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Keeping current in wellness, in and out of the water

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Isabel Inchmartin of Scotland

August 18, 2013 4 Comments

Coat of Arms Inchmartin

Coat of Arms Inchmartin

My 20th great-grandmother, Isabel Inchmartin, was an heiress in Perthshire, Scotland.  She inherited lands that were known to be rich in salmon fishing.  She was born in Perth and died in Fife.  Times were tough in those days, so her survival for 59 years was impressive.  She was able to pass her lands down through her daughters, which is also impressive, considering the times.

Isabel Inchmartin (1340 – 1399)
is my 20th great grandmother
Margaret Erskine (1357 – 1419)
daughter of Isabel Inchmartin
Isabel Glen (1380 – 1421)
daughter of Margaret Erskine
Isabel Ogilvie (1406 – 1484)
daughter of Isabel Glen
Elizabeth Kennedy (1434 – 1475)
daughter of Isabel Ogilvie
Isabella Vaus (1451 – 1510)
daughter of Elizabeth Kennedy
Marion Accarson (1478 – 1538)
daughter of Isabella Vaus
CATHERINE GORDON (1497 – 1537)
daughter of Marion Accarson
Lady Elizabeth Ashton (1524 – 1588)
daughter of CATHERINE GORDON
Capt Roger Dudley (1535 – 1585)
son of Lady Elizabeth Ashton
Gov Thomas Dudley (1576 – 1653)
son of Capt Roger Dudley
Anne Dudley (1612 – 1672)
daughter of Gov Thomas Dudley
John Bradstreet (1652 – 1718)
son of Anne Dudley
Mercy Bradstreet (1689 – 1725)
daughter of John Bradstreet
Caleb Hazen (1720 – 1777)
son of Mercy Bradstreet
Mercy Hazen (1747 – 1819)
daughter of Caleb Hazen
Martha Mead (1784 – 1860)
daughter of Mercy Hazen
Abner Morse (1808 – 1838)
son of Martha Mead
Daniel Rowland Morse (1838 – 1910)
son of Abner Morse
Jason A Morse (1862 – 1932)
son of Daniel Rowland Morse
Ernest Abner Morse (1890 – 1965)
son of Jason A Morse
Richard Arden Morse (1920 – 2004)
son of Ernest Abner Morse
Pamela Morse
I am the daughter of Richard Arden Morse

Archibald Campbell, 14th Great-Grandfather

June 25, 2013

Archibald Campbell

Archibald Campbell

Archibald Campbell tomb

Archibald Campbell tomb

My 14th great-gandfather was a powerful Marquess in Scotland who was beheaded by Charles I of England:

Archibald Campbell (1606 – 1661)
is my 14th great grandfather
Lord Neil Campbell (1610 – 1692)
son of Archibald Campbell
John Campbell (1633 – 1689)
son of Lord Neil Campbell
John Campbell (1662 – 1731)
son of John Campbell
Dugal Campbell (1699 – 1734)
son of John Campbell
Neil Campbell (1734 – 1777)
son of Dugal Campbell
Henry Campbell (1769 – 1863)
son of Neil Campbell
Elizabeth Campbell (1784 – 1861)
daughter of Henry Campbell
Mary McGill (1804 – 1898)
daughter of Elizabeth Campbell
John Wright (1800 – 1870)
son of Mary McGill
Mary Wright (1814 – 1873)
daughter of John Wright
Emiline P Nicholls (1837 – )
daughter of Mary Wright
Harriet Peterson (1856 – 1933)
daughter of Emiline P Nicholls
Sarah Helena Byrne (1878 – 1962)
daughter of Harriet Peterson
Olga Fern Scott (1897 – 1968)
daughter of Sarah Helena Byrne
Richard Arden Morse (1920 – 2004)
son of Olga Fern Scott
Pamela Morse
I am the daughter of Richard Arden Morse

Archibald Campbell, 1st Marquess of Argyll, 8th Earl of Argyll, chief of Clan Campbell, (1607 – 27 May 1661) was the de facto head of government in Scotland during most of the conflict known as the Wars of the Three Kingdoms. He was the most influential figure in the Covenanter movement that fought for the Presbyterian religion and what they saw as Scottish interests during the English Civil War of the 1640s and 1650s.

Family and early lifeHe was eldest son of Archibald Campbell, 7th Earl of Argyll, by his first wife Agnes Douglas daughter of William Douglas, 6th Earl of Morton, and was educated at St Andrews University, where he matriculated on 15 January 1622. He had early in life, as Lord Lorne, been entrusted with the possession of the Argyll estates when his father renounced Protestantism and took arms for Philip III of Spain; and he exercised over his clan an authority almost absolute, disposing of a force of 20,000 retainers, being, according to Baillie, by far the most powerful subject in the kingdom.

In the Covenanter movementOn the outbreak of the religious dispute between the king and Scotland in 1637, his support was eagerly sought by Charles I. He was made a privy councillor in 1628. In 1638, the king summoned him, together with Traquair and Roxburgh, to London, but he refused to be won over, warned Charles against his despotic ecclesiastical policy, and showed great hostility towards William Laud. In consequence, a secret commission was given to the Earl of Antrim to invade Argyll and stir up the MacDonalds against him. Argyll, who inherited the title at the death of his father in 1638, originally had no preference for Presbyterianism, but now definitely took the side of the Covenanters in defence of national religion and liberties. He continued to attend the meetings of the General Assembly of the Church of Scotland after its dissolution by the Marquess of Hamilton, when Episcopacy was abolished. In 1639, he sent a statement to Laud, and subsequently to the king, defending the General Assembly’s action. He raised a body of troops and seized Hamilton’s castle of Brodick in Arran. After the pacification of Berwick-upon-Tweed, he carried a motion, in opposition to James Graham, 1st Marquess of Montrose, by which the estates secured to themselves the election of the lords of the articles, who had formerly been nominated by the king. This was a fundamental change to the Scottish constitution, whereby the management of public affairs was entrusted to a representative body and withdrawn from the control of the crown. An attempt by the king to deprive him of his office as justiciary of Argyll failed, and on the prorogation of the parliament by Charles, in May 1640, Argyll moved that it should continue its sittings and that the government and safety of the kingdom should be secured by a committee of the estates, of which he was the guiding spirit. In June, he was trusted with a Commission of fire and sword against the royalists in Atholl and Angus, which, after succeeding in entrapping the Earl of Atholl, he carried out with completeness and cruelty.

It was on this occasion that the Bonnie Hoose o’ Airlie was burned. By this time, the personal dislike and difference in opinion between Montrose and Argyll led to an open breach. The former arranged that on the occasion of Charles’s approaching visit to Scotland, Argyll would be accused of high treason in the parliament. The plot, however, was disclosed, and Montrose, among others, was imprisoned. Accordingly, when the king arrived, he found himself deprived of every remnant of influence and authority. It only remained for Charles to make a series of concessions. He transferred control over judicial and political appointments to the parliament, created Argyll a marquess in 1641, and returned home, having, in Clarendon’s words, made a perfect deed of gift of that kingdom. Meanwhile, there was an unsuccessful attempt to kidnap Argyll, Hamilton, and Lanark, known as The Incident. Argyll was mainly instrumental in this crisis in keeping the national party faithful to what was to him evidently the common cause, and in accomplishing the alliance with the Long Parliament in 1643.

[edit] English and Scottish Civil WarIn January 1644, he accompanied the Scottish army into England as a member of the committee of both kingdoms and in command of a troop of horse, but was soon compelled, in March, to return to suppress royalists in the Scottish Civil War and to defend his own territories. He forced Huntly to retreat in April. In July, he advanced to abet the Irish troops now landed in Argyll, which were fighting in conjunction with Montrose, who had put himself at the head of the royalist forces in Scotland. Neither general succeeded in obtaining an advantage over the other, or even in engaging in battle. Argyll then returned to Edinburgh, threw up his commission, and retired to Inveraray Castle. Montrose unexpectedly followed him in December, compelling him to flee to Roseneath, and devastating his territories. On 2 February 1645, while following Montrose northwards, Argyll was surprised by him at Inverlochy. He witnessed, from his barge on the lake to which he had retired after falling from his horse, a fearful slaughter of his troops, which included 1500 of the Campbells.[1] He arrived at Edinburgh on 12 February and was again present at Montrose’s further great victory on 15 August at Kilsyth, whence he escaped to Newcastle. Argyll was at last delivered from his formidable antagonist by Montrose’s final defeat at Philiphaugh on 12 September. In 1646, he was sent to negotiate with the king at Newcastle after his surrender to the Scottish army, when he endeavoured to moderate the demands of the parliament and at the same time to persuade the king to accept them. On 7 July 1646, he was appointed a member of the Assembly of Divines.

Up to this point, Argyll’s statesmanship had been highly successful. The national liberties and religion of Scotland had been defended and guaranteed, and the power of the king in Scotland reduced to a mere shadow. In addition, these privileges had been still further secured by the alliance with the English opposition, and by the subsequent triumph of the parliament and Presbyterianism in the neighboring kingdom. The king himself was a prisoner in their midst. But Argyll’s influence could not survive the rupture of the alliance between the two nations on which his whole policy was founded. He opposed in vain the secret treaty concluded between the king and the Scots against the parliament. Hamilton marched into England and was defeated by Cromwell at Preston. Argyll, after a narrow escape from a surprise attack at the Battle of Stirling (1648), joined the Whiggamores, a body of Covenanters at Edinburgh; and, supported by John Campbell, 1st Earl of Loudoun and Alexander Leslie, 1st Earl of Leven, he established a new government, which welcomed Oliver Cromwell on his arrival there on 4 October.

War with the English Parliament and personal ruinThis alliance, however, was at once destroyed by the execution of Charles I on 30 January 1649, which excited universal horror in Scotland. In the series of tangled incidents which followed, Argyll lost control of the national policy. He describes himself at this period as “a distracted man…in a distracted time” whose ” remedies…had the quite contrary operation.”

He supported the invitation from the Covenanters to Charles II to land in Scotland, and gazed upon the captured Montrose, bound on a cart to execution at Edinburgh. When Charles II came to Scotland, having signed the Covenant and repudiated Montrose, Argyll remained at the head of the administration. After the defeat of Dunbar, Charles retained his support by the promise of a dukedom and the Garter, and an attempt was made by Argyll to marry the king to his daughter. On 1 January 1651, he placed the crown on Charles’s head at Scone. But his power had now passed to the Hamiltonian party.

He strongly opposed, but was unable to prevent, the expedition into England. In the subsequent reduction of Scotland, after holding out in Inveraray Castle for nearly a year, he was at last surprised in August 1652 and submitted to the Commonwealth. His ruin was then complete. His policy had failed, his power had vanished. He was hopelessly in debt, and on terms of such violent hostility with his eldest son as to be obliged to demand a garrison in his house for his protection.

Later life and writings

Archibald Campbell During his visit to Monck at Dalkeith in 1654 to complain of this, he was subjected to much personal insult from his creditors, and on visiting London in September 1655 to obtain money due to him from the Scottish parliament, he was arrested for debt, though soon liberated. In Richard Cromwell’s parliament of 1659 Argyll sat as member for Aberdeenshire.

At the Restoration, he presented himself at Whitehall, but was at once arrested by order of Charles and placed in the Tower (1660), being sent to Edinburgh to stand trial for high treason. He was acquitted of complicity in the death of Charles I, and his escape from the whole charge seemed imminent, but the arrival of a packet of letters written by Argyll to Monck showed conclusively his collaboration with Cromwell’s government, particularly in the suppression of Glencairn’s royalist rising in 1652. He was immediately sentenced to death, his execution by beheading taking place on 27 May 1661, before the death warrant had even been signed by the king. His head was placed on the same spike upon the west end of the Tolbooth as that of Montrose had previously been exposed, and his body was buried at the Holy Loch, where the head was also deposited in 1664. A monument was erected to his memory in St Giles’s church in Edinburgh in 1895.

While imprisoned in the Tower he wrote Instructions to a Son (1661). Some of his speeches, including the one delivered on the scaffold, were published and are printed in the Harleian Miscellany.

He married Lady Margaret Douglas, daughter of William Douglas, 7th Earl of Morton, and had two sons and four daughters

Robert Boyd, 16th Great Grandfather

May 17, 2013 2 Comments

Alnwick Castle

Alnwick Castle

My 16th great grandfather was born into a fancy Scottish family.  Politics, diplomacy and treason were part of life in Scotland under King James III:

Robert Boyd (d.c.1470) Lord Boyd, was a Scottish Statesman.

A son of Sir Thomas Boyd (d. 1439), Robert Boyd belonged to an old distinguished family, of which one earlier Sir Robert Boyd, had fought with Sir William Wallace and Robert the Bruce.

Created Lord Boyd in 1454, he was one of the Regents during the minority of King James III, in 1460. He conspired with his brother, Sir Alexander Boyd, and obtained possession of the King’s person in 1466 and was made by Act of Parliament sole Governor of the Realm.

He negotiated the marraige between James and Margaret of Norway in 1469 and secured with it the cession of the Orkney Islands by Norway. He was appointed Great Chamberlain for life, and Lord Justice General in 1467.

Conflict broke out between the King and Boyd family. Robert, and his son Thomas Boyd, 1st Earl of Arran (who was married to Princess Mary), were out of the country involved in diplomatic activities when their regime was overthrown. Robert, 1st Lord Boyd was pronounced guilty of treason and fled firstly to Alnwick, Northumberland. His brother and assistant, Sir Alexander Boyd, was captured and beheaded on November 22, 1469.

Robert 1st Lord Boyd fought in the English service in the French wars, and died in exile.

He married Mariotta, daughter of Sir John Maxwell of Calderwood, and had numerous issue. One of his daughters, Elizabeth, married Archibald Douglas, 5th Earl of Angus.

Robert Boyd (1425 – 1470)

is my 16th great grandfather
Annabella Boyd (1449 – 1476)
daughter of Robert Boyd
Robert Lord Gordon (1475 – 1525)
son of Annabella Boyd
Catherine Gordon (1497 – 1537)
daughter of Robert Lord Gordon
Lady Elizabeth Ashton (1524 – 1588)
daughter of Catherine Gordon
Capt Roger Dudley (1535 – 1585)
son of Lady Elizabeth Ashton
Gov Thomas Dudley (1576 – 1653)
son of Capt Roger Dudley
Anne Dudley (1612 – 1672)
daughter of Gov Thomas Dudley
John Bradstreet (1652 – 1718)
son of Anne Dudley
Mercy Bradstreet (1689 – 1725)
daughter of John Bradstreet
Caleb Hazen (1720 – 1777)
son of Mercy Bradstreet
Mercy Hazen (1747 – 1819)
daughter of Caleb Hazen
Martha Mead (1784 – 1860)
daughter of Mercy Hazen
Abner Morse (1808 – 1838)
son of Martha Mead
Daniel Rowland Morse (1838 – 1910)
son of Abner Morse
Jason A Morse (1862 – 1932)
son of Daniel Rowland Morse
Ernest Abner Morse (1890 – 1965)
son of Jason A Morse
Richard Arden Morse (1920 – 2004)
son of Ernest Abner Morse
Pamela Morse
I am the daughter of Richard Arden Morse

Lord Boyd conspired with his brother, Sir Alexander Boyd, and obtained possession of the young King’s person in 1466 and was made by Act of Parliament sole Governor of the Realm; and Great Chamberlain for life, and Lord Justice General in 1467.[4] Early in that year he procured the marriage of his eldest son, Thomas, (created Earl of Arran for that occasion) with Mary, elder sister of James III, which aroused the jealousy of the other nobles[1] and made his eventual downfall inevitable since the King regarded the marriage as an unforgivable insult.

Lord Boyd obtained the cession of the Orkney Islands to Scotland, 8 September 1468, from Christian I, King of Norway, for whose daughter Margaret, he negotiated a marriage with James III. While absent for that purpose he and his son Thomas (the Earl of Arran) and his brother (and coadjutor) Sir Alexander Boyd, were attainted for high treason, whereby his peerage became forfeited. He was living Easter 1480/1, and died before October 1482, it is said, at Alnwick in Northumberland where he had fled in 1469.[1]

James III’s biographer sums Boyd up as an unscrupulous political gambler and an inveterate optimist. To forcibly assume guardianship of an underage King was, indeed, a familiar path to power in mediaeval Scotland, but it was also a dangerous path. Boyd underestimated the dangers, overestimated his support, and made the fatal mistake of marrying his son to the King’s sister, an insult the King would not forgive.[5]

FamilyRobert Boyd belonged to an old and distinguished family, of which one earlier Sir Robert Boyd, had fought with Sir William Wallace and Robert The Bruce.[4] He was the son and heir of Sir Thomas Boyd of Kilmarnock (died 9 July 1439).[1] Robert married Mariot (or Janet), daughter of Sir Robert Maxwell of Calderwood. She died after 25 June 1472, apparently early in 1473.[1] They had three sons:[6]

  • Thomas, Earl of Arran, was in Denmark when his father was overthrown. However, he fulfilled his mission, that of bringing the king’s bride, Margaret, to Scotland, and then, warned by his wife, escaped to the continent of Europe. He is mentioned very eulogistically in one of the Paston Letters, but practically nothing is known of his subsequent history.[4]
  • Alexander, who became head of the family after the death of James, the son of his elder brother Thomas.
  • Archibald of Nariston, and afterwards in Bonshaw. Archibald is recorded as being of Nariston in 1472, but it appears that there was a question over his right to the property and he had lost possession by 1500. In 1502 Archibald and his wife Christian Mure had a lease of Bonschaw and Dririg. He was dead before 4 May 1507, when Christian Mure, his widow, and her sons, paid a year’s rent on taking over the lease. She was living 28 January 1523. They appear to have had two sons and’ three daughters.[6]

[ edit] References

  1. a b c d e Cokayne 1912, p. 260.
  2. ^ Paul, James Balfour, ed., “The Register of the Great Seal of Scotland A.D. 1424-1513, Edinburgh (1882), p. 126
  3. ^ Shaw, M.S., W.S., Ed., “Some Family Papers of the Hunters of Hunterston”, Edinburgh (1925), pp. 3-4
  4. a b c Hugh 1911, p. 353.
  5. ^ MacDougall, Norman James III Revised edition John Donald Edinburgh 2009
  6. a b Balfour 1904, pp. 145,146.

Attribution

  •   This article incorporates text from a publication now in the public domain: Chisholm, Hugh, ed. (1911). “Boyd, Robert Boyd”. Encyclopædia Britannica4 (11th ed.). Cambridge University Press. pp. 353,354. http://www.archive.org/stream/encyclopaediabri04chisrich#page/353/mode/1up.
  •  This article incorporates text from a publication now in the public domain: Cokayne, George Edward, ed. (1912). Complete peerage of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain and the United Kingdom, extant, extinct or dormant (Bass to Canning)2. London: The St. Catherine Press, ltd.. pp. 260,261. http://www.archive.org/details/completepeerageo02coka.
  •  This article incorporates text from a publication now in the public domain: Balfour, Paul, James (1904). The Scots peerage; founded on Wood’s edition of Sir Robert Douglas’s peerage of Scotland; containing an historical and genealogical account of the nobility of that kingdom5. Edinburgh: D. Douglas. pp. 145,146.

Peerage of ScotlandPre ceded byNew Creation Lord Boyd1454–1482Succeeded byJames Boyd

William Carr, 11th Great-Grandfather

April 30, 2013 4 Comments

castle

Ferniehirst castle

I will go grave hunting today on Jamestown Island, RI.  Caleb Carr is buried there, and maybe it is possible to visit the ancestral home!!! He has a fancy Scottish background. His grandfather, William, was baron of a castle in Scotland:

About Ferniehirst Castle

Ferniehirst Castle consists of an extended and altered towerhouse, which incorporates the cellars from the 16th century castle, with larger wings and extentions. A large conical-roofed stairturret is corbelled out above the first floor level, and bartizans, with shot-holes crowning the top of the tower.The original entrance leads to a stair known as the ‘Left-Handed Staircase’, the story being that when Sir Andrew Kerr, who was himself left-handed, returned from Flodden in 1513 he had his followers trained to use their weapons with their left hands. This is said to be the origin of ‘Corrie-fisted’ or ‘Kerr handed’. The basement is vaulted, and the hall has a 16th-century fireplace.Ferniehirst was a property of the Kerrs and first built by Sir Thomas Kerr in 1476 on the remains of an earlier foundation, but was sacked by the English in 1523. It was recaptured with French help in 1549, and the leader of the English garrison was beheaded. Sir Thomas Kerr, protector of Mary, Queen of Scots invaded England in 1570, hoping to have her released, but all that resulted was an raid on Scotland, during which Ferniehirst was damaged. James VI destroyed the castle in 1593 because of help given by the family to the Earl of Bothwell. The castle was rebuilt about 1598. As late as 1767 the house was occupied and used by the Lord Lothian of that day but even then it was showing signs of delapidation. Between 1934 and 1984 it was leased by the Scottish Youth Hostel Association, except for during World War II when it served as a army billet.Purchased recently by Lord Lothian, Ferniehirst Castle has been restored. A bothy wing has been added and built on original foundation stones to serve as the private apartment of Lord Lothian and his Lady. When he is present his personal flag is flown from the flagpole atop the castle. His flag is blue with the resplendant sun in gold in the center.A ‘Green Lady’ is said to haunt the castle in some tales, and unusual occurrences were reported during its time as a youth hostel, although the story is refuted.

William Carr (1542 – 1655)

is my 11th great grandfather

Benjamin Carr (1592 – 1635)

son of William Carr

Caleb Carr (1623 – 1695)

son of Benjamin Carr

Sarah Carr (1682 – 1765)

daughter of Caleb Carr

John Hammett (1705 – 1752)

son of Sarah Carr

MARGARET HAMMETT (1721 – 1753)

daughter of John Hammett

Benjamin Sweet (1722 – 1789)

son of MARGARET HAMMETT

Paul Sweet (1762 – 1836)

son of Benjamin Sweet

Valentine Sweet (1791 – 1858)

son of Paul Sweet

Sarah LaVina Sweet (1840 – 1923)

daughter of Valentine Sweet

Jason A Morse (1862 – 1932)

son of Sarah LaVina Sweet

Ernest Abner Morse (1890 – 1965)

son of Jason A Morse

Richard Arden Morse (1920 – 2004)

son of Ernest Abner Morse

Pamela Morse

I am the daughter of Richard Arden Morse

Name: William CARRGiven Name: WilliamSurname: CarrNSFX: 10th Baron FennehurstTitle: 10th Baron FennehurstSex: MBirth: 16 MAY 1542 in Fernichrist,ScotlandDeath: in London,EnglandNote: 10th Baron of Fennefurst.Father: Thomas CARR b: ABT 1525 in Ferniehrist Castle,ScotlandMother: Janet KIRKCALDY b: in Grange,ScotlandMarriage 1 Mary Ann CLIFFORD b: ABT 1570 in EnglandMarried: ABT 1591 in London,EnglandChildrenBenjamin CARR b: 18 AUG 1592 in London,EnglandWilliam CARR b: 17 JUN 1597 in London,EnglandGeorge CARR b: 15 AUG 1599 in London,Middlesex,EnglandJames CARR b: 4 OCT 1602 in London,EnglandRichard CARR b: 1606 in London,EnglandOther children may have been born to this couple, but the given names are not known. William Carr became the 10th Baron of Fennehurst, but he lived in London,England. William took his mother’s maiden name to continue the Kirkcaldyline, but his children reverted to Carr when their father failed toinherit the Grange property. (David Carr notes)According to Billy Neil Carr, his uncle Charlie wrote a book on Amasa Carr (1830), showing his descendants and mentioning what he knew of Amasa’s ancestors. Quoting Charlie’s book, the first three generations were based on “the framed ‘Pedigree of Governor Caleb Carr’ that hangs on the wall of the living room in the old Carr Homestead in Jamestown, RI.”Sir William Carr was born in Scotland on 16 May 1542. He married Mary Ann Clifford Carr, sister of Lord Somerset. Sir William changed the name Kerr, first to Kelso then to Carr.Sir William’s father Thomas was the son of Sir John Kerr and Katherine, daughter of Sir Andrew Kerr of Cesford. Sir John reportedly rescued Mary Queen of Scots in the incursion against Scotland. Sir John was born 17 June 1500 and died 1562.Sir John was the son of Lord Andrew Kerr, born in Scotland in 1450. He married Janet, daughter of Lord Patrick Hume.10th Baron of Fennefurst.———According to notes by David Carr, William became the 10th Baron of Ferniehurst, Scotland. However, he lived in London, England, and took his mother’s maiden name to continue the Kirkcaldy line (Why? Possibly because she had no brothers, and with a view to receiving the family inheritance.) However, when William failed to inherit family property in Grange, Scotland, his children reverted to the Carr or Kerr surname.This information, as well as data on the preceding generations, is presented without verification. It may well be fact, but proving it may be difficult since England and Scotland are far away; furthermore, locating old records is often difficult. However, there is a lot of historical information on the internet about this family. [http://www.electricscotland.com/]William’s parents are given as Thomas Kerr (Carr), 9th Baron of Ferniehurst, and Janet Kirkaldy (b. ca.1530 in Grange, Scotland).Summary of online info:Thomas became the 9th Baron of Ferniehurst Castle. He was also noted for his patriotic involvement with Mary Stuart, Queen of Scots (see notes from David Carr). The name of Carr, Kerr, or Karre is as old as the Norman Conquest at the Battle of Hastings in 1066. One of the followers of William the Conqueror, of Normandy, is recorded in the Roll of the Gattle Abbey as having the name Karre. The early descendants of this Norman soldier and succeeding generations spread on both sides of the border between England and Scotland. Direct lines can be traced through various peerage books of England and Scotland (titles and whereabouts? see web site) to Andrew Kerr I, the 6th Baron of Ferniehurst, Scotland. He was born in 1450, created Baron in 1480, and knighted in 1483. He and his son Andrew II, 7th Baron of F., were remarkable men for talent and undaunted courage, conspicuous in the reigns of James IV and James V. Andrew Kerr II died in 1543. His son, Sir John Kerr, 8th Baron of F., did great service for Scotland by rescuing Mary, Queen of Scots from English raiders. Sir Thomas, 9th Baron and son of Sir John, was also a loyal and devoted subject of the Queen.See Watson’s “The House of Carr,” 1926. William’s youngest brother (or half-brother) was Robert “Robin” Carr, b. 1580 in Ferniehurst, Scotland. He is said to have been a favorite of King James VI of Scotland, who became King James I of England after the death of Elizabeth I. It was this king who authorized the King James translation of the Bible in 1611. Robin was: Groom of the Bed Chamber, 1607; Viscount Rochester, 1611; Knight of the Garter, 1613; Earl of Somerset; and Lord High Treasurer of Scotland, 1614. In 1609 he was granted the forfeited estate of Sir Walter Raleigh. As an influential member of the court, he was both feared and respected.

Sir Walter Ogilvy, 19th Great-Grandfather

April 15, 2013 1 Comment

Clan Ogilvy tartan

Clan Ogilvy tartan

Sir Walter was a sheriff who died in a battle. This was more or less natural life in Scotland in the middle ages.  They had a very bellicose existence.

SIR WALTER OGILVY OF AUCHTERHOUSE, Knight, Sheriff of Angus. He is designed ‘Walter of Ogylwy miles’ in a charter by Thomas Sybald of Moneythin to Andrew Petcary of the lands of Monethin about 1368. On 24 October 1385 he had a grant from KingRobert II. of an annualrent out of the lands of Kyngaltny.
He was Sheriff of Angus before 1380. Douglas and Crawford state that he obtained the office by his marriage with Isabel Ramsay, daughter and heiress of Sir Malcolm Ramsay, Lord of Auchterhouse, but give no authority for their statement, and some doubt is cast upon it by a confirmation by King James III., 18 February 1482-3, of a charter by the late Alexander of Ogilvy, Sheriff of Forfar, of the lands of Balkery to his sister Matilda of Ramsay, relict of William of Fenton: the date of the original charter is therein stated to be at Auchterhouse, 21 August 1488, which is impossible, and is most probably a mistranscription of 1388, one of the witnesses being Sir David Lindesay of Glenesk, who was created Earl of Crawford in 1398.
Sir Walter Ogilvy’s mother’s name is unknown. Sir Walter of Lichtoun, who was killed along with him, is called his uterine brother. He was killed at the battle of Glenbrierachan or Glasklune in 1392 repelling an inroad of Highlandmen, and is celebrated by the chronicler Wyntoun as ‘stout and manfull, bauld and wycht,’ and as ‘Godlike, wis, and wertuous.

Sir Walter of Auchterhouse Ogilvy (1347 – 1391)

is my 19th great grandfather
son of Sir Walter of Auchterhouse Ogilvy
daughter of Walter Ogilvy
daughter of Isabel Ogilvie
daughter of Elizabeth Kennedy
daughter of Isabella Vaus
daughter of Marion Accarson
daughter of Catherine Gordon
son of Lady Elizabeth Ashton
son of Capt Roger Dudley
daughter of Gov Thomas Dudley
son of Anne Dudley
daughter of John Bradstreet
son of Mercy Bradstreet
daughter of Caleb Hazen
daughter of Mercy Hazen
son of Martha Mead
son of Abner Morse
son of Daniel Rowland Morse
son of Jason A Morse
son of Ernest Abner Morse
I am the daughter of Richard Arden Morse

Robert Glen, 20th Great-Grandfather

April 14, 2013 2 Comments

Glen Coat of Arms

Glen Coat of Arms

My 20th great grandfather married the illegitimate daughter of Robert the Bruce, Margaret. His legitimate daughter Marjorie is also my ancestor.  This is the kind of thing that gets the branches of your tree tangled. I wonder if he really accompanied the heart of Robert the Bruce to the holy land.  What a totally bizarre mission.  There is some confusion, but we know a lot, considering that he was born in 1303.

Robert, son of John de le Glen, married Margaret, illegitimate daughter of Robert Bruce Robert de Glen and ” Margaret Bruce the King’s sister,” his spouse, had a grant from David II., undated, of Nether Pitedye, Kinghorn, Fife (adjoining Balmuto) Robertson notes three other charters from David to this Robert de Glen, of the lands of Glasgow Forest, thanedom of Kintore, Aberdeen.  Wood  gives Margaret as legitimate, and says that she married, secondly, William, Earl of Sutherland.  The latter did marry as his second wife, Margaret Bruce; but it is impossible that she was the widow of Glen, and an authority points out that the arms quartered by Glen, and attributed to the co-heiress of Abernethy, were not the Abernethy arms, but those of Scotland with the Scottish mark of illegitimacy, which agrees with a tradition preserved in several branches of the family, and is conclusive. Another tradition, traceable for four centuries, insists that Robert de Glen was  one of those who accompanied the heart of Bruce to the Holy Land, and the Linlithgow  line used two crests, one a martlet; the other an arm, the hand grasping a heart, in commemoration of that event. Moreover, the Glens of Bar possessed the sword of Bruce, which a descendant carried to Ireland, in 1606, where it was seen a few years since, the inscription on the blade leaving no doubt as to its original ownership.

Robert Glen (1303 – 1345)
is my 20th great grandfather
John Glen (1349 – 1419)
son of Robert Glen
Isabel Glen (1380 – 1421)
daughter of John Glen
Isabel Ogilvie (1406 – 1484)
daughter of Isabel Glen
Elizabeth Kennedy (1434 – 1475)
daughter of Isabel Ogilvie
Isabella Vaus (1451 – 1510)
daughter of Elizabeth Kennedy
Marion Accarson (1478 – 1538)
daughter of Isabella Vaus
Catherine Gordon (1497 – 1537)
daughter of Marion Accarson
Lady Elizabeth Ashton (1524 – 1588)
daughter of CATHERINE GORDON
Capt Roger Dudley (1535 – 1585)
son of Lady Elizabeth Ashton
Gov Thomas Dudley (1576 – 1653)
son of Capt Roger Dudley
Anne Dudley (1612 – 1672)
daughter of Gov Thomas Dudley
John Bradstreet (1652 – 1718)
son of Anne Dudley
Mercy Bradstreet (1689 – 1725)
daughter of John Bradstreet
Caleb Hazen (1720 – 1777)
son of Mercy Bradstreet
Mercy Hazen (1747 – 1819)
daughter of Caleb Hazen
Martha Mead (1784 – 1860)
daughter of Mercy Hazen
Abner Morse (1808 – 1838)
son of Martha Mead
Daniel Rowland Morse (1838 – 1910)
son of Abner Morse
Jason A Morse (1862 – 1932)
son of Daniel Rowland Morse
Ernest Abner Morse (1890 – 1965)
son of Jason A Morse
Richard Arden Morse (1920 – 2004)
son of Ernest Abner Morse
Pamela Morse
I am the daughter of Richard Arden Morse

Adam Forrester

March 18, 2013

Forrester coat of arms

Forrester coat of arms

My 20th great-grandfather, Adam Forrester, was the founder of a clan in Scotland. He became wealthy trading, and had permission to import grain into Scotland without paying duty.  His castle no longer exists, but there are parts of the churches he erected in his time that can be seen today. He and his son John held important political offices.  The both were Keepers of the Great Seal of Scotland.  The clan is without a chief and has been waiting for one for centuries.  I want to visit someday, but I do not think they will hand over any clan power to an American woman.

Adam Forrester (1360 – 1405)
is my 20th great-grandfather
John Forrester (1390 – 1448)
son of Adam Forrester
Janet Forrester (1410 – 1488)
daughter of John Forrester
John MAXWELL (1404 – 1484)
son of Janet Forrester
Mariota Maxwell (1430 – 1472)
daughter of John MAXWELL
Annabella Boyd (1449 – 1476)
daughter of Mariota Maxwell
Robert Lord Gordon (1475 – 1525)
son of Annabella Boyd
CATHERINE GORDON (1497 – 1537)
daughter of Robert Lord Gordon
Lady Elizabeth Ashton (1524 – 1588)
daughter of CATHERINE GORDON
Capt Roger Dudley (1535 – 1585)
son of Lady Elizabeth Ashton
Gov Thomas Dudley (1576 – 1653)
son of Capt Roger Dudley
Anne Dudley (1612 – 1672)
daughter of Gov Thomas Dudley
John Bradstreet (1652 – 1718)
son of Anne Dudley
Mercy Bradstreet (1689 – 1725)
daughter of John Bradstreet
Caleb Hazen (1720 – 1777)
son of Mercy Bradstreet
Mercy Hazen (1747 – 1819)
daughter of Caleb Hazen
Martha Mead (1784 – 1860)
daughter of Mercy Hazen
Abner Morse (1808 – 1838)
son of Martha Mead
Daniel Rowland Morse (1838 – 1910)
son of Abner Morse
Jason A Morse (1862 – 1932)
son of Daniel Rowland Morse
Ernest Abner Morse (1890 – 1965)
son of Jason A Morse
Richard Arden Morse (1920 – 2004)
son of Ernest Abner Morse
Pamela Morse
I am the daughter of Richard Arden Morse

Wemyss Clan of Fife

March 11, 2013

Wemyss castle

Wemyss castle

Mine is a lowland clan derived from the McDuffs. My 21st great- grandmother was born in her own castle in Fife in 1322.  It has been rebuilt, but is still privately owned by my family in Fife.  I know someone who went to her ancestral castle in Scotland, and was invited in and treated very well by the contemporary royal inhabitants.  These clansmen can have a broad idea of family, if you are truly in the bloodline.  I am not really expecting the Wemyss clan to welcome and embrace me, but I would not mind seeing the gardens open to the public that have been created by my clan.

Margaret Wemyss (1322 – 1342)

is my 21st great grandmother
Isabel Inchmartin (1340 – 1399)
daughter of Margaret Wemyss
Margaret Erskine (1357 – 1419)
daughter of Isabel Inchmartin
Isabel Glen (1380 – 1421)
daughter of Margaret Erskine
Isabel Ogilvie (1406 – 1484)
daughter of Isabel Glen
Elizabeth Kennedy (1434 – 1475)
daughter of Isabel Ogilvie
Isabella Vaus (1451 – 1510)
daughter of Elizabeth Kennedy
Marion Accarson (1478 – 1538)
daughter of Isabella Vaus
CATHERINE GORDON (1497 – 1537)
daughter of Marion Accarson
Lady Elizabeth Ashton (1524 – 1588)
daughter of CATHERINE GORDON
Capt Roger Dudley (1535 – 1585)
son of Lady Elizabeth Ashton
Gov Thomas Dudley (1576 – 1653)
son of Capt Roger Dudley
Anne Dudley (1612 – 1672)
daughter of Gov Thomas Dudley
John Bradstreet (1652 – 1718)
son of Anne Dudley
Mercy Bradstreet (1689 – 1725)
daughter of John Bradstreet
Caleb Hazen (1720 – 1777)
son of Mercy Bradstreet
Mercy Hazen (1747 – 1819)
daughter of Caleb Hazen
Martha Mead (1784 – 1860)
daughter of Mercy Hazen
Abner Morse (1808 – 1838)
son of Martha Mead
Daniel Rowland Morse (1838 – 1910)
son of Abner Morse
Jason A Morse (1862 – 1932)
son of Daniel Rowland Morse
Ernest Abner Morse (1890 – 1965)
son of Jason A Morse
Richard Arden Morse (1920 – 2004)
son of Ernest Abner Morse
Pamela Morse
I am the daughter of Richard Arden Morse

from  Electronic Scotland Com. The Scottish Nation – Wemyss:

This Sir David Wemyss, the elder son of Sri Michael, had a son, Sir David Wemyss, who was one of the guarantees for the release of David II., and this baron’s son, also named Sir David, was one of the hostages for that monarch’s ransom. The latter left a daughter, Margaret, married to Sir Patrick de Inchmartine, and by him had a daughter, Isabel de Inchmartine, heiress of that barony. This last married Sir Alan Erskine, and had two daughters, his co-heiresses, Margaret, wife of Sir John Glen, and Isabel, married to Sir John Wemyss of Rires and Kincaldrum, the heir male of the family. Besides the lands he held from his father, and those disponed to him by his father-in-law, he had extensive grants of lands in Fife and elsewhere, from Robert II. and Robert III. He had three sons, the second of whom, Duncan, was one of the hostages on the liberation of James I., and the third, Alexander, was ancestor of the family of Wemyss of Lathocar

Margaret Erskine

March 9, 2013 5 Comments

Erskine Coat of Arms

Erskine Coat of Arms

My 19th great grandmother was born in Scotland in 1357. Her father married an heiress to become lord of a castle.  In a quirk of fate the children were all girls, which devolved the castle to their husbands when they married.  Since they had some real estate and political power they married well.  Her husband and my 19th great grandfather, John Glen, may or may not be an ancestor of the astronaut.

Margaret Erskine (1357 – 1419)

is my 19th great grandmother
Isabel Glen (1380 – 1421)
daughter of Margaret Erskine
Isabel Ogilvie (1406 – 1484)
daughter of Isabel Glen
Elizabeth Kennedy (1434 – 1475)
daughter of Isabel Ogilvie
Isabella Vaus (1451 – 1510)
daughter of Elizabeth Kennedy
Marion Accarson (1478 – 1538)
daughter of Isabella Vaus
CATHERINE GORDON (1497 – 1537)
daughter of Marion Accarson
Lady Elizabeth Ashton (1524 – 1588)
daughter of CATHERINE GORDON
Capt Roger Dudley (1535 – 1585)
son of Lady Elizabeth Ashton
Gov Thomas Dudley (1576 – 1653)
son of Capt Roger Dudley
Anne Dudley (1612 – 1672)
daughter of Gov Thomas Dudley
John Bradstreet (1652 – 1718)
son of Anne Dudley
Mercy Bradstreet (1689 – 1725)
daughter of John Bradstreet
Caleb Hazen (1720 – 1777)
son of Mercy Bradstreet
Mercy Hazen (1747 – 1819)
daughter of Caleb Hazen
Martha Mead (1784 – 1860)
daughter of Mercy Hazen
Abner Morse (1808 – 1838)
son of Martha Mead
Daniel Rowland Morse (1838 – 1910)
son of Abner Morse
Jason A Morse (1862 – 1932)
son of Daniel Rowland Morse
Ernest Abner Morse (1890 – 1965)
son of Jason A Morse
Richard Arden Morse (1920 – 2004)
son of Ernest Abner Morse
Pamela Morse
I am the daughter of Richard Arden Morse

Little is known regarding the proprietary history of Balhall until shortly before the year 1440. At, and for some time previous to that period, it was possessed by Sir John Glen of Inchmartin, in the barony of Longforgan, which the family de, Inclimartin held from an early date. The first of those who figured conspicuously was John, one of the ten barons selected to make the peace of Scotland with Edward L in 1305; and, on the first appointment of sheriffs in that year, he was chosen for the county of Perth.In the following year, his son Sir David, who had been one of the original followers of Bruce, was hanged, with several other patriots, by order of Edward. His successor — perhaps a son — had a charter from Bruce of the lands of his sires; and about 1376, Sir Allan de Erskyne of Wemyss succeeded to the estates on marrying the heiress. Sir Allan died in 1401, leaving an only daughter, who married Sir John Glen, and the estate of Inchmartin devolved on that knight. He also left co-heiresses, one of whom married Sir Walter de Ogilvy, who succeeded to the half of Inchmartin, and other properties belonging to Glen, of which ” Balhalwell ” (Balhall) formed a part.

Mary Stewart, Princess of Scotland

January 24, 2013 13 Comments

Mary Stewart

Mary Stewart

Lady Mary Stewart, my 18th great grandmother, was princess of Scotland. She was married either three or four times, the first time to fulfill a contract made by her father.  This is an era during which my tree becomes very difficult to untangle and decipher.  Many of these royals married a whole bunch of people.  I ended up with ancestors from several different marriages combos.  I may live long enough to get it all straight.

Mary Stewart (1380 – 1458)
is my 18th great grandmother
Gilbert Kennedy (1406 – 1479)
Son of Mary
Elizabeth Kennedy (1434 – 1475)
Daughter of Gilbert
Isabella Vaus (1451 – 1510)
Daughter of Elizabeth
Marion Accarson (1478 – 1538)
Daughter of Isabella
CATHERINE GORDON (1497 – 1537)
Daughter of Marion
Lady Elizabeth Ashton (1524 – 1588)
Daughter of CATHERINE
Capt Roger Dudley (1535 – 1585)
Son of Lady Elizabeth
Gov Thomas Dudley (1576 – 1653)
Son of Capt Roger
Anne Dudley (1612 – 1672)
Daughter of Gov Thomas
John Bradstreet (1652 – 1718)
Son of Anne
Mercy Bradstreet (1689 – 1725)
Daughter of John
Caleb Hazen (1720 – 1777)
Son of Mercy
Mercy Hazen (1747 – 1819)
Daughter of Caleb
Martha Mead (1784 – 1860)
Daughter of Mercy
Abner Morse (1808 – 1838)
Son of Martha
Daniel Rowland Morse (1838 – 1910)
Son of Abner
Jason A Morse (1862 – 1932)
Son of Daniel Rowland
Ernest Abner Morse (1890 – 1965)
Son of Jason A
Richard Arden Morse (1920 – 2004)
Son of Ernest Abner
Pamela Morse
I am  the daughter of Richard Arden

Lady Mary Stewartd. c 1458p10533.htm#i105322Robert III Stewart, King of Scotlandb. 1337\nd. 4 Apr 1406p10210.htm#i102099Annabel Drummondb. c 1350\nd. c Oct 1401p10211.htm#i102103Robert I. Stewart, King of Scotlandb. 2 Mar 1316\nd. 19 Apr 1390p10210.htm#i102097Elizabeth Mure of Rowalland. b 1355p10210.htm#i102098Sir John Drummond, 11th of Lennoxb. 1318\nd. 1373p10247.htm#i102467Mary Montifexb. 1325p10247.htm#i102464Last Edited=13 Jan 2010Consanguinity Index=0.12%
Lady Mary Stewart was the daughter of Robert III Stewart, King of Scotland and Annabel Drummond.2 She married by contract, firstly, George Douglas, 1st Earl of Angus, son of William Douglas, 1st Earl of Douglas and Margaret Stewart, Countess of Angus, on 24 May 1397.1 She married, secondly, Sir James Kennedy of Dunure, younger, son of Sir Gilbert Kennedy of Dunure, circa 1404.1 She and Sir William Cunningham were engaged in July 1409.1 She married, thirdly, Sir William Graham on 13 November 1413.1 She married, fourthly, Sir William Edmondstone of Culloden, son of Sir Archibald Edmonstone, in 1425.3 She died circa 1458.3 She was buried at Strathbane Church, Scotland.3     Lady Mary Stewart gained the title of Princess Mary of Scotland.4 As a result of her marriage, Lady Mary Stewart was styled as Countess of Angus after 24 May 1397. From after 24 May 1397, her married name became Douglas. From circa 1404, her married name became Kennedy. From 13 November 1413, her married name became Graham. From 1425, her married name became Edmonstone.
Children of Lady Mary Stewart and Sir William Graham
Robert Graham1
Patrick Graham1 d. 1478
Child of Lady Mary Stewart and Sir William Edmondstone of Culloden
Sir William Edmonstone of Duntreath+5
Children of Lady Mary Stewart and George Douglas, 1st Earl of Angus
Lady Elizabeth Douglas+1
William Douglas, 2nd Earl of Angus+1 b. c 1398, d. Oct 1437
Children of Lady Mary Stewart and Sir James Kennedy of Dunure, younger
Sir John Kennedy1 d. a 1434
Mary Kennedy+6
Gilbert Kennedy of Dunure, 1st Lord Kennedy+1 b. c 1406, d. a 6 Mar 1478/79
James Kennedy1 b. 1405/6, d. Jul 1465
Citations
Alison Weir, Britain’s Royal Family: A Complete Genealogy (London, U.K.: The Bodley Head, 1999), page 228. Hereinafter cited as Britain’s Royal Family.
G.E. Cokayne; with Vicary Gibbs, H.A. Doubleday, Geoffrey H. White, Duncan Warrand and Lord Howard de Walden, editors, The Complete Peerage of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain and the United Kingdom, Extant, Extinct or Dormant, new ed., 13 volumes in 14 (1910-1959; reprint in 6 volumes, Gloucester, U.K.: Alan Sutton Publishing, 2000), volume I, page 154. Hereinafter cited as The Complete Peerage.
Alison Weir, Britain’s Royal Family, page 229.
Cokayne, and others, The Complete Peerage, volume VII, page 121.
Charles Mosley, editor, Burke’s Peerage, Baronetage & Knightage, 107th edition, 3 volumes (Wilmington, Delaware, U.S.A.: Burke’s Peerage (Genealogical Books) Ltd, 2003). Hereinafter cited as Burke’s Peerage and Baronetage, 107th edition.
Sir Andrew, of Lochnaw Agnew, The Hereditary Sheriffs of Galloway (n.n.: n.n., 1893), page 271. Hereinafter cited as The Hereditary Sheriffs of Galloway.

The Later Scottish Kings (1371 - 1603) 

The Stewarts ruled Scotland for more than two centuries, and Great Britain for another century, yet their hold on the throne was often a tenuous one. Throughout the 15th and 16th centuries, each Scottish monarch succeeded to the throne whilst still a child or a minor, and the country was subjected to continuous faction fights amongst power-hungry nobles. That the dynasty survived at all was nothing short of a miracle. Even the abdication of Queen Mary I in 1567 did not ruin it, for her son James VI was guided by the magnates from his infancy along the path they wanted him to tread, and Elizabeth of England, of course, took care of the displaced Mary by first imprisoning and then executing here. Thus it was that the Stewarts - or Stuarts, as they had become when Mary had married into the French royal house - came to inherit also the throne of England. For Mary's grandfather. James IV, had married Margaret Tudor, daughter of Henry VII of England, and when Queen Elizabeth died without heirs in 1603, James VI of Scotland, the great-grandson of Margaret Tudor, was the English Queen's nearest surviving relative.

Robert II (1371-1390)
only child of Walter Stewart, 6th High Steward of Scotland, by his second wife and cousin the Princess Marjorie, half sister and heiress of line in her issue of David II, King of Scotland, and only dau. of Robert I, King of Scotland, by his first wife Lady Isabel of Mar
born
2 Mar 1315/6
mar. (1)
(dispensation dated 22 Nov 1347) Elizabeth Mure (d. bef. 1355), dau. of Sir Adam Mure of Rowallan
children by first wife
1. John, Earl of Carrick, later Robert III, King of Scotland
2. Walter Stewart, jure uxoris Earl of Fife (dsp. betw. 14 Aug 1362 and 10 Jan 1363), mar. bef. 1362 Lady Elizabeth Ramsay, suo jure Countess of Fife (b. bef. 1332; former wife of Sir William Ramsay of Colluthie, jure uxoris Earl of Fife; mar. (3) betw. 10 Jan 1363 and 8 Jun 1363 Sir Thomas Bisset of Upsetlington, jure uxoris Earl of Fife, and (4) John de Dunbar, jure uxoris Earl of Fife; d. after 12 Aug 1389), dau. of Duncan, 10th Earl of Fife, by his wife Lady Mary de Monthermer, dau. of Ralph [de Monthermer], 1st Baron Monthermer, by his wife the Princess Joan "of Acre", 5th dau. by his first wife of Edward I, King of England
3. Robert [Stewart], 1st Duke of Albany, Regent of Scotland 1388-1420, cr. 28 Feb 1361 Earl of Menteith and 28 Apr 1398 Duke of Albany (b. c. 1340/1; d. 3 Sep 1420), mar. (1) after 9 Sep 1361 Lady Margaret Drummond, suo jure Countess of Menteith (b. bef. 1334; former wife of (1) Sir John Murray of Bothwell (d. 1352), (2) Thomas, 9th Earl of Mar, and (3) Sir John Drummond of Concraig; d. betw. 20 Jul 1372 and 4 May 1380), dau. of Sir John Graham by his wife Lady Mary, suo jure Countess of Menteith, and had issue:
1a. Murdoch [Stewart], 2nd Duke of Albany (b. 1362; d. 25 May 1425), mar. betw. 17 Feb and 8 Nov 1392 Lady Elizabeth, suo jure Countess of Lennox (b. c. 1370; d. betw. 7 Oct 1456 and 4 May 1458), dau. of Duncan, 8th Earl of Lennox, by his wife Helen Campbell, dau. of Gillespie Campbell of Lochawe, and had issue:
1b. Robert Stewart, styled Master of Fife (dvp. betw. 1416 and Jul 1421)
2b. Sir Walter Stewart of Lennox, beheaded at Stirling (dvp. and sp. legit. 24 May 1425) - he had several mistresses and all his bastards were legitimated on 17 Apr 1479 - he was the ancestor of the Earls of Moray and of Castle Stewart
3b. Sir Alexander Stewart, beheaded at Stirling the day after his brother (d. 25 May 1425), mar. after 29 Apr 1422 his second cousin Egidia Sinclair (widow of Henry [Sinclair], 2nd Earl of Orkney; d. after 1438), sister and hrss. of Sir William Douglas of Nithsdale and only dau. of Sir William Douglas of Nithsdale (by his wife Lady Egidia Stewart, 2nd dau. by his second wife of Robert II, King of Scotland), illegit. son of Archibald [Douglas], 3rd Earl of Douglas
4b. Sir James Stewart of Baldorran (dsp. legit. bef. 18 May 1451), and had issue
1b. Lady Isabella Stewart, mar. Sir Walter Buchanan, 13th of Buchanan, and had issue
1a. Lady Janet Stewart
2a. Lady Mary Stewart, mar. Sir William Abernethy of Saltoun (d. 1420), and had issue
3a. Lady Margaret Stewart, mar. c. 1392 Sir John de Swinton of Swinton (d. 1402), and had issue
4a. Lady Joan Stewart, mar. after 27 Sep 1397 Robert Stewart of Lorne and Innermeath (d. 1449), and had issue
5a. Lady Beatrice Stewart (dsp. c. 1424), mar. James [Douglas], 7th Earl of Douglas and 1st Earl of Avonmore
6a. Lady Isabella Stewart, mar. (1) before 1398 Alexander [Leslie], 9th Earl of Ross, and (2) betw. 1402 and 2 Feb 1408 Walter Haliburton of Dirleton, and had issue by both husbands
The 1st Duke of Albany mar. (2) after 4 May 1380 Muriella Keith (d. bef. 1 Jun 1449), dau. of Sir William Keith by his wife Margaret Fraser, dau. of John Fraser, and had further issue:
2a. John [Stewart], 3rd Earl of Buchan (b. 1381; d. 17 Aug 1424), mar. Nov 1413 his first cousin once removed Lady Elizabeth Douglas (mar. (2) Sir Thomas Stewart, and (3) William [Sinclair], 3rd Earl of Orkney; d. bef. 1451), only dau. of Archibald [Douglas], 4th Earl of Douglas, by his wife the Lady Margaret Stewart, 1st dau. of Robert III, King of Scotland, and had issue:
1b. Lady Margaret Stewart, mar. bef. 1436 George [Seton], 1st Lord Seton, and had issue
3a. Andrew Stewart (d. bef. 1413)
4a. Sir Robert Stewart, de jure 4th Earl of Buchan (d. after 1431)
7a. Lady Marjorie Stewart, mar. as his first wife Duncan [Campbell], 1st Lord Campbell, and had issue
8a. Lady Elizabeth Stewart, mar. bef. 28 Jun 1413 Sir Malcolm Fleming of Biggar and Cumbernauld (d. 1440), and had issue
4. Alexander [Stewart], 1st Earl of Buchan, called "the Wolf of Badenoch", cr. 30 Mar 1371 Lord of Badenoch, 22 Jul 1382 Earl of Buchan and styled Earl of Ross jure uxoris from Jul 1382 (b. c. 1343 ; dsp. legit. before 25 Mar 1406), mar. 22 Jul 1382 Lady Euphemia Leslie, suo jure Countess of Ross (b. after 1342; widow of Sir Walter Leslie, jure uxoris Earl of Ross; d. betw. 5 Sep 1394 and 20 Feb 1395), dau. of William, 7th Earl of Ross, by his wife Mary of the Isles, dau. of Angus Og, Lord of the Isles
1. Elizabeth, mar. before 7 Nov 1372 Sir Thomas de la Haye of Erroll (d. 1406), and had issue
2. Isabella, mar. (1) after 24 Sep 1371 James [Douglas], 2nd Earl of Douglas, and (2) betw. 1358 and 1390 Sir John Edmondston of Duntreath, and had issue by both husbands
3. Jean (d. after 1404), mar. (1) 17 Jan 1373/4 Sir John Keith (d. 1375), (2) betw. 27 Jun 1376 and 4 Oct 1376 Sir John Lyon of Glamis (d. 1382), and (3) c. Nov 1384 Sir James Sandilands of Calder, and had issue by all three husbands
4. Katherine (d. after 1394), mar. Sir Robert Logan of Restalrig, and had issue
5. Margaret, mar. after 14 Jun 1350 John [Macdonald], Lord of the Isles, and had issue
6. Marjorie (d. after 6 May 1417), mar. (1) after 11 Jul 1370 John [de Dunbar], Earl of Moray, and (2) before 24 Apr 1403 Sir Alexander Keith of Grandown, and had issue by both husbands
mar. (2)
(dispensation dated 2 May 1355) Lady Euphemia Randolph (widow of John [Randolph], 3rd Earl of Moray; d. 1387), dau. of Hugh, 6th Earl of Ross, by his wife Margaret Graham
children by second wife
5. David [Stewart], 1st Earl of Strathearn and of Caithness, cr. 26 Mar 1371 Earl Palatine of Strathearn and betw. 21 Nov 1375 and 28 Dec 1377 Earl of Caithness (b. c. 1356; d. before 5 Mar 1389), mar. ..... Lindsay, dau. of Sir Alexander Lindsay of Glenesk by his wife Katherine Stirling, dau. of Sir John Stirling of Glenesk, and had issue:
1a. Lady Euphemia Stewart, suo jure Countess of Caithness and Strathearn (b. before 1375; d. 15 Oct 1434), mar. (1) bef. 24 Aug 1406 Sir Patrick Graham of Dundaff and Kilpont (d. 1413), and (2) Sir Patrick Dunbar of Bele (d. after 1438), and had issue by both husbands
6. Walter [Stewart], 1st Earl of Atholl, cr. 1378 Lord of Brechin, bef. Jul 1402 Earl of Caithness (resigned in favour of son 13 Dec 1429), c. 28 Apr 1404 Earl of Atholl, 22 Sep 1409 Lord of Cortachy and 22 Jul 1427 Earl Palatine of Strathearn (v. c. 1360; d. 26 Mar 1437), mar. before 19 Oct 1378 Margaret de Barclay (d. before 1 Aug 1404), dau. of Sir David de Barclay of Brechin, by his wife Janet Keith, dau. of Sir Edward Keith of Synton, and had issue:
1a. Alexander [Stewart], 2nd Earl of Caithness (dvp. 1431)
2a. David Stewart (dvp. after Feb 1433), mar., and had issue:
1b. Sir Robert Stewart, Master of Atholl (d. 26 Mar 1437)
7. Elizabeth, mar. c. 1384 David [Lindsay], 1st Earl of Crawford, and had issue
8. Egidia/Jill (d. after 1388), mar. c. 1387 Sir William Douglas of Nithsdale, and had issue
died
19 Apr 1390
created
16 Feb 1341/2 Earl of Atholl
bef. 1357/8 Earl of Strathearn
suc. by
son by first wife
note
suc. his father 9 Apr 1326/7 as 7th High Steward of Scotland; Regent of Scotland 1335-41 and 1346-57; suc. his uncle 22 Feb 1370/1 as King of Scotland

Robert III (1390-1406)
born
1337
mar.
c. 1367 Annabella Drummond (b. c. 1350; d. c. Oct 1401), dau. of Sir John Drummond of Stobhall, by his wife Mary Montifex, dau. of Sir William Montifex
children
1. David, cr. betw. 19 Apr 1390 and 2 Jan 1391 Earl of Carrick, 28 Apr 1398 Duke of Rothesay and 6 Sep 1398 Earl of Atholl (b. 24 Oct 1378; dvp. and sp. 26 Mar 1402), mar. Feb 1399/1400 Lady Marjorie Douglas (mar. (2) 1403 Sir Walter Haliburton of Dirleton; d. bef. 11 May 1421), only dau. of Archibald [Douglas]. 3rd Earl of Douglas, by his wife Lady Joan Moray, widow of Sir Thomas Moray, Lord of Bothwell, and only child and hrss. of Maurice [Moray], 1st Earl of Strathearn
2. James, Duke of Rothesay later James I, King of Scotland
3. Robert (d. unm.)
1. Margaret (d. betw. 26 Jan 1449 and Sep 1456), mar. bef. 1390 Alexander [Douglas], 4th Earl of Douglas later 1st Duke of Touraine, and had issue
2. Mary (d. c. 1458), mar. (1) after 24 May 1397 George [Douglas], 1st Earl of Angus, (2) 1404 Sir James Kennedy, Yr. of Dunure;  (3) 13 Nov 1413  Sir William Graham of Kincardine and Old Montrose; and (4) 1425 Sir William Edmondstone of Duntreath, and had issue by all four husbands
3. Egidia (d. unm.)
4. Elizabeth (d. bef. 1411), mar. bef. 10 Nov 1387 Sir James Douglas of Dalkeith (d. 1441), and had issue
died
4 Apr 1406
suc. by
son
note

James I (1406-1437)
born
Dec 1394
mar.
2 Feb 1423/4 Lady Joan Beaufort (mar. (2) 1439 Sir James Stewart of Lorne; d. 15 Jul 1445), 1st dau. of John [Beaufort], 1st Marquess of Somerset (by his wife Lady Margaret de Holand, 2nd dau. of Thomas [de Holand], 2nd or 5th Earl of Kent), 1st son of John "of Gaunt", 1st Duke of Lancaster (by his third wife and former mistress Katherine de Swynford, widow of Sir Hugh de Swynford, of Coleby and Kettlethorpe, co. Lincoln, and 2nd dau. and cohrss. of Sir Payn de Roët, Guienne King of Arms), 4th son of Edward III, King of England
children
1. Alexander, Duke of Rothesay (b. 16 Oct 1430; dvp. 1430)
2. James, Duke of Rothesay, later King James II
1. Margaret (b. Dec 1424; dsp. 16 Aug 1445), mar. 24 Jun 1436 Louis XI, King of France
2. Isabella (d. 1494), mar. 30 Oct 1442 Francis I, Duke of Britanny, and had issue
3. Eleanor (b. 26 Oct 1427; dsp. 1480), mar. 12 Feb 1449 Sigismund of Tyrol, Archduke of Austria
4. Joan (b. c. 1428; d. 16 Oct 1486), mar. bef. 15 May 1459 James [Douglas], 1st Earl of Morton, and had issue
5. Mary, suo jure Countess of Buchan (d. 20 Mar 1465), mar. 1444 Wolfert van Borssele, Count of Grandpré, and had issue
6. Annabel, mar. (1) 14 Dec 1447 (div. 1458) Louis of Savoy, Count of Geneva, and (2) bef. 10 Mar 1459/60 (div. 24 Jul 1471) as his second wife George [Gordon], 2nd Earl of Huntly, and had issue by her second husband
died
21 Feb 1436/7
suc. by
son
note

James II (1437-1460)
born
16 Oct 1430
mar.
3 Jul 1449 Mary of Guelders (b. 1433; d. 1 Dec 1463), dau. of Arnold, Duke of Guelders, by his wife Katherine of Cleves, dau. of Adolf, Duke of Cleves
children
1. James, Duke of Rothesay, later King James III
2. Alexander [Stewart], 1st Duke of Albany, cr. 8 Jul 1455 Baron of Annandale and Earl of March; 4 Jul 1457 Duke of Albany; titles declared forfeit 4 Oct 1479, restored 1482, cr. Sep 1482 Earl of Mar and Garioch, titles declared forfeit again 27 Jun 1483 (b. c. 1445/5; d. 1485), mar. (1) c. 1475 (div. 2 Mar 1478 and issue declared illegitimate) his second cousin Lady Katherine Sinclair, 1st dau. of William [Sinclair], 3rd Earl of Orkney later 1st Earl of Caithness, by his first wife and cousin Lady Elizabeth Douglas, only dau. of Archibald [Douglas], 4th Earl of Douglas, by his wife Lady Margaret Stewart, 1st dau. of Robert III, King of Scotland, and had issue:
1a. Andrew Stewart
2a. A son (b. 1477; d. bef. 1479)
3a. Alexander Stewart, Bishop of Moray 1528-37 (b. c. 1478; dsp. legit. 19 Dec 1537)
1a. Lady Margaret Stewart (d. after 5 Jul 1542), mar. Sir Patrick Hamilton of Kincavil (d. 1520)
The 1st Duke of Albany mar. (2) betw. 16 Jan 1479 and 4 Dec 1479 Anne de la Tour (mar. (2) 17 Feb 1487 Louis, Count of La Chambre; d. 13 Oct 1512), dau. of Bertrand de la Tour, Count of Auvergne, by his wife Louise de la Trémouille, dau. of George de la Trémouille, Seigneur de la Trémouille, and had further issue:
4a. John [Stewart], 2nd Duke of Albany, Regent of Scotland 1515-24 (b. c. 1483; dsp. legit. 2 Jun 1536), mar. 13 Jul 1505 his first cousin Anne de la Tour, suo jure Countess of Auvergne and Boulogne (b. after 1495; d. Jun 1524), dau. of John de la Tour, Count of Auvergne and Lauraguais, by his wife Joan of Vendôme, dau. of John of Bourbon, Count of Vendôme
3. David [Stewart], 1st Earl of Moray, cr. 12 Feb 1456 Earl of Moray (b. bef. 12 Feb 1456; d. bef. 16 Jul 1457)
4. John [Stewart], 1st Earl of Mar and Garioch, cr. betw. 21 Jun 1458 and 25 Jun 1459 Earl of Mar and Garioch (b. after Oct 1456; d. 9 Jul 1479)
1. Mary (b. bef. 16 May 1452; d. c. May 1488), mar. (1) bef. 26 Apr 1467 (div. Feb 1473/4) Thomas [Boyd], 1st Earl of Arran, and (2) bef. Apr 1474 James [Hamilton], 1st Lord Hamilton, and had issue by both husbands
2. Margaret
died
3 Aug 1460
suc. by
son
note

James III (1460-1488)
born
10 Jul 1452
mar.
13 Jul 1469 Margaret of Denmark (c. 1456/7; d. 14 Jul 1486), dau. of Christian I, King of Denmark, Norway and Sweden, by his wife Dorothy of Brandenburg, dau. of John III, Margrave and Elector of Brandenburg-Culmbach
children
1. James, Duke of Rothesay, later King James IV
2. James [Stewart], 1st Duke of Ross, cr. 1476 (sic?) Marquess of Ormonde, 23 Jan 1481 Duke of Ross and 29 Jan 1488 Earl of Ardmannach and Lord of Brechin and Nevar (b. Mar 1476; d. 12 Jan 1504)
3. John [Stewart], 1st Earl of Mar, cr. 2 Mar 1486 Earl of Mar (b. betw. 16 Jul 1479 and 12 Jul 1480; d. 11 Mar 1503)
died
11 Jun 1488
suc. by
son
note

James IV (1488-1513)
born
17 Mar 1472/3
mar.
8 Aug 1503 Princess Margaret of England (b. 28 Nov 1489; mar. (2) 6 Aug 1514 (div. 11 Mar 1527/8) as his second wife Archibald [Douglas], 6th Earl of Angus, and (3) Mar 1528 Henry [Stewart], 1st Lord Methven; d. 18 Oct 1541), 1st dau. of Henry VII, King of England, by his wife Lady Elizabeth Plantagenet, 1st dau. of Edward IV, King of England
children
1. James, Duke of Rothesay (b. 21 Feb 1507 ; dvp. 27 Feb 1508)
2. Arthur, Duke of Rothesay (b. 20 Oct 1509; dvp. 14 Jul 1510)
3. James, Duke of Rothesay, later James V, King of Scotland
4. Alexander [Stewart], 1st Duke of Ross (b. 12 Apr 1514; d. 18 Dec 1515)
1. a dau. (b. and d. 15 Jul 1508)
2. a dau. (b. and d. Nov 1512)
died
9 Sep 1513 (k. at the Battle of Flodden)
suc. by
son
note

James V (1513-1542)
born
10 Apr 1512
mar. (1)
1 Jan 1536/7 Madeline of France (b. 10 Aug 1520; dsp. 7 Jul 1537), dau. of Francis I, King of France, by his wife Claude of France, dau. of Louis XII, King of France
mar. (2)
May 1538 Marie of Guise, Regent of Scotland 1554-60 (b. 22 Nov 1515; widow of Louis II, Duke of Longueville; d. 10 Jun 1560), dau. of Claude I of Lorraine, Duke of Guise, by his wife Antoinette of La Marche, dau. of Francis I de Bourbon, Count of La Marche and Vendôme
children by second wife
1. James, Duke of Rothesay (b. 22 May 1540; dvp. Apr 1541)
2. Arthur, Duke of Albany (b. and dvp. Apr 1541)
1. Mary, later Mary I, Queen of Scotland
died
14 Dec 1542
suc. by
daughter by second wife
note

Mary I (1542-1567)
born
7 Dec 1542
mar. (1)
24 Apr 1558 Francis II, King of France
mar. (2)
29 Jul 1565 her half-cousin Hon Henry Stewart, styled Lord Darnley, cr. 15 May 1565 Lord Ardmanach, Earl of Ross and Duke of Albany (d. 10 Feb 1566/7), 1st son and heir of Matthew [Stewart], 4th or 13th Earl of Lennox, by his wife Lady Margaret Douglas, only child of Archibald [Douglas], 6th Earl of Angus, by his second wife Princess Margaret of England, widow of James IV, King of Scotland, and 1st dau. of Henry VII, King of England
only child by second husband
1. James, Duke of Rothesay, later James VI, King of Scotland
mar. (3)
15 May 1567 James [Hepburn], 4th Earl of Bothwell, cr. 12 May 1567 Duke of Orkney (dsp. 14 Apr 1578)
died
8 Feb 1586/7
suc. by
son by second husband
note
abdicated 24 Jul 1567

James VI (1567-1625)
note
suc. his cousin Elizabeth I, Queen of England, 24 Mar 1603 as James I, King of England
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