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Eber Sherman, ,7th Great-Grandfather

August 8, 2016 2 Comments

 

Sherman Coat of Arms

Sherman Coat of Arms

My 7th great-grandfather was born in Massachusetts, but moved with his parents to Rhode Island as baby.  His father was a judge and prominent Quaker in Rhode Island after being driven out of Salem for religious differences.  The family quit the Puritan Church and joined the Quaker Church. We have a copy of his will.

EBER SHERMAN WAS THE SON OF THE HON. PHILIP SHERMAN AND SARAH ODDINGS OF PORTSMOUTH, RHODES ISLAND, USA. HE MARRIED HIS FIRST WIFE MARY WILCOX, THE DAUGHTER OF EDWARD AND SUSANNA THOMPSON, AND SOPHIA A. BROWN HIS SECOND WIFE. HE WAS ADMITTED FREEMAN, TUESDAY, JUNE 08, 1658, IN PORTSMOUTH, RHODES ISLAND, HE WAS ONE OF THE FIRST SETTLERS IN THE NARRAGANSETT COUNTY, “DECB’R 05, 1679 AN ACCO’T OF LANDS LAID OUT & ALLWED TO MR. SAM’LL WILBORE & COMPA. TO JARED BULL, AND SEVERAL OTHERS”, SHOWS 500 ACRES TO EBER SHERMAN. (FONES RECORD-1894. PP36-7) ” HE WAS A PROMINENT AND INFLUENTIAL MAN, AND HELD MANY OF THE LOCAL OFFICES”. F.D. SHERMAN LISTS ABIGAIL AS A DAUGHTER WITH A QUESTION MARK, F.D.S. 602; A LETTER, MRS. THOMAS O. TREHARNE, TROY NY. HE SETTLED ON THE WEST SIDE OF
NARRAGANSETT BAY AT NORTH KINGSTON. “GOING TO PALMYRA; SHERMAN DEEDS” BY MARGARET SHERMAN, LUTZVICK, 1977.

Eber Sherman (1634 – 1706)
7th great-grandfather
Mary Sherman (1688 – 1751)
daughter of Eber Sherman
Thomas Sweet (1732 – 1813)
son of Mary Sherman
Thomas Sweet (1765 – 1844)
son of Thomas Sweet
Valentine Sweet (1791 – 1858)
son of Thomas Sweet
Sarah LaVina Sweet (1840 – 1923)
daughter of Valentine Sweet
Jason A Morse (1862 – 1932)
son of Sarah LaVina Sweet
Ernest Abner Morse (1890 – 1965)
son of Jason A Morse
Richard Arden Morse (1920 – 2004)
son of Ernest Abner Morse
Pamela Morse
I am the daughter of Richard Arden Morse

WILL OF EBER SHERMAN OF NORTH KINGSTON, RI.
GOD SO BLEST ME IN THIS LIFE I GIVE AND BEQUEATH THE SAME IN THE FOLLOWING MANNER AND FORM FIRST MY DEBTRS AND FUNERALL CHARGES BE PAID ( ) I GIVE TO MY BELOVED SON EBER SHERMAN ONE HUNDRED ACRES OF LAND JOYNING TO THE HOUSE WHICH JO ( ) TO BE TO HIM AND TO HIS HEIRES LAWFULLY BEGOTTEN OF HIS OWN BODY  ITEM; I GIVE TO MY BELOVED SON SAMUEL SHERMAN  ACRES OF LAND JOYNING AND BOUNDING UPON MY SON EBER SHERMANS LANDD THAT IS ABOVE MENTIONED TO BE TO HIM AND TO HIS HEIRES LAWFULLY BEGOTTEN OF HIS OWN BODY. ITEM I GIVE TO MY BELOVED SON STEPEN SHERMAN ONE HUNDRED ACRES OF LAND JOYNING AND BOUNDING UPON THE LAND GIVEN TO SAMUEL SHERMAN MY SONTHAT IS TO SAY TO HIM AND TO HIS HEIRES LAWFULLY BEGOTTEN OF HIS OWN BODY. I GIVE TO MY BELOVED SON ELISHA SHERMAN ONE HUNDRED ACRES OF LAND JOYNING AND BOUNDING UPON THE LAND GIVEN TO SON STEPEN SHERMAN BEFORE MENTIONED TO BE TO HIM AND HIS LAQFULLY GEGOTTEN OF HIS OWN BODY. ITEM I GIVE TO MY BELOVED SON WILLIAM SHERMAN ONE HUNDRED ACRES OF LAND ADJOYNING AND BOUNDING UPON THE LAND WHICH I HAVE GIVEN TO MY STO ELISHA SHERMAN TO BE TO HIM AND TO HIS HEIRES LAWFULLY BEGOTTEN OF HIS OWN BODY.ITEM. I GIVE TO MY BELOVED SON PELEG SHERMAN ONE HUNDRED AND EIGHTY & TWO ACRES OF LAND ( ) BOUNDED UPON JOHN SWEETS LAND NEAR ( ) TO BE TO HIM AND TO HIS HEIRES LAWFULLY BEGOTTEN OF HIS OWN BODY BUT IN CASE ANY OF THEM W ( ) ENTIONED SHAL DEPART THE ( ) I HEREBY UTTERLY DIALLOW AND REVOKE ALL OTHER TESTAMENTS AND WILLS BY ME FORERLY ANY WISE NAMED WRI( )ING AND CONFIRMING THIS & NOE OTHER TO MY LAST WILL AND TESTAMENT; IN WITNESS WHEREOF I HAVE HERE UNTO SETT MY HAND AND SEALE THE DAY AND YEAR ABOVE WRITEN  SIGNED SEALED PUBLISHED AND DECLARED TO BE THE LAST WILL AND TESTAMENT IN THE PRESENCE OF THE SUBSCRIBERS BY EBER SHERMAN. EBER ( HIS MARK) SHERMAN CAPTAIN JESSE ( HIS MARK) CHAMPLIN PELEG MUMFORD THEOPHILUS WHALE CAPT. JEFFERY CHAMPLIN AND PELED MUMFORD BOTH OF KINGSTOWNE IN THE COLONY OF RHOOD ISLAND AND PROVIDENCE PLANTATIONS DID BOTH APPEAR BEFORE THE COUNCIL OF KINGSTOWNE THE 14TH DAY OF ( ) DID DECLEAR THAT THEY DID SEE AND HEAR EBR SHERMAN OF KINSTOWNE (LATE DECEASED) SETT HIS MARK AND SEAL UPON THE ABOVE WRITEN INSTRUMENT AND DECLARED THE SAME TO ( ) HIS LAST WILL AND TESTAMENT AND THAT THEY SETT THEIR NAMES THERTO AS WITNESSES TO THE SAME. ENTERED UPON RECORD THE 13TH DAY NOVERMER 1706 SAMUEL FFONES CLARKE

INVENTORY OF EBER SHERMANS ESTATE LATE DECEASED BY US JUSTICE CHAMPLIN, JONATHAN SHERMA; OXEN FIVE COWS TWO THREE YEAR OLDS ONE CALF- – NORTH KINGSTOWN, R.I. PROBATE RECORDS V. 1-5, PP. 81-82 F.D.S. 603,604

THE ABOVE WILL CAN BE FOUND IN “SOME OF THE DESCENDANTS OF PHILIP SHERMAN, THE FIRST SECRETARY OF RHODE ISLAND” BY ROY V. SHERMAN, PP. 26-28—

Child of PHILIP SHERMAN and SARAH ODDING is:
5. i. EBER5 SHERMAN, b. December 1634, Roxbury, Suffolk Co., MA; d. 1706, North Kingstown, Washington Co., RI.

Generation No. 5

  1. EBER5 SHERMAN (PHILIP4, SAMUEL3, HENRY “THE ELDER”2, HENRY (SR.)1) was born December 1634 in Roxbury, Suffolk Co., MA4, and died 1706 in North Kingstown, Washington Co., RI4. He married SOPHIA A. BROWN4,5.

Notes for EBER SHERMAN:
Will of EBER SHERMAN of North Kingston, RI

(Margins destroyed by fire, Dec. 1870)
God so blest me in this life I give and bequeath the same in the following manner and form
first my debts and funerall charges be paid ( )
I give to my beloved Son Eber Sherman one hundred acres of land joyning to the house which jo ( )
to be to him and to his heires lawfully begotten of his own body ( )

Item: I give to my beloved son Samuel Sherman ( ) acres of land joyning and bounding upon my son Eber Shermans land that is above mentioned to be to him and to his heires lawfully begotten of his own body. Item I give to my beloved son Stephen Sherman one hundred acres of land joyning and bounding upon the land given to Samuel Sherman my son that is to say to him and to his heires lawfully begotten of his own body.

Item: I give to my beloved son Elisha Sherman one hundred acres of land joyning and bounding upon the land given to son Stephen Sherman before mentioned to be to him and his lawfully begotten of his own body. Item. I give to my beloved son William Sherman one hundred acres of land adjoyning and bounding upon the land which I have given to my son Elisha Sherman to be to him and to his heires lawfully begotten of his own body. Item. I give to my beloved son Peleg Sherman one hundred and eighty & two acres of land ( ) bounded upon John Sweets land near ( ) to be to him and to his heires lawfully begotten of his own body but in case any of them w( ) entioned shal depart th ( ) I hereby utterly disallow and revoke all other testaments and wills by me formerly any wise named wri( ) ing and confirming this & noe other to be my last will and testament; In witness whereof I have here unto sett my hand and seale the day and year above writen ( ) signed sealed published and declared to be the last will and testament in the presence of the subscribers by Eber Sherman.

Eber (his mark) Sherman
Captain Jesse ( his mark) Champlin
Peleg Mumford
Theophilus Whale
Capt. Jeffery Champlin and Peled Mumford both of Kingstowne in the colony of Rhood Island and Providence Plantations did both appear before the Council of Kingstowne the 14th day of ( ) did declear that they did see and hear Eber Sherman of Kingstowne (late deceased) sett his mark and seal upon the the above writen instrument and declared the same to ( ) his last will and testament and that they sett their names thereto as witnesses to the same.
Entered upon record the 13th day
November 1706

Samuel ffones Clerke


Inventory Follows
Kingstown October the 11th day 1706

Inventory of Eber Shermans Estate late deceased
By us Justice Champlin, Jonathan Sherman:

Oxen five cows two three year old
olds one calf–
North Kingstown, R.I. Probate Records V. 1-5, pp. 81-82
F.D.S. 603, 604

Eber was the son of the immigrant Philip Sherman and his wife, Sarah Odding. Secondary sources say Eber was born in Roxbury, Mass. December 1634; however, a “Heber Sherman” cosigned a deed in Portsmouth, RI on 1 March 1649 [/50?], and if that was this individual, then Eber would have been born no later than 1629. He d. N. Kingstown, RI 1706, and married late in life. c. 1677 Mary, b. c. 1650, living in Oct 1719 when named in the will of Eber’s brother, Peleg Sherman. Mary, in many sources, has been called the daughter of Edward Wilcox, but that Mary was born about 1639, and would be too old to be the mother of Eber’s younger children.

In his 1968 genealogy of the Sherman family, Roy V. Sherman asserts that Eber had another wife named Sophia Brown. If this is the case, then Sophia would have been a first wife, since Mary was the widow of Eber in 1719.

Though Eber grew up in Portsmouth, Rhode Island where his father settled, by 1670 he was living across the Narragansett Bay in Pettaquamscutt (now S. Kingstown), where he and four others were appointed to set a tax rate. In 1687 he was taxed in Kingstowne (which was spilt between North and South in 1722).

Eber’s will was proved in (North) Kingstown on 13 Nov 1706. Alden Beaman provided a good rendition of this family in his Rhode Island Genealogical Register, vol. 9, pages 1-12. However, I take exception to the son Stephen being placed as one of the older children, because he was the last of the children to marry. I have therefore re-arranged the children slightly from Beaman’s account. Children:

  • Eber, b. c. 1678, d. N. Kingstown 1758 (year his will was proved), and m. c. 1706 Martha REMINGTON, b. c. 1683, living in 1744 when named in her mother’s will, the daughter of John Remington and Abigail Richmond. On 13 Dec 1718, Eber and Martha sold land to Henry Gardiner (the second husband of Martha’s mother). Eber witnessed a will in S. Kingstown, RI 24 July 1725 (RIGR 6:83). Eber and Martha had seven known children born 1707 to 1724. Beer’s will, dated 1757, was proved in 1758, naming children John, Henry, William, and probably others whose names were lost. The burial location for Eber and Martha has not been determined, but they may be buried in the ancient Sherman Lot in N. Kingstown, Hist Cem #133. This is where Eber’s brother William is buried, and where the second wife of his brother Stephen is likely buried. Find-a-grave memorials have been created for Eber and Martha without a cemetery.
  • Samuel, b. c. 1680; administration of his estate was given to his brother Eber on 14 Sep 1742, so without wife or children he probably did not marry, or once had a wife but no surviving children.
  • Peleg, b. c. 1682, d. 1752, married c. 1714, and had five children born in N. Kingstown, but wife’s name was lost from burning of records. Peleg’s will was proved in Exeter, RI 6 May 1752. He had five children born 1715 to 1725.
  • Elisha, b. c. 1685, d. N.Kingstown 1750, and m. c. 1715 Mary SWEET, b. N. Kingstown 8 Dec 1696, d. there 1775, daughter of Benoni Sweet and Elizabeth Manchester. They had nine known children born 1716 to 1735.
  • Mary, b. 26 June 1688, m. c. 1714 James SWEET, b. 28 May 1687, d. 19 July 1751, son of Benoni Sweet and Elizabeth (Manchester?). They had nine children born 1715 to 1729.
  • William, b. c. 1690, living 20 Sep 1757 when he deeded land in N. Kingstown, m. c. 1716 Abigail PALMER, b. 1796, living in 1757 when she cosigned a deed with her husband, the daughter of Edward Palmer. Abigail was baptized, late in life, on 9 July 1752, in her 57th year at St. Paul’s Church of Narraganset, by immersion in Pettasquamscutt Pond. William and Abigail had eleven children born 1717 to 1737. William and Abigail are said to be buried in the Sherman Lot, Hist Cem NK #133, where several of their descendants are buried.
  • Stephen, b. c. 1693, d. 1773, m. (1) c. 1721 Sarah Freeman. b. say 1700, d. c. 1728; (2) at his home in N. Kingstown 18 Oct 1730 Margaret Hackstone, b. say 1695, d. 17 Nov 1748 and buried in Sherman Burial Yard on 18 Nov (per St. Paul’s Episcopal Church Records as abstracted in the Gen Dict RI, v. 10); (3) Exeter 15 July 1749 Giffie Sweet. b. c. 1705, living in 1772 when mentioned in her husband’s will. Stephen’s will, dated 29 Feb 1772, was proved at N. Kingstown 3 Sep 1773. Stephen had four children with his first wife, born 1722 to 1727 and five more with his second wife, born 1731 to c. 1739.
  • Abigail, b. c. 1695, named as one of the children by John Austin in his Genealogical Dictionary of Rhode Island, but I find no record of her.

Jeffrey Horney, 9th Great-grandfather

January 11, 2016 1 Comment

Third Haven Meeting House

Third Haven Meeting House

My 9th great-grandfather sailed to America with his parents in 1685.  His family may have been fleeing religious persecution, common for Quakers in England.  He seems to have prospered in his new home in Maryland.

Jeffrey was called a planter as were most of the early English immigrants; they were here to plant a new nation. Jeffrey and Elizabeth were in Easton, Maryland in 1685, and were of the Nicholite pursuasion (sometimes called Quakers or reffered to as Friends.) Jeffrey Horney assisted in Erecting the Friends Meeting House in 1685, the Third Haven Friends Meeting.

Jeffrey owned land in Kent (now Queen Anns) Co., Maryland on the north side of Chester River and on the west side of Unicorn Branch of Willmore’s Fork, which was called “Dixon’s Gift.” A tract of 900 acres known as “cottingham” was purchased from Isaac Abrams 20 Nov 1712. Other Maryland land records show him with 200 acres, “the Freshes”, surveyed 15 May 1681. Talbot Co. records show “… the provisiions for workmen to be pressed at Jeffrey Horney’s July 25, 1685.”

Jeffrey Horney (1675 – 1738)
is my 9th great-grandfather
Jeffrey Horney (1723 – 1779)
son of Jeffrey Horney
Mary Horney (1741 – 1775)
daughter of Jeffrey Horney
Esther Harris (1764 – 1838)
daughter of Mary Horney
John H Wright (1803 – 1850)
son of Esther Harris
Mary Wright (1816 – 1873)
daughter of John H Wright
Emiline P Nicholls (1837 – )
daughter of Mary Wright
Harriet Peterson (1856 – 1933)
daughter of Emiline P Nicholls
Sarah Helena Byrne (1878 – 1962)
daughter of Harriet Peterson
Olga Fern Scott (1897 – 1968)
daughter of Sarah Helena Byrne
Richard Arden Morse (1920 – 2004)
son of Olga Fern Scott
Pamela Morse
I am the daughter of Richard Arden Morse

Jeffrey Horney I was born. circa 1675, in England.  He was the son of Geoffrey Horney and Juliana .  Jeffrey Horney I emigrated in 1685 from England. He married Elizabeth Harwood, daughter of Elizabeth Garey, circa 1696 at Talbot, Maryland.   Jeffrey Horney I died before 27 March 1738 at Talbot, Maryland.8
Family
Elizabeth Harwood b. c 1680, d. b Jan 1737/38

Children

William Horney b. 1718
Jeffery Horney II+ b. 1720, d. b 8 Jun 1779
Phillip Horney b. c 1723
James Horney b. c 1725
Prisillia Horney b. c 1726
Jane Horney b. c 1728
Liddy Horney b. c 1728
Ann Horney b. c 1729

Philip Sherman, 8th Great-Grandfather

July 25, 2015 5 Comments

Philip Sherman's home in Rhode Island

Philip Sherman’s home in Rhode Island

My 8th great-grandfather was kicked out of the Puritan’s church at Roxbury and became a Quaker.  He moved to Rhode Island, as many of my ancestors did, to practice his religion. He was influential and prosperous in Rhode Island.

Portsmouth compact

Portsmouth compact

 

Philip Sherman (1610 – 1687)
is my 8th great grandfather
Eber Sherman (1634 – 1706)
son of Philip Sherman
Mary Sherman (1688 – 1751)
daughter of Eber Sherman
Thomas Sweet (1732 – 1813)
son of Mary Sherman
Thomas Sweet (1765 – 1844)
son of Thomas Sweet
Valentine Sweet (1791 – 1858)
son of Thomas Sweet
Sarah LaVina Sweet (1840 – 1923)
daughter of Valentine Sweet
Jason A Morse (1862 – 1932)
son of Sarah LaVina Sweet
Ernest Abner Morse (1890 – 1965)
son of Jason A Morse
Richard Arden Morse (1920 – 2004)
son of Ernest Abner Morse
Pamela Morse
I am the daughter of Richard Arden Morse – (not you?)
In Bertha L. Stratton’s book, “Sherman and Other Families,” she made the statement that Philip Sherman intended to settle in New Hampshre, but the climate proved too severe and so the lands there were abandoned. Upon discussion with Roger Williams at Providence, Rhode Island, the other people from Massachusetts bought Aquidneck Island in Narraganset Bay. Nineteen men signed the compact for the town in 1638. Upon leaving the church in Roxbury, Philip joined with the Friends. The Massachusetts Court ordered Philip to appear before them on 12 Mar 1638, he did not go. But he continued as a prominent figure in Rhode Island; he was the General Recorder in 1648-1652 & the Deputy to the Assembly in 1665-1667. Tradition says he was a “devout and determined man, and he was also a “neat and expert penman & an educated man,” and his Last Will & Testament “shows that he was wealthy for those times.”

Philip Sherman immigrated to Roxbury, MA and married Sarah Odding shortly after his arrival. He might have felt pressured to marry quickly, because bachelors especially of such an advanced age as 23 were looked upon with suspicion, and their single state could even effect business opportunities and social acceptance.

According to Representative Men of Old Families of Southeastern Massachussets, by J. H. Beers & Company, in a biographical entry of one of Philip’s descendants, Philip Sherman “took the side of Anne Hutchinson,” a brave woman in Salem, MA who maintained that women should be allowed to hold prayer meetings as well as men, and proceeded to hold such meetings in her home in defiance of the rules of the time and demands that she quit. She, with some members of her family including young grandchildren, were driven out of Salem into the wilderness of Rhode Island. Families in sympathy for her or in fear of retaliation for their past support and/or defense of her beliefs soon followed to Rhode Island, and Philip Sampson and his family were among the group that left Salem following her ouster.

In Providence, Philip met Roger Williams, founder of Rhode Island promising religious freedom to it’s citizens. Williams advised Philip andthe members of his party to purchase Aquidneck from the Indians, which they did on 1 Jul 1639. They created their own government with Coddington chosen to be the first governor of Rhode Island, and Philip chosen to be secretary.

Some historians believe that the death of Anne Hutchinson with most of her family during an attack of native Americans was the first act in several that led to the end of the Puritan Church. Members of the communities in all the colonies were horrified that she was banished for her beliefs and suffered so. Many felt banished themselves from England when their Puritan faith had been banned, and her treatment forced them to recognize their own harshness.

Philip left what is now called “the Congressional Church” and joined the Society of Friends, or Quakers.

He was the father of 13 children, and many of his descendants served America as congressmen and soldiers.

We have his will:

WILL of PHILIP SHEARMAN, of Portsmouth, RI

In the name of God Amen, I, Philip Shearman, yeoman, aged seventy-one years, of the Town of Portsmouth in the colony of Rhode Island and Providence Plantations in New England, being in good memory, praise be therefor given to Almighty God, do make and ordain this my Last Will and Testament in the manner and form following: (that is to say); first and principally I commend my soul into the hands of Almighty God and my body to the earth to be decently buried by my executor hereafter named. And as for the disposition of my worldly estate, it is in manner and form following; first I give to Sarah my loving wife the use and her dwelling in the first room at the west end of my now dwelling house & bed and bedding with the furniture thereto belonging now standing in the aforenamed room. Also I do here by ordaine and appoint my son Samuel my sole Executor to this my last will and testament truely performed; and to b__ himself, heirs, Executors and Administrators for the true performance hereof; furthermore my will is that my executor shall sufficiently maintain my loving wife with food and raiment and all necessaries whatsoever during her natural life and at her decease decently to bury her; furthermore, I do give unto Sarah mywife ten good ewe sheep to be marked out of my flock for the sole use and dispose both of bodie and wool yearly, wch said number shall be kept by my said Executor during the natural life of Sarah my said wife free and without any charge to my wife.

Item: I do give unto Eber my Eldest son that which I have already given him, ten acres of land in the bounds of Portsmouth aforesaid at a place called Briggs swamp joining to a parcel of land of his own to him and his heirs forever. And all my horse flesh in the Narragansett country except one mare, the scond best; such excepted mare, I give to Thomas Mumford and Peleg Mumford my Grandchildren.

Item: I give unto my son Peleg five ewe sheep.

Item: I give unto my son Edmund a quarter share of meadow and a sixteenth part of a share of upland lying in Ponagansett within the Township of Dartmouth in the colony of New Plymouth in New England with all the privileges th__ to belonging or any wards appertaining. And also my whole right in the purchase of Squamscutt now called Westerly by thecollony to the said Edmund and his heirs.

Item: I give unto my son Samson after the decease of my said wife his half of the breadth of my farm wch I now dwell upon from the westward end to the sea and three Rood more in breadth of the whole length of the aforesaid land and bounded southward upon a straight line Eastward from the south west corner of that orchard now called Sampson’s upon a straight line to a lande marke about a rood short of the cart way that goes from my dwelling house to my barn in Portsmouth aforesaid. And from the said land marke upon a sloap line five Rood westwardly of my barn until it comes to the lineof the aforesaid half-breadth of the aforesaid farm to him and his heires forever and to have the third part of any hay and grass yearly of the aforesaid farm. And my son Samson and my son Samuel to have equal privileges in the arible land of the aforesaid farm during the natural life of Sarah my wife.

Item: I give unto my son Samuel all the remaining of my aforesaid farm with my now dwelling house and all the other buildings upon the said part of the land lying southward of the other part of my farm now given to my son Samson as aforesaid to him and his heirs forever after the decease of Sarah my wife and to have two parts of the grass and the hay during the natural life of Sarah my wife.

Item: All my neat cattle, hors kind, sheep kind and swine I do give unto my son Samuel aforenamed Executor, (excepting two oxen and a fatting cow.) And also all my moveable goods (Excepting two great chests with lock and key to each of them, which said chests I give unto my wife Sarah) he my aforesaid executor paying the several legacies herein this my will specified both the aforementioned and what shall hereafter be exprest in this my will.

Item: I givee unto my son Samson aforenamed one white faced mare with her foale and all those four Indians wch we jointly bought.

Item: I give unto my son Samson and my son Samuel my draught horse and two draught steers equally betwixt them.

Item: I give unto my son John my bay mare.

Item: I give unto my son Benjamin all the remaining __art of of my land at Brigg’s Swamp whereupon the said Benjamin’s house now stands, being by estimation twentie acres be the same more or less to him and his heires forever.

Item: I give unto my daughter Sarah ten ewe sheep to be paid her the year after my decease.

Item: I give unto my daughter Mary ten ewe sheep to be paid her the year after my decease.

Item: I give unto my daughter Hannah fivee pounds of New England silver money for the proper use of her selfe and children to be paid the year after my decease.

Item: I give unto my daughter Hannah five ewe sheep to be paid to her the year after my decease.

Item: I give unto my daughter Philip ten ewe sheep to be paid to her the year after my decease.

Item: I give unto Benjamin Clarke to my son Edmund until he comes of age of one & twenty years, the said Edmund finding the said Benjamin with sufficient food and clothing duting the terme aforesaid.

Item: I the above said Philip Shearman do ordain and appoint this to be my last will and testament, making void all former wills and testaments heretofore by me made.

In witness whereof I have hereunto sett my hand and seal this one and thirtyeth day of the month comonly called July, Anno Domino on thousand six hundred and Eightie one.
Philip Shearman (Seal)
Before the signing and sealing of this my will and testament, I the aforesaid Philip Shearman do declare that wheras the word Assigns is omitted in the giving of the several parcels of land to my children:
That it is my true intent and meaning that I do give the said several parcels of land specified in my above written will to my children to their heires and Assigns forever.

Signed and sealed in the presence of:
Job Almy
Philip Phettiplace
Elias Williams

Proved March 22, 1686/7.
Recorded on page 260 of “Land Evidence, 2nd Book, No. 1”

Town of Portsmouth, R.I. H.E.S. & F.D.S. 48-50

New England Families Genealogical and Memorial: Third Series, Volume IV
(The Sherman Line).

(IV) Philip Sherman, son of Samuel Sherman, was named after his mother. He was born in Dedham, England, February 5, 1610. He came to America when he was twenty-three, and settled at Roxbury, Massachusetts. He was made freeman there, May 14, 1634, standing next on the list after Governor Haynes. He married Sarah Odding, in the year after his arrival; she was stepdaughter of John Porter, of Roxbury, and her mother, Margaret Porter, was widow of (???) Odding. He returned to England in 1635 for a short time. On November 20, 1637, he and others were warned to give up all arms, because “the opinions and revelations of Mr. Wheelwright and Mrs. Hutchinson have seduced and led into dangerous errors many of the people here in New England.” The Church record says he was brought over to “Familism” by Porter, his wife’s stepfather. In 1638 he was in Portsmouth, Rhode Island, but the Massachusetts authorities evidently thought he had not left, for on March 12, 1638, though he had license to leave, he had summons to appear at the next court if they had not yet gone, to “answer such things as shall be objected.” He did not answer these summons, but continued to be a prominent figure in Rhode Island affairs. In 1639 he was secretary of the colony; made freeman, March 16, 1641; was general recorder, in 1648 to 1652; deputy from 1665 to 1667. On April 4, 1676, he was among sixteen persons who were requested to be at the next meeting of the deputies to give advice and help in regard to the Narragansett campaign. He died in March, 1687. His will, dated July 30, 1681, showed that he was wealthy for the times. He had thirteen children, eight boys and five girls, their dates of birth being between the years 1634 and 1652.

=========================================================================
from: “The Great Migration Begins”

PHILIP SHERMAN

ORIGIN: Unknown
MIGRATION: 1633
FIRST RESIDENCE: Roxbury
REMOVES: Portsmouth 1638
CHURCH MEMBERSHIP: “Phillip Sherman. He came into the land in the year 1623 [sic], a single man, & after married Sarah Odding, the daughter o[f] the wife of John Porter by a former husband. This man was of a melancholy temper, he lived honestly & comfortably among us several years, upon a just calling went for England & returned again with a blessing: but after his father-in-law John Porter was so carried away with these opinions of familism & schism he followed them & removed with them to the Iland, he behaved himself sinfully in these matters (as may appear in the story) & was cast out of the church” [RChR 78-79].
FREEMAN: 14 May 1634 [MBCR 1:368]. 16 March 1640/1 [RICR 1:111].
EDUCATION: Sufficient to be General Recorder of Rhode Island. His inventory included “four old Bibles & other small books” valued at £1.
OFFICES: General Recorder, 16 May 1648, 22 May 1649, 23 May 1650 [RICR 1:209, 217, 230, 236]. On 4 November 1651 colony records were demanded of Philip Sherman “late recorder of this colony” [RICR 236].
Attended Portsmouth town meeting, 13 May 1638, 20 May 1638, 20 August 1638, 5 November 1638, 2 January 1638/9 [RICR 1:53, 54, 58, 61, 63]. Selectman, 30 April 1639 [RICR 1:71]. Committee to build fences, 20 May 1638 [RICR 1:54]. Surveyor, 1640 [RICR 1:102]. Town clerk, 1649-1656 [PoTR 42, 45, 49, 50, 57, 60, 62, 67, 71]. Town Council, 1649, 1650, 1653, 1654, 1656, 1657, 1670-1673 [PoTR 42, 45, 61, 62, 71, 76, 152, 161, 169, 176]. Portsmouth commissioner to Rhode Island General Court, 21 May 1656 [PoTR 70; RICR 1:337]. Committee to audit treasurer’s accounts, 21 May 1661 [RICR 1:442]. Portsmouth deputy to Rhode Island General Court, 3 May 1665, 25 October 1665 [PoTR 130; RICR 2:96, 130].
ESTATE: On 10 February 1639/40 he was granted 200 acres at Portsmouth [RICR 1:73].
On 28 August 1650 Samuel Gorton of Warwick sold to Philip Sherman of Portsmouth seven acres in Portsmouth [PoTR 304-05].
On 3 October 1677 Philip Sherman Senior of Portsmouth deeded to “Pelegg Sherman my son” fourteen acres in Portsmouth [PoLE 1:148]. On 15 April 1678 Philip Sherman Senior of Portsmouth deeded to “Benjamin Chase my son-in-law and my daughter Philip his wife” four acres and a half in Portsmouth [PoLE 1:150].
In his will, dated 31 July 1681 and proved 22 March 1686/7, “Philip Shearman, yeoman, aged seventy-one years, of the Town of Portsmouth,” bequeathed to “Sarah my loving wife the use and her dwelling in the first room at the west end of my now dwelling…”; “my son Samuel my sole executor” and to provide “my loving wife with food and raiment and all necessaries whatsoever during her natural life and at her decease decently to bury her”; to “Sarah my wife ten good ewe sheep”; to “Eber my eldest son that which I have already given him, ten acres of land in the bounds of Portsmouth … at a place called Briggs swamp … and all my horse flesh in the Narragansett country excepting one mare, the second best, such excepted mare, I give to Thomas Mumford and Peleg Mumford my grandchildren”; to “my son Peleg five ewe sheep”; to “my son Edmund a quarter share of meadow and a sixteenth part of a share of upland lying in Ponagansett within the township of Dartmouth … also my whole right in the purchase of Squamscutt now called Westery”; to “my son Samson after the decease of my said wife his half of the breadth of my farm which I now dwell upon … my son Samson and my son Samuel to have equal privileges in the aerable land of the aforesaid farm during the natural life of Sarah my wife”; to “my son Samuel all the remaining part of my aforesaid farm with my now dwelling house and all the other buildings … and to have two parts of the grass and the hay during the natural life of Sarah my wife”; to “my son Samson … one white faced mare with her foal and all those four Indians which we jointly bought”; to “my son John my bay mare”; to “my son Benjamin all the remaining part of my land at Briggs’ Swamp whereupon the said Benjamin’s house now stands”; to “my daughter Sarah ten ewe sheep”; to “my daughter Mary ten ewe sheep”; to “my daughter Hannah £5 of New England silver money for the proper use of herself and children”; to “my daughter Hannah five ewe sheep”; to “my daughter Philip ten ewe sheep”; “I give Benjamin Clarke to my son Edmund until he comes of age of one & twenty years, the said Edmund finding the said Benjamin with sufficient food and clothing during the term aforesaid” [Roy V. Sherman, Some Descendants of Philip Sherman The First Secretary of Rhode Island, hereafter Sherman Anc, citing PoLE 2:260-61].
The inventory of the estate of Philip Sherman, dated 19 March 1686/7, totalled £100, with no real estate included [Portsmouth Scrapbook 17].
BIRTH: Baptized Dedham, Essex, 5 February 1610/1, son of Samuel Sherman [Sherman Gen 95].
DEATH: Portsmouth before 19 March 1686/7 (date of inventory).
MARRIAGE: Roxbury about 1633 Sarah Odding, daughter of Margaret (_____) (Odding) Porter [RChR 78-79; TAG 73:176-80].
CHILDREN:
i EBER, b. say 1634; m. Mary _____. (She has been called Mary Wilcox, daughter of Edward [Transatlantic Shermans 114; Philip Sherman 28], but there is no room for her in the family of Edward Wilcox [NEHGR 147:190-91].)
ii SARAH, b. say 1636; m. by about 1656 Thomas Mumford [Austin 136].
iii PELEG, b. say 1637; m. Portsmouth 26 July 1657 Elizabeth Lawton, daughter of Thomas Lawton [RIVR 4:Portsmouth:37].
iv EDMUND, b. 1641; m. by 1674 Dorcas Hicks, daughter of Samuel Hicks and granddaughter of ROBERT HICKS [Harriet Woodbury Hodge, Hicks (Hix) Families of Rehoboth and Swansea, Massachusetts (Winnetka, Illinois, 1976), p. 59].
v SAMSON, b. 1642; m. Portsmouth 4 March 1674/5 Isabel Tripp, daughter of John Tripp [RIVR 4:Portsmouth:37; TG 4:62].
vi JOHN, b. 1644; by about 1674 Sarah Spooner, daughter of William Spooner (in his will of 8 March 1683[/4] William Spooner made a bequest to “my daughter Sarah Sherman” [PCPR 4:2:71]).
vii MARY, b. 1645; living on 31 July 1681 (father’s will). (Austin says she married Samuel Wilbore, son of Shadrach, but this Samuel was born in 1663 [Austin 228], so this identification seems highly unlikely.)
viii HANNAH, b. 1647; m. by about 1678 William Chase, son of William Chase [NEHGR 87:51-52; Austin 178-79].
ix SAMUEL, b. 1648; m. Portsmouth 23 February 1680/1 Martha Tripp [RIVR 4:Portsmouth:37; TG 4:62].
x BENJAMIN, b. 1650; m. Portsmouth 3 December 1674 Hannah Mowry, daughter of ROGER MOWRY [Austin 179].
xi PHILIP, b. 1652; m. by about 1674 Benjamin Chase, son of WILLIAM CHASE [PoLE 1:150; Austin 178-79; NEHGR 87:51].

William Gifford of Sandwich, MA

December 7, 2013

My 9th great-grandfather was one of the Quakers of Sandwich plantation who were heavily persecuted by the Pilgrims of Plymouth.  He owned property when he died in New Jersey, which was controlled by the Dutch.

William Gifford arrived in New England after 1643, as he does not appear among those able to bear arms in that year. The first record of him is in the list of debts due on the inventory of Joseph Holiway of Sandwich dated 4 December 1647: “dew from Willi Gifford” 3s. 4d. On 4 June 1650 he served on the Grand Enquest. The original deed for the Sandwich plantation was executed by Governor William Bradford 22 May 1651. It ordered that Goodman (Thomas) Tupper, Goodman (Thomas) Burges, Sr., Nathaniel Willis, and William Gifford have the power to call a town meeting.Both Brown, and Daniels & McLean say that by 1651 he was married and had a family; that he probably married in England, and children John, Patience and Hannaniah were probably born in England. Birth records are available for only the last four of his nine children; the birth dates of the older children are estimated based upon the birth dates of their first children. There is a sizeable gap in these estimated dates between Hannaniah and William, suggesting William, Robert, Christopher and Mary may have been by a second wife. Only the last wife, Mary Mills, is of record; she is the mother of the last two children, Jonathan and James.
There is a record in England of a “Guilielm Gifford” (i.e., William Gifford) who married Elizabeth Grant on 11 February 1635 in St. Martin-in-the-Fields, London. Also, the London Merchant Taylors’ Guild shows a record: “William Gifford, son of Anthi (sic) Gifford of Dublin in the kingdom of Ireland, gentleman, apprenticed to Thomas Southerne of New Exchange, London, for a period of seven years from 7 December 1628.” Apprentices were forbidden to marry, so this would mean the apprenticed William Gifford would have been given his freedom 7 December 1635, in perfect time to be the one who married 11 February 1635/1636. Also, the records of St. Martin-in-the-Fields show that an Ananias Gifford married Maria Read on 18 November 1621. Ananias (also spelled Hananias, Hannaniah and Annaniah) is a relatively rare name. William named one of his sons Hannaniah, and the name has been carried down in the family. Also, the name occurs in the Giffords of Dry Drayton, county Cambridge, England. But it cannot be proven that these English records apply to the family of William Gifford of Sandwich.
Nor can the English ancestry of William Gifford of Sandwich be proven, according to Daniels & McLean. “English Giffords can be traced back to Normandy at the time of William the Conqueror when most branches usually spelled the name Giffard. Inevitably the temptation to connect the Sandwich Giffords with these celebrated families has produced a rash of printed accounts in which the connection is stated as fact but without solid references. (Cutter’s “Genealogical History of Western New York,” 2:901; “History of Bristol County, Mass.;” “Vineland (N.J.) Historical Magazine,” 3:32; “Seabury-Gifford Families,” Hartford (Conn.) 1941) In view of the fact that highly skilled professional genealogists have found no proof as yet of such connections, it can only be said that evidence has yet to be found to confirm these wishful thoughts.”
William Gifford of Sandwich was a Quaker, and as such, suffered persecution for his faith. “Little Compton Families” says “It is supposed that he was the William Gifford who in 1647 or earlier was ordered by the court at Stanford to be whipped and banished.” On 1 June 1658, he was one of a dozen men who “all of Sandwich were summoned, appeared to give a reason for theire refusing to take the Oath of Fidelitie to this government and unto the State of England, which again being tendered them in open court, they refused, saying they held it unlawful to take any oath att all.” At the court held 2 October 1658, they were fined L5 each. At the court held 1 March 1658/1659 George Barlow, Marshall for Sandwich, Barnstable and Yarmouth, complained against William Gifford and Edward Perry in an action of defamation, asking damages of L100, in saying he took a false oath. The defendants were ordered to pay 50s and make their acknowledgement publically, or else be fined L5 plus costs. As Quakers, they could not accept the verdict, and at the 2 October court William Gifford and 11 other Friends were fined L5 for refusing to take the Oath of Fidelitie. At the June 1660 court Gifford was again summoned to take the oath, again refused, and was again fined L5. In October 1660, for persisting in his refusal and for attending Quaker meeting, he was fined L57 — an enormous sum for those times. At this point he disappears from the records, and may have left Plymouth colony, but where he went is unknown. It has been suggested that he went to New Jersey which, like New Amsterdam, was then under the control of the Dutch. On 8 April 1665 William Gifford was one of the signers of the Monmouth (NJ) Patent, but there is no evidence he actually settled there; his sons Christopher and Hannaniah did, however. In a deed by his son Christopher William was described as a tailor.
On 10 November 1670 Mr. Gifford bought from mistress Sarah Warren of Plymouth, widow of Richard Warren, one half her share in the land at Dartmouth, which he gave equally to his sons Christopher and Robert by deed dated 6 May 1683. In 1673 William Gifford purchased land in Suckanesset (Falmouth) from the Indian Sachem, Job Noantico. Gifford continued to appear in Sandwich town records and in records of the Sandwich Friends meeting, and he married Mary Mills, also of Sandwich, at the Friends Meeting of 16 day 5 mo: 1683. Thirty witnesses signed the certificate, but none of William Gifford’s children signed the document, nor did James Mills, Mary’s brother.

William Gifford (1615 – 1687)
is your 9th great grandfather
John Gifford (1640 – 1708)
son of William Gifford
Yelverton Gifford (1676 – 1772)
son of John Gifford
Ann Gifford (1715 – 1795)
daughter of Yelverton Gifford
Frances Congdon (1738 – 1755)
daughter of Ann Gifford
Thomas Sweet (1759 – 1844)
son of Frances Congdon
Valentine Sweet (1791 – 1858)
son of Thomas Sweet
Sarah LaVina Sweet (1840 – 1923)
daughter of Valentine Sweet
Jason A Morse (1862 – 1932)
son of Sarah LaVina Sweet
Ernest Abner Morse (1890 – 1965)
son of Jason A Morse
Richard Arden Morse (1920 – 2004)
son of Ernest Abner Morse
Pamela Morse
I am the daughter of Richard Arden Morse

Jeffrey Horney, Eighth Great-Grandfather

October 4, 2013 4 Comments

Quaker

Quaker

Jeffrey Horney was a Quaker born in Maryland. His father was a planter who left his estate to his children in 1738.  Jeffrey inherited “Cottingham”:

Horney, Jeffery, planter,Talbot Co.,11th Jan., 1737;
27th Mch., 1738.
To son William and hrs., “Dixon’s Gift,” Queen Anne’s Co.; and personalty.
To son Jeffery and hrs., “Cottingham,” sd. son dying without issue sd. tract to son Philip and hrs.; and personalty.
To sons Philip, James and daus. Jane and Prissillia, personalty, some of which des. as bou. of John Carslake. Residue of personal estate to 4 sons and 4 daus. divided equally.
Son Jeffery, ex., to have care of sons Philip and James until they come to age of 18.
Test: Robert Harwood, John Regester, Edward Perkins. 21. 861. MARYLAND CALENDAR OF WILLS: Volume 7

Since I have ancestors born in Maryland named Nichols, I was very interested to learn about the Nicholite movement, also known as New Quakers.   The Nichols in my tree marry into the family about 100 years later in Pennsylvania.

Jeffrey Horney (1723 – 1779)
is my 8th great grandfather
Mary Horney (1741 – 1775)
daughter of Jeffrey Horney
Esther Harris (1764 – 1838)
daughter of Mary Horney
John H Wright (1803 – 1850)
son of Esther Harris
Mary Wright (1816 – 1873)
daughter of John H Wright
Emiline P Nicholls (1837 – )
daughter of Mary Wright
Harriet Peterson (1856 – 1933)
daughter of Emiline P Nicholls
Sarah Helena Byrne (1878 – 1962)
daughter of Harriet Peterson
Olga Fern Scott (1897 – 1968)
daughter of Sarah Helena Byrne
Richard Arden Morse (1920 – 2004)
son of Olga Fern Scott
Pamela Morse
I am the daughter of Richard Arden Morse

Jeffrey Horney [III] was born before 1720 in Talbot County, Maryland. He married Deborah Baynard outside of the Quaker faith without the consent of the Friends. Their marriage license was dated October 6, 1739 in Talbot County, Maryland. Eight years later in 1747, Jeffrey and Deborah Horney would sell their land in Talbot County and move to Dorchester [now Caroline] County. On the 27th of October 1747, Jeoffery and Deborah Horney sold fifty acres of Cottingham in Talbot County to William Thomas, Gentleman. Less than one month later, on the 12th of November 1747, Jeffrey Horney of Talbot County purchased Piersons Chance [Pearsons Chance] from John Pierson of Dorchester County, formerly laid out for Thomas Pierson. The property was in two parts; one part contained 100 acres and the other part contained 50 acres. The land was located on Watts Creek, off of the Choptank riverjust south of Denton in what is now Caroline County, Maryland. As the crow flies, Piersons Chance was less than 15 miles northeast of Cottingham and was about 5 miles from the Delaware line of Kent County, Delaware.

Nov 12, 1747 John Pierson of Dor Co, planter, to Jeofrey Horney of Talb co, planter: two parts of a tract formerly laid out for Thomas Pierson called “Piersons Chance,” conveyed by said Thomas to said John by separate deeds, on Watts Creek, one part containing 100 a. and the other part containing 50 a. more or less. Wit: T. Waite, Jno. Caile, Hall Caile. Ackn by John Pierson and Elizabeth his wife before Thos. Foster abd Benj Keene, Justices. (See receipt, Dorchester County Land Records 14 Old 169).

For the first seven years of their marriage, Jeffrey and Deborah Horney lived at Cottingham, and any of their children born within the first seven years between 1740 and 1747 were born at Cottingham in Talbot County. After November 1747 when Jeffrey and Deborah purchasedPiersons Chance in Dorchester County, any subsequent children they may have had were born in Dorchester County, Maryland. This land now lies in Caroline County Maryland which was not established until 1773 from parts of Dorchester and Queen Anne’s Counties. This explains why Jeffrey and Deborah Horney and their children are subsequently found in Caroline County records. The land on which they were living from November 1747 onward,Pierson’s Chance, was once in Dorchester County in an area that became Caroline County in 1773. At least three of their children, John, Philip and William Horney, left Maryland between the 1780s and 1790’s when they may have followed the Nicholite movement into the Deep River section of Guilford County, North Carolina. Some lines would remain in North Carolina while others would move onto Ohio, Illinois and beyond.

There is a local legend surrounding the area on Watts Creek where Jeffrey and Deborah settled. It was believed that in the 1600s and early 1700s notorious pirates and privateers, such as Captain William Kidd and Edward Teach [Thatch, Thach, Thache], otherwise known asBlackbeard, may have hid or buried treasure along the shores of Watts Creek. A local legend began to circulate (or re-circulate) in 1916 when Swepson Earle wrote Manor houses on the Eastern Shore. He claimed that “Tradition says [Watts Creek, south of Denton] once provided refuge for Captain Kidd, whose ‘buried treasure’ has been sought on its banks.” Later, in the 1940s when Hulbert Footner wrote his book, Rivers of the Eastern Shore, he related that“There is such a hole near the mouth of Watts Creek that is ninety feet deep. It is called Jake’s Hole. Its exact depth is known because it’s been sounded often enough, and I’ll tell you why. There was aplenty pirates round here in the old time. The one that mostly cruised in these waters was Blackbeard; Edward Teach was his right name. Well, Blackbeard picked Jake’s Hole for one of his caches, and dropped an oaken chest bound round with copper bands in there. It’s still there. God knows what’s inside it!”However, according to Donald Shomette who more recently wrote Pirates of the Chesapeake, neither Blackbeard or Captain Kidd ever sailed into the Bay, but their legends did.

Whether or not the legends of Watts Creek spun by the old-timers were fact or fiction, there were pirates and privateers who sailed in and around the Chesapeake Bay. Among them, Roger Makeele, was found in Maryland records in 1685 when he and his band of pirates lured the crews of tobacco sloops to their camp on Watts Island. They would seize the crew and confiscate their sloops before leaving the men in the Marshes of Dorchester County. Makeele sailed the Choptank river which separated Dorchester County from Talbot County where the early Horney’s lived. Incidentally, that same year Jeffrey Honey [Horney] was testator to the will of Emanuel Jenkinson of Talbot County Maryland. It is likely the early Horney men, as well as other settlers in the area, heard of these pirates and were in peril of loosing their tobacco crops and their sloops to the pirates of the Chesapeake.

During this time, local Indians lived in the area. Their ancestors arrived in the area long before the European settlers. When John Burnyeat appointed a general meetingfor all of the Friends in the province of Maryland. George Fox wrote about that meeting in his journal, (Two Years in America 1671-1673 Chapter XVIII) It was upon me from the Lord to send to the Indian emperor and his kings to come to that meeting. The emperor came and was at the meeting. His kings, lying further off, could not reach the place in time. Besides the Horneys who married into Quaker families, other religions would later play a part in their lives. Among the early churches and societies, early Horney families were or became Puritans, Anglicans and Episcopalians. In 1760, when Joseph Nichols of Kent County, Maryland and Delaware founded the Nicholites [New Quakers], at least one branch of Horney’s were found in Nicholite Petitions. [Most likely Jeffrey and Deborah Horney and/or their descendants.] The early Horney’s also became Methodist and Methodist-Episcopal. On June 17, 1703 John Wesley, the founder of Methodism, was born in Epworth, Lincolnshire, England. By 1771, John Wesley’s teachings reached the Eastern Shore of Maryland. When Francis Asbury came to Maryland to spread Wesley’s word, the Methodist religion took a strong hold in Maryland. More than a few Horney families converted to Methodism. However, Wesley’s Tory beliefs may not have sat well with the Horney’s who served [on the American side] in the Revolutionary War.

The rivers on Maryland’s Eastern Shore defined the early transportation routes of religion. During their lifetime, the settlers of the area, did much of their traveling on the rivers, tributaries, creeks and branches which crossed the Eastern Shore of Maryland, east of the Chesapeake Bay. They lived near and traveled many of these waterways including the Choptank, Wye, St. Michaels, (now Miles),Tred Avon (Third Haven), and Tuckahoe Rivers. The Tred Avon was and still is the location of Third Haven Meeting House near what is now Easton, Talbot County, Maryland. The St. Michaels, (now Miles) River was the location ofBetty’s Cove Meeting House.

To see photos of the Choptank and Tuckahoe river areas in Talbot and Caroline counties where the Horney families lived and traveled, select the pdf file from the Upper Choptank and Tuckahoe River Cultural Resources Inventory. Another helpful tool is the Choptank and Tuckahoe Rivers Sections Map.   Take a two day canoe trip on the Choptank River Sojourn, a journey of Maryland’s Eastern Shore through areas where the earliest Horneys settled and the route that Jeffrey Horney III and his wife Deborah Baynard traveled and settled after 1747. Areas mentioned throughout this river journey are Choptank, Denton, Dover Bridge, Greensboro, Hillsboro, Tuckahoe and Watts Creek. All of these locations were found in 1600 – 1700 HORNEY records in Caroline, Talbot, and Dorchester Counties, Maryland. The journey described was a likely route traveled by Jeffrey Horney III and his wife, Deborah Baynard and their children as they left Talbot County, Maryland and settled in Dorchester [now Caroline] County, Maryland.

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