mermaidcamp

mermaidcamp

Keeping current in wellness, in and out of the water

You can scroll the shelf using and keys

Chief Wahunsonacock Powhatan 14th Great-Grandfather

June 16, 2018 1 Comment

Powhatan 1545-1618

Powhatan 1545-1618

I recently received an advisory of a DNA match from my ancestry.com account that has brought me to a very exciting destination.  This very famous Native American, the very same one we learned about in grade school, is my ancestor.  I am excited, but want to verify all my results with more evidence.  The DNA was from the Little family, and they brought me the information about all these Native American ancestors.  I have not had a DNA test that has found any Native DNA. These results area combination of DNA, and record keeping (which can be faulty and has brought me to felonious conclusions in the past). I hope I can conclusively prove all the data, but in the meantime I am excited! It looks like my mother is descended from Pocahantas’ sister, Cleopatra.

Powhatan (born June 17, 1545; died April 1618), whose proper name was Wahunsenacawh (alternately spelled WahunsenacahWahunsunacock or  Wahunsonacock), was the paramount chief of Tsenacommacah, an alliance of Algonquian-speaking Virginia Indians in the Tidewater region of Virginia at the time English settlers landed at Jamestown in 1607.

Powhatan, alternately called “King” or “Chief” Powahatan by the English, led the main political and military power facing the early colonists, was probably the older brother of Opechancanough, who led attacks against the English in 1622 and 1644. He was the father of Pocahontas, who eventually converted to Christianity and married the English settler John Rolfe.

Captain John Smith described Powhatan as “…a tall well proportioned man… his head some what grey…. His age near 60; of a very able and hardy body to endure any labour. What he commandeth they dare not disobey in the least thing.”

 

 

Powhatan's Cloak in a museum at Oxford

Powhatan’s Cloak in a museum at Oxford

 

Powhatan Village called Towne of Secoton

Powhatan Village called Towne of Secoton

Powhatan. The ruling chief and practically the founder of the Powhatan confederacy (q. v.) in Virginia at the period of the first English settlement. His proper name was Wahunsonacock, but he was commonly known as Powhatan from one of his- favorite residences at the falls of James r. (Richmond). According to Smith, of some 30 cognate tribes subject to his rule in 1607, all but six were his own conquests. At the time of the coming of the English, Powhatan is represented to have been about 60 years of age, of dignified bearing, and reserved and stern disposition. His first attitude toward the whites was friendly although suspicious, but he soon became embittered by the exactions of the newcomers. On the treacherous seizure of his favorite daughter, Pocahontas (q. v.), in 1613, he became openly hostile, but was happily converted for the time through her marriage to Rolfe. He died in 1618, leaving the succession to his brother, Opitchapan, who however was soon superseded by a younger brother, the noted Opechancanough.

Chief Wahunsonacock Powhatan (1547 – 1618)
14th great-grandfather
Princess Cleopatra Shawano Powhatan (1590 – 1680)
daughter of Chief Wahunsonacock Powhatan
Pride Chalakahatha Elizabeth (Cornstalk) Shawnee (1615 – 1679)
daughter of Princess Cleopatra Shawano Powhatan
Trader Tom Amatoya Carpenter Moytoy (1635 – 1693)
son of Pride Chalakahatha Elizabeth (Cornstalk) Shawnee
Quasty Woman (1650 – 1692)
daughter of Trader Tom Amatoya Carpenter Moytoy
Delaware Indian Fivekiller (1674 – 1741)
son of Quasty Woman
SOLOMON JOHN CHEROKEE KIMBOROUGH (1665 – 1720)
son of Delaware Indian Fivekiller
Mourning Kimbrough (1689 – 1756)
daughter of SOLOMON JOHN CHEROKEE KIMBOROUGH
Jane Jeanette Little (1713 – 1764)
daughter of Mourning Kimbrough
Andrew Armour (1740 – 1801)
son of Jane Jeanette Little
William Armor (1775 – 1852)
son of Andrew Armour
William Armer (1790 – 1837)
son of William Armor
Thomas Armer (1825 – 1900)
son of William Armer
Lucinda Jane Armer (1847 – 1939)
daughter of Thomas Armer
George Harvey Taylor (1884 – 1941)
son of Lucinda Jane Armer
Ruby Lee Taylor (1922 – 2008)
daughter of George Harvey Taylor
Pamela Morse
I am the daughter of Ruby Lee Taylor

Hans Michael Schmidt, Seventh Great-Grandfather

December 14, 2017 2 Comments

Spotswood Headrights

Spotswood Headrights

My seventh great-grandfather came to Virginia in 1717 with a group of Lutheran immigrants.  Their unscrupulous ship captain not only landed at the wrong port, but sold them into indentured servitude. Captain Andrew Tarbett had spent the passage given him by the Germans, then took them to Virginia rather than their promised destination, Pennsylvania. He sold them to Lt.Governor Alexander Spotswood.

Lieutenant Governor Alexander Spotswood’s lawsuits against his indentured servants. From 1723 through 1726, Spotswood claimed that several Germans had failed to carry out the terms of their “contract” with him. My ancestor was sued in 1924.  He proved his importation in 1926 with his wife on the ship Scott.  He patented land on June 24, 1926.

These emigrants left their villages in southern Germany (Baden and Württemberg) about 12 Jul 1717 enroute for Pennsylvania by way of London. Starvation took the lives of several of the passengers (probably 50 people perished, most of them children) who had been swindled by their captain who was retained in London. The ship held about 138 passengers and did not land in Pennsylvania but to Virginia where the passengers were sold as indentured servants to Governor Spotswood.

The base for this reconstructed list comes from:

  • Before Germanna by Gary J. Zimmerman and Johni Cerny
  • ÄThe Second Germanna Colony of 1717, Other Germanna Pioneers, the So-called Third Germanna Colony of 1719, and Late Comers to the Hebron Church Community” by B.C. Holtzclaw in The Germanna Record (1965) 6: 51-74.

Research by Zimmerman & Cerny has shown that several who were thought to have come to Virginia in 1719-1720 were actually more likely part of the 1717 group. The strongest evidence for this is the absence of any references to each of these families in Germany after 1716 and the fact that they would have left from others from the same town at that time.

Hans Michael Johann Schmidt Smith (1690 – 1761)
7th great-grandfather
John Felter Smith (1710 – 1793)
son of Hans Michael Johann Schmidt Smith
Johannes John SCHMIDT SMITH (1742 – 1814)
son of John Felter Smith
Henry Smith (1780 – 1859)
son of Johannes John SCHMIDT SMITH
Swain Smith (1805 – 1885)
son of Henry Smith
Jerimiah Smith (1845 – )
son of Swain Smith
Minnie M Smith (1872 – 1893)
daughter of Jerimiah Smith
Ernest Abner Morse (1890 – 1965)
son of Minnie M Smith
Richard Arden Morse (1920 – 2004)
son of Ernest Abner Morse
Pamela Morse
I am the daughter of Richard Arden Morse

Note: Hans is short for Johannes which is John in English
Below research provided courtesy of Tom Bowen:
“From “Before Germanna,” by Johni Cerni and Gary J. Zimmerman, No. 5,
January 1990, The Ancestry of the Sheible, Peck, Milker Smith and Holt Families:
“The Evangelical Lutheran minister [for Gemmingen, Baden] began a new set of parish registers in 1693, and the marriage entries of the Schmidt brothers are recorded therein:
married 21 January 1710 Hanns Michael Schmid, son of Michael Schmid, deceased, court official here, step-son of Alt [Old]
Hans Hecker, to Anna Margaretha, daughter of deceased Josoph Sauter, deceased courth official here.”

On 12 July 1717 the minister at Gemmingen listed in the parish death register the “parents, together with their children, [who] expect to move away from here, wanting to take ship to Pennsylvania, and there in the hardship of the wilderness better their piece of bread than they could here.” Included were:
Hans Michael Schmidt, age 28
wife Anna Margaretha, same age,
son Hans Michael, age 5 1/2
son Christopher, age 1/2
his in-laws.
Also listed was Matthäus Schmidt, age 25/30, wife Regina Catherina, same age, son Matthäus, age 3 1/2 and daughter Anna Margaretha, age 1/2.

They arrived in Virginia near Germanna in then Essex Co., now Culpeper Co., in late 1717 or early 1718 according to today’s calendar, being members of the so-called second Germanna Colony of 1717. The colony moved about 25 miles west to the Robinson River area of Spotsylvania Co. in 1725. This area became Orange Co. in 1734, Culpeper Co. in 1748, and Madison Co. in 1793.”

We have a copy of his will:

25 Feb. 1760, from Culpeper Co. Will Book A, p. 243:

In the name of God Amen, I John Michael Smith of the Parish of Brumfield in Culpeper County being old weak & helpless, but thanks be unto God of perfect Mind and Memory, & calling unto Mind the Mortality of my Body & knowing it is appointed for all men once to die, do make & ordain this my last will and Testament. That is to say principally & first of all I give & recommend my Soul into the Hands of Almighty God that gave it, & my Body I recommend to the Earth to be buried in decent Christian Burial nothing doubting that at the General Resurrection I shall receive the same again, by the mighty Power of God. and as touching such worldly Estate wherewith it hath pleased God to bless me in this Life, I do give demise & dispose of the same in the following manner & form, viz.
I do give bequeath & make over unto my dearly beloved only Son John Michael Smith Junior & his heirs forever all my Estate personal as well as real, that he may take the sole & full Possession of it, & all the Lands Goods & Chattels forever after my decease, reserving unto me only the Claim to my Estate as long as I live, & thereby I do revoke & disannull all Wills made before by me & I do acknowledge to be this my last Will & Testament never to be revoked

Signed Sealed & delivered Witness my Hand & Seal
in the presence of us
in the year of our Lord God Michael Schmid?
1760. 25th of February (signed in German)
Adam (AY) Jager,
Henry Ayler
At Court held for the County of Culpeper on Thursday the 19th day of February 1761 This last Will and Testament of John Michael Smith decd was exhibited to the Court by John Michael Smith his only son & heir and the Executor therein named and was proved by the oaths of Adam Yeager & Henry Aylor Witnesses thereto and ordered to be recorded and on the motion of the said Executor Certificate is granted him for obtaining a Probate thereof he giving Bond & Security according to Law and also took the oath of an Executor.

 

SaveSave

Elizabeth Washington, Seventh Great-Grandmother

January 16, 2017 1 Comment

Virginia Colony

Virginia Colony

My seventh great-grandmother’s grandfather was John Washington of Surry Co, VA. (See the Washington information from Louise Ingersoll’s book.) She inherited 200 acres of Surry Co. land from her father. That land was sold 2/19/1734. After Sampson died, she went into NC to live with her son James. On 22 Nov 1757 Edward Goodrich, Isaac Rowe Walton and John Maclin, gentlemen, laid off and assigned to Elizabeth Lanier, widow of Sampson Lanier, deceased her dower of said Sampson’s estate.

She remarried after Sampson died. Marriage bond, dated 23 July 1758 on file Brunswick Co, VA, shows Elizabeth Lanier,widow, marrying Cuthbert Smith, and an order dated
27 Feb 1759 appointed Cuthbert Smith guardian of Rebecca Lanier,orphan of Sampson Lanier, and an order dated 5 Sept 1759 appointing Lemuel Lanier as guardian for Burwell Lanier, Buckner Lanier, Winifred Lanier, Martha Lanier and Anne Lanier.
My seventh great-grandfather, Sampson Lanier, was born in 1681 and died in 1743.
Third son of John Lanier, Jr. born Charles City County 1681 (by deposition made in Surry Co. March 21, 1738), first appears in contemporary records as a “Tithable” in the upper end of Surry County above Stony Run in 1701. Richard Washington’s will leaves 200 acres of land to his daughter, Elizabeth, and leaves to his son-in-law, 200 acres lying in the Isle of Wight. Sampson Lanier sold this land which is now a part of Southhampton County; in February of 1734, Sampson
and Elizabeth Lanier sold the 200 acres of land given her by her father. They moved to Brunswick County before 1740. Sampson Lanier was a Justice, a Vestryman of St. Andrews, and, at one time, on the School Board. His will, dated 8 Jan. 1743, was proved on 5 May 1743. It lists their children as Thomas, Lemuel, Sampson, Richard, Elizabeth, and James. He married about 1706 in Surry, Elizabeth, daughter of Richard Washington (1660 Virginia – 1725 Virginia) & Elizabeth Jordan of Surry County, VA, and granddaughter of Major John Washington (born England 1632) of Surry County, VA. (See pp 40-41, Ingersoll.) She died in Pitt County, NC. Major John Washington was first cousin to Colonel John Washington of Westmoreland County, VA and was the Great Grandfather of George Washington, first President of the United States.

Elizabeth Washington (1689 – 1773)
7th great-grandmother
Elizabeth Lanier (1719 – 1795)
daughter of Elizabeth Washington
Martha Burch (1743 – 1803)
daughter of Elizabeth Lanier
David Darden (1770 – 1820)
son of Martha Burch
Minerva Truly Darden (1806 – 1837)
daughter of David Darden
Sarah E Hughes (1829 – 1911)
daughter of Minerva Truly Darden
Lucinda Jane Armer (1847 – 1939)
daughter of Sarah E Hughes
George Harvey Taylor (1884 – 1941)
son of Lucinda Jane Armer
Ruby Lee Taylor (1922 – 2008)
daughter of George Harvey Taylor
Pamela Morse
I am the daughter of Ruby Lee Taylor

Richard Washington’s will, dated November 9, 1724, leaves 200 acres of land to his daughter Elizabeth Lanier, “land where she now lives”; he leaves to his son-in-law, Sampson Lanier, 200 acres lying in the Isle of Wight. On March 23, 1732, Sampson Lanier sold the above 200 acres to the Vestry of Nottingham Parish, now Southampton County. On February 19, 1734, Sampson and Elizabeth Lanier sold the 200 acres of land given her by her father, and before 1740 they had moved to Brunswick County, Virginia. Sampson was a Justice, a Vestryman of St. Andrews, and at one time he was on the school board.
Sampson Lanier died about May 15, 1743 in Brunswick County, Virginia. Elizabeth died about 1773 in Pitt County, North Carolina.

George Washington and I

February 18, 2014 8 Comments

Sulgrave Manor

Sulgrave Manor

Sulgrave Manor

Sulgrave Manor

George Washington and I share some common ancestors. Robert Washington was the 4th great-grandfather of George Washington, first President of the United States.  He sounds like a heavy duty brute, having torn down his local village and church for pasture land.  They were friends with Henry VIII, who was quite the brute himself.  I notice that Elizabeth Washington, my ancestor, marries into the Lanier family, a family of musicians from Henry’s court.  I wonder if they had any knowledge of  each other’s ancestors back in England.  Since that was very important for status, my guess is that they did.

ROBERT WASHINGTON (1544 – 1623)

is my 12th great grandfather
Lawrence Washington (1568 – 1616)
son of ROBERT WASHINGTON
Richard Washington (1592 – 1642)
son of Lawrence Washington
John Washington (1632 – 1677)
son of Richard Washington
Richard Washington (1660 – 1725)
son of John Washington
Elizabeth Washington (1689 – 1773)
daughter of Richard Washington
Elizabeth Lanier (1719 – 1795)
daughter of Elizabeth Washington
Martha Burch (1743 – 1803)
daughter of Elizabeth Lanier
David Darden (1770 – 1820)
son of Martha Burch
Minerva Truly Darden (1806 – 1837)
daughter of David Darden
Sarah E Hughes (1829 – 1911)
daughter of Minerva Truly Darden
Lucinda Jane Armer (1847 – 1939)
daughter of Sarah E Hughes
George Harvey Taylor (1884 – 1941)
son of Lucinda Jane Armer
Ruby Lee Taylor (1922 – 2008)
daughter of George Harvey Taylor
Pamela Morse
I am the daughter of Ruby Lee Taylor

ROBERT WASHINGTON, the eldest son of Lawrence the builder and Amy nee Pargiter, born in 1544, died 1620 aged 76. Inherited Sulgrave Manor when his father died in 1584 with about 1250 acres at Sulgrave, Stuchbury, Woodford, Cotton, Hardingstone, Blakesley, Patishall, Ascote, Eastcote, Lower Boddington, Radway, Horley and Hornton in Oxon.
Married twice, firstly, in 1565 to Elizabeth, daughter and heiress of Walter Light (Lyte) of Radway Grange, Warwickshire, and a descendant of the Villiers family. The marriage is recorded in the original glass panel dating from about 1580 in the Great Chamber window where the W arms are impaled with the Lyte arms:As part of the marriage settlement Lawrence created an estate from two messuages (holdings) in Pattishill for his own, (L’s) use while Robert lived and after his death for the use of Elizabeth for life as her jointure. Use in this context usually means taking the revenue from rather than living in.
From Elizabeth acquired Radway Grange and title to the manors of Horley and Hornton Oxon.
Six sons and three daughters by Elizabeth. Eldest son Lawrence II born in 1565. Daughter Amye married Alban Wakelyn of Eydon, N’hants. 3rd son Walter granted Radway Grange by deed Nov 30th 1592 for peppercorn rent for 40 years after the death of Walter Light ; his marriage to Alice daughter of John Murden of Ratley is arranged in the following year and secondly, sometime before 1599, to Anne Fisher of Hanslope Bucks Clifford Smith says 3 more sons and 3 more daughters by her.

Together with Sir John Spencer was appointed a royal commissioner in Northants in 1598. Robert is usually called “esquire” in contemporary documents, a higher rank that that accorded to his father (gentleman).

In 1600, Robert bought the manor of Nether Boddington from his son-in-law, Albert Wakelyn. There was no house on the Nether Boddington manor.

Stuchbury was exploited for sheep – Robert apparently pulled down the parish church, parsonage along with “all or the most part of the said town and parish houses” before 1606.

In 1606 Robert Washington figured in an interesting exchequer case1. Robert Washington, -the patron of the rectory of Stuchbury, together with his two cousins, Robert Pargiter and George Mole (who also had an interest in the advowson), had instituted no clergyman to the living “by the space of three score years or thereabouts.” On the contrary, – they had pulled down “not only the parsonage house . . . and all or the most part of the said town and parish houses of Stuttesbury aforesaid, but also the parish church itself,” and had used the lands “for pasture for kine and sheep, to the great depopulation of the commonwealth and country thereabout.”2

Although he continued to live at Sulgrave, he made a settlement upon his eldest son Lawrence in May 1601, possibly as a result of his second marriage – to protect the interests of his first family – of the entailed portion of the estate i.e. manor of Sulgrave and manor and rectory of Stuchbury. Lawrence sold the Sulgrave manor demesne lands to Thomas Atkins, of Over Winchcombe, Buckinghamshire, on 20 August, 1605, retaining only the house and seven acres of land. With the consent of his father. Lawrence sold the reversion of the remainder on 1 March, 1610 to his cousin Lawrence Makepeace, son of Robert’s sister Mary and Abel Makepeace. Robert (and his heirs) retained the manor and rectory of Stuchbury until 1646, Nether Boddington to 1636 and Radway to 1654.

Robert died in 1619 and his will requests burial in Sulgrave Church. His second wife, Anne Fisher, continued to live at Sulgrave Manor house until 1625. She was buried at East Haddon, Northamptonshire, on 16 March. 1652. Robert was succeeded by his grandson, John, his son Lawrence having predeceased him in 1616.

Lawrence, Robert’s brother, born probably 1546, (possibly 56), became Registrar of the Court of Chancery and married firstly, in 1593 Mary Argall (nee Scott), widow of Richard Argall, who had died in 1588, leaving five sons and six daughters living. One of the sons was Sir Samuel Argall, who emigrated and was Deputy-Governor of Virginia in 1617-19. On Mary’s death in 1605, Lawrence married Martha Nuse. He died in 1619 aged either 63 or 73 (Ixxiii on his memorial) and is buried at Maidstone. Their son, another Lawrence, was knighted and, like his father, became Registrar of the Court of Chancery. He was the owner of Stonehenge. died in 1643 aged 64, and is buried at Garsdon. Wiltshire. Their daughter Mary married William Horspoole, a cousin of Sir Thomas Smythe, Treasurer Virginia Company (VMHB 90, 1982, Samuel Argall’s family, James D Alsop) and is buried at Maldon, near Cliveden.
Elizabeth
Anne married Edmond Foster of Hanslop co Bucks
Frances married John Tompson of Sulgrave
Magdalyn
BarbaraMary married Abel Makepeace of Chipping Wardon N’hants, parents of Lawrence Makepeace who purchased rights to Sulgrave from his uncle Lawrence II in 1610
Margaret married to Gerrard Hawtayne Esq second son of Edward Hawtayne of co Oxon
1.
Abstract printed by Mr. Ernest G. Atkinson in The Times 22 September, 1894,
2.
William Barcocke, clerk, versus Robert Washington and two others: Bills and Answers, Northants., Easter, 4 James I.

Robert Davis, Ulster to South Carolina

July 27, 2013 2 Comments

coat of arms Davis

coat of arms Davis

My 7th great-grandfather was born in Northern Ireland and came to South Carolina with Presbyterians.  He first settled in Virginia, then traveled south.

Robert Davis (1680 – 1770)

is my 7th great grandfather
daughter of Robert Davis
daughter of Nancy Ann Davis
daughter of Jean PICKENS
son of Margaret Miller
daughter of Philip Oscar Hughes
daughter of Sarah E Hughes
son of Lucinda Jane Armer
daughter of George Harvey Taylor
I am the daughter of Ruby Lee Taylor

Tradition states that Robert Davis was born in North Ireland, where he was married to Anne Pickens. Some of their children were born in Ireland, and they are said to have come to America about 1735 or a bit earlier. The know facts in America about them from Kegley’S Virginia Frontier records are as follows: Robert Davis first received 400 acres in 1735 in South Garden, among the mountains of the Branches of Hardware River in Virginia. At that time all this territory was in Goochland County, and is located in what became the extreme southern end of Augusta county. The same year he received an additional 400 agres in the same location. This section is actually in the Branches of James and Roanoke Rivers. Kegley shows that in 1746 Robert Davis received a grant of 300 acres on the west side of the Blue Ridge. On Nov. 22, 1746, one James Davis, received a grant of 626 acres part of a larger grant of 8,100 acres on Catawaba river. Kegley shows that in 1748 the Clerk’s fee book in Augusta County,Va. shows that Robert Davis, along with many others, is “not found”. This,says Kegley, is an indication of how restless the pioneers were on the frontier, moving from place to place and the county officials unable, or unwilling to keep up with them. Robert Davis seems to have lived a fairly quiet life while in Augusta as there are relatively few records of him. Hedid not trade lands, but witnessed a good many deeds for other eople showing who his friedds and neighbors were. Most other records of Robert Davis in Augusta are in connection with the settlement of the estate of Robert Crockett. North Carolina list of applications for land grants, show that on 1 October 1751, the following applied for land: Robert Davis-for 600 acres, William Davis-for 300 acres Robert Caldwell-for 600 acres, Andrew Pickens-for 800 acres. North Carolina had a law granting land only to people who came into the colony to live on the land. Applicatons,howerever were received in advance of actual removal. In 1753 Robert Davis made the statement in Augusta county that he planned to leave the colony. It was about this date or the next year at the latest that he arrived in the Waxhaw Section, along with others from the same ara in Augusta County. The land when granted was in the then constituted county of Anson which included most of western North Carolina. Source: THE DAVIS FAMILY ** With Crockett and Pickens connections. ** compiled by E. M. Sharp From research done by Mr. D. L. McWhorter of Bethel, North Carolina, in the Archives of the State of North Carolina, and in Mecklenburg Co. North Carolina. and Researched on the Pickens family by E. M. Sharp of Memphis, Tenn.

He served in the militia with his father-in law and brother:
Early Anson county records show the follow ANSON COUNTY, MILITIA COMPANY: Year 1755. Had 61 officers and men. Among those listed were: Captain – Andrew PickensLieutenant – Robert Ramsey Ensin – John Crockett Sgt. – Thomas Wright, Sgt. – William Geard, Sgt. – William King. Corporal – Alexander Crockett. Archibald Crockett, Andrew Nutt, George Davis, John Davis, Joh Pickens, John Linn, Joseph Pickens, Moses Davis, Robert Davis, Robert Crockett, Robert McClelland, Robert Caldwell, Robert Montgomery, William Davis, William Pickens and others.

Sara Holt and the Slave Archetype

July 12, 2013 3 Comments

In my tree I have several ancestors who owned slaves in America. When your family has owned slaves, you are forever affected by that history.  The slave archetype is a very interesting symbol.  I had not considered the aspects that can both teach and menace.  The ultimate slavery is full surrender to the divine.  One’s own will is sacrificed to the divine will in order to be fully enlightened.  Military discipline requires following orders without question. We don’t think of soldiers as slaves, but there is an aspect of it in the lack of choices.  Some are slaves to substance abuse or systems of belief.  This slavery may seem completely voluntary, but cultural pressure might be a strong factor. The positive slave archetype is the monk who devotes his life to divine providence.  The shadow aspect of the slave today is the person who gives up choices, such as cult activity.  Choice involves individuation. Following the script of the collective consciousness today without question is slavery.

My 6th great -grandmother, Sara Holt, was from a family that came to Virginia in 1620, so slavery probably was always part of their existence, like most colonials.  She and her husband from Northern Ireland owned slaves and lived in a fancy style:

Sarah Truly, A Mississippi Tory By Madel Jacobs Morgan

The Journal of Mississippi History, Vol. XXXVII, No. 1, February, 1975

One of the most loyal advocates of the rule of King George III of England was Sarah Truly, a resident of the Old Natchez District when it was a province of Spain.  She came to the Natchez District from Amelia County, Virginia, where she lived in comfortable circumstances with her husband Hector and their seven children: John, James, Bennet, Eleanor, Sarah, Judith and Martha (Patsey).   It can be deduced from Hector’s will, which was probated in 1761, that the Trulys pursued life in the cavalier tradition.  Daughter Eleanor rode sidesaddle on her own bay mare, Hector owned slaves, and he had a “complete distillery”.   He had, as well, three hundred acres of land, two prayer books, four testaments, two hymnals and “one other book”.

As Revolutionary sentiment took root and spread, the position of Sarah Truly and the other Tidewater Virginia loyalists became less and less tenable.  At the close of the decade following Hector’s death, Sarah and her brothers Dibdal and David Holt took positive action to improve their situation.   Having learned of the rich lands along the Mississippi River which the British were making available for colonization, they began investigating the possibilities of a move.  One of the Holts went to British West Florida in 1770 to consult with the governmental authorities about lands.   He returned to Virginia; then, along with his brother and a neighbor, Robert Montford, he came back to West Florida the following year on another scouting trip.

Along with her brothers, the Widow Truly made preparations for the long journey southward.  “Refusing to be a traitor to my king,” she said later, “and not wanting to live at enmity with my neighbors, I sought a home under the Spanish flag.”

Six of her children came south with Sarah Truly, John remained in Virginia.  Her three brothers, David, John and Dibdal, accompanied her, as did a son-in-law, Francis Spain (Eleanor’s husband), the Spain children, and the slaves.  If their caravan followed the route described by other migrants of that time, they traveled overland through the Cumberland Gap and across what is now Kentucky, where they paused to build a flatboat to embark on the Ohio River, floating on to the Mississippi and thence downstream to West Florida.

Seventeen hundred and seventy-three was the date of their arrival in West Florida.  The first grant of land to Sarah Truly was most likely in one of the Feliciana Parishes of Louisiana, and it has been said that Bayou Sarah was named for her.  She soon moved to a site north of Fort Panmure in the Natchez District.

The Widow was beset with difficulties from the start.  The first year, she and her family were all sick and could not make a crop.  She was obliged to sell a negro to buy provisions.  In 1774, the younger son, Bennett, was hired by a neighbor, Mr. Lum, to row his boat up the river—his pay to be in corn for the use of the family.  On arriving upriver, Bennett found the hunting good and instead of returning home, he remained four years.

In 1775, son James took his departure.  He returned to Virginia to fight with his native colony against the crown.  By this action James not only left the Widow Truly without the help of either of her sons, but placed her in the deplorable situation of acknowledging herself the mother of a Revolutionary soldier.

In 1778, both of the boys had reappeared on the scene.  Bennett returned to find Sarah engaged in getting her corn crop planted.  Instead of staying close by to lend assistance, he betook himself off to the bright lights of Natchez.  There he stayed wntil the fall of 1778 when he went off on another hunt.  But this hunt was of shorter duration.  Bennett and those with him were captured by James Willing, the American officer–and a resident of the Natchez District–who was then raiding, pillaging, and recruiting on behalf of the American Army.   Bennett was taken to New Orleans but soon came back home to his mother; and, Loyalist that he was, he enlisted in the local militia.

In the meantime, James Truly had returned from Virginia the the Natchez country in 1778, still a Revolutionary.  He immediately made himself useful to the American cause by acting as a guide for Willing when he arrived at the Natchez landing in mid-Feburary with a company of American soldiers.

In 1779, the Widow had son Bennett at home.  In her own words, Bennett “came to my house and worked with my lands and finished the crop with my three slaves.”  Out of the proceeds of that crop, she paid off $300.00 in debts that Bennett had contracted in the neighborhood.

The following year Bennett seems to have been somewhat more dependable.  She put him in charge of her crop, and with the help of four slaves he cleared 3,000 pounds of tobacco.  It seemed as though things  might be looking up for the Widow Truly.  Bennett was at home and working, and the crop was good.  Unfortunately for all concerned, Bennett came up with the idea of building a grist mill in partnership with one George Fourney.  Sarah, who could see through such schemes, was expected to provide the capital for this venture–an idea of which she heartily disapproved.  As later attested by Sarah’s daughter and granddaughter, Eleanor and Tabitha Spain, the Widow considered Fourney unreliable; and Bennett had not yet proved himself capable of carrying out such an ambitious project.  In other words, Sarah had no desire to have a mill stone around her neck.  Irrepressible Bennett went on with his plans, however, in spite of the objections and scoldings from his mother.

There was another complication!  The sight of the English flag over Fort Panmure no longer gladdened Sarah’s heart.  In its place waved the golden lions of Spain, for the Natchez district had been surrendered to Galvez when he captured Baton Rouge in1779.

No sooner had the English garrison evacuated Fort Panmure to the Spanish than Anthony Hutchins and John Blommart began plotting to recapture the Natchez District for the English.  They were aided and abetted by the Widow Truly.  She was a mere woman and has thus far received scant notice of historians, but the testimonials by her Natchez District neighbors vouch for the fact that she did all she could to assist the English cause and deal misery to the Spaniards.

When Galvez withdrew his heavy artillery to Pensacola, to bombard the British stronghold there, the Loyalist element in the Natchez District made plans for a revolt.  Their plans came to fruition in 1781. While one group of the Loyalists took up their position at the house of John Rowe (Row, Rault) in plain view of Fort Panmure, another group was ensconced in a blockhouse especially built for the occasion by Madame Truly.   The so-called rebels who took refuge in the blockhouse on the Truly holdings prepared themselves for a seige and even dug a well so that water would be plentiful.  This well was later the subject of much controversy, for it seems that Bennett had contracted with Thomas Rule to dig a well on Sarah’s plantation, giving him a horse in payment.  Before Rule could dig the well, the “rebels” encamped in the blockhouse dug it.  A year later Sarah sued Rule for the price of the horse, charging that he did not fulfil his contract.  The court ordered Rule to fulfil his contract by digging a well as originally specified.  Thus, we can be reasonably sure that in spite of other vicissitudes she may have encountered, the Widow Truly spent the last days of her life well watered.

With the capture of Pensacola by Galvez and the arrival of a Spanish force at Natchez, the revolt collapsed (in May, 1781).  The insurgents scattered in every direction.  Some, led by Anthony Hutchins, went overland to Savannah and thence to England.  Some struck into the wilderness where they joined a robber band.  Another group became Spanish prisoners and were taken to Spanish headquarters at New Orleans.  It is a matter of record that Sarah Truly made a quick trip to New Orleans in 1781.  Whether she went there in the interest of her land holdings or was called up before the Spanish authorities for her part in the counter revolution against them is a matter for conjecture.  She left at home two of her daughters, Eleanor Spain and Patsey Truly and a granddaughter, Tabitha Spain.  Also at home was Bennett whose gristmill project had been interrupted by the revolt.  But while Sarah journeyed down the river to New Orleans, Bennett rounded up George Fourney; and they slyly took advantage of the widow’s absence to complete the gristmill.

Upon leaving New Orleans, Sarah embarked for home by rowboat.  She “encouraged the hands to row briskly” saying that they should have plenty of meat when they reached home.  A trip to New Orleans by rowboat would be an ordeal at best, but in May with intense heat added to the humidity of the river swamps, not to mention the abundant insect life that thrives in such conditions, it must have been almost unbearable.  Worn and exhausted and accompanied by the hungry crew, the Widow reached home expecting a feast.  She found only two pieces of meat in the house.  She went into a rage.  Eleanor, Tabitha and Patsey wrung their hands.  When the Widow inquired of the three girls what had become of the meat,  one can imagine the violence of her reaction on being told that Bennett had given it to George Fourney, his partner in the gristmill.

Sarah Truly lived for ten years after this unfortunate episode, and it was her fortune to spend the entire time under Spanish rule.  From the court records we learn that she spent much of her remaining time before the bar of justice—suing, being sued and testifying as wittness.  The Spanish governors seemingly bore her no ill will for having taken arms against them, and she was always treated with the greatest consideration.  Her name is mentioned in more than forty different places in Spanish court records, indicating that she was a woman of diverse interests.  She loaned money, she bought and sold slaves, she dealt in lands.  Various witnesses testified that she “cursed” and “scolded”.  No one could deny that Sarah Truly was a woman of spirit.

Her children settled close around her, forming a sizeable clan of Trulys and their kin.  James married Elizabeth Burch, a widow, and they brought up an interesting family at Truly’s Flat in what is now Jefferson County.  Irrepressible Bennett married Mary Lum.  Always on the lookout for a good investment, Bennett became interested in a cotton gin and in 1796 we note that he was hauled into court for turning out inferior cotton.  Eleanor Spain and her family lived in Jefferson County.  Judith married a Holstein and she was in England in 1796.

Two of the Truly girls, first Sarah and after her death, Patsey, were married to Captain Richard Harrison who was noted for his services in the American Revolution when he served as a courier for George Rogers Clark.  The Harrison home, Auburn House, still stand in Jefferson County.

Age finally caught up with Sarah Truly, and she was “infirm and weak” on March 15, 1792, when she made her will.  She left her “beloved son Bennett” a slave “Annico”, who had two children, and one large looking glass.  To daughter Eleanor Spain went her prized feather bed and furniture.  To daughter Martha Harrison went her scissors and thimble.  The residue of her estate was to be divided among James, Bennett and Eleanor.  Then passed from the scene a forceful character and gallant pioneer–a woman of loyalty and courage.

That many of her traits passed down to her children there is little doubt.  As a fitting sequel to her tempestuous life, we note a paragrapg appended to her will which begins as follows:  “7 May 1793.  Whereas a controversy has arisen between the heirs of the late Sarah Truly, concerning the division of her estate…..”

Sarah Holt (1740 – 1792)

is my 6th great grandmother
son of Sarah Holt
daughter of James Truly
daughter of Elizabeth Betsy Truly Payne Darden
daughter of Minerva Truly Darden
daughter of Sarah E Hughes
son of Lucinda Jane Armer
daughter of George Harvey Taylor
I am the daughter of Ruby Lee Taylor

Nicholas Martiau, French Huguenot

July 2, 2013 3 Comments

In 1635 My 10th great-grandfather participated in a political act in the Virginia Colony that landed him in trouble:

A Principal in the Overthrow of a Capricious Ruler

York History Series #A-5, April 1997by (the late) Dick Ivy, Honorary NMDA Member

Hearing of secret and unlawful meetings since January by some of his councilors concerning decisions of his rulership of Virginia, Governor Sir John Harvey apprehended and committed their “chief actors” William English, Nicolas Martiau and Francis Pott. On Apr. 28, 1635, the Governor’s Councilors Samuel Matthews, John Utie, Thomas Harwood, William Perry, William Farrer, William Peirce, George Menefie and Dr. John Pott came to the governor-called council meeting at his house. John Utie of Yorke’s Chiskiak Parish hit the governor hard on his shoulder and declared he was under arrest for treason. The others held him secure and told him to go back to England to answer the complaints against him. They set Martiau and others free and called for their force of 50 musketmen waiting at a short distance. On May 7, 1635, the councilors met at James Town, opened the floor to complaints, and elected Capt. John West as governor. The complaint included the giveaway to please the King of the Isle of Kent to Maryland by a willing Harvey for persecuted Catholics from England, ignoring the ownership claim by William Claiborne who was trading with the Indians here. A war ensued between forces from Maryland and Claiborne when the latter refused to become a Catholic, it is said. Martiau was granted 1,600 acres of land that year. The King reinstated Harvey and the rebels were ordered to appear at the King’s Star Court, but were never tried for an unknown reason. Finally, Harvey was recalled over another incident of poor judgment.

Capt Nicolas Martiau (1591, France-1657) & Jane Page Berkeley
Capt. Martiau [also recorded as Marlier, Martue, Martin, Martian] was a French Huguenot (in church of Threadneedle St.) from the Island of Ré. He was in the service of Henry Hastings, Earl of Huntingdon and member of the Virginia Company, and educated as a military engineer. He was naturalized as an Englishman by royal decree. He came to Jamestown aboard the “Francis Bona Venture” in 1620, legally representing the Earl to plan fortifications. He led a foray against the Indians at Falling Creek after the 1622 massacre. He joined the liberal party committed to the Virginia outlook, pleading for continuance of the House of Burgesses in 1623/4. He, with Captain George Utie and Captain Samuel Mathews, was responsible for sending the tyrant governor Harvey back to England.
There is some question about his wives. His first wife was Elizabeth, last name and date of death unknown. She was most likely the mother of Elizabeth (born 1625). Jane was the widow of Lt. Edward Berkeley, who died in 1625; they had a child named Jane. . After her death, Nicholas married Isabella, widow of Robert Felgete & George Beech, in 1646.
Martiau’s defense of the French king in an argument with Capt. Thomas Mayhew forced him to take a loyalty oath in Jamestown in 1627. He was granted 600 acres as Chiskiack, which became Yorktown (in 1644, the Cheskiack Indians were moved to the Pianketank, where they would be forced out by Augustine Warner; the tribe seems to have vanished at that point.) He served as Burgess 1632-33, and Justice for York Co. 1633-57. “He, with George Utie and Captain Samuel Matthews, sent the tyrant governor, Harvey, close prisoner back to England.” Harvey returned, bringing George Reade–Martiau’s future son-in-law–with him, but he was forced back to England again, leaving Reade as Acting Governor. Martiau moved to the present Yorktown site in 1630 on 600 acres, plus 700 for headrights, where he grew tobacco. On this land Cornwallis surrendered his troops to Martiau’s great-great-great-grandson, General George Washington in 1781. Martiau later was granted 2000 acres on the south side of the Potomac River, which he gave to Col. George Reade in 1657. (See John Baer Stoudt, Nicolas Martiau, The Adventurous Huguenot, The Military Engineers, and the Earliest American Ancestor of George Washington.)

Nicholas French Huguenot Martiau (1591 – 1657)

is my 10th great grandfather
daughter of Nicholas French Huguenot Martiau
daughter of MARY Jane Martiau
daughter of Martha Scarisbrook
daughter of Martha Cary
son of Mary Jacquelin
son of Johannes John SCHMIDT SMITH
son of Henry Smith
son of Swain Smith
daughter of Jerimiah Smith
son of Minnie M Smith
son of Ernest Abner Morse
I am the daughter of Richard Arden Morse
I can now join yet another organization about being descended..the NMDA.

Martin, Marten, Martens, Martyn (French, Spanish, English) Descendant of Martinus [belonging to the god Mars, the god of war]; one who came from Martin, the name of places in Spain and France. The popularity of the name in Western Europe is due to St. Martin of Tours, the fourth century French saint.
Source: New Dictionary of American Family Names by Elsdon C. Smith, Gramercy Publishing Company, New York, 1988.

Nicolas Martiau – The Immigrant

This portion of the Family Roots and Branches is dedicated to the study of Nicolas Martiau (pronounced Mar-ti-o) and his descendants.

“The Adventurous Huguenot” and the father of Yorktown, Virginia, was born in France 1591, came to Virginia in 1620 and died in 1657 at Yorktown, Virginia. He was a Captain in the Jamestown militia during the Indian uprisings, a member of the Colonial Virginia House of Burgesses, and Justice of the County of York. In 1635 he was a leader in the thrusting out of Governor Harvey which was the first opposition to British Colonial Policy. He is the original patentee for Yorktown. He is buried at the Grace Church in Yorktown, Virginia.

Descendants of Nicolas are through his daughters, Mary (married Lt. Colonel John Scarsbrook), Sarah (married Captain William Fuller, Puritian governor of Maryland), and Elizabeth (married Lt. Col. George Reade). Nicolas is the earliest American ancestor of our first President George Washington.

Among the descendants of Nicolas Martiau we find – in addition to Washington – one Vice President of the United States, two Justices of the Supreme Court, three ministers to foreign countries, three cabinet officers, six governors of states, eight senators, eleven generals involved in the War Between the States, fifteen congressman, forty commissioned officers who served in the American Revolution,

2 of 3

2/6/13 12:24 PM

and a veritable host of men and women prominent in national life. Such names as General Thomas Nelson, a signer of the Declaration of Independance; Meriwether Lewis, explorer of Lewis and Clark fame; Duff Green; Thomas Nelson Page and Amelia Rives are of special interest.

In the early 20th century the registrar of the Colonial Dames of America in the state of Virginia contains the names of more than four hundred women who could trace their lineage to Nicolas Martiau.

Nicolas Martiau is my 15th great grandfather and one of two of my earliest American ancestors. Here is my line of descendent from that adventurous Hugenout – Nicolas Martiau:

Larry Van Horn, NMDA Member #174 (Scar(s)brook-Condon-Wills)

1. Nicolas Martiau & Jane ? (Berkley)
2. John Scar(s)brook & Mary Martiau
3. David Condon & Elizabeth Scar(s)brook
4. Elias Wills & Mary Condon
5. John Wills & Susanna Robertson
6. James Cole & Mary Wills
7. James Cole & Fanny Chisman Wills
8. Ware Oglesby & Elizabeth Dancy Cole
9. Aaron Redus & Lucy Ann Oglesby
10. James Ware Redus Jr & Leah Magee
11. Alexander Hamilton David Hurt & Mary Susan Redus 12. James Ira Hurt & Johanna Himena Schneider
13. Witt Lange Van Horn and Jeanette Iris Hurt

Nicolas Martiau Descendants – The First Six Generations

The link below is to an Adobe Acrobat PDF Descendants Chart that shows six generations of Nicolas Martiau Descendants. If you are a descendant of any of the below listed in this chart you are eligible for membership in the Nicolas Martiau Descendant Association (see below). The lines represented on this chart are lines that are accepted for membership in the NMDA. As more information is entered into our genealogy database, new charts will be placed on this website and the NMDA website. Be sure to check for these pages for future updates.

Nicolas Martiau Six Generation Descendants Chart (Adobe Acrobat format) The NMDA Lineage SocietyNicolas Martiau Descendant Association

Genealogist who can prove descend from Nicolas Martiau are eligible for membership in the Nicolas Martiau Descendant Association (NMDA). The NMDA was started in 1991. Two first cousins from California went to Yorktown to meet Dick Ivy (recently deceased), the Towne Crier and Historian, for a tour of the Martiau Family sites. One cousin fell and injured a knee, was propped up by the wall of the Grace Church cemetery. A lone man was in the mist, reading inscriptions. He paused at theColonel George Reade/Elizabeth Martiau stone, not aware of the Martiau Family buried there without a marker. This one act prompted the chain of events culminating in the first Tribute to Martiau held in 1993 and the 1997 grave marker dedication. A second Tribute was held in the Spring of 2000 and the third was held Spring 2004 in Yorktown. The cousins were Lee Yandell and Marty Dale. (Reade- Reade-Wattington).

The NMDA had over 182 members nationwide. I have the honor of serving as the National Registrar for this proud and prestigous lineage based organization. You can get more information on the NMDA by contacting me, Larry Van Horn, via email (link at bottom of this webpage) or visiting the official NMDA website at:

Nicolas Martiau Descendant Association

At this website you can download lineage and application formsin pdf format to aid you in the application process. On the website you will find selected members lineages, news, events, history and much more.

Capt. John Gregory, England to Virginia

June 17, 2013 1 Comment

British flag

British flag

My 8th great-grandfather came from England to Virginia in the 1600’s. We don’t know much about him except that he arrived early in America.  He was a large landowner and his wife inherited land from her brother as well. These early settlers in Virginia had plenty of obstacles to overcome to just survive.

Capt John Gregory born: 1623 in Stockwith, England died: 1676 Rappahannock County, Virginia Officer in the Colonial Militia. Emigrated to Virginia prior to 1656; settled on the north side of the James River in Charles County. 20 February 1663 had a grant of 600 acres in Rappahannock County. Vestryman in 1665.

Capt John Gregory(1623 – 1676)
is my 8th great-grandfather
Mary Gregory (1665 – 1747)
daughter of Capt John Gregory
John Taylor (1685 – 1776)
son of Mary Gregory
John Taylor (1727 – 1787)
son of John Taylor
John Taylor (1747 – 1781)
son of John Taylor
John Nimrod Taylor (1770 – 1816)
son of John Taylor
John Samuel Taylor (1798 – 1873)
son of John Nimrod Taylor
William Ellison Taylor (1839 – 1918)
son of John Samuel Taylor
George Harvey Taylor (1884 – 1941)
son of William Ellison Taylor
Ruby Lee Taylor (1922 – 2008)
daughter of George Harvey Taylor
Pamela Morse
I am the daughter of Ruby Lee Taylor

Randall Holt, 10th Great-Grandfather

May 31, 2013 5 Comments

Seal of Jamestown

Seal of Jamestown

Randall Holt was born in Cheshire, England.  His son John killed himself in Virginia, which made a big fat mess.  Queen Anne stepped in to save his land for his family.
RANDALL HOLT (1607 – 1650)
is my 10th great grandfather
Randolph Holt (1638 – 1679)
son of RANDALL HOLT
John Holt (1664 – 1705)
son of Randolph Holt
David Holt (1685 – 1749)
son of John Holt
Sarah Holt (1740 – 1792)
daughter of David Holt
James Truly (1755 – 1816)
son of Sarah Holt
Elizabeth Betsy Truly Payne Darden (1782 – 1851)
daughter of James Truly
Minerva Truly Darden (1806 – )
daughter of Elizabeth Betsy Truly Payne Darden
Sarah E Hughes (1829 – 1911)
daughter of Minerva Truly Darden
Lucinda Jane Armer (1847 – 1939)
daughter of Sarah E Hughes
George Harvey Taylor (1884 – 1941)
son of Lucinda Jane Armer
Ruby Lee Taylor (1922 – 2008)
daughter of George Harvey Taylor
Pamela Morse
I am the daughter of Ruby Lee Taylor

Randall Holt probably came to the Jamestown Colony in 1621 onboard the ship George as a young teen as a servant to Dr. John Potts.

Randall Holt was born about 1607 in Prestbury, England, the son of Randall/Randolph and Elizabeth (Pott) Holt, who were wed in the Prestbury church. Randall was probably a nephew of Dr. Pott(s), the Virginia Colony physician who later became governor.

Several Holt family christenings, weddings and burials have taken place at St. Peter’s Church in Prestbury. It is about 700 years old. Nearby in the churchyard there is an even older Norman chapel.

The Randall Holt FamilyRandall Holt’s is the first mention of the Holt family found in the American colonies. The court ordered that upon release from his indenture he was to be given “one suit apparel from head to foot and three barrels of corn.”

Read more at Suite101: Line of Descent from Randall Holt of Virginia: Grandson’s Suicide Prompted the Queen’s Intervention http://www.suite101.com/content/line-of-descent-from-randall-holt-of-virginia-a181274#ixzz0xlAZ8icn

Randall was released from his indenture in 1625 and in 1628 he married Mary Bailey, who also may have been from Prestbury. It was a fortunate match. She was the sole heir of John Bailey of Hog Island, one of the richest men in the Virginia Colony.

The Bailey Family LegacyThe Council of Jamestown had appointed Robert Evers as Mary’s guardian at her father’s death and ordered that 490 Hog Island acres be deeded to her. Randall and Mary settled on this island in the James River. He added 400 acres to his wife’s property in 1636 and another 400 acres in 1639.

In 1650, Randall Holt Jr. obtained a grant for 1022 Hog Island acres as “son and lawful heir”. He received a major’s commission in the British Colonial forces and was a member of the governing House of Burgesses. In 1668, Randall Holt Jr. was appointed Justice for Surry County. In 1679, the year he died, he was granted a patent for 1,450 acres on Hog Island.

Queen Intervenes to Help Holt DescendantsJohn Holt inherited all the lands his father, Randall Jr., had owned, was listed in the 1687 Cavalry of Surry County, and was granted the right to operate the ferry between Hog Island and the mainland. By 1704, the Holt family owned 2,768 acres in Surry County. Of this, 1,450 acres were controlled by Elizabeth, the widow of Randall Holt Jr. The remainder was owned by the sons of Randall and Elizabeth.

Read on

  • Line of Descent from John Chew of Virginia
  • Line of Descent from John Fisher of Virginia
  • U. S. Lineage Societies for Men and Women

John Holt committed suicide in 1707. Because suicide was unlawful, his land reverted to the crown. Son David had received a substantial land grant from his grandfather, David Crafford. The other sons—John Jr., Charles, Benjamin and Joseph—attended a court hearing on the matter. The court deposition read that the coroner’s jury found that his estate was forfeited. However, Gov. Edward Nott, representing the Crown, made the finding that “his five surviving children are fit objects of our mercy and compassion” and said Queen Anne had commanded the restoration of their father’s estate to them.

Read more at Suite101: Line of Descent from Randall Holt of Virginia: Grandson’s Suicide Prompted the Queen’s Intervention http://www.suite101.com/content/line-of-descent-from-randall-holt-of-virginia-a181274#ixzz0xlAgYO00

Descendants of Randall Holt are eligible for membership in the Jamestowne Society.

Cornelius Outland, Holland to Virginia

May 30, 2013 2 Comments

land patent

land patent

My 10th great grandparents came from Holland and settled in Virginia in the 1600’s.  I thought all the settlers in colonial Virginia came from England, but now I know this was not the case.  We have a written record of the marriage in the Netherlands, recorded in a book called St. Olaf’s Old Jewry…..this is very confusing, and sounds like Prairie Home Companion or something…Old Jewry????with a saint??? what does that mean??  My mother does have a couple of nice Jewish doctors in her tree from the 1400’s in Spain, but they seem to have escaped the inquisition and become unJewish in Italy.  They are also ancestors of Lucinda Jane Armer, who may have freaked out had she known about this…It is probably good that she did not know exactly how Jewish she was.

Cornelius Outland (1625 – 1666)

is my 10th great grandfather
Elizabeth Mary Oudelant (1637 – 1727)
daughter of Cornelius Outland
Mary Elizabeth Holland (1620 – 1681)
daughter of Elizabeth Mary Oudelant
Richard Dearden (1645 – 1747)
son of Mary Elizabeth Holland
George Dearden (1705 – 1749)
son of Richard Dearden
George Darden (1734 – 1807)
son of George Dearden
David Darden (1770 – 1820)
son of George Darden
Minerva Truly Darden (1806 – )
daughter of David Darden
Sarah E Hughes (1829 – 1911)
daughter of Minerva Truly Darden
Lucinda Jane Armer (1847 – 1939)
daughter of Sarah E Hughes
George Harvey Taylor (1884 – 1941)
son of Lucinda Jane Armer
Ruby Lee Taylor (1922 – 2008)
daughter of George Harvey Taylor
Pamela Morse
I am the daughter of Ruby Lee Taylor

CORNELIUS OUTLAND was born Abt. 1630 in Holland, and died 1664 in Nansemond County, Virginia. He married ELIZABETH WALLIS 1648 in Oudekirk, Holland the Netherlands. She was born 1621 in Holland, and died 1672 in Isle of Wight County, VA. Notes for CORNELIUS OUTLAND :Outland (Oudelant) – What ship brought them to America and where they landed remains unknown. We only know from land grants that they settled in Isle of Wight County, VA. At the office in Richmond, VA Cornelius Oudelant was living in Isle of Wight County, VA, a patent to John Jolliffe mentions land adjourning Cornelius Oudelant May 30, 1653. Cornelius and Elizabeth Oudelant patented 1650 acres of land in Nansemond County, VA before 1666. After his death Elizabeth forfeited the patent. Then she and two of her friends bought back the land as follows: To Elizabeth Oudelant 650 acres of land-escheat being part of a patent of 1650 acres formerly granted to Cornelius Oudelant, deed October 26, 1666. To Nathaniel Bacon 700 acres of land-escheat being part of patent of 1650 acres formerly granted to Cornelius Oudelant. To Richard Penny 300 acres of land-escheat being part of a patent of 1650 acres formerly grant to Cornelius Oudelant. Elizabeth took up another patent in Nansemond and Isle of Wight Counties. To Elizabeth Oudelant 1500 acres of land lying part in Isle of Wight County and part in Nansemond County, beginning on a point belonging to a branch of Beverly Creek and crossing said branch October 26, 1666. To Mrs. Elizabeth Oudelant 300 acres of land beginning and standing in Chuckatuck Creek by the side of a branch and Lawsons land, October 26, 1666. Isle of Wight County Records In 1675, Giles Bland, agent of John Bland, sold “Basse’s Choice” to Major Thomas Taberer, and Sarah Bland, wife of John, relinquished her dower. In a patent to Taberer in 1681, it was described as beginning at ye mouth of Polentine (Pollington) (1) swamp, which divides ye said Taberer’s land from ye land of Mr. James Day, thence up the said swamp north 32 degrees west, 80 poles to a locust saplin in John Munger’s line, then by Munger’s south west 92 poles to a white oak near ye head of a small gutt, thence down ye said gutt south 25 degrees westerly 60 poles to Hutchinson’s (2) creek, and thence by various courses down ye said creek and ye Crosse creek to ye Maine Pagan creek, then northeast by ye Maine creek side 120 poles to ye mouth of said Taberer’s own creek, then up that creek and Jone’s hole creek to a locust post in ye marsh, and then north 53 degrees west 40 poles to ye first station. Major Taberer left the estate to his grandson, Joseph Copeland, probably a relative of John Copeland visited by Thomas Story. Warrascoyack River as changed to New Town Haven Creek, thence to Pagan Creek. Pagan being originally the name of a point of land. Smithfield was laid out in 1752 by Col. Arthur Smith, and Robert Burwell, Arthur Smith, William Hodsden, James Baker, James Dunlop, James Arthur and Jospeh Bridges were the first trustees. Information from: Records: William and Mary College Quarterly, Vol. 7, No. 4 page 215 Notes for ELIZABETH WALLIS :According to the law of the times, at her husband’s death, the land reverted to the proprietor by escheat. Of the 1650 acres Elizabeth Oudelant was granted 500 acres, 700 acres were granted to Nathan Bacon, 300 to Richard Penny. From: Cavaliers and Pioneers: “The Isle of Wight, VA Patent Book No. 6”

St. Olaf's Old Jewry

St. Olaf’s Old Jewry

%d bloggers like this: