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Philip Sherman

March 27, 2014 , , ,

Philip Sherman's house

Philip Sherman’s house

My 8th great grandfather moved to Rhode Island as many of my ancestors did.  He became a Quaker and the first secretary of Rhode Island Colony.

Philip Sherman (1610 – 1687)
is my 8th great grandfather
Eber Sherman (1634 – 1706)
son of Philip Sherman
Mary Sherman (1688 – 1751)
daughter of Eber Sherman
Thomas Sweet (1732 – 1813)
son of Mary Sherman
Thomas Sweet (1759 – 1844)
son of Thomas Sweet
Valentine Sweet (1791 – 1858)
son of Thomas Sweet
Sarah LaVina Sweet (1840 – 1923)
daughter of Valentine Sweet
Jason A Morse (1862 – 1932)
son of Sarah LaVina Sweet
Ernest Abner Morse (1890 – 1965)
son of Jason A Morse
Richard Arden Morse (1920 – 2004)
son of Ernest Abner Morse
Pamela Morse
I am the daughter of Richard Arden Morse

THE HON. PHILIP SHERMAN, WAS THE SON OF SAMUEL SHERMAN AND PHILIPPA WARD. HE MARRIED SARAH ODDING; THE DAUGHTER OF WILLIAM GEORGE ODDING AND MARGARET POTTER OF BRAINTREE, ESSEX CT, ENGLAND IN (1633/XX/XX),HE WAS A MAN OF MELANCOLY TEMPER WHO CAME TO BOSTON IN (1633/XX/XX) AND UPON A JUST CALLING HE WENT BACK TO ENGLAND AND RETURNED BETWEEN (1636-1637) WITH A BLESSING, IN (1637) BECAUSE OF HIS RELIGIOUS FEELINGS HE WAS BANISHED ALONG WITH JOHN COGGESHALL AND HENRY BULL FROM THE ROXBURY BAY COLONY, BOSTON, MASS, USA. LEAVING FOR RHODES ISLANDS WERE ALL BECAME RULING OFFICIALS CHOSEN TWONE CLERKE (JUNE 1649-1656), TOWNE MAGISTRATE (1656-1679), LAYER OUT OF HIGHWAYS (1683), MEMBER OF COMM. ADJUICATION (1684-1687), AND WAS THE FIRST SECRETARY AND RECORDER OF THE COLONY OF RHODES ISLANDS.

In Bertha L. Stratton’s book, “Sherman and Other Families,” she made the statement that Philip Sherman intended to settle in New Hampshre, but the climate proved too severe and so the lands there were abandoned. Upon discussion with Roger Williams at Providence, Rhode Island, the other people from Massachusetts bought Aquidneck Island in Narraganset Bay. Nineteen men signed the compact for the town in 1638. Upon leaving the church in Roxbury, Philip joined with the Friends. The Massachusetts Court ordered Philip to appear before them on 12 Mar 1638, he did not go. But he continued as a prominent figure in Rhode Island; he was the General Recorder in 1648-1652 & the Deputy to the Assembly in 1665-1667. Tradition says he was a “devout and determined man, and he was also a “neat and expert penman & an educated man,” and his Last Will & Testament “shows that he was wealthy for those times.”

Philip Sherman immigrated to Roxbury, MA and married Sarah Odding shortly after his arrival. He might have felt pressured to marry quickly, because bachelors especially of such an advanced age as 23 were looked upon with suspicion, and their single state could even effect business opportunities and social acceptance.

According to Representative Men of Old Families of Southeastern Massachussets, by J. H. Beers & Company, in a biographical entry of one of Philip’s descendants, Philip Sherman “took the side of Anne Hutchinson,” a brave woman in Salem, MA who maintained that women should be allowed to hold prayer meetings as well as men, and proceeded to hold such meetings in her home in defiance of the rules of the time and demands that she quit. She, with some members of her family including young grandchildren, were driven out of Salem into the wilderness of Rhode Island. Families in sympathy for her or in fear of retaliation for their past support and/or defense of her beliefs soon followed to Rhode Island, and Philip Sherman and his family were among the group that left Salem following her ouster.

In Providence, Philip met Roger Williams, founder of Rhode Island promising religious freedom to it’s citizens. Williams advised Philip andthe members of his party to purchase Aquidneck from the Indians, which they did on 1 Jul 1639. They created their own government with Coddington chosen to be the first governor of Rhode Island, and Philip chosen to be secretary.

Some historians believe that the death of Anne Hutchinson with most of her family during an attack of native Americans was the first act in several that led to the end of the Puritan Church. Members of the communities in all the colonies were horrified that she was banished for her beliefs and suffered so. Many felt banished themselves from England when their Puritan faith had been banned, and her treatment forced them to recognize their own harshness.

 

Philip left what is now called “the Congressional Church” and joined the Society of Friends, or Quakers.

He was the father of 13 children, and many of his descendants served America as congressmen and soldiers.

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comments

Have you figured out at what point different parts of your family tree moved to what would become the US? Also did they move elsewhere?

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Stevie Wilson (@LAStory)

March 29, 2014

Yes, many of them came to the colonies from England. One came from Ireland during the potato famine, and almost everyone was religious..they went from Va and NY to Ohio, then to KS in the case of the Morses. They Taylors were more in the South the whole time.

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mermaidcamp

March 29, 2014

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