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Elisabeth Wittelsbach Duchess Bavaria, 20th Great-Grandmother

March 19, 2014 , , , ,

Bayern COA

Bayern COA

German Queen's crown

German Queen’s crown

Elisabeth of Bavaria, Queen of Germany was married to Conrad IV in her hometown of Landshut, Bavaria in 1246.  Her husband the king was at war with the pope which lead to his early demise in 1254.  Her second husband, Duke of Carinthia, is my ancestor.  She is one of the only royal ladies in my tree who managed to avoid the monastic life.

Elisabeth of Bavaria, Queen of Germany (Landshut, c. 1227 – 9 October 1273) was the Queen consort of Conrad IV of Germany.

She was the eldest daughter of Otto II Wittelsbach, Duke of Bavaria and Agnes of the Rhine. Her maternal grandparents were Henry V, Count Palatine of the Rhine and Agnes von Staufer.

The elder Agnes was a daughter of Conrad of Hohenstaufen and Irmingard of Henneberg.

Marriages and children

Her father Otto II had become a supporter of Frederick II, Holy Roman Emperor in 1241, following initial conflict between them. Their political alliance would lead to the marriage of the elder daughter of the Wittelsbach and the elder son of the Hohenstaufen. Said son was Conrad IV of Germany, son and heir of Frederick II. Their marriage took place on 1 September 1246, in her native Landshut.

Elisabeth and Conrad would only have one son:

  • Conradin (25 March 1252 – 29 October 1268).

Her father-in-law Frederick II died on 13 December 1250. He was still involved in a war against Pope Innocent IV and his allies at the time of his death. Conrad IV would continue the war until his own death of malaria at Lavello, Basilicata on 21 May 1254.

Elisabeth remained a widow for five years. She married her second husband Meinhard, Duke of Carinthia in 1259. They had six children:

  • Elisabeth of Tirol (1262-1312), wife of Albert I, Duke of Austria (1248-1308), became queen-consort of the Romans in 1298.
  • Otto II, Duke of Carinthia (d 1310), father of Elisabeth of Carinthia, queen-consort of sicily as wife of Peter II of Sicily.
  • Albrecht von Kärnten, died 1292.
  • Ludwig von Tyroln, died 1305.
  • Henry I of Bohemia (c 1270-1335), king of Bohemia 1306 and 1307-10, Duke of Carnithia 1310-35, Count of Tirol, father of Margarete Maultasch of Tirol.
  • Agnes of Carinthia (died 1293), wife of Frederick I, Margrave of Meissen (1257-1323), grandson of Emperor Frederick II, her only son Frederick of Meissen predeceased his father.

Elisabeth Wittelsbach Duchess Bavaria (1227 – 1273)
is my 20th great grandmother
Consort Elisabeth the Romans Carinthia (1263 – 1313)
daughter of Elisabeth Wittelsbach Duchess Bavaria
Albrecht Albert II ‘The Wise’ Duke of Austria Habsburg (1298 – 1358)
son of Consort Elisabeth the Romans Carinthia
Leopold III “Duke of Austria” Habsburg (1351 – 1386)
son of Albrecht Albert II ‘The Wise’ Duke of Austria Habsburg
Ernst I “Ironside” Archduke of Austria Habsburg (1377 – 1424)
son of Leopold III “Duke of Austria” Habsburg
Katharina Archduchess Austria Von Habsburg (1420 – 1493)
daughter of Ernst I “Ironside” Archduke of Austria Habsburg
Christof I VanBaden (1453 – 1527)
son of Katharina Archduchess Austria Von Habsburg
Beatrix Zahringen (1492 – 1535)
daughter of Christof I VanBaden
Sabine Grafin VonSimmern (1528 – 1578)
daughter of Beatrix Zahringen
Marie L Egmond (1564 – 1584)
daughter of Sabine Grafin VonSimmern
Richard Sears (1590 – 1676)
son of Marie L Egmond
Silas Sears (1638 – 1697)
son of Richard Sears
Silas Sears (1661 – 1732)
son of Silas Sears
Sarah Sears (1697 – 1785)
daughter of Silas Sears
Sarah Hamblin (1721 – 1814)
daughter of Sarah Sears
Mercy Hazen (1747 – 1819)
daughter of Sarah Hamblin
Martha Mead (1784 – 1860)
daughter of Mercy Hazen
Abner Morse (1808 – 1838)
son of Martha Mead
Daniel Rowland Morse (1838 – 1910)
son of Abner Morse
Jason A Morse (1862 – 1932)
son of Daniel Rowland Morse
Ernest Abner Morse (1890 – 1965)
son of Jason A Morse
Richard Arden Morse (1920 – 2004)
son of Ernest Abner Morse
Pamela Morse
I am the daughter of Richard Arden Morse

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comments

loved your piece! you seem to understand all of this more than I do.
I have Isabelle Wittelsbach (1371-1435). I am sure you know better than I that her daughter, Catherine of Valois (1401-1437), married (?) Owen Tudor (1397-1461) after her husband Henry V died.
All of this led to Henry VIII – a Welshman really! I find this so ironic? Look at what Reginald Grey, Lord of Ruthyn and his “pal” Henry IV did to Owain Glyndwr, the last native Prince of Wales (c.1354/1359 – c.1416)? I have descent from Grey and Owain or should I say Owain and Grey? (I tend to identify with Owain) Look at England’s policy toward/treatment of Wales prior to Henry VIII?

Am I frequently wrong but never in doubt?

Here is my descent from Isabelle Wittelsbach:
Isabelle Wittelsbach (1371 – 1435)
• our 16th (or so) great grandmother
• scion of the house/dynasty of Wittelsbach
• wife of Charles VI, King of France (1368-1422)
Catherine of Valois (1401 – 1437)
daughter of Isabelle Wittelsbach
Edmund Tudor (1430 – 1456)
son of Catherine of Valois
Henry VII, King of England (1457 – 1509)
son of Edmund Tudor
Henry VIII, King of England (1491 – 1547)
son of Henry VII, King of England
Mary Berkeley (1490 – 1558)
wife/whatever of Henry VIII, King of England
Margaret Jones (1532 – 1565)
daughter of Mary Berkeley
William Lewis (1561 – 1592)
son of Margaret Jones
Christopher Lewis (1593 – 1673)
son of William Lewis
Sarah Rebecca Lewis* (see ascent pedigree) (1650 – 1724)
daughter of Christopher Lewis
Mary Jones Williams (1679 – 1707)
daughter of Sarah Rebecca Lewis* (see ascent pedigree)
Anne Williams (1705 – 1788)
daughter of Mary Jones Williams
Ann Dearden (1755 – 1781)
daughter of Anne Williams
William B. Lucy* (see ascent pedigree) (1779 – 1823)
son of Ann Dearden
Sarah Ann Lucy (1811 – 1866)
daughter of William B. Lucy* (see ascent pedigree)
Burwell Christmas Evans* (see ascent pedigree) (1844 – 1889)
son of Sarah Ann Lucy
Ethel Evans (1887 – 1981)
daughter of Burwell Christmas Evans
Ethel Bennett (1917 – 2013)
daughter of Ethel Evans
Frederick Edward Rehfeldt
son of Ethel Bennett –

Sadly, none/mostly none of Henry VIII’s blood lines are beyond question?

We are diversified, because we apparently/probably/may descend from three children of Henry VIII out of the bounds of wedlock, namely, Francis Hastings by Anne Stafford, Thomas Jones (1530-1603) by Mary Berkeley, and William Henry ap Rhys/Rice (1522-1588) by Beatrice Gardiner. 1 out of 3 is better than 1 out of 1? My best. C. Rick

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frederick (rick) rehfeldt

March 20, 2014

You and I (our families) were all bound up with Henry VIII and his antics, dear Cousin Rick…I watched the Tudors series on TV which straightens out a lot of the history. I continue to learn history by doing this. I have someone of Valoise, but not sure which ones…

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mermaidcamp

March 20, 2014

This is pretty interesting. I wonder how she was able to avoid retreating to a religious order? That was pretty typical for women whose husbands were killed.

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Stevie Wilson (@LAStory)

March 22, 2014

It was. She married another guy after a long wait and then all went well for her…good luck in this case.

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mermaidcamp

March 23, 2014

lol good on Elizabeth for escaping the convent! I wonder how the others all got themselves sent there!

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eclecticgal

March 23, 2014

When politics took radical turns, the widowed queen often had to go to a monastery to save her own life. Things were pretty brutal in the Euro kingdoms.

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mermaidcamp

March 23, 2014

My Isabelle Wittelsbach (1371-1435) had a daughter who married (?) Owen Tudor, a man at Court because of his good looks, and not his station in life. The Wittelsbach family were, in contrast, very, very wealthy. Their son, Edmund, married Margaret Beaufort, and she became pregnant at about age 13. Edmund was captured by the Yorkist Herbert family and imprisoned where he died of the plague. Henry VII was born 2 months later. I wonder if Wittelsbach money and power tipped the scales in the War of the Roses? Who knows? Just a thought.

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frederick (rick) rehfeldt

March 25, 2014

A very reasonable thought, cousin Rick..They had a lot of money, having married all the money in Europe for centuries…stratagists, these Wittelsbachs

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mermaidcamp

March 25, 2014

I think the military defines “strategy” as how you get to the battlefield and “tactics” as what you do when you get there. Just a random recollection.

Like

Frederick Rehfeldt

April 5, 2014

I think you are right..and my military experience is bill.

Like

mermaidcamp

April 5, 2014

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