke were Mayflower passengers;
Elizabeth (c1616- 9 March 1670) married Richard Church;
Abigail (c1618- 3 January 1693) married Anthony Snow;
Nathaniel (c1625-1667) married Sarah Walker; and
Joseph (1627 – 4 May 1689) married Priscilla Faunce (1634- 15 May 1707).[4]
All of Richard Warren’s children survived to adulthood, married, and also had large families. It is claimed that Warren has the largest posterity of any pilgrim, numbering 14 million, the Mayflower passenger with more descendants than any other passenger.
Among his descendants are: Civil War general and U.S. President Ulysses S. Grant, President Franklin D. Roosevelt, astronaut Alan Shepard, author Laura Ingalls Wilder, actor Richard Gere, actress Joanne Woodward, writers Henry David Thoreau and Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, Lavinia Warren (the wife of “General Tom Thumb”), aviator Amelia Earhart, actor Orson Welles, United States Secretary of State William Jennings Bryan, the Wright Brothers, Tonight Show host Johnny Carson, chef Julia Child, Irish President Erskine Hamilton Childers, inventor Lee DeForest, and many more.
Ancestral Summary
More information has been published about Richard Warren than any other Mayflower passenger, probably because he has so many descendants (note that all seven of his children grew up and married). Warren’s ancestry is unknown, despite some published sources suggesting that he was a descendant of royalty. There is also dispute over his wife’s maiden surname, but in 2002, Edward Davies located the will of Augustine Walker, who seems likely to have been her father.
Relatively little has been uncovered about Richard Warren’s life in America. He came alone on the Mayflower in 1620, leaving behind his wife and five daughters. His family travelled on the ship “Anne” to join him in 1623, and Richard and Elizabeth subsequently had two sons, Nathaniel and Joseph, at Plymouth.

Mayflower

Mayflower

Richard Warren (1580 – 1628)
is my 13th great grandfather
Nathaniel Warren (1624 – 1667)
son of Richard Warren
Sarah Warren (1649 – 1692)
daughter of Nathaniel Warren
Elizabeth Blackwell (1662 – 1691)
daughter of Sarah Warren
Thomas Baynard (1678 – 1732)
son of Elizabeth Blackwell
Deborah Baynard (1720 – 1791)
daughter of Thomas Baynard
Mary Horney (1741 – 1775)
daughter of Deborah Baynard
Esther Harris (1764 – 1838)
daughter of Mary Horney
John H Wright (1803 – 1850)
son of Esther Harris
Mary Wright (1816 – 1873)
daughter of John H Wright
Emiline P Nicholls (1837 – )
daughter of Mary Wright
Harriet Peterson (1856 – 1933)
daughter of Emiline P Nicholls
Sarah Helena Byrne (1878 – 1962)
daughter of Harriet Peterson
Olga Fern Scott (1897 – 1968)
daughter of Sarah Helena Byrne
Richard Arden Morse (1920 – 2004)
son of Olga Fern Scott
Pamela Morse
I am the daughter of Richard Arden Morse

His house in Plymouth was very near other ancestors’ homes, Stephen Hopkins and John Howland.  I have a high concentration of first Thanksgiving ancestors.  I am thankful I can find information about them and their lives.  I am also very thankful they survived the first winter in the colony in order to become my ancestors.  I give thanks to all my relations, on both sides of that feast table, for the contributions they made to me and to the history of the nation.

 

Plymouth land plots

Plymouth land plots

 

Pilgrim Stephen Hopkins, 15th Great-grandfather

November 24, 2014 2 Comments

Mayflower seal

Mayflower seal

My 15th great-grandfather was a big adventurer in the New World.  He sailed to Jamestown in 1609, and was on the ill fated voyage to Bermuda that inspired William Shakespeare to write the Tempest.  His wife died while he was in Virginia, so he returned to England to care for his three children.  He brought his family to Plymouth on the Mayflower.  As an experienced colonist he was an important part of the Pilgrim’s diplomatic mission to the Wampanoag tribe.  He fell from grace when he opened a shop selling alcohol.  He went down a slippery slope from allowing drinking and shuffleboard playing on Sunday to selling beer for twice what it was worth.  He managed to stay in town, but did some jail time for defying the court.  I am thankful to you, Grandpa Stephen, for attempting so many grand adventures and defying your odds of survival.

Stephen Hopkins was from Hampshire, England. He married his first wife, Mary, and in the parish of Hursley, Hampshire; he and wife Mary had their children Elizabeth, Constance, and Giles all baptized there. It has long been claimed that the Hopkins family was from Wortley, Gloucester, but this was disproven in 1998.  Stephen Hopkins went with the ship Sea Venture on a voyage to Jamestown, Virginia in 1609 as a minister’s clerk, but the ship wrecked in the “Isle of Devils” in the Bermudas. Stranded on an island for ten months, the passengers and crew survived on turtles, birds, and wild pigs. Six months into the castaway, Stephen Hopkins and several others organized a mutiny against the current governor. The mutiny was discovered and Stephen was sentenced to death. However, he pleaded with sorrow and tears. “So penitent he was, and made so much moan, alleging the ruin of his wife and children in this his trespass, as it wrought in the hearts of all the better sorts of the company”. He managed to get his sentence commuted. Eventually the castaways built a small ship and sailed themselves to Jamestown. How long Stephen remained in Jamestown is not known. However, while he was gone, his wife Mary died. She was buried in Hursley on 9 May 1613, and left behind a probate estate which mentions her children Elizabeth, Constance and Giles. Stephen was back in England by 1617, when he married Elizabeth Fisher, but apparently had every intention of bringing his family back to Virginia. Their first child, Damaris, was born about 1618. In 1620, Stephen Hopkins brought his wife, and children Constance, Giles, and Damaris on the Mayflower (child Elizabeth apparently had died). Stephen was a fairly active member of the Pilgrims shortly after arrival, perhaps a result of his being one of the few individuals who had been to Virginia previously. He was a part of all the early exploring missions, and was used almost as an “expert” on Native Americans for the first few contacts. While out exploring, Stephen recognized and identified an Indian deer trap. And when Samoset walked into Plymouth and welcomed the English, he was housed in Stephen Hopkins’ house for the night. Stephen was also sent on several of the ambassadorial missions to meet with the various Indian groups in the region. Stephen was an assistant to the governor through 1636, and volunteered for the Pequot War of 1637 but was never called to serve. By the late 1630s, however, Stephen began to occasionally run afoul of the Plymouth authorities, as he apparently opened up a shop and served alcohol. In 1636 he got into a fight with John Tisdale and seriously wounded him. In 1637, he was fined for allowing drinking and shuffleboard playing on Sunday. Early the next year he was fined for allowing people to drink excessively in his house: guest William Reynolds was fined, but the others were acquitted. In 1638 he was twice fined for selling beer at twice the actual value, and in 1639 he was fined for selling a looking glass for twice what it would cost if bought in the Bay Colony. Also in 1638, Stephen Hopkins’ maidservant got pregnant from Arthur Peach, who was subsequently executed for murdering an Indian. The Plymouth Court ruled he was financially responsible for her and her child for the next two years (the amount remaining on her term of service). Stephen, in contempt of court, threw Dorothy out of his household and refused to provide for her, so the court committed him to custody. John Holmes stepped in and purchased Dorothy’s remaining two years of service from him: agreeing to support her and child. Stephen died in 1644, and made out a will, asking to be buried near his wife, and naming his surviving children.

Pilgrim Stephen Hopkins (1581 – 1644)
is my 15th great grandfather
Constance HOPKINS (1600 – 1677)
daughter of Pilgrim Stephen Hopkins
Sarah Snow (1632 – 1704)
daughter of Constance HOPKINS
Sarah Walker (1622 – 1700)
daughter of Sarah Snow
Sarah Warren (1649 – 1692)
daughter of Sarah Walker
Elizabeth Blackwell (1662 – 1691)
daughter of Sarah Warren
Thomas Baynard (1678 – 1732)
son of Elizabeth Blackwell
Deborah Baynard (1720 – 1791)
daughter of Thomas Baynard
Mary Horney (1741 – 1775)
daughter of Deborah Baynard
Esther Harris (1764 – 1838)
daughter of Mary Horney
John H Wright (1803 – 1850)
son of Esther Harris
Mary Wright (1816 – 1873)
daughter of John H Wright
Emiline P Nicholls (1837 – )
daughter of Mary Wright
Harriet Peterson (1856 – 1933)
daughter of Emiline P Nicholls
Sarah Helena Byrne (1878 – 1962)
daughter of Harriet Peterson
Olga Fern Scott (1897 – 1968)
daughter of Sarah Helena Byrne
Richard Arden Morse (1920 – 2004)
son of Olga Fern Scott
Pamela Morse
I am the daughter of Richard Arden Morse

Richard and his second wife had a child born at sea on the Mayflower.  They named her Oceanus.

Mayflower record

Mayflower record

Mary Priest, 12th Great Grandmother

April 13, 2014 1 Comment

Netherlands

Netherlands

Mary Priest was born in the Netherlands. Her father Degory was a hatter who sailed to America on the Mayflower, and died in Plymouth Colony shortly after his arrival. His wife and children, including Mary, came later to Plymouth to inherit his allotment:

DEGORY PRIEST
ORIGIN: Leiden, Holland
MIGRATION: 1620 on Mayflower
FIRST RESIDENCE: Plymouth
OCCUPATION: Hatter (when admitted as a citizen of Leiden) [Leiden 216].
ESTATE: In the 1623 Plymouth land division “Cudbart Cudbartsone” received six acres as a passenger on the Anne in 1623 [ PCR 12:6]; four of these six shares would be for the deceased Degory Priest, his widow Sarah and his two daughters. In the 1627 Plymouth cattle division “Marra Priest” and “Sarah Priest” were the tenth and eleventh persons in the second company, just after their mother and stepfather [PCR 12:9].
BIRTH: About 1579 (aged about forty in 1619 [ Dexter 630]).
DEATH: Plymouth 1 January 1620/1 [ Prince 287].
MARRIAGE: Leiden 4 November 1611 [NS] “Sara Vincent, widow of Jan Vincent” [ MD 7:129-30; Leiden 216]; Priest is said to be of London. She was sister of ISAAC ALLERTON and married (3) Leiden November 1621 (betrothed 25 October 1621 [NS]) GODBERT GODBERTSON [Leiden 101].
CHILDREN:
i MARY, b. say 1612; m. by about 1630 PHINEAS PRATT.
ii SARAH, b. say 1614; m. by about 1632 JOHN COOMBS.

COMMENTS: Bradford includes “Digory Priest” in his list of those on the Mayflower, and in his accounting of 1651 says that Priest “died soon after … arrival in the general sickness,” but “had his wife and children sent hither afterwards, she being Mr. Allerton’s sister” [ Bradford 443, 447].
In 1957 John G. Hunt published the 1582 baptism for a “Digorius Prust” in Hartland, Devonshire [ NEHGR 111:320]; although there is nothing to connect this with Degory Priest of London, Leiden and Plymouth, it is a useful clue.
BIBLIOGRAPHIC NOTE: Degory Priest and his descendants have been given full and definitive treatment in the eighth volume of the Five Generations project of the General Society of Mayflower Descendants, compiled by Mrs. Charles Delmar Townsend, Robert S. Wakefield and Margaret Harris Stover, and edited by Robert S. Wakefield (Plymouth 1994). The Great Migration Begins
Sketches
PRESERVED PURITAN View Full Context

 

Mayflower increase

Mayflower increase

Mary Priest (1613 – 1689)
is my 12th great grandmother
Daniel Pratt (1640 – 1680)
son of Mary Priest
Henry Pratt (1658 – 1745)
son of Daniel Pratt
Esther Pratt (1680 – 1740)
daughter of Henry Pratt
Deborah Baynard (1720 – 1791)
daughter of Esther Pratt
Mary Horney (1741 – 1775)
daughter of Deborah Baynard
Esther Harris (1764 – 1838)
daughter of Mary Horney
John H Wright (1803 – 1850)
son of Esther Harris
Mary Wright (1816 – 1873)
daughter of John H Wright
Emiline P Nicholls (1837 – )
daughter of Mary Wright
Harriet Peterson (1856 – 1933)
daughter of Emiline P Nicholls
Sarah Helena Byrne (1878 – 1962)
daughter of Harriet Peterson
Olga Fern Scott (1897 – 1968)
daughter of Sarah Helena Byrne
Richard Arden Morse (1920 – 2004)
son of Olga Fern Scott
Pamela Morse
I am the daughter of Richard Arden Morse

She married Phineas Pratt, a joiner, who was part of a group that got into trouble with both Pilgrims and Natives:

Phineas Pratt was a member of a company of men sent from England by Thomas Weston. They arrived in New England in 1622 on three ships : the Sparrow, Charity and Swan (Pratt was a passenger on the Sparrow, the first to arrive). The approximately 67 men, many of them ailing, arrived with no provisions. The Pilgrims supported them throughout the summer of 1622.

In the fall of 1622, the Weston men left to colonize an area north of Plymouth called Wessagusset. They soon fell into difficulties through behaving, generally, in a very foolish and improvident fashion. They also severely angered the local Native Americans by stealing their corn.

Massasoit, sachem of the Wampanoags, informed the Plymouth colonists that there was a conspiracy among the Natives of the Wessagusset area to massacre the Weston men. Myles Standish prepared to head north with a small company of Plymouth men to rescue Weston’s men.

The same message was also delivered by one of Weston’s men, who came to Plymouth in March of 1623 “from the Massachusetts with a small pack at his back.”

Phineas Pratt was the man with the backpack. He had secretly snuck out of the Wessagusset settlement, traveling for several days without food through a snowy landscape on his 25-mile journey.

Myles Standish and a small contingent (minus Phineas, who was still recovering from his arduous journey) headed to Wessagusset to recognize Weston’s men. The Plymouth contingent killed several Native Americans in the process (for which, they were roundly scolded by their pastor, John Robinson). Soon afterwards, Weston’s group abandoned Wessagusset. Sometime in late 1623, Phineas joined the Plymouth settlement.

Sometime before May of 1648, when he purchased a house and garden in Charlestown (now a part of Boston), Pratt left Plymouth. In 1662, Pratt presented to the General Court of Massachusetts a narrative entitled “A declaration of the affairs of the English people that first inhabited New England” to support his request for financial assistance. The extraordinary document is Phineas Pratt’s own account of the Wessagusset settlement and its downfall.
Phineas Pratt was by profession a “joiner.” “Joining” was the principle method of furniture construction during the 17th century. “Joiners” were highly skilled craftsmen who specialized in this work; their skills were valued more highly than those of a carpenter.

Phineas Pratt married Mary Priest, daughter of Degory and Sarah Allerton Vincent Priest (the sister of Mayflower passenger Isaac Allerton, Sarah had been married to Jan Vincent and widowed before she married Degory Priest). Degory Priest journeyed to Plymouth on the Mayflower, his wife and two daughters intended to join him later. Priest died during the first winter. Before sailing for America, the widowed Sarah Allerton Vincent Priest married Godbert Godbertson, who became Mary Priest’s stepfather. The family (mother, stepfather and two daughters) were among the passengers of the Anne and Little James, arriving in Plymouth in 1623.

Phineas was probably born about 1593, Mary was probably born about 1612. It seems likely, given the probably age of their oldest child at the time of her death, that they married about 1631 or 1632. Phineas and Mary Pratt had 8 children.
According to his gravestone in the old Phipps Street Cemetery, in the Charlestown area of Boston, “Phinehas Pratt, agd about 90 yrs, decd April ye 19, 1680 & was one of ye first English inhabitants of ye Massachusetts Colony.” (Mayflower Descendant, Vol. 6, p. 1-2).

Priest and Pratt

Priest and Pratt

Henry Ewer of Sandwich MA

December 1, 2013 3 Comments

Ewer Coat of Arms

Ewer Coat of Arms

Henry Ewer moved his family from Plymouth to Sandwich, MA on Cape Cod to settle. The Pilgrims of Plymouth, right up the road, were religious nuts who banished and harassed those with whom they differed. The London contract that governor Brewster undertook allowed him to sell and or release lands to new settlers. He allowed the settlements on Cape Cod, but the church in Plymouth was in charge. The new towns on Cape Cod were subject to laws of the colony, and were treated harshly because of religious differences. The Cape Cod colonists, for instance, were to enforce observance of the Sabbath on the local native population, and make sure all the pigs had rings in their noses. They could be called up to Plymouth for infractions, and frequently were. In 1638 Henry and his wife were deemed unfit and told to leave the town, but their infractions were settled in an unknown way. Generations of Ewers continued to live in Sandwich and the surrounding area.

Henry Ewer (1570 – 1638)
is my 12th great grandfather
son of Henry Ewer
daughter of Thomas Ewer
daughter of Mary Ewer
son of Mehitable Jenkins
son of Isaac Hamblin
daughter of Eleazer Hamblin
daughter of Sarah Hamblin
daughter of Mercy Hazen
son of Martha Mead
son of Abner Morse
son of Daniel Rowland Morse
son of Jason A Morse
son of Ernest Abner Morse
I am the daughter of Richard Arden Morse
The Pilgrims were harsh on anyone they suspected of being Quakers, and made life hard on that group.  Any religious (which included behavioral issues ) deviance was treated as criminal.  Henry’s son Thomas seems to have been persecuted, then later converted to the Quaker faith.  I visited Sandwich in May to see the town and glass museum.  I loved the place.  I have since found several Sandwich people in my tree.  It is a very interesting place to visit for such a tiny town.

William Walker, 13th Great Grandfather

October 26, 2013 5 Comments

burial place

burial place

coat of arms

coat of arms

William Walker received a grant of land in 1639 in Hingham, Massachusetts and was among the first settlers there. He was with Richard, James, and Sarah Walker when they came to New England in the “Elizabeth” in April 1635. He later removed to Eastham where he was admitted to freedom June 3, 1656.

William Walker (1620 – 1703)
is my 13th great grandfather
daughter of William Walker
daughter of Sarah Walker
daughter of Sarah Warren
son of Elizabeth Blackwell
daughter of Thomas Baynard
daughter of Deborah Baynard
daughter of Mary Horney
son of Esther Harris
daughter of John H Wright
daughter of Mary Wright
daughter of Emiline P Nicholls
daughter of Harriet Peterson
daughter of Sarah Helena Byrne
son of Olga Fern Scott
I am the daughter of Richard Arden Morse

William Walker was born in 1620 at England. He immigrated in 1635. He immigrated in 1643 to Plymouth, MA. He married Sarah Snow, daughter of Nicholas Snow and Constance Hopkins, on 25 February 1654 at Eastham, MA (25 Jan 1655 per #494). William Walker’s name is on the list of those able to bear arms in 1643 and he was admitted as a freeman 8 June 1656 at Eastham, Barnstable, MA. He was in COURT/CIVIL on 3 March 1663 at Plymouth Colony: Ralph Smith of Eastham, fined 3s, 4p for breaking the peace in striking William Walker. He was in COURT/CIVIL on 5 June 1671 at Plymouth: William Walker was charged with stealing cloth from Thomas Clark, “of Boston” and was sentenced to pay double for the cloth and for telling a lie about it, was fined 10 Pounds. He died in 1703.

Nathaniel Warren of Plymouth Colony

October 25, 2013 2 Comments

Richard landing with Pilgrims

Richard landing with Pilgrims

Nathaniel Warren was born in 1624 in Plymouth Colony.  His father, Richard, came alone on the Mayflower to America, then sent later for his family:
We know that the Mayflower passenger’s first three children were named Mary, Ann, and Sarah (in that birth order).Very little is known about Richard Warren’s life in America.  He came alone on the Mayflower in 1620, leaving behind his wife and five daughters.  They came to him on the ship Anne in 1623, and Richard and Elizabeth subsequently had sons Nathaniel and Joseph at Plymouth.
Nathaniel Warren (1624 – 1667)
is my 12th great grandfather
daughter of Nathaniel Warren
daughter of Sarah Warren
son of Elizabeth Blackwell
daughter of Thomas Baynard
daughter of Deborah Baynard
daughter of Mary Horney
son of Esther Harris
daughter of John H Wright
daughter of Mary Wright
daughter of Emiline P Nicholls
daughter of Harriet Peterson
daughter of Sarah Helena Byrne
son of Olga Fern Scott
I am  the daughter of Richard Arden Morse
When he was 41 years old he was given the responsibility of negotiating with my 11th great uncle Metacom to purchase land from the Wampanoag tribe.
Plymouth Colony Land Purchase:

  • Oct. 1665, John Cooke and his Brother-In-Law Nathaniel Warren, were appointed by Plymouth Colony to “treat with Philip the Sagamore about the sale of such lands as are to be sold by him, and to purchase them in the behalf of the country.” Philip the Sagamore, sometimes called Metacom, was the son or grandson of Massasoit, and leader of the Wampanoag Indians. He would later be dubbed “King Philip” during the Wampanoag’s war he led against the English in 1676.

    His prepared his will in 1661 to resolve disputes over his father’s estate.

From the book “Mayflower Families Through Five Generations” Richard Warren, Volume Eighteen Part 1 – Third Edition by the General Society of Mayflower Descendants 2004
On June 11 1653 Jane Collyare (Collier) on behalf of her grandchild Sara, the wife of Nathaniel Warren. Elizabeth Warren and Nathaniel Warren agreed to let the court resolve their differences over certain lands of Mr. richard Warren deceased.
Nathaniel Warren became a Freeman 3 June 1657. On 1 June 1658 he was a Deputy from Plymouth, a position he frequently held.
On 15 oct 1661 Nathaniell Warren “aged thirty seaven yeares or thereabouts” made a deposition. NOTE: spelling in the ( )’s are exactly the way it was written back in 1661.
The will of Nathaniel Warren Sr. of Plymouth, dated 29 June 1667, codicil dated 16 July 1667, names wife Sarah; dau. Hope who is lame; other children (not named); the codicil mentions mother Elizabeth Warren; brother Joseph Warren; sisters Mary Bartlett, Sr., Ann Little, Sarah Cooke, Elizabeth Church and Abigail Snow. The inventory was taken 21 Oct 1667, sworn by widow Sarah Warren who was granted administration 30 Oct 1667.
On 9 Jan. 1689/90, Sarah Warren sold land in Plymouth to her son James Warren. On 9 Jan. 1689/90, the other heirs of Nathaniel Warren consented to the sale, they were: Richard Warren; Nathaniel Warren; Jabiz Warren; Elizabeth Green; Sarah Blackwell; Thomas Gibbs and wife Alice; Jonathan Delano and wife Mercy Delano.
On 19 Sept. 1694 Jabiz Warren of Plymouth, yeoman, sold to John Gibbs land in Middleboro which was bought by his father Nathaniel Warren.

Captain Michael Pierce, 9th Great Grandfather

September 16, 2013 26 Comments

oldest Veteran's memorial in the US

oldest Veteran’s memorial in the US

My 9th great grandfather was killed by my 11th great uncle.  King Philip’s War was fought between the Wampanoag people and the colonists of Plymouth.  This is the first, but not the last, war on American soil in which I had ancestors on both sides of the conflict. The memorial that commemorates this event is in preset day Providence, RI.  It is the oldest Veterans memorial in the US.  The vanquished native people were sent to the West Indies and sold into slavery.  Nobody knows where the graves of my Wampanoag ancestors are.

Captain Michael Pierce was born in 1615 and died in1676. He and his descendants form the first American generation of Pierces in our family tree. Michael Pierce immigrated to the New World in the early 1640s from Higham, Kent, England to Scituate, in what later became Massachusetts. The ten year period from 1630 to 1640 is know as The Great Migration. During this period, 16,000 people, immigrated to the East Coast of North America.

Brother of famous Colonial Sea Captain, William Pierce. Captain Michael Pierce was the brother of the famous Colonial sea captain, William Pierce, who helped settle Plymouth Colony. Captain Michael Pierce played a significant role in the Great Migration. Historical records show that this one sea captain crossed the Atlantic, bringing settlers and provisions to the New World more frequently than any other. He had homes in London, the Bahamas and Rhode Island. He played a central role in the government of the early colonies. He was killed at Providence, one of the Bahama Islands, in 1641.

There were actually four Pierce brothers who made their mark on the New World: John Pierce (the Patentee), Robert Pierce, Captain William Pierce, and Captain Michael Pierce. All were grandsons of Anteress Pierce, and sons of Azrika Pierce and his wife Martha.

Marries Persis Eames. In 1643, Michael Pierce married Persis Eames of Charleston Massachusetts. His wife was born in Fordington, Dorsetshire England 28 October 1621. She was the daughter of Anthony Eames and Margery Pierce.

Pierce Family Moves to Scituate. Michael and Persis Pierce’s first child, a daughter, was born in 1645 and named Persis in honor of her mother. Unfortunately, their first child died in 1646 at one year of age. The new family settled first in Higham, but moved in 1676 to Scituate, where the Pierce family continued to reside for most of the next century. Scituate is located some 10 miles north of the original Plymouth colony. It was settled as early as 1628 by a group of men from Kent, England.

In 1646, Benjamin Pierce, their second child, a son and heir, was born. This son, Benjamin Pierce, fathered the second Pierce generation in this family tree. Twelve other children were born over the coming years: Ephraim, Elizabeth, Deborah, Sarah, Mary, Abigail, Anna, Abiah, John, Ruth and Peirsis.

Erected First Saw-Mill. Michael Pierce resided on a beautiful plain near the north river and not far form Herring brook. He assisted in erecting the first saw-mill. The mill was the first one erected in the colony. It is believed that Samuel Woodworth (1784-1842) wrote the song, “The Old Oaken Bucket,” concerning this river and mill in Scituate. Samuel Woodworth’s grandfather, Benjamine Woodworth, witnessed the signing of Captain Michael Pierce’s will, on January 1675. The lyrics to this classic American folk tune are given below:
How dear to this heart are the scenes of my childhood, When fond recollection presents them to view, The orchard, the meadow, the deep tangled wildwood, And ev’ry lov’d spot which my infancy knew. The wide spreading stream, the mill that stood near it, The bridge and the rock where the cataract fell. The cot of my father, the dairy house by it, And e’en the rude bucket that hung in the well. The old oaken bucket, the ironbound bucket, The moss-covered bucket that hung in the well. The moss-covered bucket I hail as a treasure, For often at noon when returned from the field, I found it the source of an exquisite pleasure, The purest and sweetest that nature can yield. How ardent I seized it with hands that were glowing, And quick to the white pebbled bottom it fell. Then soon with the emblem of truth overflowing, And dripping with coolness it rose from the well. The old oaken bucket, the ironbound bucket, The moss-covered bucket that hung in the well. How soon from the green mossy rim to receive it, As poised on the curb it reclined to my lips, Not a full flowing goblet could tempt me to leave it, Tho’ filled with the nectar that Jupiter sips. And now far removed from the loved situation, The tear of regret will intrusively swell. As fancy reverts to my father’s plantation, And sighs for the bucket that hung in the well. The old oaken bucket, the ironbound bucket, The moss-covered bucket that hung in the well.

Captain in the Local Militia Fighting the Indians. Unlike his famous brother, Captain William Pierce, Michael Pierce was not a sea captain. He attained the title, Captain, from the Colony court in 1669. Historical records show that he was first given the rank of Ensign under Captain Miles Standish, then later, in 1669, he was made Captain. These titles reflects his role as a leader in the local militia formed to protect the colony from the Indians.

Honored for Heroism in King Phillip’s War. Captain Michael Pierce’s memory is well-documented in American history. He is honored for the brave manner in which he died in defense of his country. The exact manner in which he died is repeated in more than 20 books and letters detailing the military history of the King Phillip’s War. This war took place between 1675 and 1676, and remains one of the bloodiest conflicts in American history. It was also a pivotal point in early American history. Although the English colonists were ultimately victorious over the Indians, it took the colonies over 100 years to recover from the economic and political catastrophy brought about by this conflict.

The battle in which Captain Michael Pierce lost his life is detailed in Drakes Indian Chronicles (pp. 220-222) as follows:

“Sunday the 26th of March, 1676, was sadly remarkable to us for the tidings of a very deplorable disaster brought into Boston about five o’clock that afternoon, by a post from Dedham, viz., that Captain Pierce of Scituate in Plymouth Colony, having intelligence in his garrison at Seaconicke, that a party of the enemy lay near Mr. Blackstorne’s, went forth with sixty-three English and twenty of the Cape Indians (who had all along continued faithful, and joyned with them), and upon their march discovered rambling in an obscure woody place, four or five Indians, who, in getting away from us halted as if they had been lame or wounded. But our men had pursued them but a little way into the woods before they found them to be only decoys to draw them into their ambuscade; for on a sudden, they discovered about five hundred Indians, who in very good order, furiously attacked them, being as readily received by ours; so that the fight began to be very fierce and dubious, and our men had made the enemy begin to retreat, but so slowly that it scarce deserved the name, when a fresh company of about four hundred Indians came in; so that the English and their few Indian friends were quite surrounded and beset on every side. Yet they made a brave resistance for about two hours; during which time they did great execution upon their enemy, who they kept at a distance and themselves in order. For Captain Pierce cast his sixty-three English and twenty Indians into a ring, and six fought back to back, and were double – double distance all in one ring, whilst the Indians were as thick as they could stand, thirty deep. Overpowered with whose numbers, the said Captain and fifty-five of his English and ten of their Indian friends were slain upon the place, which in such a cause and upon such disadvantages may certainly be titled “The Bed of Honor.” However, they sold their worthy lives at a gallant rate, it being affirmed by those few that not without wonderful difficulty and many wounds made their escape, that the Indians lost as many fighting men in this engagement as were killed in the battle in the swamp near Narragansett, mentioned in our last letter, which were generally computed to be above three hundred.”

Today, in Scituate, there is a Captain Pierce Road.
In Cumberland, Rhode Island, there is a monument called Nine Men’s Misery. A tablet near the monument reads:

NINE MEN’S MISERYON THIS SPOT WHERE
THEY WERE SLAIN
BY THE INDIANS
WERE BURIED
THE NINE SOLDIERS
CAPTURED IN
PIERCE’S FIGHT
MARCH 26, 1676

The monument is located in a dark, place in the woods, near a former monastery. The monastery is now a public library. The monument consists of little more than a pile of stones cemented together by a monk and marked with a plaque. However, this site is of major historical significance because it is concidered to be the oldest monument to veterans in the United States.


1. Captain Michael Pierce born 1615; died 3/26/1676.
married Persis Eames, 1643 (born. Oct. 28, 1621; died Dec. 31,1662). Micheal Pierce and Persis Eames had these 13 children:
2. Persis Pierce, born 1645. Persis died 1646 at 1 year of age. 3. >>>Benjamin Pierce, born 1646. 4. Ephraim Pierce, born 1647. Ephraim died 1719 at 72 years of age. 5. Elizabeth Pierce, born 1649. She married a Holbrook and gave birth to Captain Michael Pierce’s only two grandchildren at the time of his death who are mentioned in his will: Elizabeth Holbrook and Abigail Holbrook. 6. Deborah Pierce, born 1650. 7. Sarah Pierce, born 1652. 8. Mary Pierce, born 1654. She married Samuel Holbrook, 23 June 1675. Samuel was born in Weymouth, Mass 1650. Samuel was the son of William Holbrook and Elizabeth Pitts. Samuel died 29 October 1712 at 62 years of age. Mary Pierce and Samuel Holbrook had the following six children: Persis, Elizabeth, Bethiah, Samuel, Elizabeth, and Mary. 9.Abigail Pierce, born 1656. Abigail died 1723 at 67 years of age. 10. Anna Pierce, born 1657. 11. Abiah Pierce, born 1659. She married Andrew Ford. 12. John Pierce, born 1660. John died 28 June 1738 at 77 years of age. He married Patience Dodson 12 December 1683. 13. Ruth Pierce, born 1661. 14. Peirsis Pierce, born 1662. Persis 3 December 1695. She married Richard Garrett, 3rd, who was born in 1659. They lived in Scituate, Mass. and had three children: John (born 1706), Anna, and Deborah.
married Mrs. Annah James sometime soon after 1662. They had no children. Captain Michael Pierce remained married to Annah Pierce until his death. Annah Pierce is well provided for in his will.

Michael  Pierce (1615 – 1676)
is my 9th great grandfather
Ann Pierce (1640 – 1655)
daughter of Michael Captain Pierce
Sarah Kinchen (1655 – 1724)
daughter of Ann Pierce
Philip Raiford (1689 – 1752)
son of Sarah Kinchen
Grace Raiford (1725 – 1778)
daughter of Philip Raiford
Sarah Hirons (1751 – 1817)
daughter of Grace Raiford
John Nimrod Taylor (1770 – 1816)
son of Sarah Hirons
John Samuel Taylor (1798 – 1873)
son of John Nimrod Taylor
William Ellison Taylor (1839 – 1918)
son of John Samuel Taylor
George Harvey Taylor (1884 – 1941)
son of William Ellison Taylor
Ruby Lee Taylor (1922 – 2008)
daughter of George Harvey Taylor
Pamela Morse
I am the daughter of Ruby Lee Taylor

When I read that he’d died during the Great Swamp Fight, it peaked my interest so I bought a book called King Philip’s War The History and Legacy of America’s Forgotten Conflict, by Eric B. Schultz and Michael J. Tougias.  The following is an excerpt from the book describing Michael Pierce’s involvement in the conflict.

KING PHILIP’S WAR

PIERCE’S FIGHT, CENTRAL FALLS, RHODE ISLAND

The ambush of Captain Michael Pierce and his Plymouth Colony soldiers

occurred on Sunday, March 26, 1676, in the present-day city of Central

Falls, Rhode Island. Sometimes attributed to the Narragansett sachem

Canonchet, this ambush was in many respects a textbook military operation.

Several friendly natives escaped the engagement, but only nine English

survived, and these nine men were later discovered dead several miles

north of Central Falls in present-day Cumbedand, Rhode Island, a site now

known as Nine Men’s Misery. Not only was the ambush deadly for Pierce

and his men, but it was devastating to the morale of the colonies which, on

the very same day, witnessed the murder of settlers in Longmeadow, Massachusetts,

the burning of Marlboro, Massachusetts, and the destruction of

Simsbury, Connecticut.

Pierce, a resident of Scituate, Massachusetts, had gathered in Plymouth

a force of Englishmen from Scituate, Marshfield, Duxbury, Eastham, and

Yarmouth, supported by twenty friendly natives from Cape Cod. Together,

this band marched to Taunton, then along the Old Seacuncke Road

(Tremont Street) to Rehoboth (now East Providence, Rhode Island).

There, they were joined by several men from Rehoboth, expanding their total

number to sixty-three English and twenty friendly natives.

Reports indicated that a large group of the enemy had gathered in the

area of Pawtucket Falls, an ideal location from which to catch alewives,

salmon, and shad, and a natural fording spot in the river.149Pierce and his

men set out in pursuit. On Saturday, March 25, they skirmished with the

Narragansett, perhaps north of the falls, where, historian Leonard Bliss

concludes, Pierce “met with no loss, but judged he had occasioned considerable

to the enemy.”

It is not unreasonable to think that Pierce had skirmished with a small

patrol sent intentionally to meet and test the English-an exercise broken

off by the natives once they had gathered information on the size and”

strength of their opponent. In any event, Pierce met no other natives and returned

for the night to the garrison at Old Rehoboth. Meanwhile, armed

with information from the skirmish, native leaders undoubtedly set to work

devising a trap for the English troops.

On Sunday, March 26, Pierce and his troops returned to the field, probably

marching from present-day East Providence, north along the Seekonk

River (which becomes the Blackstone River), back toward Pawtucket Falls.

It is said that as they marched, they were watched by Narragansett from

Dexter’s Ledge, now the site of Cogswell Tower in Jenks Park, Central Falls

(rough distance and heavily wooded terrain made this questionable).

Somewhere close to the Blackstone, perhaps near a fording spot where

Roosevelt Avenue now crosses the river, in what Bliss describes as an

“obscure woody place,” they spotted four or five Narragansett fleeing as

if wounded or hurt. Had a more experienced commander witnessed this

show, he might have immediately fallen back. However, Pierce and his

troops charged after the bait, suddenly finding themselves surrounded by

“about 500 Indians, who, in very good order, furiously attacked them.”

Pierce apparently met the ambush on the eastern side of the Blackstone,

but crossed to the western side, where the natives were engaged in force. A

contemporary account of the battle by an anonymous Boston merchant,

paraphrased by Bliss, made the English out to be as heroic as possible, but

the devastation was complete:

Our men had made the enemy retreat, but so slowly, that it scarce deserved

the name; when a fresh company of about 400 Indians came in,

so that the English and their few Indian friends, were quite surrounded

and beset on every side. Yet they made a brave resistance for above two

hours, during all which time they did great execution upon the enemy,

whom they kept at a distance, and themselves in order. For Captain

Pierce cast his 63 English and 20 Indians into a ring and fought back to

back, and were double-double distance all in one ring, whilst the Indians

were as thick as they could stand thirty deep: overpowered with

whose numbers, the said captain, and 55 of his English, and 10 of their

Indian friends were slain upon the place; which, in such cause, and

upon such disadvantages, may certainly be styled the bed of honour.

It is unlikely, of course, that nine hundred natives participated in the ambush.

Nor does it seem logical that eighty-three men, disadvantaged by surprise,

terrain, and numbers, would have much chance of forcing even four

hundred warriors to retreat. (Contemporary writers reported that Pierce

and his men killed 140 of their enemy, a figure undoubtedly inflated.)

However, if Pierce and his troops crossed the Blackstone near present-day

Roosevelt Avenue, the battle may have moved northward along the river to

a spot near present-day Macomber Field on High Street, where a commemorative

marker was placed in 1907. The marker reads:

PIERCE’S FIGHT

NEAR THIS SPOT

CAPTAIN MICHAEL PIERCE

AND HIS COMPANY OF

PLYMOUTH COLONISTS

AMBUSHED AND OUTNUMBERED WERE

ALMOST ANNIHILATED

By THE INDIANS

MARCH 26 1676

ERECTED By THE STATE OF RHODE ISLAND

IN 1907

A visit to this site today places the traveler in a heavily industrialized area

surrounded by factories and baseball fields. It is worth remembering, however,

that Central Falls was once the “North Woods” of Providence and

remained only sparsely settled throughout the eighteenth century.

Marching along, Pierce would have seen a wooded land of oak, walnut,

chestnut, and birch trees with three falls (Pawtucket to the south, Valley to

the north, and Central near the crossing at Roosevelt Avenue) supplying the

Narragansett with rich fishing grounds. ’59Bycontrast, present-day Central

Falls is so densely built that the Blackstone River is all but invisible from

nearby Cogswell Tower.

Not all of Pierce’s troops died in the ambush. Several of the friendly natives

devised ingenious means of escape. One blackened his face with powder

like the enemy and passed through their lines without incident.16oAnother

pretended to chase his comrade with a tomahawk, the two running past

their enemies and on to safety.161It appears also that nine English soldiers

escaped death during the ambush, though the details of their story are conjecture

only. One tradition holds that they had gone ahead of the main body

of troops and were chased into present-day Cumberland, where they made

their stand against a large rock and all perished.161

A more plausible explanation is that these nine survived the ambush,

were taken prisoner, and were marched northward about three miles to a

piece of upland surrounded by swamp known as Camp Swamp. Here, upon

a large rock, they were executed. It was several weeks before their bodies

were found, scalped and uncovered, on this rock. The men were buried

some seventy yards northeast of the rock in a common grave. Above this

grave a heap of small stones was used to construct a fourteen-foot-Iong

stone wall, some three feet high and one foot wide at the base. To this

day, residents know this place as Nine Men’s Misery.

In the early twentieth century a cairn of stones (since damaged) was

placed over the spot, and in 1928 a granite marker was set by the Rhode Island

Historical Society. The marker reads:

NINE MEN’S MISERY

ON THIS SPOT

WHERE THEY WERE SLAIN BY

THE INDIANS

WERE BURIED THE NINE SOLDIERS

CAPTURED IN PIERCE’S FIGHT

MARCH 26, 1676

The cairn and marker can be found near the former Cistercian Monastery

on Diamond Hill Road, about six-tenths of a mile south of Route 295 in

Cumberland. (These grounds are now home to the Hayden Library, the

Northern Rhode Island Collaborative School, the Cumberland Senior Citizens

Department, and other city services.) A dirt road, heading northnortheast

from the northeast corner of the grounds, leads directly to the

site, which requires about a quarter-mile walk. (Many residents walk and

jog in this area and are able to point a visitor in the right direction.)

Around the time of the American Revolution a physician dug up remains

from the grave, identifying one skeleton as that of Benjamin Buckland

of Rehoboth by its large frame and double set of teeth.r65 When the

Catholic Order of Monks purchased the land, remains of the men killed at

Nine Men’s Misery were dug up and given to the Rhode Island Historical

Society. During the 1976 bicentennial celebration, after the land had been

turned over to the town of Cumberland for its use, the bones were reburied

at their original site.

 

My American History, Plymouth to Tucson

July 4, 2013 6 Comments

My single Wampanoag ancestor, Quadequina is the only true American in my tribe. My DNA tests out at 96% from the British Isles. My pedigree is what is known in the US as blue blooded.  My ancestors almost all left Europe in the early 1600’s to colonize America.  They had a religious problem with the locals who were freaking out all over Europe in different religious ways.  Suffice it to say the move to Plymouth or Jamestown was done with more than a little religious arrogance.  The locals here had a perfectly adequate religious practice, but the Pilgrims and Virginians were bound to convert and enslave them in an exciting new monotheistic way.  The God who sailed over with the Pilgrims was that angry, vengeful ,all by himself God who just had no patience or tolerance for the beliefs of others.  This God provided for the English on American soil by making sure the king back home had power to scare the beJesus out of any non-believer.

Imagine the dismay of the locals in Massachusetts when they learned that the colonists not only sucked down their erstwhile property and hunting rights, but planned to take more of the same.  King Philip , AKA my great uncle, planned and executed a revolution against the colonists, which is when things got ugly quickly and forever. When I visited Mashpee, the land that was given by the English to the tribe, by arrangement with the King in 1655, I thought I would see the graves of the elders who started Thanksgiving.  I was mighty upset with my Pilgrim ancestors, even though one of them married into the tribe, the group in general was highly rude and creepy.  I saw the graves of the Mayflower passengers, and their church….but not a clue as to the location of Quadequina’s resting place.  Bury my heart at Mashpee.

I learned  much about the way American history has been reconstructed, but I also got to meet some young Wampanoag people who have great pride and are reviving the language.  I became very angry again when I found out the wampum belts that document this history are in England…and the tribe asked them to return the property to Mashpee.  Wampum is a shell currency used to create agreements and make purchases.  The belt was a form of contract used to define, for instance, real estate deals made with Brits.  The state of Rhode Island was purchased with wampum.  I have no power to get the wampum artifacts returned, or change the facts of history.  I just wear the wampum I got on Cape Cod as a reminder of by beloved American tribe.  On behalf of 96% of my blood, I apologize.

Elizabeth Southworth of Plimouth Colony

June 19, 2013 1 Comment

Southworth Coat of Arms

Southworth Coat of Arms

Plimouth Colony

Plimouth Colony

My 9th great-grandmother was born and died in Plymouth Colony. She married Joseph Howland, who was also born in Plymouth.

Joseph Howland [Parents] was born about 1637 in Plymouth, Mass.. He died in Jan 
1703 in Plymouth, Mass.. He married Elizabeth Southworth on 7 Dec 1664 in 
Plymouth, Ma.. 
  NOTE: Hubert Kinney Shaw, Families Of The Pilgrims; ; Massachusetts Society of
  Mayflower Descendants; pg. 6; ;
  MARRIAGE:Hubert Kinney Shaw, Families Of The Pilgrims; ; Massachusetts
  Society of Mayflower Descendants; pg. 6; ;
Elizabeth Southworth [Parents] was born in 1645. She died in Mar 1717 in 
Plymouth, Ma.. She married Joseph Howland on 7 Dec 1664 in Plymouth, Ma.. 
  NOTE: Hubert Kinney Shaw, Families Of The Pilgrims; ; Massachusetts Society of
  Mayflower Descendants; pg. 6; ;
  MARRIAGE:Hubert Kinney Shaw, Families Of The Pilgrims; ; Massachusetts
  Society of Mayflower Descendants; pg. 6; ;
They had the following children: 
         MiThomas Howland
         MiiJames Howland
         FiiiSarah Howland was born in 1673 in Plymouth, Ma.. She died on 23 Dec 
        1703 in Plymouth, Ma.. 
         FivLydia Howland
         FvElizabeth Howland
         FviMercy Howland
         MviiNathaniel Howland
         MviiiBenjamin Howland was born on 7 Sep 1689 in Plymouth, Ma.. He died 
        on 7 Sep 1689 in Plymouth, Ma.. 
         MixJoseph Howland was born on 8 Jul 1689 in Barnstable, Ma.. He died on 
        8 Jul 1689 in Barnstable, Ma.. 
         FxMary Howland
         FxiElizabeth Howland was born in 1665 in Plymouth, Ma.. She died on 15 
        Feb 1723.

Elizabeth Southworth (1645 – 1716)
is my 9th great grandmother
Elizabeth Howland (1673 – 1724)
daughter of Elizabeth Southworth
Eleazer Hamblin (1699 – 1771)
son of Elizabeth Howland
Sarah Hamblin (1721 – 1814)
daughter of Eleazer Hamblin
Mercy Hazen (1747 – 1819)
daughter of Sarah Hamblin
Martha Mead (1784 – 1860)
daughter of Mercy Hazen
Abner Morse (1808 – 1838)
son of Martha Mead
Daniel Rowland Morse (1838 – 1910)
son of Abner Morse
Jason A Morse (1862 – 1932)
son of Daniel Rowland Morse
Ernest Abner Morse (1890 – 1965)
son of Jason A Morse
Richard Arden Morse (1920 – 2004)
son of Ernest Abner Morse
Pamela Morse
I am the daughter of Richard Arden Morse

We see that she is a progenitor of Teddy Roosevelt, and that her roots are Plantagenetial:

1.  Theodore Delano Roosevelt 1882-1945  32nd United States President

2.  James Roosevelt 1828-1900

3.  Mary Rebecca Aspinwall 1809-1886

4.  Susan Howland 1779-1852

5.  Joseph Howland 1749-1836

6.  Nathaniel Howland 1705-1766

7.  Nathaniel Howland 1671-1746

8.  Elizabeth Southworth 1645-1717   

9. Thomas Southworth 1616-1669

10.  Edward Southworth 1590-1621

11. Thomas Southworth 1548-1616

12.  Sir John Southworth 1526-1595

13. Margarey Boteler 1500-1546

14.  Sir Thomas Boteler 1461-1522

15. Margaret Stanley 1433-1481

16. Joan Goushill 1404-1460

17. Elizabeth Fitzalan 1366-1385

18.  Elizabeth De Bohun 1350-1385

19.  William De Bohun 1312-1360

20.  Elizabeth Plantagenet 1282-1316

21.  Edward I Longshanks King of Enlgand, Plantagenet 1239-1397

22.  Henry III King of England, Plantagenet 1207-1272

23.  John of Lackland King of England, Plantagenet 1167-1216

24.  Henry II King of England, Plantagenet 1132-1189

Elizabeth Henchman, 10th Great Grandmother

April 8, 2013

gravestone

grave of Elizabeth Henchman

Elizabeth Henchman has a birthplace on file of Plymouth, MA.  I doubt this is true, since in 1612 the Mayflower had not yet landed.  She came from England with her parents, I believe.  She married my 10th great grandfather in Plymouth in 1634.  Her second husband, Richard Hildreth, was prominent in Cambridge, MA. They married in Cambridge in 1645. Her grave can still be located in Malden, MA.

The origin of the name is really from being a royal henchmen in history:

ENGLISH ORIGINS

The origin, genealogy, history, and traditions of the Henchman, Hensman, Hinchman, and Hincksman families are known to many family members today, because of the research and dedication of Robert Hinchman, Jr. (1921-1996), of Dallas, Texas, the founder and first president of the Hinchman Heritage Society.  It is from this beginning in England that we may someday find connections to The Hinchman Family in America.  The following two paragraphs were written by Robert for the October 1992 Hinchman Heritage Week in England.

“Legend has it that Thomas Crosborough of Magna Doddington, Northamptonshire, saved the life of King Henry VII during a hunt.  Upon being rescued from the tusks of a wild boar the King said to him:  “Truly, thou art my veritable henchman.”  Thomas thereupon, changed his name to Henchman, and thus, the family began.  His great grandson, Thomas, was apprenticed at the age of 12 to William Cokayne, Master of the Skinners’ Guild, and subsequently became a prominent merchant and Freeman of the City of London during the latter part of the reign of Elizabeth I.  Thomas was the father of Humfry who was instrumental in aiding Charles II escape to France during the English Civil War.  Thus, two Henchmans have helped save the lives of two English kings.”

“The scions of Thomas Crosborough Henchman are the progenitors of the Henchman/Hinchman and Hensman Families of today.  The variations in spellings began to stabilize during the reign of James I and by the time of the restoration of Charles II in 1660, the orthography had become almost set .. but as a Hinchman, you well know that confusion still exists.  The family began its migration to New England in 1637, to Maryland in 1664, and to Australia in the 1860’s.  And, of course, English members  continued down to this day.  Our generation, wherever we live, are descendants of Thomas Crosborough Henchman, his sons and grandsons.  It is an adventure for each of us to discover our particular origins.”

Elizabeth Henchman (1612 – 1693)
is my 10th great grandmother
Mercy Vaughn (1630 – 1675)
daughter of Elizabeth Henchman
Sarah Carr (1682 – 1765)
daughter of Mercy Vaughn
John Hammett (1705 – 1752)
son of Sarah Carr
MARGARET HAMMETT (1721 – 1753)
daughter of John Hammett
Benjamin Sweet (1722 – 1789)
son of MARGARET HAMMETT
Paul Sweet (1762 – 1836)
son of Benjamin Sweet
Valentine Sweet (1791 – 1858)
son of Paul Sweet
Sarah LaVina Sweet (1840 – 1923)
daughter of Valentine Sweet
Jason A Morse (1862 – 1932)
son of Sarah LaVina Sweet
Ernest Abner Morse (1890 – 1965)
son of Jason A Morse
Richard Arden Morse (1920 – 2004)
son of Ernest Abner Morse
Pamela Morse
I am the daughter of Richard Arden Morse

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