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Thomas Howard, 3rd Duke of Norfolk

June 21, 2016 4 Comments

 

Tomb of Thomas Howard - 3rd Duke of Norfolk St. Michael's Church; Suffolk,England Thomas Howard was buried here after his death on Aug. 25, 1554. It is possibly the best preserved ornate stonework in Europe. Although both Thomas and his wife, Elizabeth Stafford appear on the same monument, only he is buried there. She was interred in the Howard Chapel in St. Mary's Church, Lambeth. This was due to the unhappy marriage and final separation.

Tomb of Thomas Howard – 3rd Duke of Norfolk St. Michael’s Church; Suffolk,England Thomas Howard was buried here after his death on Aug. 25, 1554. It is possibly the best preserved ornate stonework in Europe. Although both Thomas and his wife, Elizabeth Stafford appear on the same monument, only he is buried there. She was interred in the Howard Chapel in St. Mary’s Church, Lambeth. This was due to the unhappy marriage and final separation.

Thomas Howard, 3rd Duke of Norfolk (1473 – 25 August 1554) was a prominent Tudor politician. He was uncle to two of the wives of Henry VIII, Anne Boleyn and Catherine Howard, and played a major role in the machinations behind these relationships. After falling from favor he was imprisoned in the Tower of London with his dukedom forfeit, and was released on the accession of Mary I. He aided in securing Mary’s throne, setting the stage for alienation between his Catholic family and the Protestant royal line that would be continued by Elizabeth I.

As with all the Dukes of Norfolk, Thomas Howard was descended from Edward I. He was the son of Thomas Howard, 2nd Duke of Norfolk, and Elizabeth Tilney. Thomas Howard succeeded his younger brother Edward as Lord High Admiral in 1513. Until 1524 he was styled Earl of Surrey.

Norfolk first married Anne of York, daughter of Edward IV of England and Elizabeth Woodville on 4 February 1494 at Greenwich Palace. The couple had at least two children: Thomas Howard (c. 1496-1508) and a stillborn child (c. 1499). There are also suggestions of short-lived Henry Howard and William Howard resulting from this marriage.
Following Anne’s death in 1511 he married Elizabeth Stafford, daughter of Edward Stafford, 3rd Duke of Buckingham and Alianore Percy on 8 January 1512. They had three children: Lady Mary Howard (c. 1513-1555) who married Henry Fitzroy, illegitimate son of Henry VIII; Henry Howard (1517-1547) was one of the founders of Renaissance poetry; and Thomas Howard (c.1520-1582). The marriage with Elizabeth was unhappy. When Elizabeth complained about his mistress, Bess Holland, the Duke beat her. The couple remained estranged until Norfolk’s death.

On his father’s death in 1524 he inherited the dukedom of Norfolk and was named Lord High Treasurer and Earl Marshal, making Howard one of the most premier nobles in the kingdom. He distinguished himself many times in battle, and was an able soldier. His power increased somewhat after his niece Anne Boleyn became Henry VIII’s mistress, sometime around 1527. However, their relationship was fraught with difficulty since Anne found her uncle to be selfish and untrustworthy. Although they were political allies throughout the late 1520s alongside Howard’s brother-in-law Thomas Boleyn, Anne’s father, Norfolk once complained that Anne used words to him “that one would not use to a dog.” She was crowned queen in 1533, and was probably influential along with Queen Anne in securing the marriage of Norfolk’s daughter Mary to Henry Fitzroy.

Queen Anne’s religious and political vision was more radical than Norfolk’s, and their relationship deteriorated throughout 1535 and 1536 as Henry VIII became increasingly unfaithful, including with Anne’s cousin, Mary Shelton. Putting his own security before family loyalties, he presided over Queen Anne’s trial in 1536, giving a death sentence despite her probable innocence. The next day, he condemned to death his nephew, Anne’s brother George for the crime of incest with his own sister, the Queen.
After the death of Jane Seymour he used another of his nieces, the teenaged Catherine Howard to strengthen his power at court by orchestrating an affair between her and the 48 year-old king. He used Henry’s subsequent marriage to Catherine as an opportunity to dispose of his long-term enemy Thomas Cromwell, who was beheaded in 1540. Queen Catherine’s reign was a short one, however, since Thomas Cranmer, the Archbishop of Canterbury, discovered that she was already secretly betrothed before her marriage to Henry and had been extremely indiscreet since. Catherine was beheaded in February 1542, and numerous other Howards were imprisoned in the Tower – including the duke’s stepmother, brother, two sisters-in-law and numerous servants.

Catherine Howard’s execution was his downfall, despite Norfolk’s desperate efforts to heal the rift. He had become the leader of the premier family in England; as the uncle of Anne Boleyn and Catherine Howard, and the great-uncle of Jane Seymour[1] He had also benefited from the influence of several of the King’s mistresses, his nieces Mary Boleyn and Elizabeth Carew and his wife’s aunt, Anne Stafford, Countess of Huntingdon. In 1546, Norfolk allegedly hatched a plot to make his daughter, Mary Howard, the King’s mistress, even though she was the widow of Henry’s illegitimate son.[2] In December 1546, he was arrested in company with his son Henry and charged with treason. Henry VIII died the day before the execution was due to take place, and Norfolk’s sentence was commuted to imprisonment. The Earl of Surrey was less fortunate and had been executed a few days previously.
Norfolk remained in the Tower throughout the reign of Edward VI of England and his dukedom remained forfeit. He was released by Mary I in 1553, due to the Howards being an important Catholic family, and the dukedom was restored. The Duke showed his gratitude by leading the forces sent to put down the rebellion of Thomas Wyatt, who had protested against the Queen’s forthcoming marriage to Philip II of Spain and had planned to put Anne Boleyn’s daughter, the future Elizabeth I on the throne in Mary’s place. The result of Norfolk’s suppression of the Wyatt Rebellion was Princess Elizabeth’s imprisonment in the Tower (although there was not enough evidence to convict her on treason, since she clearly had not been party to the rebels’ precise intentions) and the execution of the Queen’s cousin Lady Jane Grey. Norfolk died not long after the Wyatt Rebellion and was succeeded by his grandson Thomas. The 4th Duke, also a Catholic, was executed on Elizabeth’s orders for illegally plotting to marry Mary Queen of Scots.

Thomas Howard’s tomb is situated in Framlingham Church, Suffolk. It is among the best preserved example of ornate stonework in Europe

Lord Thomas Howard (1473 – 1554)
15th great-grandfather
Lady Katherine Howard Duchess Bridgewater (1495 – 1554)
daughter of Lord Thomas Howard
William ApRhys (1522 – 1588)
son of Lady Katherine Howard Duchess Bridgewater
Henry Rice (1555 – 1621)
son of William ApRhys
Edmund Rice (1594 – 1663)
son of Henry Rice
Edward Rice (1622 – 1712)
son of Edmund Rice
Lydia Rice (1649 – 1723)
daughter of Edward Rice
Lydia Woods (1672 – 1738)
daughter of Lydia Rice
Lydia Eager (1696 – 1735)
daughter of Lydia Woods
Mary Thomas (1729 – 1801)
daughter of Lydia Eager
Joseph Morse III (1756 – 1835)
son of Mary Thomas
John Henry Morse (1775 – 1864)
son of Joseph Morse III
Abner Morse (1808 – 1838)
son of John Henry Morse
Daniel Rowland Morse (1838 – 1910)
son of Abner Morse
Jason A Morse (1862 – 1932)
son of Daniel Rowland Morse
Ernest Abner Morse (1890 – 1965)
son of Jason A Morse
Richard Arden Morse (1920 – 2004)
son of Ernest Abner Morse
Pamela Morse
I am the daughter of Richard Arden Morse

My 15th great-grandfather, Thomas Howard, 3rd Duke of Norfolk, KG (1473 – 25 August 1554)  aided Mary in securing her throne, which ended him and his family  in a world of trouble. He was fully immersed in the politics of Henry VIII, and paid the price for it.  Those were treacherous times to be close to the king.

Thomas Howard

Thomas Howard

 

 

Baroness Elizabeth de Badlesmere de Mortimer de Bohun

June 4, 2016 1 Comment

Badlesmere Castle

Badlesmere Castle

My 19th great-grandmother was born in the castle above, located in Kent, England, in 1313.  She died in London in 1356 and is buried in the Black Friars Churchyard.

Baroness Elizabeth de Badlesmere de Mortimer de Bohun

Wife and widow of Sir Edmund de Mortimer, son of Sir Roger de Mortimer and Joan de Geneville. They were married 27 June 1316 in the chapel at the manor of Ernwood in Kinlet, Shropshire and had two sons; Sir Roger and John. Sir Edmund would die at Stanton Lacy in early 1332.

Secondly, wife of Sir William de Bohun, son of Sir Humphrey de Bohun and Elizabeth of England, the daughter of King Edward I. They were married by papal dispensation dated 13 Nov 1335, being related in the 4th degree, and had one son, Sir Humphrey, Earl of Hereford and Essex, and one daughter, Elizabeth, who married Sir Richard de Arundel.

Elizabeth died testate 08 June 1355, buried at Black Friars, London.
Inscription:
Church destroyed in the Great Fire of London. Graves predating 1660 did not survive. AKA St. Ann’s Black Friars.

Elizabeth Countess of Northampton 3rd Baroness of Badlesmere De Badlesmere (1313 – 1356)
19th great-grandmother
Lady Elizabeth Countess Arundel Countess DeBohun (1350 – 1385)
daughter of Elizabeth Countess of Northampton 3rd Baroness of Badlesmere De Badlesmere
Elizabeth Duchess Norfolk Fitzalan (1366 – 1425)
daughter of Lady Elizabeth Countess Arundel Countess DeBohun
Lady Joan De Goushill Baroness Stanley (1402 – 1459)
daughter of Elizabeth Duchess Norfolk Fitzalan
Countess Elizabeth Sefton Stanley (1429 – 1459)
daughter of Lady Joan De Goushill Baroness Stanley
Thomas Sir 8th Earl of Sefton Molyneux (1445 – 1483)
son of Countess Elizabeth Sefton Stanley
Lawrence Castellan of Liverpool Mollenaux (1490 – 1550)
son of Thomas Sir 8th Earl of Sefton Molyneux
John Mollenax (1542 – 1583)
son of Lawrence Castellan of Liverpool Mollenaux
Mary Mollenax (1559 – 1598)
daughter of John Mollenax
Gabriell Francis Holland (1596 – 1660)
son of Mary Mollenax
John Holland (1628 – 1710)
son of Gabriell Francis Holland
Mary Elizabeth Holland (1620 – 1681)
daughter of John Holland
Richard Dearden (1645 – 1747)
son of Mary Elizabeth Holland
George Dearden (1705 – 1749)
son of Richard Dearden
George Darden (1734 – 1807)
son of George Dearden
David Darden (1770 – 1820)
son of George Darden
Minerva Truly Darden (1806 – 1837)
daughter of David Darden
Sarah E Hughes (1829 – 1911)
daughter of Minerva Truly Darden
Lucinda Jane Armer (1847 – 1939)
daughter of Sarah E Hughes
George Harvey Taylor (1884 – 1941)
son of Lucinda Jane Armer
Ruby Lee Taylor (1922 – 2008)
daughter of George Harvey Taylor
Pamela Morse
I am the daughter of Ruby Lee Taylor

William Longsword (Plantagenet) (Earl of Salisbury) Longespee, Royal Bastard

June 1, 2014 6 Comments

William Longsword (Plantagenet) (Earl of Salisbury) Longespee

William Longsword (Plantagenet) (Earl of Salisbury) Longespee

My 25th great-grandfather is buried at Salisbury Cathedral in England.  He was allegedly poisoned.  His body was exhumed 431 years after his death.  The corpse of a rat was found within his skull, which can be seen at a museum in Salisbury.  I think I am good just with the grave, no need to see the rat with traces of arsenic.

William Longsword (Plantagenet) (Earl of Salisbury) Longespee (1173 – 1226)
is my 25th great grandfather
Stephen Longespee (1216 – 1260)
son of William Longsword (Plantagenet) (Earl of Salisbury) Longespee
Ela Longespee (1246 – 1276)
daughter of Stephen Longespee
Alan laZOUCHE (1267 – 1314)
son of Ela Longespee
Maude LaZouche (1290 – 1349)
daughter of Alan laZOUCHE
Sir Thomas de Holand Wake Kent (1314 – 1360)
son of Maude LaZouche
Sir Thomas Holand Knight deHolland (1350 – 1397)
son of Sir Thomas de Holand Wake Kent
Margaret DeHoland (1385 – 1439)
daughter of Sir Thomas Holand Knight deHolland
Joan Beaufort (1407 – 1445)
daughter of Margaret DeHoland
Joan Stewart (1428 – 1486)
daughter of Joan Beaufort
John Gordon (1450 – 1517)
son of Joan Stewart
Robert Lord Gordon (1475 – 1525)
son of John Gordon
Catherine Gordon (1497 – 1537)
daughter of Robert Lord Gordon
Lady Elizabeth Ashton (1524 – 1588)
daughter of Catherine Gordon
Capt Roger Dudley (1535 – 1585)
son of Lady Elizabeth Ashton
Gov Thomas Dudley (1576 – 1653)
son of Capt Roger Dudley
Anne Dudley (1612 – 1672)
daughter of Gov Thomas Dudley
John Bradstreet (1652 – 1718)
son of Anne Dudley
Mercy Bradstreet (1689 – 1725)
daughter of John Bradstreet
Caleb Hazen (1720 – 1777)
son of Mercy Bradstreet
Mercy Hazen (1747 – 1819)
daughter of Caleb Hazen
Martha Mead (1784 – 1860)
daughter of Mercy Hazen
Abner Morse (1808 – 1838)
son of Martha Mead
Daniel Rowland Morse (1838 – 1910)
son of Abner Morse
Jason A Morse (1862 – 1932)
son of Daniel Rowland Morse
Ernest Abner Morse (1890 – 1965)
son of Jason A Morse
Richard Arden Morse (1920 – 2004)
son of Ernest Abner Morse
Pamela Morse
I am the daughter of Richard Arden Morse

William Longespée, jure uxoris 3rd Earl of Salisbury (c. 1176 – 7 March 1226) was an English noble, primarily remembered for his command of the English forces at the Battle of Damme and for remaining loyal to King John .
Early life
He was an illegitimate son of Henry II of England. His mother was unknown for many years, until the discovery of a charter of William mentioning “Comitissa Ida, mater mea” (engl. “Countess Ida, my mother”).
This Ida de Tosny, a member of the prominent Tosny or Toesny family, later (1181) married Roger Bigod, 2nd Earl of Norfolk.
King Henry acknowledged William as his son and gave him the Honour of Appleby, Lincolnshire in 1188. Eight years later, his half-brother, King Richard I, married him to a great heiress, Ela of Salisbury, 3rd Countess of Salisbury in her own right, and daughter of William of Salisbury, 2nd Earl of Salisbury.
During the reign of King John, Salisbury was at court on several important ceremonial occasions, and held various offices: sheriff of Wiltshire , lieutenant of Gascony , constable of Dover and warden of the Cinque Ports, and later warden of the Welsh Marches. He was then, circa 1213, appointed High Sheriff of Cambridgeshire and Huntingdonshire.
Military career
He was a commander in the king’s Welsh and Irish expeditions of 1210-1212. The king also granted him the honour of Eye .
In 1213, Salisbury led a large fleet to Flanders , where he seized or destroyed a good part of a French invasion fleet anchored at or near Damme . This ended the invasion threat but not the conflicts between England and France . In 1214, Salisbury was sent to help Otto IV of Germany, an English ally, who was invading France. Salisbury commanded the right wing of the army at their disastrous defeat in that year at the Battle of Bouvines, where he was captured.
By the time he returned to England, revolt was brewing amongst the barons. Salisbury was one of the few who remained loyal to John. He was appointed High Sheriff of Devon in 1217 and High Sheriff of Staffordshire and Shropshire in 1224. In the civil war that took place the year after the signing of the Magna Carta, Salisbury was one of the leaders of the king’s army in the south. He was made High Sheriff of Wiltshire again, this time for life. After raising the siege of Lincoln with William Marshall he was also appointed High Sheriff of Lincolnshire (in addition to his current post as High Sheriff of Somerset) and governor of Lincoln castle. However, after the French prince Louis (later Louis VIII) landed as an ally of the rebels, Salisbury went over to his side. Presumably, he thought John’s cause was lost.
After John’s death and the departure of Louis, Salisbury, along with many other barons, joined the cause of John’s young son, now Henry III of England. He held an influential place in the government during the king’s minority and fought in Gascony to help secure the remaining part of the English continental possessions. Salisbury’s ship was nearly lost in a storm while returning to England in 1225, and he spent some months in refuge at a monastery on the French island of Ré.
Death
He died not long after his return to England at Salisbury Castle. Roger of Wendover alleged that he was poisoned by Hubert de Burgh. He was buried at Salisbury Cathedral in Salisbury, Wiltshire, England.
William Longespee’s tomb was opened in 1791. Bizarrely, the well-preserved corpse of a rat which carried traces of arsenic, was found inside his skull. The rat is now on display in a case at the Salisbury and South Wiltshire Museum.
Family
By his wife Ela, Countess of Salisbury, he had four sons and four daughters :
• Willi am II Longespée (1212?-1250), who was sometimes called Earl of Salisbury but never legally bore the title because he died before his mother, Countess Ela, who held the earldom until her death in 1261;
• Richard, a canon of Salisbury ;
• Stephen (d. 1260), who was seneschal of Gascony and married Emeline de Ridelsford. Their two daughters were Eleanor Longspee, who married Sir Roger La Zouche and Emeline Longspee, who married Sir Maurice FitzMaurice, Justicar of Ireland.
• Nicholas (d. 1297), bishop of Salisbury
• Isabella, who married William de Vesey
• Ella, married William d’Odingsels
• Ela Longespée, who first married Thomas de Beaumont, 6th Earl of Warwick, and then married Philip Basset
• Ida, who first married Ralph de Somery, and then William de Beauchamp

Royal Bastard, John Beaufort, 18th Great-Grandfather

May 12, 2014 4 Comments

Order of the Garter

Order of the Garter

tomb

tomb

John Beaufort

John Beaufort

It is a good thing I have picked up a copy of the book Royal Panoply to figure out what those royal Brits were doing because I seem to be descended from John of Gaunt at least 3 different ways.  This makes the tree confusing to trace.  The 1st Earl of Somerset was a Royal Bastard.

John Beaufort , 1st Earl of Somerset (1371 – 1410)
is my 18th great grandfather
Joan Beaufort (1407 – 1445)
daughter of John Beaufort , 1st Earl of Somerset
Joan Stewart (1428 – 1486)
daughter of Joan Beaufort
John Gordon (1450 – 1517)
son of Joan Stewart
Robert Lord Gordon (1475 – 1525)
son of John Gordon
Catherine Gordon (1497 – 1537)
daughter of Robert Lord Gordon
Lady Elizabeth Ashton (1524 – 1588)
daughter of Catherine Gordon
Capt Roger Dudley (1535 – 1585)
son of Lady Elizabeth Ashton
Gov Thomas Dudley (1576 – 1653)
son of Capt Roger Dudley
Anne Dudley (1612 – 1672)
daughter of Gov Thomas Dudley
John Bradstreet (1652 – 1718)
son of Anne Dudley
Mercy Bradstreet (1689 – 1725)
daughter of John Bradstreet
Caleb Hazen (1720 – 1777)
son of Mercy Bradstreet
Mercy Hazen (1747 – 1819)
daughter of Caleb Hazen
Martha Mead (1784 – 1860)
daughter of Mercy Hazen
Abner Morse (1808 – 1838)
son of Martha Mead
Daniel Rowland Morse (1838 – 1910)
son of Abner Morse
Jason A Morse (1862 – 1932)
son of Daniel Rowland Morse
Ernest Abner Morse (1890 – 1965)
son of Jason A Morse
Richard Arden Morse (1920 – 2004)
son of Ernest Abner Morse
Pamela Morse
I am the daughter of Richard Arden Morse

John Beaufort, 1st Earl of Somerset (1373 – 16 March 1410) was the first of the four illegitimate children of John of Gaunt, 1st Duke of Lancaster, and his mistress Katherine Swynford, later his wife. Beaufort was born in about 1371 and his surname probably reflects his father’s lordship of Beaufort in Champagne, France.
The family emblem was the portcullis which is shown on the reverse of a modern British 1p coin. John of Gaunt had his nephew Richard II declare the Beaufort children legitimate in 1390, Gaunt married their mother in January 1396. Despite being the grandchildren of Edward III, and next in the line of succession after the Lancasters, their father’s legitimate children, by agreement they were barred from the succession to the throne.
Early life
In May to September of 1390 Beaufort served in Louis II, Duke of Bourbon’s crusade in North Africa. In 1394 he was in Lithuania serving with the teutonic Knights
In 1396, after his parents’ marriage, John and his siblings were legitimated by a papal bull. Early the next year, their legitimation was recognized by an act of Parliament, and then, a few days later, John was created Earl of Somerset (10 February 1397).[5]
That summer the new Earl was one of the noblemen who helped Richard II free himself from the power of the Lords Appellant. As a reward on 29 September he was created Marquess of Dorset, and sometime later that year he was made a Knight of the Garter and appointed Lieutenant of Ireland. In addition, two days before his elevation as a Marquess he married the King’s niece, Margaret Holland, sister of the 3rd Earl of Kent, another of the counter-appellants.[5]
He remained in the King’s favour even after his half-brother Henry Bolingbroke (later Henry IV) was banished. In February 1397 he was appointed Admiral of the Irish fleet, as well as constable of Dover and Warden of the Cinque Ports. In May his Admiralty was extended to include the northern fleet.
Later career
After Richard II was deposed by Henry Bolingbroke in 1399, the new king rescinded the titles that had been given to the counter-appellants, and thus John Beaufort became merely Earl of Somerset again. Nevertheless, he proved loyal to his half-brother’s reign, serving in various military commands and on some important diplomatic missions. It was he who was given the confiscated estates of the Welsh rebel leader Owain Glyndwr in 1400, although Beaufort could not effectively come into these estates until after 1415. In 1404 he was Constable of England.
Family
John Beaufort and his wife Margaret Holland, the daughter of the Earl of Kent, had six children; his granddaughter Lady Margaret Beaufort married a son, (Edmund Tudor, 1st Earl of Richmond), of dowager queen Catherine of Valois by Owen Tudor — thus creating a powerful branch of the Lancastrian family which enabled the issue of that (Beaufort) marriage, Henry Tudor, ultimately to claim the throne, as Henry VII, in spite of the agreement barring the Beaufort family from the succession.
Somerset died in the Hospital of St Katharine’s by the Tower. He was buried in St Michael’s Chapel in Canterbury Cathedral.
His children included:
Henry Beaufort, 2nd Earl of Somerset (1401 – 25 November 1418)
John Beaufort, 1st Duke of Somerset (baptized 25 March 1404 – 27 May 1444)
Joan Beaufort, Queen of Scotland (1404 – 15 July 1445) married James I, King of Scots.
Thomas Beaufort, Count of Perche (1405 – 3 October 1431)
Edmund Beaufort, 2nd Duke of Somerset (1406 – 22 May 1455)
Margaret Beaufort, Countess of Devon (1409 – 1449) married Thomas de Courtenay, 13th Earl of Devon.

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