mermaidcamp

mermaidcamp

Keeping current in wellness, in and out of the water

You can scroll the shelf using and keys

John Mead, 8th Great-Grandfather

July 4, 2016 4 Comments

headstone

headstone

My 8th great-grandfather came to America as young boy with his parents and became a founder of Hartford, Connecticut.

John was born about 1628 in England and came to Connecticut with his parents as a young child. He married Hannah Potter, daughter (or possibly stepdaughter) of William Potter of Stamford. John and his brother Joseph moved from Stamford to Hempstead, Long Island, and returned to Connecticut by 1664. John died 5 Feb 1699, probably in Connecticut. John was one of seven original proprietors of Greenwich, CT, as described at http://www.rootsweb.com/~ctfairfi/pages/greenwich/greenwich_index.htm

“On February 5, 1664, the Seven Proprietors made a formal request to the General Assembly in Hartford to be allowed to separate from Stamford and to support its own minister and lay out its own lands. The Seven Proprietors were John MEAD, Jonathan RENALDS, John HOBBY, Joseph FERRIS, Joshua KNAPP, Angell HUSTED, and Jeffrey FERRIS.
On May 11, 1665, the General Assembly in Hartford declared Greenwich a separate township, and authorized funds for the hiring and support of an orthodox minister. In 1672, the so-called “27 Proprietors” bought land from the few remaining Indians to the west of the “Myanos River.” This land became known as “Horseneck” because of the neck of land now known as Field Point was the common HORSE PASTURE. ”
John signed all documents with a mark, but had several books in his estate inventory, so he could probably read but not write.
John and Hannah had eleven children:
John, b. abt 1658, married Ruth Hardey in 1681.
Joseph, b. 2 May 1660, married Mary.
Hannah, b. abt 1661, married John Scofield 12 Jul 1677.
Ebenezer, b. 1663, married Sarah Knapp in 1691.
JONATHAN, b. abt 1665, married Martha Finch.
David, b. abt 1665, married Abigail Leane 16 Dec 1707.
Benjamin, b. May 1666, married first Sarah Waterbury, second Rachel Brown.
Nathaniel, b. abt 1669, married Rachel.
Samuel, b. abt 1673, married Hannah.
Abigail, b. abt 1675. Fairfield Probate Records cited in The Ancestry of Elizabeth Barret Gillespie, “reveal that she was incompetent to manage her own affairs: ‘Whereas John Mead Sen’r, deceased, of Greenwich, haveing not made Satisfieing provision in his will for his daughter Abegaile Mead, She being not Capable of doing for her Self as may be desired by Reason, whearof Ebeneaz Mead of Greenwich dos hereby, in the presence of ye Prerogative Court, Engage to pay unto ye s’d Abegaile Mead, his sister, ye Sum of therty and five pounds, to be paid unto her According as he Shall Apprehend She Shall stand in Need of it for her Comfortable subsistence.”

Tomac Burying Ground

Tomac Burying Ground

John Mead's House

John Mead’s House

John Mead (1634 – 1699)
8th great-grandfather
Benjamin Daniel Mead (1667 – 1746)
son of John Mead
Mary Mead (1724 – 1787)
daughter of Benjamin Daniel Mead
Abner Mead (1749 – 1810)
son of Mary Mead
Martha Mead (1784 – 1860)
daughter of Abner Mead
Abner Morse (1808 – 1838)
son of Martha Mead
Daniel Rowland Morse (1838 – 1910)
son of Abner Morse
Jason A Morse (1862 – 1932)
son of Daniel Rowland Morse
Ernest Abner Morse (1890 – 1965)
son of Jason A Morse
Richard Arden Morse (1920 – 2004)
son of Ernest Abner Morse
Pamela Morse
I am the daughter of Richard Arden Morse

The following anecdote, which has been preserved by tradition, shows his character: One day when he was quite an old man, as he was going for his grist on horseback to the mill at Dumpling Pond, before he reached the Mianus River he overtook and old Quaker jogging slowly along, loaded with a heavy budget. In a real spirit of kindness he offered to take the Quaker’s load upon his horse, and thus give him a lift on his journey. No,replied the Quaker, thee don’t get my bundle, for I can read men’s thoughts. Thee wants to get my bundle, and then thee’ll run off. Thee don’t get my bundle. Very well, was the simple reply, and so they went slowly on together. At last they came to the brink of the Mianus River. Here the Quaker was really in trouble. How to cross a river, two or three feet deep, dry shod, was quite a puzzle. But he gladly accepted a second offer of assistance from the horseman. The bundle was mounted in front, John in the middle, and the Quaker behind. Arriving at the centre of the river, in pretending to adjust his stirrup John caught the Quaker by the heel and gave him a gratuitous bath. Such treatment was too much, even for Quaker forbearance, and the victim, with his hands full of pebbles, would have taken summary vengeance, had not the other party threatened to put the bundle under a similar course of treatment. This threat, and the lecture following it, gradually cooled off the Quaker’s anger. John informed him that all had been done for his good, to teach him a lesson. And the lecturer said he hoped the stranger would never again profess to read men’s thoughts. For, said he, I asked you to ride, kindly in the first place, when you refused; but at the second time of asking, I really intended to do as I have just done. So saying, and tossing the bundle back, he rose on, leaving his companion to apply the moral as he thought best.

Margaret Howard, 13th Great-Grandmother

June 30, 2016 2 Comments

Margaret Howard

Margaret Howard

Margaret Howard was the daughter of Thomas Howard, 4th duke of Norfolk (March 10, 1538-June 2, 1572) and his second wife, Margaret Audley (1539-January 10, 1564). Her father’s execution for treason when she was ten limited her choice of husbands but in February 1569 she married Robert Sackville of Bolbrooke and Buckhurst, Sussex and Knole, Kent (1561-February 27, 1609), later Lord Buckhurst and earl of Dorset. They had three sons and three daughters, including Richard (1590-1624), Edward (1591-1652), Anne, and Cecily. After her death, Robert Southwell published a small volume in her honor and Sackville described his late wife as “a lady . . . of as great virtue . . . as is possible for any man to wish to be matched withal.” He asked to be buried at Withyham “as near to my first dearly beloved wife . . . as can be” and ordered that £200 to £300 be spent on their tomb, with effigies of them both. A devout Catholic, she influenced his religious beliefs.

Robert Sackville and Margaret Howard

Robert Sackville and Margaret Howard

Margaret Howard (1561 – 1591)
13th great-grandmother
Lady Ann Dorset (1552 – 1680)
daughter of Margaret Howard
Robert Lewis (1574 – 1656)
son of Lady Ann Dorset
Robert Lewis (1607 – 1644)
son of Robert Lewis
Ann Lewis (1631 – 1686)
daughter of Robert Lewis
Joshua Morse (1669 – 1753)
son of Ann Lewis
Joseph Morse (1692 – 1759)
son of Joshua Morse
Joseph Morse (1721 – 1776)
son of Joseph Morse
Joseph Morse III (1756 – 1835)
son of Joseph Morse
John Henry Morse (1775 – 1864)
son of Joseph Morse III
Abner Morse (1808 – 1838)
son of John Henry Morse
Daniel Rowland Morse (1838 – 1910)
son of Abner Morse
Jason A Morse (1862 – 1932)
son of Daniel Rowland Morse
Ernest Abner Morse (1890 – 1965)
son of Jason A Morse
Richard Arden Morse (1920 – 2004)
son of Ernest Abner Morse
Pamela Morse
I am the daughter of Richard Arden Morse

Robert Sackville, 2nd Earl of Dorset, married first, in February 1580, Lady Margaret, by then only surviving daughter of Thomas Howard, 4th Duke of Norfolk, then suspected as a crypto-Catholic. By her he had six children, including:
Richard Sackville, 3rd Earl of Dorset (18 March 1589 – 28 March 1624)
Edward Sackville, 4th Earl of Dorset (1591 – 17 July 1652)
Anne, married Sir Edward Seymour, eldest son of Edward Seymour, Viscount Beauchamp, and, secondly, Sir Edward Lewis (d.1630) by whom she had issue
Cecily, married Sir Henry Compton, K.B.
Lady Margaret died on 19 August 1591; Robert Southwell, who never met her, published in her honour, in 1596, Triumphs over Death, with dedicatory verses to her surviving children

My 15th great-uncle, Thomas Sackville, inherited a calendar house, Knole House, in Kent, where they, no doubt, all visited.  The house became famous:

Knole is an English country house in the town of Sevenoaks in west Kent, surrounded by a 1,000-acre (4.0 km2) deer park. One of England’s largest houses, it is reputed to be a calendar house, having 365 rooms, 52 staircases, 12 entrances and 7 courtyards. It is known for the degree to which its early 17th-century appearance is preserved, particularly in the case of the state rooms: the exteriors and interiors of many houses of this period, such as Clandon Park in Surrey, were dramatically altered later on. The surrounding deer park has also survived with little having changed over the past 400 years except for the loss of over 70% of its trees in the Great Storm of 1987.
In 1566, during the reign of Queen Elizabeth I, it came into the possession of her cousin Thomas Sackville whose descendants the Earls and Dukes of Dorset and Barons Sackville have lived there since 1603 (the intervening years saw the house let to the Lennard family). Most notably, these include writer Vita Sackville-West (her Knole and the Sackvilles, published 1922, is regarded as a classic in the literature of English country houses); her friend and lover Virginia Woolf wrote the novel Orlando drawing on the history of the house and Sackville-West’s ancestors. The Sackville family custom of following the Salic rules of primogeniture prevented Sackville-West herself from inheriting Knole upon the death of her father Lionel (1867–1930), the 3rd Lord Sackville, and her father bequeathed the estate to his brother Charles (1870–1962).

Thomas Howard, 3rd Duke of Norfolk

June 21, 2016 4 Comments

 

Tomb of Thomas Howard - 3rd Duke of Norfolk St. Michael's Church; Suffolk,England Thomas Howard was buried here after his death on Aug. 25, 1554. It is possibly the best preserved ornate stonework in Europe. Although both Thomas and his wife, Elizabeth Stafford appear on the same monument, only he is buried there. She was interred in the Howard Chapel in St. Mary's Church, Lambeth. This was due to the unhappy marriage and final separation.

Tomb of Thomas Howard – 3rd Duke of Norfolk St. Michael’s Church; Suffolk,England Thomas Howard was buried here after his death on Aug. 25, 1554. It is possibly the best preserved ornate stonework in Europe. Although both Thomas and his wife, Elizabeth Stafford appear on the same monument, only he is buried there. She was interred in the Howard Chapel in St. Mary’s Church, Lambeth. This was due to the unhappy marriage and final separation.

Thomas Howard, 3rd Duke of Norfolk (1473 – 25 August 1554) was a prominent Tudor politician. He was uncle to two of the wives of Henry VIII, Anne Boleyn and Catherine Howard, and played a major role in the machinations behind these relationships. After falling from favor he was imprisoned in the Tower of London with his dukedom forfeit, and was released on the accession of Mary I. He aided in securing Mary’s throne, setting the stage for alienation between his Catholic family and the Protestant royal line that would be continued by Elizabeth I.

As with all the Dukes of Norfolk, Thomas Howard was descended from Edward I. He was the son of Thomas Howard, 2nd Duke of Norfolk, and Elizabeth Tilney. Thomas Howard succeeded his younger brother Edward as Lord High Admiral in 1513. Until 1524 he was styled Earl of Surrey.

Norfolk first married Anne of York, daughter of Edward IV of England and Elizabeth Woodville on 4 February 1494 at Greenwich Palace. The couple had at least two children: Thomas Howard (c. 1496-1508) and a stillborn child (c. 1499). There are also suggestions of short-lived Henry Howard and William Howard resulting from this marriage.
Following Anne’s death in 1511 he married Elizabeth Stafford, daughter of Edward Stafford, 3rd Duke of Buckingham and Alianore Percy on 8 January 1512. They had three children: Lady Mary Howard (c. 1513-1555) who married Henry Fitzroy, illegitimate son of Henry VIII; Henry Howard (1517-1547) was one of the founders of Renaissance poetry; and Thomas Howard (c.1520-1582). The marriage with Elizabeth was unhappy. When Elizabeth complained about his mistress, Bess Holland, the Duke beat her. The couple remained estranged until Norfolk’s death.

On his father’s death in 1524 he inherited the dukedom of Norfolk and was named Lord High Treasurer and Earl Marshal, making Howard one of the most premier nobles in the kingdom. He distinguished himself many times in battle, and was an able soldier. His power increased somewhat after his niece Anne Boleyn became Henry VIII’s mistress, sometime around 1527. However, their relationship was fraught with difficulty since Anne found her uncle to be selfish and untrustworthy. Although they were political allies throughout the late 1520s alongside Howard’s brother-in-law Thomas Boleyn, Anne’s father, Norfolk once complained that Anne used words to him “that one would not use to a dog.” She was crowned queen in 1533, and was probably influential along with Queen Anne in securing the marriage of Norfolk’s daughter Mary to Henry Fitzroy.

Queen Anne’s religious and political vision was more radical than Norfolk’s, and their relationship deteriorated throughout 1535 and 1536 as Henry VIII became increasingly unfaithful, including with Anne’s cousin, Mary Shelton. Putting his own security before family loyalties, he presided over Queen Anne’s trial in 1536, giving a death sentence despite her probable innocence. The next day, he condemned to death his nephew, Anne’s brother George for the crime of incest with his own sister, the Queen.
After the death of Jane Seymour he used another of his nieces, the teenaged Catherine Howard to strengthen his power at court by orchestrating an affair between her and the 48 year-old king. He used Henry’s subsequent marriage to Catherine as an opportunity to dispose of his long-term enemy Thomas Cromwell, who was beheaded in 1540. Queen Catherine’s reign was a short one, however, since Thomas Cranmer, the Archbishop of Canterbury, discovered that she was already secretly betrothed before her marriage to Henry and had been extremely indiscreet since. Catherine was beheaded in February 1542, and numerous other Howards were imprisoned in the Tower – including the duke’s stepmother, brother, two sisters-in-law and numerous servants.

Catherine Howard’s execution was his downfall, despite Norfolk’s desperate efforts to heal the rift. He had become the leader of the premier family in England; as the uncle of Anne Boleyn and Catherine Howard, and the great-uncle of Jane Seymour[1] He had also benefited from the influence of several of the King’s mistresses, his nieces Mary Boleyn and Elizabeth Carew and his wife’s aunt, Anne Stafford, Countess of Huntingdon. In 1546, Norfolk allegedly hatched a plot to make his daughter, Mary Howard, the King’s mistress, even though she was the widow of Henry’s illegitimate son.[2] In December 1546, he was arrested in company with his son Henry and charged with treason. Henry VIII died the day before the execution was due to take place, and Norfolk’s sentence was commuted to imprisonment. The Earl of Surrey was less fortunate and had been executed a few days previously.
Norfolk remained in the Tower throughout the reign of Edward VI of England and his dukedom remained forfeit. He was released by Mary I in 1553, due to the Howards being an important Catholic family, and the dukedom was restored. The Duke showed his gratitude by leading the forces sent to put down the rebellion of Thomas Wyatt, who had protested against the Queen’s forthcoming marriage to Philip II of Spain and had planned to put Anne Boleyn’s daughter, the future Elizabeth I on the throne in Mary’s place. The result of Norfolk’s suppression of the Wyatt Rebellion was Princess Elizabeth’s imprisonment in the Tower (although there was not enough evidence to convict her on treason, since she clearly had not been party to the rebels’ precise intentions) and the execution of the Queen’s cousin Lady Jane Grey. Norfolk died not long after the Wyatt Rebellion and was succeeded by his grandson Thomas. The 4th Duke, also a Catholic, was executed on Elizabeth’s orders for illegally plotting to marry Mary Queen of Scots.

Thomas Howard’s tomb is situated in Framlingham Church, Suffolk. It is among the best preserved example of ornate stonework in Europe

Lord Thomas Howard (1473 – 1554)
15th great-grandfather
Lady Katherine Howard Duchess Bridgewater (1495 – 1554)
daughter of Lord Thomas Howard
William ApRhys (1522 – 1588)
son of Lady Katherine Howard Duchess Bridgewater
Henry Rice (1555 – 1621)
son of William ApRhys
Edmund Rice (1594 – 1663)
son of Henry Rice
Edward Rice (1622 – 1712)
son of Edmund Rice
Lydia Rice (1649 – 1723)
daughter of Edward Rice
Lydia Woods (1672 – 1738)
daughter of Lydia Rice
Lydia Eager (1696 – 1735)
daughter of Lydia Woods
Mary Thomas (1729 – 1801)
daughter of Lydia Eager
Joseph Morse III (1756 – 1835)
son of Mary Thomas
John Henry Morse (1775 – 1864)
son of Joseph Morse III
Abner Morse (1808 – 1838)
son of John Henry Morse
Daniel Rowland Morse (1838 – 1910)
son of Abner Morse
Jason A Morse (1862 – 1932)
son of Daniel Rowland Morse
Ernest Abner Morse (1890 – 1965)
son of Jason A Morse
Richard Arden Morse (1920 – 2004)
son of Ernest Abner Morse
Pamela Morse
I am the daughter of Richard Arden Morse

My 15th great-grandfather, Thomas Howard, 3rd Duke of Norfolk, KG (1473 – 25 August 1554)  aided Mary in securing her throne, which ended him and his family  in a world of trouble. He was fully immersed in the politics of Henry VIII, and paid the price for it.  Those were treacherous times to be close to the king.

Thomas Howard

Thomas Howard

 

 

Matilda Princess of Scotland

June 11, 2016 3 Comments

 

 

Marriage of Henry I of England (1068-1135) to Princess (Eadgyth) Matilda of Scotland. Engraving c1880.

Marriage of Henry I of England (1068-1135) to Princess (Eadgyth) Matilda of Scotland. Engraving c1880.

My 27th great-grandmother was Princess of Alba/Albany. She was christened Edith, but adopted the name Matilda upon her marriage to Henry.  It was thought the Norman barons might not respect a queen with a Saxon name.
The marriage to Henry represented the union of Norman & Saxon royal lines.
She was crowned Queen Consort 11/14 Nov 1100 at Westminster Abbey.
Henry married Matilda (daughter of Margaret) to appease his Saxon subjects.  She is interred at Westminster Abbey, London, England (or Winchester).

Christened Edith, but adopted the name Matilda upon her marriage to Henry I. It was thought the Norman barons might not respect a queen with aSaxon name. The marriage to Henry represented the union of the Norman &Saxon royal lines. She is also known by the diminutive of that name – Maud (which had been the name of Henry’s mother). She was the sister of Edgar, King of Scotland 1098-1107.

Edith – Margaret (Matilda) of Scotland, born in 1080 and died in 1118, married Henry I. Beauclerc, King of England, son of William I The Conqueror (ruler from 1066 to 1087) and his wife, Matilda of Flanders,who died in 1083… Matilda was educated at Wilton and Romsey Abbey where she said that her aunt, Christina, forced her to wear a black veil. She threw it on the ground whenever left alone, in spite of beatings. When her mother died she came to England to Edgar Atheling, her uncle. She was a sister of King David of Scotland; she was a correspondent of Anselm and Hildebert, Bishop of Le Mans, who wrote poetry about her. She was asymbol of the union of Saxon and Norman. She was Henry’s Queen for seventeen years and six months, and died in her prime like most of herfamily. Henry and Matilda had a son and a daughter.

Matilda Princess of Scotland

Matilda Princess of Scotland

Matilda of Scotland (born Edith; c. 1080 – 1 May 1118) was the first wife and queen consort of Henry I of England. Matilda was born around 1080 in Dunfermline, the daughter of Malcolm III of Scotland and Saint Margaret. She was christened Edith, and Robert Curthose stood as godfather at her christening. Queen Matilda was also present at the font and may have been her godmother.When she was about six years old, Matilda (or Edith as she was then probably still called) and her sister Mary were sent to Romsey, where their aunt Cristina was abbess. During her stay at Romsey and Wilton, the Scottish princess was much sought-after as a bride; refusing proposals from William de Warenne, 2nd Earl of Surrey, and Alan Rufus, Lord of Richmond. Hermann of Tournai even claims that William II Rufus considered marrying her.She had left the monastery by 1093, when Anselm, Archbishop of Canterbury, wrote to the Bishop of Salisbury ordering that the daughter of the king of Scotland be returned to the monastery that she had left. After the death of William II Rufus in August 1100, his brother, Henry, soon seized the royal treasury and crown. His next task was to marry and Henry’s choice was Matilda. Because Matilda had spent most of her life in a convent, there was some controversy over whether she was a nun and thus ineligible for marriage. Henry sought permission for the marriage from Archbishop Anselm of Canterbury, who returned to England in September 1100 after a long exile. Professing himself unwilling to decide so weighty a matter on his own, Anselm called a council of bishops in order to determine the legality of the proposed marriage. Matilda testified that she had never taken holy vows, insisting that her parents had sent her and her sister to England for educational purposes, and her aunt Cristina had veiled her to protect her “from the lust of the Normans.” Matilda claimed she had pulled the veil off and stamped on it, and her aunt beat and scolded her for it. The council concluded that Matilda was not a nun, never had been and her parents had not intended that she become one, giving their permission for the marriage. Matilda and Henry seem to have known one another for some time before their marriage — William of Malmesbury states that Henry had “long been attached” to her, and Orderic Vitalis says that Henry had “long adored” Edith’s character.Her mother was the sister of Edgar the Ætheling, proclaimed but uncrowned King of England after Harold, and through her, Matilda was descended from Edmund Ironside and thus from the ancient royal family of Wessex, which in the 10th century, became the royal family of a united England. This was very important as Henry wanted to make himself more popular with the English people and Matilda represented the old English dynasty. In their children, the Norman and English dynasties would be united. Another benefit was that England and Scotland became politically closer; three of her brothers became kings of Scotland and were unusually friendly to England during this period.After Matilda and Henry were married on 11 November 1100 at Westminster Abbey by Archbishop Anselm of Canterbury, she was crowned as “Matilda”, a fashionable Norman name. She gave birth to a daughter, Matilda, in February 1102, and a son, William, in November 1103.As queen, she maintained her court primarily at Westminster, but accompanied her husband on his travels around England, and, circa 1106–1107, probably visited Normandy with him. She also served in a vice-regal capacity when Henry was away. Her court was filled with musicians and poets; she commissioned a monk, probably Thurgot, to write a biography of her mother, Saint Margaret. She was an active queen and, like her mother, was renowned for her devotion to religion and the poor. William of Malmesbury describes her as attending church barefoot at Lent, and washing the feet and kissing the hands of the sick. She also administered extensive dower properties and was known as a patron of the arts, especially music.After Matilda died on 1 May 1118 at Westminster Palace, she was buried at Westminster Abbey. The death of her only adult son and Henry’s failure to produce a legitimate son from his second marriage led to the succession crisis of The Anarchy.After her death, she was remembered by her subjects as “Matilda the Good Queen” and “Matilda of Blessed Memory”, and for a time sainthood was sought for her, though she was never canonized.Matilda and Henry had four children:
Matilda of England (c. February 1102 – 10 September 1167), Holy Roman Empress, Countess consort of Anjou, called Lady of the English
William Adelin, (5 August 1103 – 25 November 1120), sometimes called Duke of Normandy, who married Matilda (d.1154), daughter of Fulk V, Count of Anjou.
Euphemia, died young.
Richard, died young.
She is known to have been given the name “Edith” (the Old English Eadgyth, meaning “Fortune-Battle”) at birth, and was baptized under that name. She is known to have been crowned under a name favored by the Normans, “Matilda” (from the Germanic Mahthilda, meaning “Might-Battle”), and was referred to as such throughout her husband’s reign. It is unclear, however, when her name was changed, or why. Accordingly, her later name is used in this article. Historians generally refer to her as “Matilda of Scotland”; in popular usage, she is referred to equally as “Matilda” or “Edith”. References
Chibnall, Marjorie. The Empress Matilda: Queen Consort, Queen Mother, and Lady of the English, 1992
Hollister, Warren C. Henry I, 2001
Parsons, John Carmi. Medieval Mothering, 1996
Parsons, John Carmi. Medieval Queenship, 1997
Huneycutt, Lois L. “Matilda of Scotland: A Study in Medieval Queenship”.” 2004.

Matilda Princess of Scotland (1079 – 1118)
27th great-grandmother
Matilda, Empress of England Beauclerc (1102 – 1167)
daughter of Matilda Princess of Scotland
Henry II “Curtmantel” PLANTAGENET, “King of England” (1133 – 1189)
son of Matilda, Empress of England Beauclerc
Eleanor Spain Plantagenet (1162 – 1214)
daughter of Henry II “Curtmantel” PLANTAGENET, “King of England”
Berenguela CASTILE LEON (1181 – 1244)
daughter of Eleanor Spain Plantagenet
Saint Ferdinand Castile amp Leon (1199 – 1252)
son of Berenguela CASTILE LEON
Alfonso X Wise Castile Leon amp Galicia (1221 – 1284)
son of Saint Ferdinand Castile amp Leon
Sancho Brave Castile Leon (1258 – 1295)
son of Alfonso X Wise Castile Leon amp Galicia
Beatrice Sanchez Infanta Castile (1293 – 1359)
daughter of Sancho Brave Castile Leon
Peter I Portugal Cruel Algarve (1320 – 1367)
son of Beatrice Sanchez Infanta Castile
John I DePinto (1358 – 1433)
son of Peter I Portugal Cruel Algarve
Beatrix DePinto (1403 – 1447)
daughter of John I DePinto
John Fettiplace (1427 – 1464)
son of Beatrix DePinto
Richard Fettiplace (1460 – 1511)
son of John Fettiplace
Anne Fettiplace (1496 – 1567)
daughter of Richard Fettiplace
Mary Purefoy (1533 – 1579)
daughter of Anne Fettiplace
Susanna Thorne (1559 – 1586)
daughter of Mary Purefoy
Gov Thomas Dudley (1576 – 1653)
son of Susanna Thorne
Anne Dudley (1612 – 1672)
daughter of Gov Thomas Dudley
John Bradstreet (1652 – 1718)
son of Anne Dudley
Mercy Bradstreet (1689 – 1725)
daughter of John Bradstreet
Caleb Hazen (1720 – 1777)
son of Mercy Bradstreet
Mercy Hazen (1747 – 1819)
daughter of Caleb Hazen
Martha Mead (1784 – 1860)
daughter of Mercy Hazen
Abner Morse (1808 – 1838)
son of Martha Mead
Daniel Rowland Morse (1838 – 1910)
son of Abner Morse
Jason A Morse (1862 – 1932)
son of Daniel Rowland Morse
Ernest Abner Morse (1890 – 1965)
son of Jason A Morse
Richard Arden Morse (1920 – 2004)
son of Ernest Abner Morse
Pamela Morse
I am the daughter of Richard Arden Morse

Ramon Berenguer IV, Count of Provence and Forcalquier

June 8, 2016 2 Comments

Ramon Berenguer & Beatrice of Savoy

Ramon Berenguer & Beatrice of Savoy

My 23rd great grandfather was a nobleman born in France in 1198.  He died Jul. 19, 1245 and is buried at Eglise Saint Jean de Malte, Aix-en-Provence, Departement des Bouches-du-Rhone, Provence-Alpes-Cote d’Azur, France.  I want to visit his grave someday.  I love the Cote d’Azur.

Ramon was Count of Provence and Forcalquier. He was the only son of Alfonso II de Provence, who died 1209 during an epidemic in Palermo and Gersend de Sabran, Countess of Forcalquier. He married Beatrice of Savoy in 1220 who bore him five children. Their only son Raymond died young and their four daughters Marguerite, Eleanor, Sanchia and Beatrice were all married to kings.

Ramon Berenguer IV de Provence Saint (1195 – 1245)
23rd great-grandfather
Eleanor Berenger (1223 – 1291)
daughter of Ramon Berenguer IV de Provence Saint
Edward I “the Longshanks” Plantagenet (1239 – 1307)
son of Eleanor Berenger
Elizabeth of Rhuddlan Princess of England Plantagenet (1282 – 1316)
daughter of Edward I “the Longshanks” Plantagenet
William Earl of Northampton De Bohun (1312 – 1360)
son of Elizabeth of Rhuddlan Princess of England Plantagenet
Lady Elizabeth Countess Arundel Countess DeBohun (1350 – 1385)
daughter of William Earl of Northampton De Bohun
Elizabeth Duchess Norfolk Fitzalan (1366 – 1425)
daughter of Lady Elizabeth Countess Arundel Countess DeBohun
Lady Joan De Goushill Baroness Stanley (1402 – 1459)
daughter of Elizabeth Duchess Norfolk Fitzalan
Countess Elizabeth Sefton Stanley (1429 – 1459)
daughter of Lady Joan De Goushill Baroness Stanley
Thomas Sir 8th Earl of Sefton Molyneux (1445 – 1483)
son of Countess Elizabeth Sefton Stanley
Lawrence Castellan of Liverpool Mollenaux (1490 – 1550)
son of Thomas Sir 8th Earl of Sefton Molyneux
John Mollenax (1542 – 1583)
son of Lawrence Castellan of Liverpool Mollenaux
Mary Mollenax (1559 – 1598)
daughter of John Mollenax
Gabriell Francis Holland (1596 – 1660)
son of Mary Mollenax
John Holland (1628 – 1710)
son of Gabriell Francis Holland
Mary Elizabeth Holland (1620 – 1681)
daughter of John Holland
Richard Dearden (1645 – 1747)
son of Mary Elizabeth Holland
George Dearden (1705 – 1749)
son of Richard Dearden
George Darden (1734 – 1807)
son of George Dearden
David Darden (1770 – 1820)
son of George Darden
Minerva Truly Darden (1806 – 1837)
daughter of David Darden
Sarah E Hughes (1829 – 1911)
daughter of Minerva Truly Darden
Lucinda Jane Armer (1847 – 1939)
daughter of Sarah E Hughes
George Harvey Taylor (1884 – 1941)
son of Lucinda Jane Armer
Ruby Lee Taylor (1922 – 2008)
daughter of George Harvey Taylor
Pamela Morse
I am the daughter of Ruby Lee Taylor

in Church Saint-Jean-de-Malte, Aix-en-Provence, France

in Church Saint-Jean-de-Malte, Aix-en-Provence, France

 

 

Ramon Berenguer IV (1195 – 19 August 1245), Count of Provence and Forcalquier, was the son of Alfonso II of Provence and Garsenda of Sabran, heiress of Forcalquier. After his father’s death (1209), Ramon was imprisoned in the castle of Monzón, in Aragon until he was able to escape in 1219 and claim his inheritance. He was a powerful and energetic ruler who added Forcalquier to his domain. Giovanni Villani in his Nuova Cronica had this to say about Raymond:
Count Raymond was a lord of gentle lineage, and kin to them of the house of Aragon, and to the family of the count of Toulouse, By inheritance Provence, this side of the Rhone, was his; a wise and courteous lord was he, and of noble state and virtuous, and in his time did honourable deeds, and to his court came all gentle persons of Provence and of France and of Catalonia, by reason of his courtesy and noble estate, and he made many Provençal coblas and canzoni of great worth.
On 5 June 1219, Ramon married Beatrice of Savoy, daughter of Thomas I of Savoy. She was a shrewd and politically astute woman, whose beauty was likened by Matthew Paris to that of a second Niobe. Along with two stillborn sons (1220 & 1225), Ramon and Beatrice had four daughters, all of whom married kings.
Margaret of Provence (1221–1295), wife of Louis IX of France
Eleanor of Provence (1223–1291), wife of Henry III of England
Sanchia of Provence (1228–1261), wife of Richard of Cornwall, king of Germany
Beatrice of Provence (1234–1267), wife of Charles I of Sicily
Ramon Berenguer IV died in Aix-en-Provence. At least two planhs (Occitan funeral laments) of uncertain authorship (one possibly by Aimeric de Peguilhan and one falsely attributed to Rigaut de Berbezilh) were written in his honour.

Maria Jeanne, Countess of Ponthieu, Dammartin

June 7, 2016

Burial: Abbey of Valloires Argoules Departement de la Somme Picardie, France

Burial: Abbey of Valloires Argoules Departement de la Somme Picardie, France

My 23rd great-grandmother was born Apr. 19, 1199. She was a noblewoman.   Her title was Countess of Ponthieu and Montreuil. She was the only child and heiress of Guillaume II de Ponthieu and Alix de France. She married Simon de Dammartin and bore him four daughters. In 1241 she remarried Matthieu de Montmorency who was killed in the Battle of Mansurah in 1250.  She died Sep.,1250

Maria Jeanne, Countess of Ponthieu & Montreuil, Dammartin (1199 – 1250)
23rd great-grandmother
Queen Consort Joan (Castile and León) (Countess Ponthieu) DeDammartin (1216 – 1279)
daughter of Maria Jeanne, Countess of Ponthieu & Montreuil, Dammartin
Eleanor Castille Princess of Castille and Leon (1241 – 1290)
daughter of Queen Consort Joan (Castile and León) (Countess Ponthieu) DeDammartin
Elizabeth of Rhuddlan Princess of England Plantagenet (1282 – 1316)
daughter of Eleanor Castille Princess of Castille and Leon
William Earl of Northampton De Bohun (1312 – 1360)
son of Elizabeth of Rhuddlan Princess of England Plantagenet
Lady Elizabeth Countess Arundel Countess DeBohun (1350 – 1385)
daughter of William Earl of Northampton De Bohun
Elizabeth Duchess Norfolk Fitzalan (1366 – 1425)
daughter of Lady Elizabeth Countess Arundel Countess DeBohun
Lady Joan De Goushill Baroness Stanley (1402 – 1459)
daughter of Elizabeth Duchess Norfolk Fitzalan
Countess Elizabeth Sefton Stanley (1429 – 1459)
daughter of Lady Joan De Goushill Baroness Stanley
Thomas Sir 8th Earl of Sefton Molyneux (1445 – 1483)
son of Countess Elizabeth Sefton Stanley
Lawrence Castellan of Liverpool Mollenaux (1490 – 1550)
son of Thomas Sir 8th Earl of Sefton Molyneux
John Mollenax (1542 – 1583)
son of Lawrence Castellan of Liverpool Mollenaux
Mary Mollenax (1559 – 1598)
daughter of John Mollenax
Gabriell Francis Holland (1596 – 1660)
son of Mary Mollenax
John Holland (1628 – 1710)
son of Gabriell Francis Holland
Mary Elizabeth Holland (1620 – 1681)
daughter of John Holland
Richard Dearden (1645 – 1747)
son of Mary Elizabeth Holland
George Dearden (1705 – 1749)
son of Richard Dearden
George Darden (1734 – 1807)
son of George Dearden
David Darden (1770 – 1820)
son of George Darden
Minerva Truly Darden (1806 – 1837)
daughter of David Darden
Sarah E Hughes (1829 – 1911)
daughter of Minerva Truly Darden
Lucinda Jane Armer (1847 – 1939)
daughter of Sarah E Hughes
George Harvey Taylor (1884 – 1941)
son of Lucinda Jane Armer
Ruby Lee Taylor (1922 – 2008)
daughter of George Harvey Taylor
Pamela Morse
I am the daughter of Ruby Lee Taylor

Marie de Ponthieu (before 17 Apr 1199-Sep 1250). Daughter of Guillaume II “Talvas” de Ponthieu and Alix de France. The De Rebus Hispaniæ of Rodericus Ximenes names “Mariam…mater Joannæ Reginæ Castellæ et Legionis” as the daughter of “Comitis de Pontivo” and his wife “Adelodis” daughter of “Ludovico Regi Francorum” (and his wife “Elisabeth”, an error for Constanza). “Willelmus comes Pontivi et Monstreoli” donated property to the church of Saint Giosse, with the consent of “Marie filie mee et Aelis uxoris mee”, by charter dated 1205. “Willelmus comes Pontivi et Monstreoli…et Aalais uxor mea comitissa Pontivi et Maria filia mea” granted concessions by charter dated 1207. “Willelmus comes Pontivi et Monstreoli” granted rights to one of his vassals, with the consent of “Aalis, uxoris mee Ludovici regis filie et Marie filie mee”, by charter dated Aug 1208. “Renaldus comes Bolonie” confirmed the marriage contract between “Guillelmum comitem Pontivi et Mariam eiusdem comitis filiam” and “Simonem fratrem meum” by charter dated Sep 1208. “Willelmus comes Pontivi et Monstreoli” granted rights to the commune of Maioc, with the consent of “Aalis, uxoris mee et Symonis de Bolonia, generis mei, et Marie filie mee, uxoris eius”, by charter dated 1209. “Guilelmus comes Pontivi et Monstrolii” donated property to Saint-Maurice d’Agaune, for the souls of “Alaidis uxoris meæ et Mariæ filiæ meæ”, by charter dated Mar 1210. “Willaume comte de Pontieu et de Montreuil” agreed a concession made by one of his vassals, with the consent of “Aalis sa femme et de Marie leur fille” by charter dated Nov 1211.
She succeeded her father in 1221 as Countess de Ponthieu. Louis VIII King of France confirms an agreement with “consanguinea nostra Maria comitissa Pontivi” related to rights of her “filios et filios quos susceperat a Simone fratre comitis Renaldi Bolonie” by charter dated 1225. “Symon comes Pontivi et Monsteroli et Maria uxor mea” confirmed a donation of property to the abbey of Notre-Dame d’Ourscamp by “Johannes comes Pontivi” by charter dated 2 Mar 1230. “Maria comitissa Pontivi et Monstreoli” donated property to the church of Boulogne in memory of “Symon comes Pontivi et Monstreoli…maritus meus” by charter dated Oct 1239. “Matheus comes Pontivi et Monstreoli et Maria uxor eius, comitissa” noted property sales by charter dated Sep 1242. “Matheus de Montemorenc. comes Pontivi et Monsterolii dominus de Atechi” donated property, with the consent of “Maria comitissa Pontivi et Monsterolii uxor mea”, by charter dated Feb 1246.
Married firstly (contract Sep 1208) Simon de Dammartin, Comte de Aumale, son of Aubry II, Comte de Dammartin & his wife Mathilde [Mabile] de Clermont-en-Beauvaisis ( – 21 Sep 1239). Comte Simon & his wife had four children: Jeanne, Mathilde, Phillipa and Marie.
Married secondly (Sep 1240/15 Dec 1241) Mathieu de Montmorency, Seigneur d’Attichy, son of Mathieu II, Seigneur de Montmorency ( – killed in Battle Mansurah 8 Feb 1250).

Royal Flush-Princess Ancestors

June 6, 2016 5 Comments

Elizabeth's pedigree

Elizabeth’s pedigree

Both of my parents appear to descend from the Plantagenets of England.  The princess daughters of Edward I, Joan and Elizabeth, are my 22nd and 21st great-grandmothers.  I have found double ancestry before in my tree in the past.  I am not so concerned about inbreeding since this happened to my parents’ families in the 1200’s and they did not marry until 1942.

Princess Joan was born in Syria while her parents were on a crusade to the holy land.  Elizabeth was born in Wales.  There is a 10 year difference in their ages. Joan  and Elizabeth both married twice. After her first husband died young Joan married a commoner, my ancestor, who would be killed in battle.

Princess Elizabeth Plantagenet of England
Youngest Daughter of Edward I

Not much is written about Elizabeth. In medieval times, unless she became queen, a woman had little hope of being remembered in history. Rich or poor, most women faded into obscurity upon their death, never to be thought of again. So, what can be drawn from the known tidbits of Elizabeth’s life as a princess?
All little girls at one time or another dream of being a princess -no matter which country, culture, language, or religion; around the world, this is a universal fantasy for very young girls. Oddly enough however, the fantasy has nothing to do with the realities of medieval life, which was arguably coarse, unpaved, and uncomfortable for several hundred years. Rather, in a little girl’s mind, being a princess would mean spendiing money like it was going out of style, buying lavish wardrobes, dating all the good looking guys who always hang around the king in those ‘not particularly accurate’ movies about the middle ages -not to mention that we’d have a maid, meaning we’d never have to do household chores again. But, the lives of medieval noble women in actuality were far from idyllic.
A Princess’s Life
Elizabeth Plantagenet was born in August of 1282 at Rhuddlan Castle in North Wales. Her father, King Edward I, was on a millitary campaign in Wales, and Queen Eleanor had accompanied him, as was her custom.
Like moons locked in orbit around a domineering star, generally their fathers or husbands, there was no escape for medieval noble women. Their lives were often planned years in advance.
Frankly, it was the men in Elizabeth’s life who shaped her as a person. Fist, her father Edward, whom she loved dearly. Like all the other possessions belonging to her father, as a princess, Elizabeth was a tool in the making of Edward’s foreign policy.
But then, a Princess was not consulted with regard to her feelings on the matter. After all, in her father’s eyes, it was none of her business who she married. She was simply expected to do as the king requested.
Elizabeth Plantagenet was first married to John I, Count of Holland, in 1297.
After his death, she married Humphrey de Bohun on Nov. 14th, 1302. Although never done in continental royalty, a few daughters of the English Plantagenet Kings did marry commoners, such as in the case of Elizabeth. This fact is what permits any of the commoners of today to have a royal line of descent. Elizabeth had 6 sons and 4 daughters with Humphrey de Bohun, which included the twins William and Edward.
Elizabeth is reported to have been the most strong-headed of her sisters. She could be stuborn, confrontational, and openly argumentative, qualities that are traditionally discouraged in a princess. But, Elizabeth also knew how to get at least some of what she wanted in life -through superficial charm and flattery.
In fact, when Elizabeth and her other sisters wanted something, they used to gang up on their father the king, complimenting him, capitalizing on topics they knew to be ego boosters for him, turning him into malleable taffy, all the better to wrap him around their fingers. Poor Edward was a sucker for a beautiful girl, batting her eyes, fawning over him, making him feel like a pampered man. But, the decisions he made concerning his daughters’ futures were sober, carefully thought out ones. He was determined to have them married to his choice of men, for his reasons only -personal feelings notwithstanding.
Husband #1 -John I, Count of Holland
John I (1284-1299) was count of Holland and son of Count Floris V. After a campaign in 1287-1288 Cloris finally defeated the Frisians. In the meantime he had received Zeeland-bewester-Schelde (the area that controls access to the Scheldt river) as a loan from the Holy Roman King in 1287, but the local nobility sided with the count of Flanders who invaded in 1290. Floris arranged a meeting with count Guy of Flanders, but he was taken prisoner and was forced to abandon his claims and then set free.
Floris immediately wanted to resume war, but King Edward I of England, who had an interest in access to the great rivers for wool and other English goods, convinced Floris to stop hostilities with Flanders. Then Edward I moved his trade in wool from Dordrecht in Holland to Mechelen in Flanders and, in 1296. he prohibited all English trade on Holland and conspired with count Guy of Flanders to have Floris kidnapped and taken to France.The humiliated lords Gijsbrecht IV of Amstel and Hendrik of Woerden enter the scene again as part of the conspiracy.
Together with Gerard of Velzen they capture Count Floris during a hunting party. The news of his capture spreads quickly and the small group of knights is stopped by an angry mob of local peasants. In panic Gerard of Velzen kills the count, and the knights flee. Gerard of Velzen is later captured and killed in Leiden.

Having rid himself of both these irritants, Edward then arranges Elizabeth’s marriage to the dead man’s son John. In many ways, Edward I outdid his predescessors by developing his own dispicable brand of viciousness.
Elizabeth was the most strong willed of her sisters and was not afraid to argue with her father. Nonetheless, whether or not she agreed with the decision, she did as she was asked and married John, Count of Holland. And he wasn’t that bad of a catch for her. John inherited the county in 1296 after Edward practically arranged for the murder of his father. In the following year, he married Princess Elizabeth. At the wedding, Edward I threw her coronet into the fire, apparently unhappy at some aspect of wedding planning.
The marriage was not to last as John died soon afterwards in 1299, only fifteen years-old. With his death without descendents, Elizabeth was free to marry again.
Husband #2 -Earl Humphrey VIII of Hereford-Essex
The marriage of Humphrey VII to Elizabeth Plantagenet, daughter of Edward I was the very pinnacle of the DeBohun dynastic rise to power. Sir Humphrey was a favorite of Edward’s. Like the Claypools to follow, the DeBohun’s were Social climbers. They were among the people who sought their fortune by getting as close as they possibly could to the sovreign on the throne at any given time. Indeed, many fortunes were made and lost in just this way throughout the centuries in England.
Although he may have loved her, Humphrey was more concerned with how his marriage improved his social standing and the extent to which it could improve his landholdings and profits. This worked out great when Edward I was king. Unfortunately, when Edward II -Elizabeth’s brother- took the helm, Humphrey suddenly had some stiff competition in the way of Piers Gaveston and the Despencers. (The Claypooles also share a line with the Despencers.)
Needless to say Sir Humphrey did a great deal of complaining. Although he was married to Edward II’s sister and carried the sceptre with the cross at his coronation, Humphrey was to die, a proclaimed traitor, from the thrust of a Welshman’s lance at the battle of Boroughbridge. This would be the ignoble end of Elizabeth’s second and final husband.
Brotherly Influence -Edward II and His Sister Elizabeth
Close to the same age, Elizabeth had a strong sibling relationship with her brother Edward, later to be the ill-fated King Edward II. Elizabeth Plantagenet died c. May 5, 1316, and was buried at Walden Priory in Essex. King Edward I was born on June 17th, 1239, the son of King Henry III and Eleanor of Provence. He acceded to the throne on Nov. 16th, 1272. During Edward’s long reign, he became the outstanding English king of the middle ages.
He married Eleanor, daughter of King Ferdinand III of Castile and Leon, at Las Huelgas in 1254. Edward and Eleanor had 14 children, with Elizabeth being the 12th, and the future Edward II the 13th. Eleanor of Castile died in 1290; and after her funeral procession from Lincolnshire marked by the famous Eleanor Crosses, she was buried in London at Westminster Abbey. Edward I later married Margaret of France as his second wife in 1299. While on a military campaign against the Scots, Edward I died July 7th, 1307, at the border site of Burgh-on-the-Sands near Carlisle. He also was buried at Westminster Abbey. The tombs of Edward and Eleanor can be visited at the Abbey to the present day.
Edward II was more than just an ineffectual king, he was a jerk and people simply didn’t like him. England suffered under many ineffectual leaders in the middle ages, but a monarch who committed what his subjects viewed as ‘abominible acts’ was something the English couldn’t stomach. Without the hearts and minds of the people, such a monarch is doomed, no matter how good or bad a sovreign he or she may be. Elizabeth was on her brother’s side for quite a while. However, Edward’s behavior eventually got completely out of hand, and her continued support for him made things increasingly awkward for her, considering her marriage into the DeBohun family. So, what exactly did Edward do that was so terrible?

Was it that he was a murderer? No. While murder is a heinous thing, his subjects did not consider it an ‘abominible act’ for a king to commit. Instead, what Edward did was thought to be a sin against nature and God -Edward II was openly homosexual. Not that there hadn’t been gay princes and kings in the past -Richard I was notoriously attracted to same sex relationships. It’s the idea that he was not discreet about it. He didn’t do what princes of the past had done -marry and keep any extracurricular relationships, whether they be with men or women, out of the public eye. Edward pushed the bounds of decency, even at formal events when the eyes of the world were upon him.
At his own coronation in 1324, Edward horrified the nobility and visitiing French royalty with he blatently flirted with Piers Gaveston, completely ignoring his wife, Queen Isabella. Not that his preferring the company of a man his own age to that of his twelve-year-old spouse was so strange, but he wasn’t just conversing with him. Edward was treating Gaveston as if he were talking to the opposite sex.
It was extremely embarrassing for his family members present. Such behavior dangerously flauted social convention of the day, which was heavily influenced by the Church and its draconian notions of propriety and sin. Elizabeth, who had been on her brother’s side, was placed in an awkward postion. She loved Edward her brother, but she was also married to one of the chief plaintiffs where Gaveston and the Despencers were concerned. That, coupled with the openess with which Edward displayed his sexuality, made the world nervous and ultimately forced her to withdraw her support as well. [Above and Left: Edward II, King of England]
Like many kings before him, Edward II’s reign was perverted by the counsel of evil favorites. Favorites were, in any case, a considerable threat to magnates’, such as Sir Humphrey, possibilities of bettering themselves, or of even surviving. Those magnates rich and important enough to frequent the court were always haunted by the fear that their power, based on a quasi-monopoly of royal favor and patronage, might be eroded by the arrival of newcomers or monopolized by one or two individuals.
This meant not only the loss of land grants but of possibilities of finding the best marriages for themselves and their children. And these favorites -are they gracious to others in their new found fortune? -Hardly. Favorites tend to not only absorb a lot of royal wealth, but also develop a hostility or contemptuous attitude toward the nobility. This portrait of ugliness is a perfect depiction of Piers Gaveston and the Despencers.

The Plantagenet Bloodline
Although the women of the king’s household never were allowed to wield any actual power per se over the kingdom, oddly enough, because of wars, assassinations, and sometimes just general bad luck, it was the women who were the ones, more often than not, to carry on the family bloodline. In the case of Edward and his sister Elizabeth, it was Elizabeth who would become the great progenetor of subsequent generations of noble children through her marriage to Humphrey DeBohun.
Edward, was eventually imprisoned at Kenilworth Castle, and a parliament met at Westminster in January 1327, which chose his son to be king as Edward III. It was thought prudent to compel the captive king to resign the crown, and on January 20 Edward was forced to renounce his office before a committee of the estates.
The government of Isabella, Edward’s wife, and Mortimer, a former baronial exile, was so precarious that they dared not leave the deposed king alive. On April 3 he was secretly removed from Kenilworth and entrusted to the custody of two dependants of Mortimer. After various wanderings he was imprisoned at Berkeley Castle in Gloucestershire. Every indignity was inflicted upon him, and he was systematically ill-treated in the hope that he would die of disease. When his strong constitution seemed likely to prevail he was secretly put to death on September 21. The popular legend is that his murder was by a red-hot poker thrust up his anus through a hollow tube, considered by his captors as an appropriate punishment for his homosexuality, which would show no outward signs of violence. It was announced that he had died a natural death, and he was buried in St Peter’s Abbey at Gloucester, now the cathedral, where his son afterwards erected a magnificent tomb.
Elizabeth, on the other hand, went on to bear her husband, Humphrey, several children, one of which was William DeBohun, 1st Earl of Northampton, who in turn had a daughter named Elizabeth DeBohun, who married Richard Fitalan KG, 11th/4th Earl of Arundel, Earl of Surry, English nobleman, naval and miltary commander. Richard was the grandson of Baron Hugh Despencer, fierce rival of Humphrey DeBohun, who was his wife’s grandfather. In this way, marriage and money held powerful sway over family aliances and enmities. Quite often the need to increase fortunes and landholdings led natural enemies to eventually join households, pursuant to building an exponentially more powerful noble house than the two ever could have been as separate entities.

My paternal line looks like this:

Joan Plantagenet (1272 – 1307)
22nd great-grandmother
Lady Margaret De Clare Baroness Audley (1292 – 1342)
daughter of Joan Plantagenet
Lady Alice De Audley Baroness Neville (1315 – 1373)
daughter of Lady Margaret De Clare Baroness Audley
Sir John ‘3rd Baron de Raby’ Neville, Admiral of the Kings Fleet (1341 – 1388)
son of Lady Alice De Audley Baroness Neville
Thomas De Neville (1362 – 1406)
son of Sir John ‘3rd Baron de Raby’ Neville, Admiral of the Kings Fleet
Maude de Neville (1392 – 1421)
daughter of Thomas De Neville
John Talbot (1413 – 1460)
son of Maude de Neville
Isabel Talbot (1444 – 1531)
daughter of John Talbot
Sir Richard Ashton (1460 – 1549)
son of Isabel Talbot
Sir Christopher Ashton (1493 – 1519)
son of Sir Richard Ashton
Lady Elizabeth Ashton (1524 – 1588)
daughter of Sir Christopher Ashton
Capt Roger Dudley (1535 – 1585)
son of Lady Elizabeth Ashton
Gov Thomas Dudley (1576 – 1653)
son of Capt Roger Dudley
Anne Dudley (1612 – 1672)
daughter of Gov Thomas Dudley
John Bradstreet (1652 – 1718)
son of Anne Dudley
Mercy Bradstreet (1689 – 1725)
daughter of John Bradstreet
Caleb Hazen (1720 – 1777)
son of Mercy Bradstreet
Mercy Hazen (1747 – 1819)
daughter of Caleb Hazen
Martha Mead (1784 – 1860)
daughter of Mercy Hazen
Abner Morse (1808 – 1838)
son of Martha Mead
Daniel Rowland Morse (1838 – 1910)
son of Abner Morse
Jason A Morse (1862 – 1932)
son of Daniel Rowland Morse
Ernest Abner Morse (1890 – 1965)
son of Jason A Morse
Richard Arden Morse (1920 – 2004)
son of Ernest Abner Morse
Pamela Morse
I am the daughter of Richard Arden Morse

The maternal line is:

Elizabeth of Rhuddlan Princess of England Plantagenet (1282 – 1316)
20th great-grandmother
William Earl of Northampton De Bohun (1312 – 1360)
son of Elizabeth of Rhuddlan Princess of England Plantagenet
Lady Elizabeth Countess Arundel Countess DeBohun (1350 – 1385)
daughter of William Earl of Northampton De Bohun
Elizabeth Duchess Norfolk Fitzalan (1366 – 1425)
daughter of Lady Elizabeth Countess Arundel Countess DeBohun
Lady Joan De Goushill Baroness Stanley (1402 – 1459)
daughter of Elizabeth Duchess Norfolk Fitzalan
Countess Elizabeth Sefton Stanley (1429 – 1459)
daughter of Lady Joan De Goushill Baroness Stanley
Thomas Sir 8th Earl of Sefton Molyneux (1445 – 1483)
son of Countess Elizabeth Sefton Stanley
Lawrence Castellan of Liverpool Mollenaux (1490 – 1550)
son of Thomas Sir 8th Earl of Sefton Molyneux
John Mollenax (1542 – 1583)
son of Lawrence Castellan of Liverpool Mollenaux
Mary Mollenax (1559 – 1598)
daughter of John Mollenax
Gabriell Francis Holland (1596 – 1660)
son of Mary Mollenax
John Holland (1628 – 1710)
son of Gabriell Francis Holland
Mary Elizabeth Holland (1620 – 1681)
daughter of John Holland
Richard Dearden (1645 – 1747)
son of Mary Elizabeth Holland
George Dearden (1705 – 1749)
son of Richard Dearden
George Darden (1734 – 1807)
son of George Dearden
David Darden (1770 – 1820)
son of George Darden
Minerva Truly Darden (1806 – 1837)
daughter of David Darden
Sarah E Hughes (1829 – 1911)
daughter of Minerva Truly Darden
Lucinda Jane Armer (1847 – 1939)
daughter of Sarah E Hughes
George Harvey Taylor (1884 – 1941)
son of Lucinda Jane Armer
Ruby Lee Taylor (1922 – 2008)
daughter of George Harvey Taylor
Pamela Morse
I am the daughter of Ruby Lee Taylor

Both families landed in America in the 1600’s.

Samuel Wilbore, Pioneer Wheeler Dealer

May 30, 2016 13 Comments

Central Burial Grounds Boston

Central Burial Grounds Boston

My 10th great-grandfather was banished from the colony of Massachusetts, and signed the Portsmouth Compact.  He did not stay in Rhode Island for very long, but returned to live in Boston, where he was one of the citizens who purchased the Boston Common and donated it to the town.  I am not sure how he became un-banished, but his case is not the only un-banishment in our family.  He kept his property in Rhode Island and had extensive holdings in Boston as well.  He was in the wool business.

Portsmith Compact

Portsmith Compact

Samuel Wilbore and wife Ann, came to America before 1 December, 1633 and lived in Boston. May have come 4 September, 1633 on ship “Griffin” He was a merchant, had a ship, probably sold cloth and lumber and was in the wool business.
He and 6 men under him guarded the gate at Roxbury. He sold his home on what is now Washington St. to Samuel Sherman. In 1634, he and William Blackstene bought “Boston Commons” and gave it to the town. Made “Freeman” 4 March 1633/4 and with John Porter and Philly Sherman bought Aquidneck Island, (Rhode Island). He was banished from Boston 30 August 1637, and disarmed 20 November 1637 and went to Portsmouth, R.I. because of his association with a religious group lead by Anne Hutchinson, Mr. Wheelwright and possibly Roger Williams. Anne Hutchinson was the unauthorized Puritan preacher of a dissident church discussion group.
Rhode Island had become a haven for persecuted religious sects. These people, called Antinomians, believed that the moral laws as taught by the Church of England were of no value and that the only law that should be followed was that of the Gospel. Quakers, who eventually merged with the Antinomians, established a meeting house on Aquidneck in 1657.
11 January 1638/9 he was constable at Portsmouth. He owned land at Nt. Wolliston (now Quincy). With Ralph Earle he built a planing mill at Portsmouth,1640. By 1645 was back in Boston, though he kept his Portsmouth and Taunton land, and lived on Mill Street. He was wealthy and gave to the 1st free school in America. The early spelling was “Welleboro”, a Norman name. In 1626 he was a “juror” in Sible Hedington, Essex, England.

Samuel Wilbore (1595 – 1656)
10th great-grandfather
Dorothy Wilbore (1617 – 1696)
daughter of Samuel Wilbore
Elizabeth Albro (1646 – 1720)
daughter of Dorothy Wilbore
Benjamin Congdon (1676 – 1756)
son of Elizabeth Albro
William Congdon (1711 – 1755)
son of Benjamin Congdon
Frances Congdon (1738 – 1755)
daughter of William Congdon
Thomas Sweet (1765 – 1844)
son of Frances Congdon
Valentine Sweet (1791 – 1858)
son of Thomas Sweet
Sarah LaVina Sweet (1840 – 1923)
daughter of Valentine Sweet
Jason A Morse (1862 – 1932)
son of Sarah LaVina Sweet
Ernest Abner Morse (1890 – 1965)
son of Jason A Morse
Richard Arden Morse (1920 – 2004)
son of Ernest Abner Morse
Pamela Morse

Samuel Wilbore was born in Jan 1595 in Sible Hedingham, Essex, England. He died on 29 Sep 1656 in Boston, Suffolk, Massachusetts. Samuel married Ann Smith on 13 Jan 1619/1620 in Sible, Hedingham, Essex, England.

Samuel Wildbore, said to have been born in 1585, came to Boston not later than 1633, and was admitted to the First Church of Boston on December 1/1633. His house was on the neck of land between the island and the mainland, now called Washington St. and later Milk Street. In 1634 Samuel and others bought the Boston Common for the town, from William Blackstone whose ownership was acknowledged by an entry in the Town Records as early as 1633 by which it was agreed that William Blackstone shall have 50 acres set off to him near his house in Boston. The Town Records have the following statement in reference to Samuel Wildbore’s share in the purchase of the Common. “The 10th day of the 9th month 1654: Item, Edmund Quinsey, Samuel Wildbore, William Baulston, Edward Hutchinson the elder, and William heesborough, constable, shall make and assess all the rates, viz, a rate of œ30 to William Blackstone”. Blackstone sold the whole parcel of land except 6 acres immediately adjoining his house. On August 6/1635, Samuel gave œ10 towards a free school, the first in America. Governor Winthrop gave a like amount, and none other gifts exceeded this amount. Samuel also had a piece of land on Essex St., near where the Touraine Hotel now stands. Samuel married in 1620, at Sibley Hedringham, England, Ann Smith. Most genealogies wrongly give her name as Ann Bradford. Samuel was made freeman on March 4/1634. He bought much property in Taunton and likewise possessed considerable holdings in Boston, evidently dividing his place of residence between the two places. While in Taunton, he with others, embraced the “dangerous doctrines” as they were then called, of Cotton and Wheelwright, for which in 1637 he was banished from the Massachusetts Colony. Acting upon the advice of Roger Williams, he and seventeen others fled to Providence, R.I., where they purchased the island of Aquidnec, (now Rhode Island) from the Naragansett Indians, and early in 1638 moved his family there and formed a colony on March 7/1638. Full details of the purchase and history of this action is contained in the Genealogies quoted, but too long to insert here. He did not remain in Rhode Island for long, and returned to Boston in 1645 and built the first iron furnace in New England at Taunton, now Raynham, on the main road from Tilicut to Taunton. He was clerk of the town board in 1638, Constable in 1639, Sergeant in 1644. He married, 2nd, before November 29/1645, Elizabeth Lechford, widow of Thomas Lechford. Date of his second marriage and date of death of his first wife Ann are not known. Samuel died July 24/1656. After his death Elizabeth married, 2nd, on December 20/1656, Henry Bishop who died in 1664: Elizabeth died in 1665. Samuel was a man of wealth and he was of very respectable standing in society, exerting a wide influence in each of the places he dwelt. His will was dated April 30/1656.

Ann SMITH-8832 was born on 13 Jan 1598 in Sible, Hedingham, Essex, England. She died on 24 Sep 1636 in Taunton, Bristol, Massachusetts. Ann married Samuel WILDBORE-8833 on 13 Jan 1619/1620 in Sible, Hedingham, Essex, England.
They had the following children.
MiSamuel WILBORE-8830 was born on 10 Apr 1622. He died in 1697. MiiWilliam WILBORE-8838 was born on 21 May 1630. He died on 15 Apr 1710.

Death, the Party

November 2, 2015 3 Comments

Day of the Dead

Day of the Dead

Day of the Dead

Day of the Dead

Beliefs about death and afterlife vary, but we all share the knowledge that we will die. If you have helped anyone with end of life issues you know each departure is unique.  If you are close to anyone who has departed you have had the experience of some eternal bond that is not broken by that exit.  Some essential part of your relationship remains and feels alive.  I started to study my ancestry after both of my parents were dead.  I had a few brief conversations with them about their families in history, but they had little information.  My dad said he was Scotch Irish, which is true.  My mother thought she was a relative of Zachary Taylor, which does not seem to be a fact.  I believe they would have been very fascinated to learn about their ancestors, but maybe now they are one with all our relations.

My dad died in a a hospital setting, but my other died in her own home.  She had severe dementia at the end of her life.  We had excellent help from hospice for the last months of her existence.  The hospice nurses know all about death since it is their specialty.  They let us know that it is common to have visitations like my mother did before she passed.  Some people have brief encounters but my mother had large crowds of visitors for months.  It was clear that she was in touch with other beings, and sometimes we had the sensation of feeling their presence also.  They were not ghosts, but were the ones who had come to accompany her across the bridge.  She was able to die peacefully in her bed after all the interaction.

This week celebrations mark the remembrance of the dead.  As we in the northern hemisphere journey deeper into winter and darkness the departed are free of time.  Neither global warming nor the stock market has power over them. They are in an eternal state we will know someday.

Day of the Dead

Day of the Dead

 

 

Puritan Blue Laws

July 20, 2015 1 Comment

Blue laws in Plymouth Colony were created to keep Sabbath exactly the way the Puritans wanted it to be kept.  The Puritans had no tolerance for other religious views, or for slacker Puritans.  The criminal justice system was used to fine and persecute those found guilty of profaning the Lord’s day.  It did not take much to arouse the ire of these founding fathers.  The laws evolved very slowly over time, but still represent a will to control what happens on Sunday. In Plymouth you would be fined for walking anywhere but to church from Saturday at sundown until Sunday at sundown.  This was a no laughing/no smiling kind of religious day and they were serious about preserving it.  The Pilgrims of the Mayflower would freak right out about the televised football games, a tradition many associate with Thanksgiving.

%d bloggers like this: