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Elisabeth Wittelsbach Duchess Bavaria, 20th Great-Grandmother

March 19, 2014 10 Comments

Bayern COA

Bayern COA

German Queen's crown

German Queen’s crown

Elisabeth of Bavaria, Queen of Germany was married to Conrad IV in her hometown of Landshut, Bavaria in 1246.  Her husband the king was at war with the pope which lead to his early demise in 1254.  Her second husband, Duke of Carinthia, is my ancestor.  She is one of the only royal ladies in my tree who managed to avoid the monastic life.

Elisabeth of Bavaria, Queen of Germany (Landshut, c. 1227 – 9 October 1273) was the Queen consort of Conrad IV of Germany.

She was the eldest daughter of Otto II Wittelsbach, Duke of Bavaria and Agnes of the Rhine. Her maternal grandparents were Henry V, Count Palatine of the Rhine and Agnes von Staufer.

The elder Agnes was a daughter of Conrad of Hohenstaufen and Irmingard of Henneberg.

Marriages and children

Her father Otto II had become a supporter of Frederick II, Holy Roman Emperor in 1241, following initial conflict between them. Their political alliance would lead to the marriage of the elder daughter of the Wittelsbach and the elder son of the Hohenstaufen. Said son was Conrad IV of Germany, son and heir of Frederick II. Their marriage took place on 1 September 1246, in her native Landshut.

Elisabeth and Conrad would only have one son:

  • Conradin (25 March 1252 – 29 October 1268).

Her father-in-law Frederick II died on 13 December 1250. He was still involved in a war against Pope Innocent IV and his allies at the time of his death. Conrad IV would continue the war until his own death of malaria at Lavello, Basilicata on 21 May 1254.

Elisabeth remained a widow for five years. She married her second husband Meinhard, Duke of Carinthia in 1259. They had six children:

  • Elisabeth of Tirol (1262-1312), wife of Albert I, Duke of Austria (1248-1308), became queen-consort of the Romans in 1298.
  • Otto II, Duke of Carinthia (d 1310), father of Elisabeth of Carinthia, queen-consort of sicily as wife of Peter II of Sicily.
  • Albrecht von Kärnten, died 1292.
  • Ludwig von Tyroln, died 1305.
  • Henry I of Bohemia (c 1270-1335), king of Bohemia 1306 and 1307-10, Duke of Carnithia 1310-35, Count of Tirol, father of Margarete Maultasch of Tirol.
  • Agnes of Carinthia (died 1293), wife of Frederick I, Margrave of Meissen (1257-1323), grandson of Emperor Frederick II, her only son Frederick of Meissen predeceased his father.

Elisabeth Wittelsbach Duchess Bavaria (1227 – 1273)
is my 20th great grandmother
Consort Elisabeth the Romans Carinthia (1263 – 1313)
daughter of Elisabeth Wittelsbach Duchess Bavaria
Albrecht Albert II ‘The Wise’ Duke of Austria Habsburg (1298 – 1358)
son of Consort Elisabeth the Romans Carinthia
Leopold III “Duke of Austria” Habsburg (1351 – 1386)
son of Albrecht Albert II ‘The Wise’ Duke of Austria Habsburg
Ernst I “Ironside” Archduke of Austria Habsburg (1377 – 1424)
son of Leopold III “Duke of Austria” Habsburg
Katharina Archduchess Austria Von Habsburg (1420 – 1493)
daughter of Ernst I “Ironside” Archduke of Austria Habsburg
Christof I VanBaden (1453 – 1527)
son of Katharina Archduchess Austria Von Habsburg
Beatrix Zahringen (1492 – 1535)
daughter of Christof I VanBaden
Sabine Grafin VonSimmern (1528 – 1578)
daughter of Beatrix Zahringen
Marie L Egmond (1564 – 1584)
daughter of Sabine Grafin VonSimmern
Richard Sears (1590 – 1676)
son of Marie L Egmond
Silas Sears (1638 – 1697)
son of Richard Sears
Silas Sears (1661 – 1732)
son of Silas Sears
Sarah Sears (1697 – 1785)
daughter of Silas Sears
Sarah Hamblin (1721 – 1814)
daughter of Sarah Sears
Mercy Hazen (1747 – 1819)
daughter of Sarah Hamblin
Martha Mead (1784 – 1860)
daughter of Mercy Hazen
Abner Morse (1808 – 1838)
son of Martha Mead
Daniel Rowland Morse (1838 – 1910)
son of Abner Morse
Jason A Morse (1862 – 1932)
son of Daniel Rowland Morse
Ernest Abner Morse (1890 – 1965)
son of Jason A Morse
Richard Arden Morse (1920 – 2004)
son of Ernest Abner Morse
Pamela Morse
I am the daughter of Richard Arden Morse

Isabelle de Hainault, 23rd Great-Grandmother

March 12, 2014 10 Comments

Isabelle de Hainault

Isabelle de Hainault

queen consort of France

queen consort of France

Isabelle gives birth

Isabelle gives birth

Isabella of Hainault (Valenciennes, 5 April 1170 – 15 March 1190, Paris) was queen consort of France as the first wife of King Philip II of France.

Early life

Isabella was born in Valenciennes on 5 April 1170, the daughter of Baldwin V, Count of Hainaut, and Margaret I, Countess of Flanders. At the age of one, her father had her betrothed to Henry, the future Count of Champagne. He was the nephew of Adèle of Champagne, who was Queen of France. In 1179, both their fathers swore that they would proceed with the marriage, but her father later agreed to her marrying Philip II of France.

Queen of France

She married King Philip on 28 April 1180 at Bapaume and brought as her dowry the county of Artois. The marriage was arranged by her maternal uncle Philip, Count of Flanders, who was advisor to the King.

Isabella was crowned Queen of France at Saint Denis on 28 May 1180. As Baldwin V rightly claimed to be a descendant of Charlemagne, the chroniclers of the time saw in this marriage a union of the Carolingian and Capetian dynasties.

The wedding did not please the queen mother, since it had meant the rejection of her nephew and the lessing of influence for her kinsmen. Though she received extravagant praise from certain annalists, she failed to win the affections of Philip due to her inability to provide him with an heir; although she was only 14 years old at the time. Meanwhile, King Philip in 1184, was waging war against Flanders, and angered at seeing Baldwin support his enemies, he called a council at Sens for the purpose of repudiating her. According to Gislebert of Mons, Isabella then appeared barefooted and dressed as a penitent in the town’s churches and thus gained the sympathy of the people. Her appeals angered them so much that they went to the palace and started shouting loud enough to be heard inside.

Robert, the king’s uncle, successfully interposed and no repudiation followed as repudiating her would also have meant the loss of Artois to the French crown.

Finally, on 5 September 1187, she gave birth to the needed heir, the future King Louis VIII of France.

Death

Her second pregnancy was extremely difficult; on 14 March 1190, Isabella gave birth to twin boys named Robert and Philip. Due to complications in childbirth, Isabella died the next day, and was buried in the cathedral of Notre Dame in Paris. She was not quite 20 years old and was mourned for greatly in the capital, since she had been a popular queen.

The twins lived only four days, both having died on 18 March 1190. Her son Louis succeeded her as Count of Artois. Isabella’s dowry of Artois eventually returned to the French Crown following the death of King Philip, when her son Louis became king.

Isabelle De Hainault (1170 – 1190)

is my 23rd great grandmother
Louis VIII France (1187 – 1226)
son of Isabelle De Hainault
Charles I King of Jerusalem and Naples (1227 – 1285)
son of Louis VIII France
Charles NAPLES (1254 – 1309)
son of Charles I King of Jerusalem and Naples
Marguerite Sicily Naples (1273 – 1299)
daughter of Charles NAPLES
Jeanne DeVALOIS (1294 – 1342)
daughter of Marguerite Sicily Naples
Philippa deHainault (1311 – 1369)
daughter of Jeanne DeVALOIS
John of Gaunt – Duke of Lancaster – Plantagenet (1340 – 1399)
son of Philippa deHainault
Joan DeBeaufort (1375 – 1440)
daughter of John of Gaunt – Duke of Lancaster – Plantagenet
Duchess of York Lady Cecily DeNeville (1415 – 1495)
daughter of Joan DeBeaufort
Henry Holland (1485 – 1561)
son of Duchess of York Lady Cecily DeNeville
Henry Holland (1527 – 1561)
son of Henry Holland
John Holland (1556 – 1628)
son of Henry Holland
Francis Gabriell Holland (1596 – 1660)
son of John Holland
John Holland (1628 – 1710)
son of Francis Gabriell Holland
Mary Elizabeth Holland (1620 – 1681)
daughter of John Holland
Richard Dearden (1645 – 1747)
son of Mary Elizabeth Holland
George Dearden (1705 – 1749)
son of Richard Dearden
George Darden (1734 – 1807)
son of George Dearden
David Darden (1770 – 1820)
son of George Darden
Minerva Truly Darden (1806 – 1837)
daughter of David Darden
Sarah E Hughes (1829 – 1911)
daughter of Minerva Truly Darden
Lucinda Jane Armer (1847 – 1939)
daughter of Sarah E Hughes
George Harvey Taylor (1884 – 1941)
son of Lucinda Jane Armer
Ruby Lee Taylor (1922 – 2008)
daughter of George Harvey Taylor
Pamela Morse
I am the daughter of Ruby Lee Taylor

Elisabeth of Gorizia-Tyrol

March 2, 2014 2 Comments

Elisabeth of Tirol

Elisabeth of Tirol

Elisabeth of Gorizia-Tyrol was a Queen of Germany whose husband was murdered by his nephew.  After his murder she joined a monastery.

Consort Elisabeth the Romans Carinthia (1263 – 1313)
is my 19th great grandmother
Albrecht Albert II ‘The Wise’ Duke of Austria Habsburg (1298 – 1358)
son of Consort Elisabeth the Romans Carinthia
Leopold III “Duke of Austria” Habsburg (1351 – 1386)
son of Albrecht Albert II ‘The Wise’ Duke of Austria Habsburg
Ernst I “Ironside” Archduke of Austria Habsburg (1377 – 1424)
son of Leopold III “Duke of Austria” Habsburg
Katharina Archduchess Austria Von Habsburg (1420 – 1493)
daughter of Ernst I “Ironside” Archduke of Austria Habsburg
Christof I VanBaden (1453 – 1527)
son of Katharina Archduchess Austria Von Habsburg
Beatrix Zahringen (1492 – 1535)
daughter of Christof I VanBaden
Sabine Grafin VonSimmern (1528 – 1578)
daughter of Beatrix Zahringen
Marie L Egmond (1564 – 1584)
daughter of Sabine Grafin VonSimmern
Richard Sears (1590 – 1676)
son of Marie L Egmond
Silas Sears (1638 – 1697)
son of Richard Sears
Silas Sears (1661 – 1732)
son of Silas Sears
Sarah Sears (1697 – 1785)
daughter of Silas Sears
Sarah Hamblin (1721 – 1814)
daughter of Sarah Sears
Mercy Hazen (1747 – 1819)
daughter of Sarah Hamblin
Martha Mead (1784 – 1860)
daughter of Mercy Hazen
Abner Morse (1808 – 1838)
son of Martha Mead
Daniel Rowland Morse (1838 – 1910)
son of Abner Morse
Jason A Morse (1862 – 1932)
son of Daniel Rowland Morse
Ernest Abner Morse (1890 – 1965)
son of Jason A Morse
Richard Arden Morse (1920 – 2004)
son of Ernest Abner Morse
Pamela Morse
I am the daughter of Richard Arden Morse

Tenure
1299-1 May 1308
Spouse
Albert I of Germany
Issue
Rudolph I of Bohemia
Frederick the Fair
Leopold I, Duke of Austria
Albert II, Duke of Austria
Otto, Duke of Austria
Anna, Duchess of Breig
Agnes, Queen of Hungary
Elisabeth, Duchess of Lorraine
Catherine, Duchess of Calabria
Judith, Countess of Öttingen

House
House of Habsburg
Father
Meinhard, Duke of Carinthia
Mother
Elisabeth of Bavaria
Born
c.1262

Died
28 October 1312
Monastery of Königsfelden
Burial
Monastery of Königsfelden
Elisabeth of Gorizia-Tyrol (c. 1262 – 28 October 1312 was Queen of the Romans, Queen of Germany and Duchess of Austria by marriage. She is also known as Elisabeth of Tirol.

Family

She was the eldest daughter of Meinhard, Duke of Carinthia, Count of Gorizia and Tyrol.

Her mother was Elisabeth of Bavaria, daughter of Otto II Wittelsbach, Duke of Bavaria and his wife Agnes, herself daughter of Henry V, Count Palatine of the Rhine and Agnes of Hohenstaufen. Her mother was also the widow of Conrad IV of Germany. Therefore, the young Elisabeth was a half-sister of Conradin, King of Jerusalem and Duke of Swabia.

Marriage
She was married in Vienna on 20 December 1274 to the future Albert I of Germany, one of the founders of the House of Habsburg, thus becoming daughter-in-law of the King of the Romans. Her husband, then a Count of Habsburg, was invested as Duke of Austria and Styria in December 1282 by his father King Rudolf. They solidified their rule in what was to become the Habsburg patrimony, also with the help of Elisabeth’s father who in his turn in 1286 was created Duke of Carinthia.

Elisabeth was in fact better connected to powerful German rulers than her husband: a descendant of earlier kings, for example Henry IV, Holy Roman Emperor, she was also a niece of dukes of Bavaria [1], Austria’s important neighbours.

In 1298, her husband was finally elected king upon the end of the reign of Adolf of Nassau. In 1299 she was Nuremberg was crowned Queen of Germany and the Romans. Her husband was murdered on 1 May 1308 by his nephew John “the Parricide” in Windisch, located in modern-day Switzerland.

After the murder of her husband, Elisabeth joined the monastery of Königsfelden were she died 28 October 1312 and was later buried.

Elisabeth was a shrewd and enterprising woman who had some commercial talents. The construction of the Saline plant in Salzkammergut goes back to her suggestion.

Their children were:
Rudolph III (ca. 1282–4 July 1307, Horazdiowitz), Married but line extinct and predeceased his father.
Frederick I (1289–13 January 1330, Gutenstein). Married but line extinct.
Leopold I (4 August 1290–28 February 1326, Strassburg).
Albert II (12 December 1298, Vienna–20 July 1358, Vienna).
Heinrich (1299–3 February 1327, Bruck an der Mur). Married but line extinct.
Meinhard, 1300 died young.
Otto (23 July 1301, Vienna–26 February 1339, Vienna). Married but line extinct.
Anna 1280?, Vienna–19 March 1327, Breslau), married:
in Graz ca. 1295 to Margrave Hermann of Brandenburg;
in Breslau 1310 to Duke Heinrich VI of Breslau.
Agnes (18 May 1281–10 June 1364, Königsfelden), married in Vienna 13 February 1296 King Andrew III of Hungary.
Elisabeth (d. 19 May 1353), married 1304 Frederick IV, Duke of Lorraine.
Catherine (1295–18 January 1323, Naples), married 1316 Charles, Duke of Calabria.
Jutta (d. 1329), married in Baden 26 March 1319 Count Ludwig VI of Öttingen.

Women in History-Anima Projection

February 4, 2013 3 Comments

The celebration of Women’s History Month will take place in March, 2013 with a theme about innovation and imagination. A  salute to women in engineering, math and science must include the women who broke into those and other fields after a struggle to be educated.  By following a timeline we can see the contributions women have made.  The Queen archetype, both in history and in mythology has power to rule with wisdom when she is at her best.  Queens inherit the power and responsibility of ruling people wisely.  The shadow queen is ruled by her own heart and lacks boundaries.

It is obvious that without women there could be no history, no men, and no archetypes.  Our collective consciousness is full of both reality and projections.  To create a better and more wholesome future it behooves us to sort out delusions in order to enlighten both men and women.  When archetypes are understood well the need to perceive the world by using stereotypes can vanish.  Stereotypes are cliche. Archetypes are infinitely instructive. When you look around the world do you notice examples of both? How do you avoid being a stereotype?

Isabell Mar, 23rd Great Grandmother

December 18, 2012 1 Comment

Isabell Mar, 23rd great grandmother

Isabell Mar, 23rd great grandmother

My 23rd great grandmother had a short life, as did her daughter Marjorie Bruce.  She was married to Robert the Bruce of Scotland.  We know a lot about her:

Isabella of Mar (c. 1277 – December 1296) was the first wife of Robert Bruce. She was the daughter of Domhnall I, Earl of Mar and a woman named Helen (or Ellen) b. 1246 d. 1295, who had previously been the wife of Maol Choluim II, Earl of Fife. Isabella was a wealthy young woman at the time of her arranged marriage to the Earl of Carrick, Robert Bruce. Her father was one of the seven guardians of Scotland who believed Robert Bruce to be the rightful King of Scotland. Despite the risks, he could see the advantage of the two families joining in marriage and bearing an heir to the throne. Mar was the first to sign over the estates of his family to the Bruce. Isabella was married to Robert at the age of 18 and legend has it that they were much in love. Shortly after their marriage Isabella became pregnant. She had a healthy pregnancy but she died soon after giving birth to a daughter, Marjorie Bruce in 1296. Robert married his second wife, Elizabeth de Burgh, six years later. Isabella’s daughter Princess Marjorie (d. 1316) married Walter Stewart, 6th High Steward of Scotland, and their son became Robert II of Scotland. From him descend the monarchs of the House of Stewart and the later royal families of the United Kingdom[edit]SourcesFelix Skene, editor, Book of Pluscarden, 1877John of Fordun

Robert and Isabell rule

Robert and Isabell rule

Scotland is certainly not for the squeamish, but imagine it in 1278.  I want to go someday.

Isabell Mar (1278 – 1296)
is my 23rd great grandmother
Daughter of Isabell
Son of Marjorie
Daughter of Scotland Stewart
Daughter of Katherine
Daughter of Margaret
Son of Joanna
Son of Thomas
Daughter of Robert
Son of Annabella
Daughter of Robert Lord
Daughter of CATHERINE
Son of Lady Elizabeth
Son of Capt Roger
Daughter of Gov Thomas
Son of Anne
Daughter of John
Son of Mercy
Daughter of Caleb
Daughter of Mercy
Son of Martha
Son of Abner
Son of Daniel Rowland
Son of Jason A
Son of Ernest Abner
I am the daughter of Richard Arden

Royal Coat of Arms

October 18, 2012

An armiger is a person who has the right to bear heraldry. In the United States there are no legal limits to bearing or designing your own coat of arms. In UK, Spain, Ireland, and Canada, places concerned with historical authenticity and royal ancestry, the use of the heraldry is regulated by law.  I am not sure what would become of you if you went out with heraldry that was bogus to you, but it is against the law.  The rest of us are free to create coats of arms for any occasion, on the fly.

When the Mayflower sailed to Plymouth the Pilgrims left the religious restrictions they had known in England.  They took extreme risks to pursue religious freedom.  They had their own costuming and strict code that bound them together in this adventure.  They originated near Sherwood Forrest, fled for Amsterdam, then Leiden, arriving in 1609.  The trip to America began there not only for the Pilgrims of Plymouth Colony, but for many branches of my family tree.  It appears that almost all of my ancestors were anxious to high tail it out of Europe in the early 1600s.  There is much research to be done, but it seems that they all took these risks sailing across the Atlantic because they had extreme convictions of various sorts. Some believed as traders and planters they would prosper and thrive.  That seemed to be enough for the Dutch ones.  The Brits and the French who sailed out of Leiden were all on big religious trips. As Thanksgiving approaches I am pretty obsessed with my Pilgrim ancestors and all their deets.  I truly enjoy living vicariously through the discovery of the actual history of my ancestors.

After about three years of working on my family tree  I have collected many coats of arms from my branches.  The tree grows ever wider as it goes backwards in time. Some have heraldry.   I was thinking about making a piece of art with some of them, and one that I make myself.  The real ones have symbols that were meaningful to the family.  Mine will have symbols that are enchanting for me.  The Queen of your Own Life book includes guidelines for creating one’s own coat of arms, as well as a coronation ceremony to claim sovereignty over body, mind, and spirit. I adore the positive and contemporary way Queen Cindy and Queen Kathy present alchemy, ceremony, and magic.  To eliminate the negative  is to create space for the essence, the distilled spirit, the powerful talisman.  I am pleased to live in a country where I can, as a queen wild and free, create and fly my own royal heraldry without fear of retribution by authorities.  I plan to make use of this inalienable right.  Have you thought about the symbols that you would use to express the essence of you?

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