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William Herbert, Earl Of Pembroke, Knight Of The Garter

August 7, 2018

William Pembroke Herbert

William Pembroke Herbert

My 18th great-grandfather was mixed up in that War of the Roses business that obsessed the British for so long.  He was beheaded, as several of my other ancestors were, during those tricky Tudor years. HIs castle, Raglan, can still be visited today.

Raglan Castle

Raglan Castle

 

How does one begin to describe the handsome majesty that is Raglan Castle? Raglan, with its great multi-angular towers and Tudor-styling, is unlike any other castle in Wales. There were only three times during our vacation, when visiting a site, I said to myself, “this is why we came to Wales.” The first time was while viewing Conwy Castle from the spur wall near the Quay. The second was upon seeing the cathedral and Bishop’s Palace at St. Davids, and the last was while standing in front of the double-towered gatehouse at Raglan.
The main stone used in construction of the castle is sandstone, but of two different types. The 15th century castle is characterized by pale, almost yellowish sandstone from Redbrook on the Wye river, three miles away. The other sandstone is local Old Red Sandstone, red, brown or purplish in color, used in the Tudor work. A paler stone was also used in the fireplaces. From a distance, Raglan seemed to have a reddish cast, although on approaching the gatehouse, the castle’s yellow sandstone becomes obvious.
The castle is probably most closely associated with William ap Thomas, who fought with King Henry V at the Battle of Agincourt in 1415. In 1426, ap Thomas was knighted by Henry VI, becoming known to his compatriots as “the blue knight of Gwent.” Sir William Herbert, Earl of Pembroke, was the next owner of the castle, and it is Herbert who is responsible for Raglan’s distinctive Tudor-styling. The castle was also the boyhood home of Henry Tudor, later King Henry VII. As a boy he bided his time at Raglan, while his uncle Jasper agitated a Lancastrian return to the throne in the person of young Henry.
Both William ap Thomas and William Herbert fought in France, and undoubtedly, the castles that they saw in that country influenced their work at Raglan. The elaborately decorated polygonal keep, as well as the double-drawbridge arrangement of the keep, unique in Britain, demonstrate French influence. In 1492, Elizabeth Herbert married Sir Charles Somerset, a natural son of Henry Beaufort, third duke of Somerset, and it is to the Somerset family as earls of Worcester that we owe the final architectural touches of the castle.
On approaching the gatehouse, we passed Raglan’s Great Tower, surrounded by its apron wall and beautiful moat. Pink wildflowers spring from the apron wall, creating an unforgettable image. The wall has six corner turrets, one of which has a postern door to the moat. The Great Tower, known as “The Yellow Tower of Gwent,” is the most striking feature at Raglan. It was begun by Sir William ap Thomas and was designed very much in contemporary French style. Unfortunately, the tower was largely destroyed by Parliamentary forces during the English Civil War. The tower and moat are outside the main body of the castle. The Great Gate leading to the Pitched Stone Court lies next to The Great Tower. It was raised by Sir William Herbert, and served as the main entrance to the castle after 1460, however, we chose to continue surveying The Great Tower from the outside, via the park surrounding the moat, finally entering the castle from the South Gate.
Through the South Gate, we entered the main Apartments. The porch and Grand Stair lead to the apartments in the Fountain Court. The Grand Stair reminded us of a similar structure at Carew Castle. The two most impressive rooms at Raglan are The Hall and Long Gallery. The hall is the finest and most complete of the castle’s surviving apartments. A plaque over the dais in the hall bears the distinctive arms of the third earl of Worcester, as Knight of the Garter. Viewing the Great Tower from the apartments, we saw a finely carved shield and badge over the first floor chamber, a good example of the castle’s surviving detail. The Long Gallery has been called one of the finest rooms of Tudor rebuilding in Britain. Once a showcase of Tudor elegance, the gallery contained handsome paintings, tapestries and sculptures. During this time, Raglan was one of Britain’s social centers. Important guests were entertained until the early hours of the morning. The gallery had a series of windows overlooking the Fountain Court, and an ornate Renaissance fireplace. The remains of the fireplace, clearly showing two carved human figures, are a major highlight of the castle.
Re-entering the castle through the Great Gate, we entered the Pitched Stone Court, a large cobblestone area. Standing at the end of the court gives a magnificent view of the rear of the gatehouse and the Attic. The Attic, with its stunning Tudor-style windows, housed another gallery running along the rear of the gatehouse range. The building once held the castle’s extensive library, which was also destroyed by Cromwell’s soldiers. The wonderful thing about Raglan is that there are so many parts of the castle retaining detail and beauty, that you could spend an hour or so just admiring the beauty of any one area. A green park with benches surrounds most of the castle, giving visitors the chance to sit and contemplate the magnificence before them. There are several on-site exhibits explaining the history of the castle, and an extensive giftshop is planned for the future.
We could have easily spent a half day at Raglan, to properly survey the castle. By the time we finished looking at the exhibit rooms, it was late afternoon and time to find lodging for the night. Still, I had to take just one more walk around the moat and Great Tower. I used the excuse that I had not yet seen the back of the castle to prolong our stay. As I took my final walk around the moat, my eyes were fixed on the castle, not on the ground before me. I knew it would be quite some time before I’d experience a site such as this, and I wanted to burn this view of the castle into my memory forever. I was probably lucky I didn’t fall into the moat! Raglan was like a fairy tale castle I was afraid would disappear if I looked away. Carew had its aspects of beauty, but stately Raglan is a handsome, unique structure in every detail. I knew that our trip to Raglan would be a highlight of the trip, but if I had known just how magnificent the site was, I would have certainly set aside more time than the two hours we were there. If you ever travel to south Wales, make seeing Raglan Castle your number one priority. If necessary, drop all other plans, just don’t miss seeing Raglan! Once you visit this wonder of medieval architecture, you’ll understand why.
Cadw 1990
Raglan, stately and handsome, is perhaps deceptive. The might of its angular towers bears comparison with the great castles of Edward I, and suggests its origins lay in the bitter conflicts of the later 13th century. In face it belongs mainly to the 15th century, and was as much a product of social aspiration as it was of military necessity.
It was begun by Sir William ap Thomas, a veteran of the French wars, who grew wealthy through exploiting his position as a local agent of the duke of York in south-east Wales. About 1435 he began building the Great Tower, subsequently known as the Yellow Tower of Gwent, probably on the site of a much earlier Norman motte-and-bailey castle. Surrounded by a water-filled moat, the unusual hexagonal plan of the tower, together with its elaborate drawbridge arrangements, are more easily paralleled in France than in Britain. Within, there was a single large room to each floor, and the entire structure echoed the power and influence of its builder.
Following ap Thomas’s death he was succeeded by his son William Herbert who continued to develop Raglan. As a prominent Yorkist, he played a major role in securing the throne for Edward IV in 1461, and was raised to the peerage as Lord Herbert of Raglan. Eventually rising to earl of Pembroke, his political career is reflected in his sumptuous building. Under Herbert, Raglan became a veritable palace, unmatched in the 15th century southern March. He added the great gatehouse, the Pitched Stone Court and also rebuilt the Fountain Court with a series of formal state apartments for himself and his household. All of these repay careful examination. Notice, for example, the circular gun ports in the lower part of the gatehouse. The great kitchen lay in the tower at the corner of the Pitched Stone Court, and its huge ovens and fireplaces remain.
Herbert was beheaded following his defeat at the battle of Edgecote in 1469, and there were no further major alterations to Raglan until the ownership of William Somerset, earl of Worcester (1548-89). In the main, he was responsible for extensive changes to the hall, which remains the finest and most complete of all apartments in the castle. The huge fireplace survives, as does the tracery of the beautiful windows. These were once filled with heraldic glass, and the roof was built of Irish oak. Earl William also added the long gallery, without which no great Elizabethan house was complete.
At the outbreak of the Civil War, Raglan was garrisoned for the king. Henry, the new earl, and later marquess of Worcester, poured his fortune into the royal cause. By 1646 the castle was under siege, one of the longest of the Civil War. It was pounded by heavy artillery under the command of Sir Thomas Fairfax, and finally the elderly marquess was forced to surrender.
The fall of Raglan virtually marked the end of the Civil War, and Cromwell’s demolition engineers were soon at work reducing the great walls. However, the strength of the Great Tower was almost great enough to defy them. Only after ‘tedious battering the top thereof with pickaxes’, did they eventually undermine the walls and two of its six sides were brought crashing down in a mass of falling masonry.

written by Jeff Thomas, 1994

William Pembroke Herbert (1423 – 1469)
18th great-grandfather
Maud Countess of Northumberland Herbert (1453 – 1485)
Daughter of William Pembroke Herbert
Eleanor Dutchess Buckingham Percy (1474 – 1530)
Daughter of Maud Countess of Northumberland Herbert
Elizabeth Dutchess Norfolk Stafford Howard (1497 – 1558)
Daughter of Eleanor Dutchess Buckingham Percy
Lady Katherine Howard Duchess Bridgewater (1495 – 1554)
Daughter of Elizabeth Dutchess Norfolk Stafford Howard
William ApRhys (1522 – 1588)
Son of Lady Katherine Howard Duchess Bridgewater
Henry Rice (1555 – 1621)
Son of William ApRhys
Edmund Rice (1594 – 1663)
Son of Henry Rice
Edward Rice (1622 – 1712)
Son of Edmund Rice
Lydia Rice (1649 – 1723)
Daughter of Edward Rice
Lydia Woods (1672 – 1738)
Daughter of Lydia Rice
Lydia Eager (1696 – 1735)
Daughter of Lydia Woods
Mary Thomas (1729 – 1801)
Daughter of Lydia Eager
Joseph Morse III (1756 – 1835)
Son of Mary Thomas
John Henry Morse (1775 – 1864)
Son of Joseph Morse III
Abner Morse (1808 – 1838)
Son of John Henry Morse
Daniel Rowland Morse (1838 – 1910)
Son of Abner Morse
Jason A Morse (1862 – 1932)
Son of Daniel Rowland Morse
Ernest Abner Morse (1890 – 1965)
Son of Jason A Morse
Richard Arden Morse (1920 – 2004)
Son of Ernest Abner Morse
Pamela Morse
I am the daughter of Richard Arden Morse

William Pembroke Herbert

William Pembroke Herbert

 

SIR WILLIAM HERBERT, EARL OF PEMBROKE, was elder son of William Herbert of Raglan Castle, called also William ap Thomas, and in Welsh Margoah Glas, or Gumrhi, who fought in France under Henry V, and was made a knight-banneret in 1415. Herbert’s mother was Gladys, daughter and heiress of David Gam, and widow of Sir Robert Vaughan. Sir Richard Herbert of Colebrook was a younger brother. Sir William’s grandfather, Thomas ap Gwillim ap Jenkin (d.1438), secured Raglan Castle on his marriage with Maud, daughter and heiress of Sir John Morley.

The Herbert family claimed descent from ‘Herbertus Camerarius,’ a companion of William I, and his son ‘Henry Thesaurarius,’ both of whom were tenants in capite in Hampshire.1 The descendants of Henry Thesaurarius in the fifteenth-century claimed that he was ‘son natural of King Henry the First,’ and that they were thus connected with ‘the Royal Blood of the Crown of England,’2 but the pretension contradicts established fact. Peter, the great-grandson of Henry Thesaurarius, seems to have been the first of the family to settle in Wales. He received from John in 1210 many grants of land there forfeited by William of Braose, Peter’s descendants by intermarriages with Welsh heiresses acquired very large estates in South-east Wales, and practically became Welshmen.

Herbert was a warrior from his youth. He was knighted by Henry VI in 1449, and in 1450 was on active service in France under the Duke of Somerset. He was taken prisoner at the battle of Formigny in 1450, but was apparently soon released. He played a prominent part on the side of the Yorkists in the Wars of the Roses. In Wales he did very notable service against Jasper Tudor, Earl of Pembroke, Henry, Duke of Exeter, and James, Earl of Wiltshire.

On 1 May 1457 it was reported that the Lancastrians had offered him his life and goods if he would come to Leicester and ask pardon of Henry VI; but the Yorkists were still strong, and he remained faithful to them.3 On Edward IV’s accession Herbert was made a privy councillor (10 March 1461). On 8 May following he was granted the offices of chief justice and chamberlain of South Wales, and some sub-ordinate posts; on 7 Sept. he was made steward of those castles, including that of Brecknock in South Wales, which had belonged to Humphrey, Duke of Buckingham. On 4 Nov. he was created Baron Herbert, and received in consideration of his services the castle, town, and lordship of Pembroke, with numerous manors and castles on the Welsh marches.

On 29 April 1462 he appeared in the House of Lords, and was made a knight of the Garter. Shortly afterwards he joined Edward IV in an expedition to the north of England, where Lancastrians still held out. In 1463 he was appointed justice in Merionetshire, and received new grants of land, including Dunster, and those manors in Devonshire and Suffolk which had been forfeited by Sir James Luttrell. On 3 June 1466 he was in London, and accompanied Edward IV on a visit to the Archbishop of York. In 1467 he was nominated chief justice of North Wales for life, and made constable of Carmarthen and Cardigan castles.

In August 1468 Pembroke and his brother, Sir Richard, advanced against the castle of Harlech, the last Lancastrian stronghold in Wales, where Jasper Tudor, with his young nephew Henry (afterwards Henry VII), still resisted the power of Edward IV. After a siege the castle, although strongly fortified, surrendered, but Sir Richard promised the governor to do what he could to save his life. Sir Richard petitioned Edward IV to that effect, and the request was unwillingly granted. Herbert seems to have taken Prince Henry prisoner, and he was appointed his guardian; but a plan to marry Henry to his daughter Maud failed.

He was advanced to the dignity of Earl of Pembroke (8 Sept. 1468), after the attainder of Jasper Tudor, and received the manor of Haverfordwest and the offices of chief forester of Snowdon and constable of Conway Castle. Soon afterwards the two brothers proceeded to Anglesey to apprehend seven brothers who had been guilty of ‘many mischiefs and murders.’ The mother pleaded strongly with Pembroke to spare the lives of two of her sons. Richard seconded her prayer, but Pembroke refused to yield, and executed all. Whereupon the mother cursed him on her knees, ‘praying God’s mischief might fall to him in the first battle he should make.’4

Meanwhile Pembroke and the Earl of Warwick had quarrelled. Pembroke, it is said, desired to marry his infant son to the daughter of Lord Bonvile, and Warwick opposed the arrangement. Pembroke thenceforth sought to widen the breach which was threatening the king’s relations with Warwick, and as early as 1466 he had captured in Wales a messenger of Queen Margaret of Anjou, with whom he showed that Warwick was intriguing. In January 1467 the disagreement seemed subsiding, and Pembroke and Warwick both attended a meeting of the king’s council.

But in July 1469 a rebellion, which was largely fomented by Warwick, broke out in the north. The rebels declared for Henry VI, and rapidly marched south. Pembroke readily prepared an army of Welshmen to resist their progress. He and his brother were ordered with their army to join at Banbury a strong detachment of archers under the command of Humphrey Stafford, Earl of Devonshire, and to intercept the enemy there. The first part of the manoeuvre was successfully accomplished. But a skirmish between a detachment of Pembroke’s army under Sir Richard and some rebel troops ended in the total rout of the former.

Immediately afterwards Pembroke and Devonshire encamped at Hedgecote, near Banbury. A quarrel between the commanders, however, caused Devonshire to lead his archers away, almost in presence of the enemy. On 26 July Pembroke, with his strength thus seriously impaired, was forced to give battle [Battle of Edgecote]. Panic seized his Welsh followers. He and his brother fought desperately. Sir Richard is said to have twice passed through the ‘battail of his adversaries,’ armed with a poleaxe, and ‘without any mortal wound returned.’But the defeat was decisive, and both brothers were taken prisoners.

Pembroke pleaded for his brother’s life in vain, on the ground of his youth; he declared that he was willing to die. On 27 July he made his will, giving directions for his funeral, making many pious bequests to Tintern Abbey and other religious foundations, and providing almshouses for the relief of six poor men. On 28 July Pembroke and Sir Richard were brought to Northampton and beheaded there. Pembroke was buried in Tintern Abbey, and Sir Richard in Abergavenny Church, where his wife Margaret was also buried.5

Pembroke married Anne, daughter of Sir Walter Devereux, Lord Ferrers of Chartley, and had by her four sons, William, Walter, George, and Philip, and six daughters. By a mistress, Maud, daughter of Adam ap Howell Graunt, he had some illegitimate issue, including Sir Richard Herbert, father of Sir William, first Earl of Pembroke of the second creation (1501?-1570).

Eleanor Percy, Duchess of Buckingham, 16th Great-Grandmother

August 3, 2018

Eleanor Dutchess Buckingham Percy

Eleanor Dutchess Buckingham Percy

Eleanor Percy, Duchess of Buckingham (ca. 1474 – 13 February 1530), also known as Alianore, was a daughter of Henry Percy, 4th Earl of Northumberland by his wife Lady Maud Herbert, herself a daughter of the first Earl of Pembroke. She married Edward Stafford, 3rd Duke of Buckingham, who was beheaded in 1521 on false charges of plotting to overthrow the king, Henry VIII. As a result, the Buckingham title and estates were forfeited, and her children lost their inheritance.
She was born about 1474 in Leconfield, Yorkshire. On 14 December 1490, at about sixteen years of age, Eleanor married Edward Stafford, 3rd Duke of Buckingham, who was five years old when his father, the rebellious 2nd Duke of Buckingham, was attainted and executed for high treason. Edward Stafford’s mother, Catherine Woodville, went on to marry the first Duke of Bedford and thirdly, Richard Wingfield. Two years after his father’s execution, when Henry VII ascended the throne, the attainder was reversed, and the title and estates of Edward’s father were restored to him. At seven, Edward became the third Duke of Buckingham and also the ward of King Henry VII’s mother, Lady Margaret Beaufort.
After Edward’s death, Eleanor remarried to John Audley. Her second marriage was childless.
Eleanor bore her husband, Edward Stafford, four children:
Mary (born abt. 1495), married George Nevill, 5th Baron Bergavenny, parents of Mary Nevill, Baroness Dacre
Elizabeth (1497 – 30 November 1558), married Thomas Howard, 3rd Duke of Norfolk.
Catherine (born abt. 1499 – 14 May 1555), married Ralph Neville, 4th Earl of Westmorland.
Henry (18 September 1501 – 30 April 1563), 1st Baron Stafford, married Ursula Pole, daughter of Margaret Pole, 8th Countess of Salisbury.

Eleanor Dutchess Buckingham Percy (1474 – 1530)
16th great-grandmother
Elizabeth Dutchess Norfolk Stafford Howard (1497 – 1558)
Daughter of Eleanor Dutchess Buckingham Percy
Lady Katherine Howard Duchess Bridgewater (1495 – 1554)
Daughter of Elizabeth Dutchess Norfolk Stafford Howard
William ApRhys (1522 – 1588)
Son of Lady Katherine Howard Duchess Bridgewater
Henry Rice (1555 – 1621)
Son of William ApRhys
Edmund Rice (1594 – 1663)
Son of Henry Rice
Edward Rice (1622 – 1712)
Son of Edmund Rice
Lydia Rice (1649 – 1723)
Daughter of Edward Rice
Lydia Woods (1672 – 1738)
Daughter of Lydia Rice
Lydia Eager (1696 – 1735)
Daughter of Lydia Woods
Mary Thomas (1729 – 1801)
Daughter of Lydia Eager
Joseph Morse III (1756 – 1835)
Son of Mary Thomas
John Henry Morse (1775 – 1864)
Son of Joseph Morse III
Abner Morse (1808 – 1838)
Son of John Henry Morse
Daniel Rowland Morse (1838 – 1910)
Son of Abner Morse
Jason A Morse (1862 – 1932)
Son of Daniel Rowland Morse
Ernest Abner Morse (1890 – 1965)
Son of Jason A Morse
Richard Arden Morse (1920 – 2004)
Son of Ernest Abner Morse
Pamela Morse
I am the daughter of Richard Arden Morse

Henry Stafford, Second Duke Of Buckingham

July 31, 2018 1 Comment

Henry Stafford, Duke of Buckingham

Henry Stafford, Duke of Buckingham

Henry Stafford, Second Duke of Buckingham, (1454-1483), was the son of Humphrey Stafford, killed at the first battle of St. Albans in 1455, and grandson of Humphrey the 1st Duke (cr. 1444), killed at Northampton in 1460, both fighting for Lancaster. The first duke, who bore the title of Earl of Buckingham in right of his mother, was the son of Edmund, 5th Earl of Stafford, and of Anne, daughter of Thomas, Duke of Gloucester, youngest son of Edward III; Henry’s mother was Margaret Beaufort, daughter of Edmund Beaufort, 2nd Duke of Somerset,* grandson of John of Gaunt. Thus he came on both sides of the Blood Royal, and this, coupled with the vastness of his inheritance, made the young duke’s future of importance to Edward IV.

He was recognized as duke in 1465, and next year was married to Catherine Woodville, the queen’s [Elizabeth Woodville] sister. On reaching manhood he was made a Knight of the Garter in 1474, and in 1478 was high steward at the trial of George, Duke of Clarence. He had not otherwise filled any position of importance, but his fidelity might seem to have been secured by his marriage. However, after Edward’s death; Buckingham was one of the first persons worked upon by Richard, Duke of Gloucester. It was through his help that Richard obtained possession of the young king [Edward V], and he was at once rewarded with the offices of Justiciar and Chamberlain of North and South Wales, and Constable of all the royal castles in the principality and Welsh Marches. In the proceedings which led to the deposition of Edward V he took a prominent part, and on the 24th of June 1483 he urged the citizens at the Guildhall to take Richard as king, in a speech of much eloquence, “for he was neither unlearned and of nature marvellously well spoken” (Sir Thomas More).

At Richard’s coronation he served as chamberlain, and immediately afterwards was made Constable of England and confirmed in his powers in Wales. Richard might well have believed that the duke’s support was secured. But early in August Buckingham withdrew from the court to Brecon. He may have thought that he deserved an even greater reward, or possibly had dreams of establishing his own claims to the crown. At all events, at Brecon he fell somewhat easily under the influence of his prisoner, John Morton, who induced him to give his support to his cousin Henry Tudor, Earl of Richmond. A widespread plot was soon formed, but Richard had early warning, and on the 15th of October, issued a proclamation against Buckingham. Buckingham, as arranged, prepared to enter England with a large force of Welshmen. His advance was stopped by an extraordinary flood on the Severn, his army melted away without striking a blow, and he himself took refuge with a follower, Ralph Bannister, at Lacon Hall, near Wem. The man betrayed him for a large reward, and on the 1st of November, Buckingham was brought to the king at Salisbury. Richard refused to see him, and after a summary trial had him executed next day (2nd of November 1483), though it was a Sunday.

Buckingham’s eldest son, Edward Stafford (1478-1521), eventually succeeded him as 3rd Duke, the attainder being removed in 1485; the second son, Henry, was afterwards Earl of Wiltshire. The 3rd Duke played an important part as Lord High Constable at the opening of the reign of Henry VIII, and is introduced into Shakespeare’s play of that king, but he fell through his opposition to Wolsey, and in 1521 was condemned for treason and executed (17th of May); the title was then forfeited with his attainder, his only son Henry (1501-1563), who in his father’s lifetime was styled Earl of Stafford, being, however, given back his estates in 1522, and in 1547 restored in blood by parliament with the title of Baron Stafford, which became extinct in this line with Roger, 5th Baron, in 1640. In that year the barony of Stafford was granted to William Howard (1614-1680), who after two months was created Viscount Stafford; he was beheaded in 1680, and his son was created Earl of Stafford in 1688, a title which became extinct in 1762; but in 1825 the descent to the barony of 1640 was established, to the satisfaction of the House of Lords, in the person of Sir G. W. Jerningham, in whose family it then continued

  • [AJ Note: not to be confused with the more famous Margaret Beaufort, daughter of John Beaufort, first Duke of Somerset.]
Henry Stafford Duke of Buckingham (1454 – 1483)
17th great-grandfather
Edward Richard Buckingham Stafford (1479 – 1521)
Son of Henry Stafford Duke of Buckingham
Elizabeth Dutchess Norfolk Stafford Howard (1497 – 1558)
Daughter of Edward Richard Buckingham Stafford
Lady Katherine Howard Duchess Bridgewater (1495 – 1554)
Daughter of Elizabeth Dutchess Norfolk Stafford Howard
William ApRhys (1522 – 1588)
Son of Lady Katherine Howard Duchess Bridgewater
Henry Rice (1555 – 1621)
Son of William ApRhys
Edmund Rice (1594 – 1663)
Son of Henry Rice
Edward Rice (1622 – 1712)
Son of Edmund Rice
Lydia Rice (1649 – 1723)
Daughter of Edward Rice
Lydia Woods (1672 – 1738)
Daughter of Lydia Rice
Lydia Eager (1696 – 1735)
Daughter of Lydia Woods
Mary Thomas (1729 – 1801)
Daughter of Lydia Eager
Joseph Morse III (1756 – 1835)
Son of Mary Thomas
John Henry Morse (1775 – 1864)
Son of Joseph Morse III
Abner Morse (1808 – 1838)
Son of John Henry Morse
Daniel Rowland Morse (1838 – 1910)
Son of Abner Morse
Jason A Morse (1862 – 1932)
Son of Daniel Rowland Morse
Ernest Abner Morse (1890 – 1965)
Son of Jason A Morse
Richard Arden Morse (1920 – 2004)
Son of Ernest Abner Morse
Pamela Morse
I am the daughter of Richard Arden Morse

Henry Stafford, 2nd Duke of Buckingham, KG (4 September 1455 – 2 November 1483) played a major role in King Richard III’s rise and fall.  He is also one of the primary suspects in the disappearance (and presumed murder) of the Princes in the Tower. Buckingham was related to the royal family of England in many different ways, but his connections were all through daughters of younger sons. His chances of inheriting the throne would have seemed remote, but he played the role of a ‘kingmaker’ for Richard III and, unsuccessfully, for Henry VII

Buckingham was the son of Humphrey Stafford, Earl of Stafford, and Margaret Beaufort, Countess of Stafford. Three of his four grandparents were descended from Edward III of England:
Buckingham’s paternal grandfather was Humphrey Stafford, 1st Duke of Buckingham, who was the son of Anne of Gloucester, daughter of Thomas of Woodstock, 1st Duke of Gloucester, the youngest son of Edward III.
Buckingham’s paternal grandmother was Lady Anne Neville, a daughter of Joan Beaufort, Countess of Westmorland, while Buckingham’s maternal grandfather was Edmund Beaufort, 2nd Duke of Somerset, the youngest son of John Beaufort, 1st Earl of Somerset. John and Joan Beaufort were illegitimate children of John of Gaunt, 1st Duke of Lancaster, (the third son of Edward III) and Katherine Swynford. (They were later legitimized by John of Gaunt but were not in the direct line and could not claim the throne).

Thus, Buckingham was closely related to the royal families of England and Scotland. Five of his near relations became King of England – his (Lancaster) second cousin, once removed Henry VI, his (Beaufort/Neville) first cousins, once removed Edward IV and Richard III, his second cousin Edward V, and his (Beaufort/Holland) second cousin, once removed Henry VII – while two relations became Queen consorts of England: his (Beauchamp) first cousin, once removed (and Beaufort/Neville second cousin) Lady Anne Neville and his (Beaufort/Neville) second cousin, Elizabeth of York. His (Beaufort/Holland) first cousin, once removed was James II of Scotland.

His father, Humphrey Stafford, Earl of Stafford, supported the House of Lancaster in the initial phase of the Wars of the Roses. He died in 1458 of wounds after First Battle of St Albans, and his paternal grandfather, Humphrey Stafford, 1st Duke of Buckingham, another leading Lancastrian, was killed at the Battle of Northampton (10 July 1460). After his grandfather’s death, Henry was recognized as Duke of Buckingham. The new Duke eventually became a ward of Queen Elizabeth Woodville, consort of Edward IV of England.

Sometime before the Queen’s coronation in May 1465 he was married to her sister Catherine Woodville, Duchess of Buckingham and Bedford (b.1458). Both parties were children at the time; they were carried on squires’ shoulders at the coronation ceremony and were reared in the queen’s household together. According to Dominic Mancini, Buckingham resented his wife and the other Woodvilles because of his marriage to a woman of a lower status.

In 1483, a conspiracy arose among a number of disaffected gentry, supporters of Edward IV. They originally planned to depose Richard III and place Edward V back on the throne. When rumours arose that Edward and his brother (the Princes in the Tower) were dead, Buckingham intervened, proposing instead that Henry Tudor return from exile, take the throne and marry Elizabeth of York. For his part, Buckingham would raise a substantial force from his estates in Wales and the Marches.

Richard eventually put down the rebellion; Henry’s ships ran into a storm and had to go back to Brittany, and Buckingham’s army was greatly troubled by the same storm and deserted when Richard’s forces came against them. Buckingham tried to escape in disguise but was turned in for the bounty Richard had put on his head, and he was convicted of treason and beheaded in Salisbury on 2 November. A monument in nearby Britford Church has been identified as his. Following Buckingham’s execution, his widow, Catherine, married Jasper Tudor.

#NaPoWriMo All My Relations

April 2, 2018

 

The grandmothers

What do you think you learned studying our family history?
Have you reached conclusions about the nature of human existence?
I believe the most pertinent thing I have learned is about delusion
We stay in deep canyons of ignorance in groups habitually
Are you saying we are all ignorant, or that you are so enlightened?
Not at all, dear ancestors, for my own generation I am frightened
Have you seen how the people are destroying Mother Earth?
You should know that this battle began in earlier centuries
That you choose what role you play by the company you keep
All your relations continue to speak directly to your soul’s mysteries

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This is day 2 of National Poetry Writing Month.  Join the fun all over the internet by following the hashtag #NaPoWriMo2018.  Meet poets from around the world and submit your own work here.  Let yourself bust a rhyme. Now is the time!!

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#WritePhoto Thaw

December 21, 2017 12 Comments

thaw

thaw

Crimson mittens kept our fingers warm as we marched up the hill in the forrest. Our lunch was still heavy in our systems while we trudged through the snow on the icy path looking for firewood. The night before we had slept at our grandparents’ cabin, full of memories, old books, letters, and games. We sifted through the boxes of photos, finding some that had been taken of our childhood visits. Those black and white images of our grandparents before their hair turned white flooded us with sentimentality.

We sat next to the fireplace telling stories and laughing about our youth until we had consumed all the dry wood. Watching the embers die and darkness descend was like witnessing the energy drained from those gentle ancestors who left us this cabin. They spent their lives in remote isolation, content with nature’s schedule. The grandchildren came for a month every summer, but returned to the city for the rest of the year.  Now that they were gone we came out on winter holiday to take care of the place and decide what to do with it.  It was the first time we had seen the place in winter.  It was the only time we had been there without our grandparents.

We found a few pieces of dry wood tucked into a cranny in the rocks.  We carried enough back to the house to make one more fire.  This time the stories turned solemn, and spirits joined together in a mutual sadness and loss.  We had busy lives, rarely stopping to reflect.  None of us gathered our own firewood or even cleaned our own houses in the city.  Our family was warmed in the glow of the fire, and let go of the daily grind.  We recognized the loss of our grandparents was also the loss of a way of life none of us had embraced.  The cabin contained traditions and memories that were melting like the snow, dissolving into the earth.  This year the thaw will wash away most of our family’s connection to this place.  It is possible to gain a fortune and lose it again many times.  Once time is gone, it will never return.

#writephoto

#writephoto

Please join Sue Vincent each Thursday for a photo prompt on her Echo.  Read, comment, or write your own story, poem, or essay here.  The responses are many and varied.

William Ellison Taylor, Great-Grandfather

August 15, 2017 1 Comment

William and Lucinda

William and Lucinda

My maternal great-grandfather fought for the Confederacy in the Civil War. I have a copy of the military records and pension applications for my maternal  great-grandfather, William Ellison Taylor. He enlisted in the Civil War on April 26, 1861, Company C, 4th Regiment, Alabama Regiment of Volunteers, under the command of Captain N.H.R. Dawson. He was injured at the Battle of First Manassas, Virginia, on July 21, 1861. He was discharged October 22, 1861.  His great-grandfather, Jonathan Aaron Taylor, fought in the Revolutionary War in South Carolina. After the Civil war William and his wife’s family moved to East Texas and bought land. He became a preacher.

William Ellison Taylor

William Ellison Taylor

The following is from Gospel Preachers Who Blazed the Trail by C. R. Nichol, 1911.

William Ellyson Taylor was born in Alabama, November 22, 1839, and was reared in that state. His education was received in the common schools. When the war broke out between the states he enlisted in the 4th Alabama Regiment and went to Virginia. In the battle of Manassas. July 21, 1861, he was wounded, which made him a cripple for life.

Dec. 27. 1864, he was married to Lucinda Armer, who has been his faithful help-meet, and to the present shares his joys and sorrows. To this union six boys and two girl have been born.

November, 1869, he moved to Texas. In August, 1874, Dr. W. L. Harrison preached the first sermon he ever heard. Afterward and and David Pennington became a Christian. In 1877 he began preaching and though he works on the farm, he has preached as he found opportunity. Entering the firgin field he has established congregations in Montgomery, San Jacinto and Walker counties and is now preaching monthly for congregations at Willis, Bethan and Ne Bethel, Montgomery County. When confined for nearly two years through sickness his brethren administer to his every need. All who know Bro. Taylor love him for his intrinsic worth and work in the Lord.

Gospel Preachers Who Blazed the Trail by C. R. Nichol, 1911.

William Ellison Taylor (1839 – 1918)
great-grandfather
George Harvey Taylor (1884 – 1941)
son of William Ellison Taylor
Ruby Lee Taylor (1922 – 2008)
daughter of George Harvey Taylor
Pamela Morse
I am the daughter of Ruby Lee Taylor
Ruby Lee was named after Robert E Lee.  She changed the spelling to Lea later in her life. My father’s ancestors fought for the Union army and worked on the underground railroad.

Say It In Latin, Felo de Se

September 6, 2016 2 Comments

Lower Surry Church

Lower Surry Church

Lawnes Creek Parish Church was the first church erected on Hogg Island in 1628 for the citizens of James City County who lived on the south side of the James River. Surry formed from James City County and the first parish for the area now encompassed by Surry County was known as “Lawnes Creek.”
The parish church members would have been buried at their place of worship as was the custom in those days.
This site is now occupied by the Surry Nuclear Plant.
No access permitted.

LAWNES CREEK PLANTATION, Rts 650 & 628
The peninsula of land about 2 miles in width and 8 in length between Lower Chippoakes Creek and Lawnes Creek and south of Hog Island, was, together with the lands adjoining upper Chippoakes Creek and opposite Jamestown, the first to be settled in Surry away from the James River. Virtually all this land had been patented before 1635, mainly by William Spencer, Captain William Pierce, Roger Delke, and Captain Lawrence Baker.

My 8th great-grandfather, John Holt was born in 1664 in Surry County, Virginia, a British colony.  He died in  1705 Surry County, Virginia, hung by his own hand.  His 8th great-grandson, George Harvey Taylor,  committed the same “Felonious homicide of a man’s self”  by drinking carbolic acid in 1941.  George Harvey was my  maternal grandfather.  It is said that suicide reoccurs in families.

He was listed in the 1687 Cavalry of Surrey County, Virginia.  John M. Holt was born in 1664 in Lawnes Creek Parish, Hog Island, Surry County, VA.  John died 1705 at the age of 41 in Surry County, VA.  John Holt committed suicide.

On Feb 24, 1685 Mr. John Holt and his wife were fined for not going to church by the Surry County Court. (This may have been rather harsh as she most probably was pregnant.)
In 1703 he petitioned the Legislature to be Keeper of the Ferry settled on James River to Archer’s Hope Creek on the north side. Appears on the 1704 Rent Roll for Surry County, VA On November of 1706 the Surry County Court Records state that “John Holt upon his petition is admitted to keep a ferry in Hog Island pursuant to a Law made to that purpose and for his better compliance therewith ordered that he forthwith provide and maintain one substantial flat bottom boat of at least fifteen feet by the keel for carrying over of horses as also one other boat of at least twelve or thirteen feet by keel for passengers with three able men constantly to attend the said service ant that he enter into a bond with good and sufficient security duly to perform the same. In May of 1710 John Holt petitioned the Court and they “exempted him from payment from his bond for keeping a ferry at Hog Island. (Surry County, Virginia Court Records, 1707-1711, Book VI

By 1704 the Holt family would own 2,768 acres in Surry County. Of this, 1,450 acres were controlled by Elizabeth Holt, wife of Randall Holt, Jr.. The remainder was owned by the sons of Randall and Elizabeth..

John Holt (1664 – 1705)
8th great-grandfather
David Holt (1685 – 1749)
son of John Holt
Sarah Holt (1740 – 1792)
daughter of David Holt
James Truly (1755 – 1816)
son of Sarah Holt
Elizabeth Betsy Truly (1782 – 1851)
daughter of James Truly
Minerva Truly Darden (1806 – 1837)
daughter of Elizabeth Betsy Truly
Sarah E Hughes (1829 – 1911)
daughter of Minerva Truly Darden
Lucinda Jane Armer (1847 – 1939)
daughter of Sarah E Hughes
George Harvey Taylor (1884 – 1941)
son of Lucinda Jane Armer
Ruby Lee Taylor (1922 – 2008)
daughter of George Harvey Taylor
Pamela Morse
I am the daughter of Ruby Lee Taylor

By 22 September 1705 John Holt “laid violent hands upon himself”
Suicide was against the law. Without regard to the rights of the heirs, the estate and property of the perpetrator reverted back to the crown.  Govenor of Virginia Colony was Edward Nott decribes John as a man “who being under some indisposition of mind lately hanged himself…troubled with lunacy and distraction of mind.”
John’s eldest son David, had already received a substantial land grant from his grandfather David Crafford prior to David’s twenty-first birthday. John’s sons John Jr., Charles, Benjamin, and Joseph attended the hearing. The deposition of the court read in part: “Having labor’ d long under a very great Indisposition of Mind, and at last layd violent hands upon himself”, a coroner’s jury found that his estate was forfeited as “Felo de Se.” {Latin for “Felonious homicide of a man’s self”}
Governor Edward Nott appealed to the Crown for the family. He inventoried the estate at: 159I, 16s, 6d, and “his Five Surviving Children are fit Objects of Our Mercy and Compassion.”.
Queen Anne commanded the restoration of his estate to them on 7 Jan. 1706. “the said estate consisting chiefly in cattle proper for plantations and other perishable good is hereby to be restored to his five children John, David, Charles, Joseph and Benjamin. ibid, p.512.”

Source: I want to Especially THANK Charles Lindley Holt for sending me his research on this Virginia Colony HOLT family. THANK YOU. I used his dates and many of his ” ” ‘s.
Also:: Familysearch had some of this “(taken from the book “Adventurers of Purse and Person”.}” .

 

Eber Sherman, ,7th Great-Grandfather

August 8, 2016 2 Comments

 

Sherman Coat of Arms

Sherman Coat of Arms

My 7th great-grandfather was born in Massachusetts, but moved with his parents to Rhode Island as baby.  His father was a judge and prominent Quaker in Rhode Island after being driven out of Salem for religious differences.  The family quit the Puritan Church and joined the Quaker Church. We have a copy of his will.

EBER SHERMAN WAS THE SON OF THE HON. PHILIP SHERMAN AND SARAH ODDINGS OF PORTSMOUTH, RHODES ISLAND, USA. HE MARRIED HIS FIRST WIFE MARY WILCOX, THE DAUGHTER OF EDWARD AND SUSANNA THOMPSON, AND SOPHIA A. BROWN HIS SECOND WIFE. HE WAS ADMITTED FREEMAN, TUESDAY, JUNE 08, 1658, IN PORTSMOUTH, RHODES ISLAND, HE WAS ONE OF THE FIRST SETTLERS IN THE NARRAGANSETT COUNTY, “DECB’R 05, 1679 AN ACCO’T OF LANDS LAID OUT & ALLWED TO MR. SAM’LL WILBORE & COMPA. TO JARED BULL, AND SEVERAL OTHERS”, SHOWS 500 ACRES TO EBER SHERMAN. (FONES RECORD-1894. PP36-7) ” HE WAS A PROMINENT AND INFLUENTIAL MAN, AND HELD MANY OF THE LOCAL OFFICES”. F.D. SHERMAN LISTS ABIGAIL AS A DAUGHTER WITH A QUESTION MARK, F.D.S. 602; A LETTER, MRS. THOMAS O. TREHARNE, TROY NY. HE SETTLED ON THE WEST SIDE OF
NARRAGANSETT BAY AT NORTH KINGSTON. “GOING TO PALMYRA; SHERMAN DEEDS” BY MARGARET SHERMAN, LUTZVICK, 1977.

Eber Sherman (1634 – 1706)
7th great-grandfather
Mary Sherman (1688 – 1751)
daughter of Eber Sherman
Thomas Sweet (1732 – 1813)
son of Mary Sherman
Thomas Sweet (1765 – 1844)
son of Thomas Sweet
Valentine Sweet (1791 – 1858)
son of Thomas Sweet
Sarah LaVina Sweet (1840 – 1923)
daughter of Valentine Sweet
Jason A Morse (1862 – 1932)
son of Sarah LaVina Sweet
Ernest Abner Morse (1890 – 1965)
son of Jason A Morse
Richard Arden Morse (1920 – 2004)
son of Ernest Abner Morse
Pamela Morse
I am the daughter of Richard Arden Morse

WILL OF EBER SHERMAN OF NORTH KINGSTON, RI.
GOD SO BLEST ME IN THIS LIFE I GIVE AND BEQUEATH THE SAME IN THE FOLLOWING MANNER AND FORM FIRST MY DEBTRS AND FUNERALL CHARGES BE PAID ( ) I GIVE TO MY BELOVED SON EBER SHERMAN ONE HUNDRED ACRES OF LAND JOYNING TO THE HOUSE WHICH JO ( ) TO BE TO HIM AND TO HIS HEIRES LAWFULLY BEGOTTEN OF HIS OWN BODY  ITEM; I GIVE TO MY BELOVED SON SAMUEL SHERMAN  ACRES OF LAND JOYNING AND BOUNDING UPON MY SON EBER SHERMANS LANDD THAT IS ABOVE MENTIONED TO BE TO HIM AND TO HIS HEIRES LAWFULLY BEGOTTEN OF HIS OWN BODY. ITEM I GIVE TO MY BELOVED SON STEPEN SHERMAN ONE HUNDRED ACRES OF LAND JOYNING AND BOUNDING UPON THE LAND GIVEN TO SAMUEL SHERMAN MY SONTHAT IS TO SAY TO HIM AND TO HIS HEIRES LAWFULLY BEGOTTEN OF HIS OWN BODY. I GIVE TO MY BELOVED SON ELISHA SHERMAN ONE HUNDRED ACRES OF LAND JOYNING AND BOUNDING UPON THE LAND GIVEN TO SON STEPEN SHERMAN BEFORE MENTIONED TO BE TO HIM AND HIS LAQFULLY GEGOTTEN OF HIS OWN BODY. ITEM I GIVE TO MY BELOVED SON WILLIAM SHERMAN ONE HUNDRED ACRES OF LAND ADJOYNING AND BOUNDING UPON THE LAND WHICH I HAVE GIVEN TO MY STO ELISHA SHERMAN TO BE TO HIM AND TO HIS HEIRES LAWFULLY BEGOTTEN OF HIS OWN BODY.ITEM. I GIVE TO MY BELOVED SON PELEG SHERMAN ONE HUNDRED AND EIGHTY & TWO ACRES OF LAND ( ) BOUNDED UPON JOHN SWEETS LAND NEAR ( ) TO BE TO HIM AND TO HIS HEIRES LAWFULLY BEGOTTEN OF HIS OWN BODY BUT IN CASE ANY OF THEM W ( ) ENTIONED SHAL DEPART THE ( ) I HEREBY UTTERLY DIALLOW AND REVOKE ALL OTHER TESTAMENTS AND WILLS BY ME FORERLY ANY WISE NAMED WRI( )ING AND CONFIRMING THIS & NOE OTHER TO MY LAST WILL AND TESTAMENT; IN WITNESS WHEREOF I HAVE HERE UNTO SETT MY HAND AND SEALE THE DAY AND YEAR ABOVE WRITEN  SIGNED SEALED PUBLISHED AND DECLARED TO BE THE LAST WILL AND TESTAMENT IN THE PRESENCE OF THE SUBSCRIBERS BY EBER SHERMAN. EBER ( HIS MARK) SHERMAN CAPTAIN JESSE ( HIS MARK) CHAMPLIN PELEG MUMFORD THEOPHILUS WHALE CAPT. JEFFERY CHAMPLIN AND PELED MUMFORD BOTH OF KINGSTOWNE IN THE COLONY OF RHOOD ISLAND AND PROVIDENCE PLANTATIONS DID BOTH APPEAR BEFORE THE COUNCIL OF KINGSTOWNE THE 14TH DAY OF ( ) DID DECLEAR THAT THEY DID SEE AND HEAR EBR SHERMAN OF KINSTOWNE (LATE DECEASED) SETT HIS MARK AND SEAL UPON THE ABOVE WRITEN INSTRUMENT AND DECLARED THE SAME TO ( ) HIS LAST WILL AND TESTAMENT AND THAT THEY SETT THEIR NAMES THERTO AS WITNESSES TO THE SAME. ENTERED UPON RECORD THE 13TH DAY NOVERMER 1706 SAMUEL FFONES CLARKE

INVENTORY OF EBER SHERMANS ESTATE LATE DECEASED BY US JUSTICE CHAMPLIN, JONATHAN SHERMA; OXEN FIVE COWS TWO THREE YEAR OLDS ONE CALF- – NORTH KINGSTOWN, R.I. PROBATE RECORDS V. 1-5, PP. 81-82 F.D.S. 603,604

THE ABOVE WILL CAN BE FOUND IN “SOME OF THE DESCENDANTS OF PHILIP SHERMAN, THE FIRST SECRETARY OF RHODE ISLAND” BY ROY V. SHERMAN, PP. 26-28—

Child of PHILIP SHERMAN and SARAH ODDING is:
5. i. EBER5 SHERMAN, b. December 1634, Roxbury, Suffolk Co., MA; d. 1706, North Kingstown, Washington Co., RI.

Generation No. 5

  1. EBER5 SHERMAN (PHILIP4, SAMUEL3, HENRY “THE ELDER”2, HENRY (SR.)1) was born December 1634 in Roxbury, Suffolk Co., MA4, and died 1706 in North Kingstown, Washington Co., RI4. He married SOPHIA A. BROWN4,5.

Notes for EBER SHERMAN:
Will of EBER SHERMAN of North Kingston, RI

(Margins destroyed by fire, Dec. 1870)
God so blest me in this life I give and bequeath the same in the following manner and form
first my debts and funerall charges be paid ( )
I give to my beloved Son Eber Sherman one hundred acres of land joyning to the house which jo ( )
to be to him and to his heires lawfully begotten of his own body ( )

Item: I give to my beloved son Samuel Sherman ( ) acres of land joyning and bounding upon my son Eber Shermans land that is above mentioned to be to him and to his heires lawfully begotten of his own body. Item I give to my beloved son Stephen Sherman one hundred acres of land joyning and bounding upon the land given to Samuel Sherman my son that is to say to him and to his heires lawfully begotten of his own body.

Item: I give to my beloved son Elisha Sherman one hundred acres of land joyning and bounding upon the land given to son Stephen Sherman before mentioned to be to him and his lawfully begotten of his own body. Item. I give to my beloved son William Sherman one hundred acres of land adjoyning and bounding upon the land which I have given to my son Elisha Sherman to be to him and to his heires lawfully begotten of his own body. Item. I give to my beloved son Peleg Sherman one hundred and eighty & two acres of land ( ) bounded upon John Sweets land near ( ) to be to him and to his heires lawfully begotten of his own body but in case any of them w( ) entioned shal depart th ( ) I hereby utterly disallow and revoke all other testaments and wills by me formerly any wise named wri( ) ing and confirming this & noe other to be my last will and testament; In witness whereof I have here unto sett my hand and seale the day and year above writen ( ) signed sealed published and declared to be the last will and testament in the presence of the subscribers by Eber Sherman.

Eber (his mark) Sherman
Captain Jesse ( his mark) Champlin
Peleg Mumford
Theophilus Whale
Capt. Jeffery Champlin and Peled Mumford both of Kingstowne in the colony of Rhood Island and Providence Plantations did both appear before the Council of Kingstowne the 14th day of ( ) did declear that they did see and hear Eber Sherman of Kingstowne (late deceased) sett his mark and seal upon the the above writen instrument and declared the same to ( ) his last will and testament and that they sett their names thereto as witnesses to the same.
Entered upon record the 13th day
November 1706

Samuel ffones Clerke


Inventory Follows
Kingstown October the 11th day 1706

Inventory of Eber Shermans Estate late deceased
By us Justice Champlin, Jonathan Sherman:

Oxen five cows two three year old
olds one calf–
North Kingstown, R.I. Probate Records V. 1-5, pp. 81-82
F.D.S. 603, 604

Eber was the son of the immigrant Philip Sherman and his wife, Sarah Odding. Secondary sources say Eber was born in Roxbury, Mass. December 1634; however, a “Heber Sherman” cosigned a deed in Portsmouth, RI on 1 March 1649 [/50?], and if that was this individual, then Eber would have been born no later than 1629. He d. N. Kingstown, RI 1706, and married late in life. c. 1677 Mary, b. c. 1650, living in Oct 1719 when named in the will of Eber’s brother, Peleg Sherman. Mary, in many sources, has been called the daughter of Edward Wilcox, but that Mary was born about 1639, and would be too old to be the mother of Eber’s younger children.

In his 1968 genealogy of the Sherman family, Roy V. Sherman asserts that Eber had another wife named Sophia Brown. If this is the case, then Sophia would have been a first wife, since Mary was the widow of Eber in 1719.

Though Eber grew up in Portsmouth, Rhode Island where his father settled, by 1670 he was living across the Narragansett Bay in Pettaquamscutt (now S. Kingstown), where he and four others were appointed to set a tax rate. In 1687 he was taxed in Kingstowne (which was spilt between North and South in 1722).

Eber’s will was proved in (North) Kingstown on 13 Nov 1706. Alden Beaman provided a good rendition of this family in his Rhode Island Genealogical Register, vol. 9, pages 1-12. However, I take exception to the son Stephen being placed as one of the older children, because he was the last of the children to marry. I have therefore re-arranged the children slightly from Beaman’s account. Children:

  • Eber, b. c. 1678, d. N. Kingstown 1758 (year his will was proved), and m. c. 1706 Martha REMINGTON, b. c. 1683, living in 1744 when named in her mother’s will, the daughter of John Remington and Abigail Richmond. On 13 Dec 1718, Eber and Martha sold land to Henry Gardiner (the second husband of Martha’s mother). Eber witnessed a will in S. Kingstown, RI 24 July 1725 (RIGR 6:83). Eber and Martha had seven known children born 1707 to 1724. Beer’s will, dated 1757, was proved in 1758, naming children John, Henry, William, and probably others whose names were lost. The burial location for Eber and Martha has not been determined, but they may be buried in the ancient Sherman Lot in N. Kingstown, Hist Cem #133. This is where Eber’s brother William is buried, and where the second wife of his brother Stephen is likely buried. Find-a-grave memorials have been created for Eber and Martha without a cemetery.
  • Samuel, b. c. 1680; administration of his estate was given to his brother Eber on 14 Sep 1742, so without wife or children he probably did not marry, or once had a wife but no surviving children.
  • Peleg, b. c. 1682, d. 1752, married c. 1714, and had five children born in N. Kingstown, but wife’s name was lost from burning of records. Peleg’s will was proved in Exeter, RI 6 May 1752. He had five children born 1715 to 1725.
  • Elisha, b. c. 1685, d. N.Kingstown 1750, and m. c. 1715 Mary SWEET, b. N. Kingstown 8 Dec 1696, d. there 1775, daughter of Benoni Sweet and Elizabeth Manchester. They had nine known children born 1716 to 1735.
  • Mary, b. 26 June 1688, m. c. 1714 James SWEET, b. 28 May 1687, d. 19 July 1751, son of Benoni Sweet and Elizabeth (Manchester?). They had nine children born 1715 to 1729.
  • William, b. c. 1690, living 20 Sep 1757 when he deeded land in N. Kingstown, m. c. 1716 Abigail PALMER, b. 1796, living in 1757 when she cosigned a deed with her husband, the daughter of Edward Palmer. Abigail was baptized, late in life, on 9 July 1752, in her 57th year at St. Paul’s Church of Narraganset, by immersion in Pettasquamscutt Pond. William and Abigail had eleven children born 1717 to 1737. William and Abigail are said to be buried in the Sherman Lot, Hist Cem NK #133, where several of their descendants are buried.
  • Stephen, b. c. 1693, d. 1773, m. (1) c. 1721 Sarah Freeman. b. say 1700, d. c. 1728; (2) at his home in N. Kingstown 18 Oct 1730 Margaret Hackstone, b. say 1695, d. 17 Nov 1748 and buried in Sherman Burial Yard on 18 Nov (per St. Paul’s Episcopal Church Records as abstracted in the Gen Dict RI, v. 10); (3) Exeter 15 July 1749 Giffie Sweet. b. c. 1705, living in 1772 when mentioned in her husband’s will. Stephen’s will, dated 29 Feb 1772, was proved at N. Kingstown 3 Sep 1773. Stephen had four children with his first wife, born 1722 to 1727 and five more with his second wife, born 1731 to c. 1739.
  • Abigail, b. c. 1695, named as one of the children by John Austin in his Genealogical Dictionary of Rhode Island, but I find no record of her.

Say It In Latin, Nemo Me Impune Lacessit

July 29, 2016 3 Comments

Coat of Arms of Scotland(1660-1689).

Coat of Arms of Scotland(1660-1689).

Latin is sometimes the most technical as well as the most expressive way to convey a concept.  The phrase Nemo Me Impune Lacessit means “Wha daur meddle wi’ me?” in Scottish.  This is the motto of the Scottish Dragoon Guards.  It translates literally into English as “No one cuts me with impunity.”  I like the way it makes clear where the line has been drawn. This was also the motto of my ancestors in the Stewart clan.  I like all my ancestral warriors, but I think I like the Scotsmen the best.  Even when they came to America to be Presbyterians they were badass Revolutionary War heroes in South Carolina.  They had a super strong sense of independence.

This phrase was taught to me by one of the gentle readers of this blog, and I treasure it, along with my ancestors who embodied it.  Thank you John Holton for this tasty and meaningful piece of history.  I hope to go someday to Edinburgh Castle where it is written above the entrance.

Edinburgh castle Nemo me impune lacessit

Edinburgh castle Nemo me
impune lacessit

Sir Richard, 11th Earl of Oxford, De Vere, 19th Great-Grandfather

July 20, 2016 1 Comment

resting place

resting place

Birth Place-Hedingham Castle

Birth Place-Hedingham Castle

Richard de Vere, 11th Earl of OxfordKG (15 August 1385 – 15 February 1417) was the son and heir of Aubrey de Vere, 10th Earl of Oxford. He took part in the trial of Richard, Earl of Cambridge and Lord Scrope for their part in the Southampton Plot, and was one of the commanders at Agincourt in 1415.
Richard de Vere, born 15 August 1385, was the eldest son of Aubrey de Vere, 10th Earl of Oxford, and his wife Alice Fitzwalter, daughter of John, 2nd Baron Fitzwalter, by Eleanor Percy, daughter of Henry de Percy, 2nd Baron Percy. The 10th Earl died on 23 April 1400 while Richard was underage. His wardship was initially granted to his mother, but after her death on 29 April 1401, King Henry IV granted it to his mother-in-law, Joan de Bohun, Countess of Hereford.  Oxford had livery of his lands on 21 December 1406 without proof of age.
From 1410 onwards Oxford was appointed as a commissioner in Essex on various occasions, and in November 1411 was a Trier of Petitions from overseas in Parliament.
In August 1412 Oxford was among those who sailed to Normandy under Thomas of Lancaster, 1st Duke of Clarence, to aid the Armagnac party against the Burgundians. According to Pugh, the members of the nobility who accompanied the Duke of Clarence on this expedition did so in hope of financial gain, Oxford’s earldom in particular having suffered from forfeitures and attainders during the lives of his predecessors which had made him ‘the poorest member of the English higher nobility’.  Another member of the Duke of Clarence’s expedition was Richard, 3rd Earl of Cambridge, and three years later, on 5 August 1415, Oxford was among the peers at the trial, presided over by the Duke of Clarence, which condemned to death Cambridge and Lord Scrope for their part in the Southampton Plot on the eve of Henry V’s invasion of France.  A few days later Oxford sailed to France with the King, and was one of the commanders at Agincourt on 25 October 1415.
In May 1416 Oxford was invested with the Order of the Garter, and in that year sailed with the fleet to relieve Harfleur, taking part in the naval battle at the mouth of the Seine on 15 August.
Oxford died 15 February 1417, aged 31, and was buried at Earls Colne, Essex. His widow, Alice, married Sir Nicholas Thorley (d. 5 May 1442). She died 18 May 1452, and was buried at Earls Colne.

Oxford married firstly, before 1400, Alice Holland, daughter of John Holland, 1st Duke of Exeter by Elizabeth, sister of King Henry IV and daughter of John of Gaunt, Duke of Lancaster. There were no issue of the marriage.
Oxford married secondly, about 1406-7, Alice Sergeaux (c.1386 – 18 May 1452), the widow of Guy St Aubyn of St Erme, Cornwall, and daughter of Sir Richard Sergeaux of Colquite, Cornwall by his second wife, Philippe (d. 18 May 1452), the daughter and co-heiress of Sir Edmund de Arundel,who had been bastardized by the annulment in 1344 of the marriage of his parents, Richard Fitzalan, 10th Earl of Arundel and Isabel Despenser. They had three sons:
John de Vere, 12th Earl of Oxford.
Sir Robert Vere (1410-1461), of Haccombe, Devon, who married Joan Courtenay (d. before 3 August 1465), daughter of Sir Hugh Courtenay by Philippa Archdekne, and widow of Sir Nicholas Carew (d. before 20 April 1448). Sir Robert Vere and Joan Courtenay had one son, John Vere (d. before 15 March 1488), who married Alice Colbroke, and by her was father of John de Vere, 15th Earl of Oxford.
Sir Richard Vere, who married Margaret Percy (d. 22 September 1464), widow of Henry Grey, 6th Baron Grey of Codnor (d. 17 July 1444), and daughter and co-heiress of Sir Henry Percy ‘of Atholl’ of Harthill, Yorkshire, and his wife Elizabeth Bardolf, daughter of William Bardolf, 4th Baron Bardolf by Agnes Poynings.

References
· Cokayne, George Edward (1945). The Complete Peerage, edited by H.A. Doubleday X. London: St. Catherine Press.
· Castor, Helen (2004). Vere, John de, twelfth earl of Oxford,(1408-1462), magnate. Oxford Dictionary of National Biography. Retrieved 15 March 2011.

Sir Richard, 11th Earl of Oxford DeVere KG (1385 – 1417)
19th great-grandfather
Sir John 12th Earl of Oxford DeVere (1408 – 1462)
son of Sir Richard, 11th Earl of Oxford DeVere KG
John DeVere (1447 – 1509)
son of Sir John 12th Earl of Oxford DeVere
John DeVere (1490 – 1540)
son of John DeVere
Frances DeVere (1517 – 1577)
daughter of John DeVere
Thomas Howard (1536 – 1572)
son of Frances DeVere
Margaret Howard (1561 – 1591)
daughter of Thomas Howard
Lady Ann Dorset (1552 – 1680)
daughter of Margaret Howard
Robert Lewis (1574 – 1656)
son of Lady Ann Dorset
Robert Lewis (1607 – 1644)
son of Robert Lewis
Ann Lewis (1631 – 1686)
daughter of Robert Lewis
Joshua Morse (1669 – 1753)
son of Ann Lewis
Joseph Morse (1692 – 1759)
son of Joshua Morse
Joseph Morse (1721 – 1776)
son of Joseph Morse
Joseph Morse III (1756 – 1835)
son of Joseph Morse
John Henry Morse (1775 – 1864)
son of Joseph Morse III
Abner Morse (1808 – 1838)
son of John Henry Morse
Daniel Rowland Morse (1838 – 1910)
son of Abner Morse
Jason A Morse (1862 – 1932)
son of Daniel Rowland Morse
Ernest Abner Morse (1890 – 1965)
son of Jason A Morse
Richard Arden Morse (1920 – 2004)
son of Ernest Abner Morse
Pamela Morse
I am the daughter of Richard Arden Morse

Hedingham Castle
middle ages to the present , Essex, England
Aubrey de Vere was one of William the Conqueror’s most favoured knights. After the Battle of Hastings he was given land in many counties including Middlesex where he owned Kensington and Earls Court. His son Aubrey II built a huge castle at Hedingham c.1140 using the Archbishop of Canterbury as his architect. Aubrey III was created Ist Earl of Oxford by Queen Matilda and the castle remained the stronghold of the de Veres for 550 years and is still owned by a descendant. The Norman keep with its magnificent banqueting hall and minstrels’ gallery is now the only remaining evidence of this great medieval castle and its later extensive Tudor buildings.
The immensely rich and powerful de Veres were one of the most important medieval families who, as Lord Great Chamberlains, gave loyal service and military leadership to their kings and queens for over 500 years. Hedingham had many royal visitors including King Henry VII, King Henry VIII and Queen Elizabeth I.
The Earls of Oxford were great crusaders and Aubrey, 2nd Earl fought with Richard Coeur de Lion and Robert, 3rd Earl was one of the barons who forced King John to sign the Magna Carta in 1215. The following year Hedingham Castle was besieged by King John, and again by the Dauphin of France in 1217. The de Veres were commanders throughout history and featured at the Siege of Caerlaverock and the famous battles of Crecy, Poitiers, Agincourt and Bosworth. John, 15th Earl took part in the Battle of the Spurs and accompanied King Henry VIII at the Field of the Cloth of Gold, and as Lord 
Great Chamberlain bore the crown at Anne Boleyn’s coronation. John, 16th Earl escorted young Elizabeth from Hatfield to London for her coronation in 1559 and his wife Margery became her maid of honour. In 1561 Queen Elizabeth I aged twenty-eight stayed at Hedingham from August 14th-19th, and Edward,17th Earl, became one of her favourites and was acclaimed to be the best of the courtier poets.
Aubrey, 20th Earl of Oxford, had no sons and when he died in 1703 this famous title became extinct. His daughter Diana married Charles, the illegitimate son of Nell Gwynne and King Charles II who was created 1st Duke of St. Albans. In 1713 the castle was purchased by Sir William Ashhurst, M.P., Lord Mayor of London. He landscaped the grounds and built a fine country house which was finished in 1719. The estate passed to his great granddaughter, Elizabeth Houghton who married Lewis Majendie. This family owned Hedingham for 250 years until Miss Musette Majendie left it to her cousin, The Honourable Thomas Lindsay, who is descended from the de Veres through both his mother and his father. His son Jason and his wife Demetra now live at Hedingham with their three small children.
The castle is now available to be seen and explored by visitors. It is even possible to have weddings and banquets there.

His monumental effigy was removed from the ruined priory at Earls Colne and placed at St Stephen’s Chapel in Bures, Suffolk.

A cenotaph is an "empty tomb" or a monument erected in honour of a person or group of people whose remains are elsewhere. The word derives from the Greek: κενοτάφιον = kenotaphion (kenos, one meaning being "empty", and taphos, "tomb").

A cenotaph is an “empty tomb” or a monument erected in honour of a person or group of people whose remains are elsewhere. The word derives from the Greek: κενοτάφιον = kenotaphion (kenos, one meaning being “empty”, and taphos, “tomb”).

 

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